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  • 1. Carlzén, Katarina
    et al.
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Partnership Skåne: establishing a model for health diplomacy at subnational level2019In: Health diplomacy: spotlight on refugees and migrants / [ed] Santino Severoni, Monika Kosinska, Palmira Immordino, Michaela Told, Mihály Kökény, WHO regional office for europe , 2019, p. 172-183Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 2.
    Edvik, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Geisler, Martin
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Björk, Josefin
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Credence in the Organization's Ability to Respond to Change: Implications on Work Engagement and Job Satisfaction in the Church of Sweden2020In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, article id 995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of society, religious organizations are exposed to contextual conditions and challenges. However, adapting to external conditions is an act of balance since too much compromising may risk having a negative effect on employees' perception of organizational authenticity and, in turn, employees' well-being and attitudes toward work. In this study, we examined how specific characteristics of the work, in terms of job demands (role conflict and emotional demands) and job resources (influence at work and social community at work), as well as employees' credence in the organization's ability to respond to change, relate to employee well-being within the Church of Sweden. In total 2,112 employees (58% participation rate) answered a web-based survey. The results of regression analyses showed that job resources and credence in the organization's ability to respond to change provided a clear contribution to the explanation of variance in work engagement and, especially, job satisfaction. However, the contribution of job demands was less clear. Moreover, to further the understanding of the association between employees' credence in the organization's ability to respond to change and employee well-being, the mediating effect of job resources was tested. The results showed that the association between credence and well-being is in part mediated by job resources. In sum, the study demonstrate that employees' credence in the organization's ability to respond to change is important to consider for understanding employee well-being within religious organizations. In conclusion, our study suggest that organizations that are built up on strong values and institutionalized beliefs, such as religious and faith-based organizations, need to tread carefully in the process of adapting to conformal pressure for change. This, since the actions and choices of the organization are important for employees' credence in the organization and, in turn, employee well-being. Implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.

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  • 3.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

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  • 4.
    Håkansson, Peter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Social Media and Trust: A systematic literature review2014In: Book of Abstracts and Programme, 2014, p. 154-154Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of social trust has long been acknowledged among economists and political scientists. It is often argued that high levels of trust among people help promote democratization, economic activity, investments and growth, responsive and well-performing institutions, low levels of violence and personal health and happiness (Knack & Keefer, 1997; Putnam, 2000; Zak & Knack 2001). Trust is needed in all different kind of relations because it lowers transaction costs and risk. According to Robert Putnam (1993, 2000) trust derives from reciprocity, which can be learned only in cooperation with others. However, Putnam denies that there should be a positive relationship between trust and digitalized social media. On the contrary Putnam is very skeptical that the internet and social media would be capable of creating social trust. This paper does a structured literature review on the research on this subject. We want to find out what knowledge there is on if trust can be created by contacts on social media? We found eight articles emphasizing that there is a positive relationship between social media and trust, and that trust can be created by connections on social media. We also found two articles claiming that there is no relationship between trust and social media. According to these studies people using social media do not become more or less trusting than others. In spite of Putnam’s skepticism we did not find any studies claiming there is a negative relation between social media and trust.

  • 5.
    Håkansson, Peter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Social media and trust: a systematic literature review2015In: Journal of Business and Economics, ISSN 2155-7950, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 517-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of trust has long been acknowledged among economists and political scientists. It is often argued that high levels of trust among people help promote democratization, economic activity, well-performing institutions and low levels of violence. Social media has been identified as a significant vehicle in fostering social connections however the depth and significance of these connections to the creation of trust has not been well developed. According to Robert Putnam trust derives from reciprocity that is learned only in cooperation with others. Putnam is skeptical of a positive relationship between trust and digitalized social media. According to Uslaner trust is a moral issue established by family relationships early in life and therefore use of social media has no impact on creating trust. This paper is a structured literature review. The aim is to investigate if trust can be created by connections on digitalized social media. Eight articles emphasized a positive relationship between social media and trust; two articles claimed no relationship between trust and social media. We did not find any studies claiming there is a negative relation between social media and trust.

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  • 6.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Lundsten, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Missing voices on meaningful relationships in time and space2017In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, TuijaMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).Berthelsen, HanneMalmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).Witmer, HopeMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).Lundsten, JonasMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    COMMUNITY, WORK AND FAMILY: What are we talking about after 10 years?2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 8.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Skolledarskap och resiliens2016In: Upplyftande ledarskap / [ed] Bim Riddersporre, Magnus Erlandsson, Natur & Kultur , 2016, p. 104-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Mølbjerg Jørgensen, Kenneth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Trägårdh, Tracy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Ingman, Sissi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Säwe, Filippa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Storymaking for Gaia?: Newcomers' stories of managing for sustainability2023In: Organizing for the Good Life: Grand Challenges and the Rhetoric of Collective Action, 2023Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper constructs an ethics of managing by reading Latour’s notion of Gaia with Arendt’s notion of storytelling. Gaia implies reframing the ethical foundation for making stories as well as it has ontological consequences for how we perceive stories. We suggest reframing storytelling into storymaking. This concept attunes to how storymaking is part of making life that becomes through, relies on, and is answerable to multiple other lives: human as well as nonhuman. Second, storymaking allows depicting managers’ imagination of themselves and what they do in the complex webs of relations that managers are part of. We put storymaking to work in discussing the processes of translation that occur when new managers transition from management education for sustainability to work life. Our re-storying of their stories attunes to their ethical compass and how they enact it into being. We attune to the tensions involved in building a stable foundation for their storymaking and the compromises they make in coping with fleeting and, at times, chaotic organizational realities. Attuning to how organizations make life and affect the conditions of caring for life is important for judging organizational action. Second, storymaking allows understanding of managing as a process that involves making stories about life spiritually and materially, thereby stabilizing life amid chaos. 

