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  • 51.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Lundh, Christer
    Employment integration of refugees: the influence of local factors on refugee job opportunities in Sweden2007In: Discussion Paper, ISSN 0308-5864, no 2551Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies the importance of local conditions for the employment integration of refugees in Sweden, this in contrast to most studies on immigrant economic integration primarily conducted on the national level or for the larger cities. The data used in the analysis is on male and female natives and twelve refugee groups for the year 2003. Besides monitoring the regional variation in employment integration of twelve refugee groups, this paper, with the use of logistic regressions, estimates the effect of individual and human capital characteristics, internal migration, municipality, local labour market and economic sector factors on the refugees’ odds of being employed. The local variations of refugees’ integration into the labour market were partly a result of internal migration, in most cases from less to more populated municipalities. The job opportunities were better in Stockholm than in other big cities like Malmö and Göteborg. The local unemployment and employment rates, a proxy for the local supply of jobs, significantly affected the individual refugees’ chances to obtain employment. This also applies to the size of the labour market through increased diversification in the supply of job openings. We also find that the structure of the local economy affected the refugees’ probability of obtaining employment. Areas with lower general education and skill levels were positively related, whereas, for example, university localities were negatively related to refugees’ employment chances. Refugees had higher probabilities of being employed in industry in less population-dense areas and in the private service sector in larger cities.

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  • 52.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Lundh, Christer
    Utbildning, yrke och inkomster bland iranska män i Sverige2007In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 21-40Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Mata, Fernando
    Private Researcher.
    Pendakur, Ravi
    University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Housing Policy and Employment Outcomes for Refugees2019In: International migration (Geneva. Print), ISSN 0020-7985, E-ISSN 1468-2435, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 134-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Otterbeck, Jonas
    Islamophobia in Sweden: politics, representations, attitudes and experiences2012In: Islamophobia in the West: measuring and explaining individual attitudes / [ed] Marc Helbling, Routledge, 2012, p. 70-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Otterbeck, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Young people's attitudes towards Muslims in Sweden2010In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 404-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the use of multiple regression technique, the principal objective of this study is to clarify and examine young people's attitudes towards Muslims, and the relationships between these attitudes and a large number of background factors. We use a representative sample of 9,498 non-Muslim youths between 15 and 19 years of age. The main results show that, when controlling for several background variables simultaneously, the country of birth, socio-economic background and school/programme factors all have an effect on the attitude towards Muslims. Moreover, socio-psychological factors, the relationship to friends and the perceptions of gender role patterns are found to be important. In addition, local factors like high levels of unemployment, high proportions of immigrants in a local environment also have an effect. No differences in the attitudes of boys and girls were found. Further, the study establishes a correlation between negative attitudes and right-wing populist seats in local government.

  • 56.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Citizenship and employment- comparing two cool countries2012In: International perspectives: integration and inclusion / [ed] Jim Frideres, John Biles, McGill-Queen's University Press, 2012, p. 251-272Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Citizenship, Co-ethnic Populations and Employment Probabilities of Immigrants in Sweden2009In: IZA Discussion paper series, no 4495Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Citizenship, co-ethnic populations and employment probabilities of immigrants in Sweden2012In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 203-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decades, Sweden has liberalized its citizenship policy by reducing the required number of years of residency to 5 years for foreign citizens and only 2 years for Nordic citizens. Dual citizenship has been allowed since 2001. During the same period, immigration patterns by country of birth changed substantially, with an increasing number of immigrants arriving from non-western countries. Furthermore, immigrants were settling in larger cities as opposed to smaller towns as was the case before. Interestingly, the employment integration of immigrants has declined gradually, and in 2006, the employment rate for foreign-born individuals is substantially lower compared with the native-born. The aim of this paper is to explore the link between citizenship and employment probabilities for immigrants in Sweden, controlling for a range of demographic, human capital, and municipal characteristics such as city and co-ethnic population size. The information we employ for this analysis consists of register data on the whole population of Sweden held by Statistics Sweden for the year 2006. The basic register, STATIV, includes demographic, socio-economic, and immigrant specific information. In this paper, we used instrumental variable regression to examine the “clean” impact of citizenship acquisition and the size of the co-immigrant population on the probability of being employed. In contrast to Scott (2008), we find that citizenship acquisition has a positive impact for a number of immigrant groups. This is particularly the case for non-EU/non-North American immigrants. In terms of intake class, refugees appear to experience substantial gains from citizenship acquisition (this is not, however, the case for immigrants entering as family class). We find that the impact of the co-immigrant population is particularly important for immigrants from Asia and Africa. These are also the countries that have the lowest employment rate.