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  • 10.
    Scholten, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    The opaque gendered lens: barriers to recruitment and career development2017In: Gender in Management, ISSN 1754-2413, E-ISSN 1754-2421, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 47-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose – This paper aims to reveal gendered leadership constructs that hinder a competency-based view of leadership in Swedish-based global companies and the implications for leadership recruitment and development to top management positions. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on qualitative semi-structured interviews, which have been analyzed using a gender analytic framework to identify how senior management, Human resource management and leadership trainees are discussing leadership and career development. Findings – Three themes were identified as clouding the issue of gender-equal leadership practices thereby creating an opaque gendered lens of who is defined as eligible for leadership positions. The three themes were: symbols as gendered images, counting heads – preserving the existing system and illusive gender inclusion. Research limitations/implications – Recruitment practices were identified as contributors to homosocial practices that perpetuate male-dominated leadership representation. However, specific recruitment practices were not fully explored. Practical implications – The potential use of gender equality as a sustainable management practice for competitive organizations to recruit and develop talented people. Social implications – To create resilient and gender-equal recruitment and leadership development practices. Originality/value – This research offers an original perspective on gender representation at the senior management level in global companies by revealing gendered leadership constructs in the leadership recruitment and development process as antecedents to unequal gender representation in senior management positions.

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  • 11.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Evaluation of "Labb Digitalisering" and suggestion for the further continuation of the Innovation Lab at VA SYD2021Report (Other academic)
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  • 12.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Few ideas about Public Sector Innovation2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Public organizations are increasing their engagement with innovation as they respond to the imminent environmental social and economic challenges. These responses are often achieved by replicating ideas and processes from the private sector without adapting them to the unique specificities and characteristics of the public sector. 

    In our work we observed how this translation (private to public sector innovation) is not easy to accomplish however, it is important in terms of creating a grounded understanding of innovation that can be shared among public organizations as well as with external actors, politicians and citizens.

    In this short booklet, we provide some suggestions for how to reflect on public sector innovation. We mostly highligh the differences with private sector innovation and touch upon the role of innovation labs and leadership for public sector innovation. 

    The aim of this booklet is to provide inspiration and starting points for discussions rather than definitive answers. 

    We ourselves are also on this journey to better understand this question and welcome any comments and/or suggestions on this material. Please feel free to reach out to us!

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  • 13.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    (Service) Design and organizational change: balancing with translation objects2021In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 73-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the further understanding of how (service) design can engage with organisational change. It does so by applying translation theory and building on the insights from a 7-year-long collaboration with a public agency, during which three attempts at introducing new ways of working were carried out. Translation theory understands organisational change as an intentional and contingent process through which ideas are materialised in possible translation objects that intervene in organisational practices, structures, and assumptions. The longitudinal study highlights how to bring about change, translation processes, and the objects needed to balance the reproduction and challenging of existing practices, structures, and assumptions within organisations. Moreover, translation processes interact with existing power dynamics, which cause reactions to change interventions by, among other things, influencing the legitimacy and mandate of the processes. Therefore, in addition to the mobilisation of internal organisational knowledge, (service) design that engages with organisational change needs to be aware of both power dynamics and to develop approaches and sensibilities to be able to listen and respond to the consequences that interventions in these dynamics might create. 

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  • 14.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    VA SYDs Innovationslabb: Utvärdering av initiativet ”Labb Digitalisering”och förslag på fortsatt arbete2021Report (Other academic)
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  • 15.
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Degendering organizational resilience: the Oak and Willow against the wind2019In: Gender in Management, ISSN 1754-2413, E-ISSN 1754-2421, Vol. 34, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a degendered organizational resilience model challenging current and dominant conceptualizations of organizational resilience by exploring how gendered organizational power structures, language and practices of everyday organizational life interplay and limit inclusive constructions of organizational resilience. Design/methodology/approach – The degendered organizational resilience model was developed using Acker’s (1990) model of gendered organizations, Martin’s (2003) gendering practices, Lorber’s (2000) degendering and other feminist research on gendered organizations. The purpose of the model is to explore power structures, practices and language within the organizational context during conditions requiring organizational resilience. Findings – A conceptual model for analyzing the theoretical development of organizational resilience is presented. The model analyzes the following three different aspects of organizations: power structure, to identify which resilient practices receive status based on established gendered organizational hierarchies and roles; actions, to identify how resilience is enacted through practices and practicing of gender; and language, to identify how and what people speak reinforces collective practices of gendering that become embedded in the organization’s story and culture. Practical implications – The degendered organizational resilience model offers a process for researchers, managers and organizational leaders to analyze and reveal power imbalances that hinder inclusive theoretical development and practices of organizational resilience. Social implications – The degendered organizational resilience model can be used to reveal power structures, gendered practices and language favoring normative masculine organizational practices, which restrict the systemic implementation of inclusive democratic practices that incorporate and benefit women, men and other groups subject to organizational subordination. Originality/value – This paper offers an original perspective on the theoretical development of organizational resilience by proposing a degendering model for analysis. A feminist perspective is used to reveal the gendered power structures, practices and language suppressing the full range of resilient qualities by restricting what is valued and who gives voice to resilient processes that lead to resilient organizations. Keywords Resilience,Organizationaltheory,Genderingpractices,Organizationalresilience, Degendering Paper type Conceptual paper

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  • 16.
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Entrapment Between Narratives: The Millennial Voice and Degendering Organi-zational Resilience2021In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 1, p. 1-14, article id 620903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Covid-19 pandemic pushes organizations to innovate, adapt, and be responsive to new conditions. These demands are exacerbated as organizations respond to the triple sustainability challenge of social and environmental issues alongside economic recovery. These combined factors highlight the need for an inclusive definition of organizational resilience, the increased agility to adapt, learn, and transform to rapidlyshifting external and internal conditions. This paper explores a gendered perspective of organizational resilience and the implications for degendering the concept to incorporate masculine and feminine constructs equally valuable to the theory and practices oforganizational resilience during times of crisis. Viewing the organizational demands of crisis and the expectations of the millennial workforce through the degendering lens elucidates conceptualizations of gender constructions and power that limit inclusivepractices and processes of organizational resilience. Data was used from focus groups of men and women between the ages of 21–35 (millennials) who have experience in the workplace and a shared knowledge of sustainability including social aspects of gender equity and inclusion. The Degendering Organizational Resilience model (DOR) was used for analysis to reveal barriers to inclusive, resilient organizational practices.The data was organized according to the three aspects of the DOR, power structures, gendering practices, and language. A unique contribution of this study is that it explores a cross-cultural gender perspective of organizational resilience focused on a specific cohortgroup, the millennials. Based on the findings three organizational recommendations for practice were identified. These include recommendations for policies and practices that deconstruct inequitable practices and co-create more agile structures, practices, and narratives for sustainable and resilient organizations.

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  • 17.
    Witmer, Hope
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Johansson, Jonas
    Disciplinary action for academic dishonesty: does the student’s gender matter?2015In: International Journal for Educational Integrity, E-ISSN 1833-2595, Vol. 6, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify if gender differences exist with respect to conviction of university students for academic dishonesty. To investigate this phenomenon, data from the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education (SNAHE) and from disciplinary boards of several Swedish universities were evaluated from a gender perspective. To identify whether the penalty severity for academic dishonesty is gender biased, the ratio of suspensions/warnings for male and female students was calculated. It was identified that female students are less prevalent in disciplinary matters and that there was no systematic gender bias in penalty severities (warnings or suspensions). In addition, female students deny academic dishonest behaviors more than male students, indicating a possibly higher false conviction rate.

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  • 18.
    Witmer, Hope
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Johansson, Jonas
    The Role of Gender When Faculty Members Assign Consequences for Academic Dishonesty2018In: New Directions for Community Colleges, ISSN 0194-3081, E-ISSN 1536-0733, Vol. 2018, no 183, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a gender perspective on the faculty members’ role in assigning discipline for academic dishonesty. Results of a study on this topic, along with recommendations for equitable practices, are included.

  • 19.
    Witmer, Hope
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Mellinger, Marcela Sarmiento
    Organizational resilience: Nonprofit organizations’ response to change2016In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 255-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Organizational resilience refers to the ability to respond productively to significant disruptive change and transform challenges into opportunities. There is a gap in the literature about resilient nonprofit organizations and its application for identifying organizational conditions for successful adaption to external variables that threaten their existence. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify organizational characteristics that point to the resilience of nonprofit behavioral healthcare organizations as they successfully adapt to funding changes. METHODS: A multiple case study of two behavioral health nonprofit organizations was conducted. Data was collected through interviews and focus groups, and analyzed through a qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Using the framework of resilience, six themes that equipped these organizations to successfully adapt to funding changes were identified. They included: commitment to the mission, improvisation, community reciprocity, servant and transformational leadership, hope and optimism, and fiscal transparency. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that incorporating these qualities into an organizational system equips it to systematically adapt to funding changes and other disruptive challenges. Using resilience as a process and not simply an outcome after recovery, nonprofit organizations can have the capacity to continuously respond to challenges and provide uninterrupted and valuable services to society.

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