  • 59.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Citizenship, enclaves and earnings: comparing two cool countries2014In: Citizenship Studies, ISSN 1362-1025, E-ISSN 1469-3593, Vol. 18, no 3-4, p. 384-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses the Canadian 2006 Census and the Swedish 2006 register data to analyse the citizenship effect on the relative earnings of immigrants, using instrumental variable regression to control for citizenship acquisition. We ask: ‘Is there a citizenship effect and if any, in which country is it that we find the largest effect and for which immigrant groups?’ We add one further dimension, asking if the size of the co-immigrant population in the municipality has an effect on earnings. We find that the impact of citizenship acquisition is substantial in both Canada and Sweden. However, the place of birth of immigrants is important. In most cases, immigrant women in Sweden enjoy a higher citizenship premium than is the case for immigrant women in Canada. Amongst men the picture is more mixed. Most European groups receive a larger citizenship premium in Canada as compared to Sweden. Being in a city with more immigrants of the same background is better for earnings in Sweden than in Canada. However, being in a city with a lot of immigrants (regardless of origin) is better in Canada as compared to Sweden.

  • 60.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Electoral participation of natives, immigrants and descendants in Sweden2008In: Discussion Paper, ISSN 0308-5864, no 3764Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three decades ago, Sweden extended municipal and county voting privileges to non-citizen residents arguing that it would increase political influence, interest and self-esteem among foreign citizens. Three decades later, electoral participation on the part of immigrants is perceived as being substantially lower than for native born citizens and questions have arisen regarding the degree to which this may be symptomatic of a larger integration issue. The aim of this paper is to explore the determinants of voting within the context of social inclusion by comparing immigrants, their descendants and native citizens in Sweden while controlling for a range of socio-economic, demographic characteristics and contextual factors. We use two unique sets of data to conduct our research. The 2006 Electoral Participation Survey contains information on individual electoral participation in national, county and municipal elections. We match this information to registry data from Statistics Sweden which contains socio-demographic information for every Swedish resident. From these two sources, we are able to create a database which matches voting behaviour to individual characteristics for more than 70,000 residents of whom almost 13,000 are not citizens. We find that after controlling for demographic, socio-economic and contextual characteristics, acquisition of citizenship makes a real difference to the odds of voting and is therefore, a likely and powerful indicator of social inclusion. Immigrants who obtain citizenship are far more likely to vote than those who do not. Arguably, some of this may be attributed to the number of years of residency in the country. However, even non-citizens born in Sweden have substantially lower odds of voting. Country of birth also makes a difference. Immigrants from the Americas and those born in Sweden with immigrant parents are more likely to vote than immigrants from other countries. Somewhat surprisingly, age at immigration does not make a substantial difference to the odds of voting.

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  • 61.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Social Capital and Voting Participation in Canada2009In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1406-1430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the social capital literature as a base, we explore the impact of interaction with others on voter participation with particular emphasis on exploring the differences between Canadian-born majority and minority residents. We use the 2002 wave of the Equality Security Community survey to explore the relationship between voting and personal characteristics, work characteristics, social capital attributes and ethnic characteristics. We find that the odds of voting are largely a product of socio-demographic and social capital attributes. The impact of immigration and ethnicity is largely overridden. This suggests that it is not the minority attribute that impacts voting. Rather it is age, level of schooling and level of civic engagement which affects the probability of voting, both federal and provincial.

  • 62.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Socialt kapital och integration i Kanada2011In: Kanadamodellen, Hur invandring leder till jobb / [ed] Petter Hojem, Martin Ådahl, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), 2011, p. 141-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 63.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    The Employment Attachment of Resettled, Refugees, Refugees and Family Reunion Migrants in Sweden2009In: Resettled and Included? The Employment Integration of Resettled Refugees in Sweden, Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM) , 2009, p. 227-245Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 64.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    The labour market integration of refugee and family reunion immigrants: a comparison of outcomes in Canada and Sweden2014In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 689-709Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses the employment and earnings trajectories of refugee and family reunion category immigrants in Canada and Sweden using two national level sources of data. The Canadian Immigration Database (IMDB) is a file that links the intake record of post-1979 immigrants with annual taxation records. The 2007 Swedish Register Data includes information on all legal permanent residents. Using standard regression methods, we compare labour force outcomes of age–sex–schooling–place of birth cohorts looking specifically at non-economic (family reunion and refugee intake) immigrants from Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan and the former Yugoslavia. We find that the employment and earning trajectories of the selected non-economic migrant groups are quite similar in the two host countries, although earnings are higher in Canada than in Sweden.

  • 65.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    Voting and Social Inclusion2011In: International migration (Geneva. Print), ISSN 0020-7985, E-ISSN 1468-2435, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 67-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three decades ago, Sweden extended municipal and provincial voting privileges to non-citizen residents arguing that it would increase political influence, interest and self-esteem among foreign citizens. The aim of this paper is to explore the act of voting as a measure of social inclusion by comparing voting propensities of immigrants (people born outside Sweden), their descendants (born in Sweden) and native Swedish citizens (those who have citizenship through jus sanguine) while controlling for a range of socio-economic, demographic characteristics, contextual factors and a set of “hard” and “soft” social inclusion related variables. In particular we focus on the impact of citizenship acquisition -- does the symbolic act of attaining citizenship result in increased voting participation on the part of Swedish residents who are not citizens by birth. We use the Swedish 2006 electoral survey matched to registry data from Statistics Sweden to assess the correlates of voting by Swedish-born and immigrant residents. Using instrumental variable regressions we estimate the impact of citizenship acquisition. We find that acquisition of citizenship makes a real difference to the probability of voting. Immigrants who naturalise are in general far more likely to vote than those who do not.

  • 66.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Petersson, BoMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Crisis and Migration: Implications of the Eurozone crisis for perceptions, politics, and policies of migration2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing Eurozone crisis frequently makes front-page news, but aspects of its deeper implications are more rarely discussed in media. In Crisis and Migration the authors analyse the current situation and its effects on politics and migration. In case studies they show how the economic downturn affects daily life on a local, national, and European level. The authors reflect on the crisis from mutually rewarding micro-to-macro perspectives. Their focus is geared away from the crisis as an acute phenomenon – instead they investigate it as a potential symptom of a chronic decline of the EU in relation to other regions. It is imperative to address the long-term consequences of the development and that scholars engage in that critical discussion. Alongside its senior authors, Crisis and Migration features contributors of a new generation of scholars who are likely to be prominent in the field in years to come. The book is vital reading for researchers in migration and European studies, policymakers, and journalists.

  • 67.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Petersson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    "Crisis, oh that crisis!": The Financial Crisis and its Impacts on Migration in Europe2014In: Crisis and Migration: Implications of the Eurozone crisis for perceptions, politics, and policies of migration / [ed] Pieter Bevelander, Bo Petersson, Nordic Academic Press, 2014, p. 9-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing Eurozone crisis frequently makes front-page news, but aspects of its deeper implications are more rarely discussed in media. In Crisis and Migration the authors analyse the current situation and its effects on politics and migration. In case studies they show how the economic downturn affects daily life on a local, national, and European level. The authors reflect on the crisis from mutually rewarding micro-to-macro perspectives. Their focus is geared away from the crisis as an acute phenomenon – instead they investigate it as a potential symptom of a chronic decline of the EU in relation to other regions. It is imperative to address the long-term consequences of the development and that scholars engage in that critical discussion. Alongside its senior authors, Crisis and Migration features contributors of a new generation of scholars who are likely to be prominent in the field in years to come. The book is vital reading for researchers in migration and European studies, policymakers, and journalists.

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  • 68.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Rönnqvist, Sofia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Migration und Integration in Schweden2010In: Migration und Integration in Europa / [ed] Frank Baasner, MOMOS , 2010, p. 187-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Rönnqvist, Sofia
    Hagström, Mirjam
    Från skyddad till anställd2009In: I & M : invandrare och minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 6, p. 18-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 70.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Slotwinski, Michaela
    University of Basel.
    Stutzer, Alois
    University of Basel.
    Ökar röstande aptiten på medborgarskap?2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Policy Briefen undersöker författarna effekterna och värdet av formella politiska rättigheter, såsom rösträtten. Författarna ställer frågan om huruvida möjligheten att rösta för utländska medborgare i kommunal- och landstingsval i Sverige påverkar individernas benägenhet att bli svenska medborgare.

    I Policy Briefen analyseras svenska administrativa data som i kombination med institutionella förhållanden skapat en kvasi-slumpmässig fördelning av rösträtten, det vill säga variationen av invandrarnas invandringsdatum. Här undersöks nettoeffekten för tre grupper av invandrare. Detta utifrån levnadsstandarden i ursprungsländerna, som skiljer sig åt i hur de reagerar på möjligheten av att få delta i den demokratiska processen i Sverige.

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  • 71.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Spång, Mikael
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    From Aliens to Citizens: The Political Incorporation of Immigrants2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a draft chapter for the Handbook on Economics of International Migration (Eds. B. R. Chiswick and P. W. Miller) and deals with the political incorporation of immigrants in host societies. Political incorporation is discussed with regard to the regulation of legal status, rights, opportunities, and acquisition of citizenship. We give examples of the legal regulation and policies from several countries in the world, showing thereby the diversity of approaches to political incorporation but also similarities to the regulation of access to residence, rights, and citizenship. We highlight changes in this regard since the Second World War and discuss more recent trends. Moreover, we discuss different factors explaining the variation in incorporation policies. Also, this chapter traces different dimensions of political participation of immigrants, and, finally, we address the expected effects on wider integration of citizenship acquisition.

  • 72.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Spång, Mikael
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    From Aliens to Citizens: The Political Incorporation of Immigrants2015In: Handbook of the economics of international migration / [ed] Barry Chiswick, Paul Miller, North Holland , 2015, p. 443-489Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Spång, Mikael
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Migration and Citizenship in Sweden2008In: Canadian Diversity, ISSN 1711-1870, E-ISSN 1910-9733, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 116-120Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 74.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Spång, MikaelMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Valdeltagande och representation: Om invandring och politisk integration i Sverige2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary Democracy gives us opportunities to participate in politics and thereby to influence legislation, policy and decisions. There are several ways in which political participation may take place. The focus of this book is representative democracy, to elect representatives to political assemblies and to stand as representative for such assemblies. There are major differences between different groups in society regarding the actual use of these rights. Such differences are usually called representation gaps. The aim of the book is to discuss participation in elections and representation in political assemblies, focusing on the differences between foreign born and domestic born. We ask the following main questions: 1. What is the electoral turnout among foreign born and persons with foreign background? 2. How do foreign born vote? Do they vote for individual candidates to a larger extent than domestic born and which parties do they vote for? 3. Which factors explain being elected as representatives and how may the representation gap between foreign and domestic born be explained? 4. What are the characteristics of nomination processes in political parties and how do these create opportunities and obstacles for equal representation? 5. What role do ethnic and minority associations play for political participation in Stockholm and other European big cities? 6. What do we know about measures taken to increase voting among foreign born? The result shows that foreign born take part in elections to a much lesser degree than domestic born and that there are differences between domestic born with two parents born abroad and other domestic born. The propensity to vote is larger among those that have one parent born in Sweden – in particular a mother – than those having two foreign born parents. Voting for individuals is somewhat more common among persons with foreign background, in particular in elections for national parliament, than among other voters. Earlier studies have shown that persons with foreign background tend to vote for left parties to a larger extent than others. This is also the case in Sweden. Persons with foreign background vote for the Social Democrats and the Left Party to somewhat higher extent than others, in particular in elections for the national parliament. Immigrant representation in political assemblies has increased over the past decades but foreign born is still an underrepresented group. Explanations addressed in the book are individual resources and contextual factors. Results show little support for resource based explanations and the explanatory power of contextual factors is also limited, with the exception of the number of seats in local assemblies compared to the number of eligible voters. Up to one third of the representation gap on an aggregated level can be explained by the fact that foreign born more often live in larger municipalities where the number of seats in the local councils, in relation to the number of voters, is lower than in smaller municipalities. The political party’s nomination process is another factor relevant to consider when discussing underrepresentation. Internal factors of parties affecting the likelihood to be nominated as candidate are discussed. Networks are important in this respect. They play both an including and excluding role. Being a politician with immigrant background may offer a way into politics but may in the long run also be an obstacle for advancement. Other obstacles discussed include thresholds for participation, internal democratic processes of parties, and cost-benefit analysis. The question about the role of ethnic and minority associations for political participation is discussed in the book. The focus is on comparing the situation in Stockholm with other big cities in Europe. The results show that even though more persons are engaged in these associations in Stockholm, they do not offer better opportunities for political integration than in other larger cities in Europe. This suggests that economic and political support of ethnic associations plays a less important role for political integration than expected. At the same time, the results do not suggest that ethnic associations hinder political integration by contributing to isolation from the rest of society. Finally, measures taken by state and municipalities to increase voter turnout are discussed. There is limited research about the most effective ways to affect turnout but there is some support that meetings and interaction with voters have positive effects on the turnout. Meetings with voters have been central to measures involving so called "democracy ambassadors", which several municipalities have worked with during the last elections. Important to these measures is the attempt to avoid problems of earlier measures, such as one way communication.

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  • 75.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Veenman, Justus
    Naturalization and socioeconomic integration: The case of the Netherlands2008In: The Economics of Citizenship, Malmö University , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76. Careja, Romana
    et al.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Using population registers for migration and integration research: examples from Denmark and Sweden2018In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 19, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper starts from the observation that research on immigrants’ integration trajectories needs detailed information, both objective and attitudinal, and ideally longitudinal. This study uses the cases of Denmark and Sweden – whose registers produce detailed records about all natives’ and immigrants’ lives in their host countries – in order to, first, review existing research on immigrants and their integration and, second, discuss the way in which register data are used, their caveats and their potential. The study finds that, in Denmark and Sweden, registers provide systematic objective data which are fully available to researchers and have the potential to help in the collection of high-quality subjective data. However, the population registers have some traits which may impact on the representativeness of the samples. The authors argue that, if researchers are aware of the caveats, registers can be used to obtain representative samples of immigrants, and register data can be complemented with survey-based attitudinal data, thus opening up new research opportunities for testing propositions on integration theories.

  • 77.
    Dahlstedt, Inge
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    General Versus Vocational Education and Employment Integration of Immigrants in Sweden2010In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 158-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the effect of human capital on the employment acquisition of foreign-born men and women in Sweden. Besides categorizing different levels of education, a distinction is made between type of education, general and vocational, and where education is obtained, home or host country. The data used is based on register data for the year 2003 held by Statistics Sweden. The population under consideration is the total population subdivided by the following countries of birth: Sweden, Former Yugoslavia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Poland, Romania, Chile, Germany, Iraq, Iran, and Lebanon. The analysis shows that foreign-born individuals have a higher probability of employment with a vocational and host country education as opposed to a general and home country education.

  • 78.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Magnusson, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    The world's most open country: labour migration to Sweden after the 2008 law2014Book (Other academic)
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  • 79.
    Fernández, Christian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Hellström, Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Att bli medborgare, att vara medmänniska2011In: Vägar till medborgarskap / [ed] Pieter Bevelander, Christian Fernández, Anders Hellström, Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2011, p. 143-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 80. Hagström, Mirjam
    et al.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Kvotflyktingars fördröjda framgång2010In: Lyckad Invandring / [ed] Martin Ådahl, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), 2010, p. 139-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81. Helgertz, Jonas
    et al.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Influence of Partner Choice and Country of Origin Characteristics on the Naturalization of Immigrants in Sweden: a Longitudinal Analysis2017In: The international migration review, ISSN 0197-9183, E-ISSN 1747-7379, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 667-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data for the period 1968–2001, this article assesses the influence of partner choice and origin country characteristics on the propensity of immigrants to naturalize in Sweden. Marriage to a foreign‐born Swedish citizen increases the naturalization propensity, and its effect increases strongly when the spouse naturalizes during the same year. The analysis suggests that a lower level of civic and political freedom or relative GDP per capita in the individual's country of origin is associated with an elevated probability of naturalization. During the period of study, originating from a country which allows for dual citizenship did not systematically elevate the probability to naturalize; this probability was accentuated, however, if the individual originated from a context characterized by a low degree of civic and political freedom.

  • 82. Helgertz, Jonas
    et al.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Tegunimataka, Anna
    Naturalization and Earnings: A Denmark-Sweden comparison2014In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 337-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The determinants and consequences of the naturalization of immigrants is a hot topic in the political debate in Europe. This article compares the effect of naturalization on the income attainment of immigrants in two Scandinavian countries, Denmark and Sweden, using longitudinal register data from 1986 and onward. Sweden is characterized by low obstacles to naturalization, and existing studies provide inconclusive evidence regarding the impact of naturalization on labor market outcomes. Denmark is instead characterized by higher barriers to naturalization, as well as a virtual inexistence of previous studies on the topic. Results, obtained through individual fixed-effect regression analysis, suggest similar effects in both countries. A consistent naturalization premium is detected for immigrants of Asian and African descent, but not for any other immigrant group. The similarity across contexts arguably questions the use of more stringent naturalization laws to promote the economic integration of immigrants.

  • 83.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    When the media matters for electoral performance2018In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 55, no 2-3, p. 249-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we analyse the connection between media exposure and opinion polls for political parties or "the media influence". We compare two parliamentary periods in Sweden: 2006-2010 and 2010-2014. Our results show that the media is important for the anti-immigration party, the Sweden Democrats (SD) in the first period. This is not the case, or at least less so, for the other parliamentary parties. In the second period, media exposure wanes in importance for explaining poll fluctuations as well as shifts from national to regional media for the Sweden Democrats. These findings are in consonance with previous research which underlines that the media's influence on electoral performance differs before and after the party has crossed the electoral threshold to the national parliament.

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  • 84.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Fernández, Christian
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Vägar till medborgarskap2011In: Vägar till medborgarskap / [ed] Pieter Bevelander, Christian Fernández, Anders Hellström, Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2011, p. 9-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Hutcheson, Derek Stanford
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    FAIREU Key Country Report: Electoral Participation in Sweden2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Key Country report focuses on electoral registration and turnout in Sweden, where the most recent general election was held on 9 September 2018. It provides a historical perspective on patterns of electoral registration and turnout among foreignborn voters (non-citizens and Swedish citizens) in local and regional elections. In a handful of municipalities, a significant proportion of the electorate comprises non- Swedish citizens with voting rights. However, the likelihood of voting is higher among foreign-born voters who have acquired Swedish citizenship – which potentially leaves non-citizen residents under-represented in local and regional representative organs. A second focus is on non-resident Swedish citizens in the country’s national elections. The number of Swedish voters abroad has increased in every election since 1968. Though a very small proportion of the total electorate, their ballots make a slight difference to the distribution of seats in the Swedish parliament, the Riksdag.

  • 86.
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Skilled Migrants in the Swedish Labour Market: An Analysis of Employment, Income and Occupational Status2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 6, article id 3428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a globalised world with an increasing division of labour, the competition for highly skilled individuals-regardless of their origin-is growing, as is the value of such individuals for national economies. Yet the majority of studies analysing the economic integration of immigrants shows that those who are highly skilled also have substantial hurdles to overcome: their employment rates and salaries are lower and they face a higher education-to-occupation mismatch compared to highly skilled natives. This paper contributes to the paucity of studies on the employment patterns of highly skilled immigrants to Sweden by providing an overview of the socio-demographic characteristics, labour-market participation and occupational mobility of highly educated migrants in Sweden. Based on a statistical analysis of register data, we compare their employment rates, salaries and occupational skill level and mobility to those of immigrants with lower education and with natives. The descriptive analysis of the data shows that, while highly skilled immigrants perform better than those with a lower educational level, they never catch up with their native counterparts. Our regression analyses confirm these patterns for highly skilled migrants. Furthermore, we find that reasons for migration matter for highly skilled migrants' employment outcomes, with labour migrants having better employment rates, income and qualification-matched employment than family reunion migrants and refugees.

  • 87.
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Taking on the challenge of getting refugees into the job market in Sweden2016In: The Conversation, no November 16, 2016Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 88.
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Labour Market Participation of Humanitarian Migrants in Sweden: An Overview2017In: Intereconomics. Review of European Economic Policy, ISSN 0020-5346, E-ISSN 1613-964X, Vol. 5, no 52, p. 270-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article was twofold: first, to provide an overview of immigration and integration policies in Sweden, and second, to analyse the labour market integration of humanitarian migrants who arrived in Sweden between 1998 and 2012 relative to other migrants and natives.

  • 89.
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Labour-Market Participation of Highly Skilled Immigrants in Sweden: An Overview2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the socio-demographic characteristics, labour-market participation and occupational mobility of highly educated immigrants1 in Sweden. Based on a statistical analysis of register data, we compare their employment rates, salaries and occupational skill level and mobility to those of immigrants with lower education and with natives. Among the questions addressed in this paper are: What is the socio-demographic profile of highly skilled immigrants to Sweden? Where do they come from and how do they enter the country? Are there differences in highly educated immigrants’ employment rates by citizenship status, migration entry route and place of birth? How do the salaries of highly educated men and women compare between immigrants and natives? What is the education-to-job match for them? How do occupational mobility patterns compare for highly educated immigrants versus those with lower education? Finally, are there differences in occupational skill level for highly educated migrants by entry route? Our results show that, while highly skilled immigrants perform better than those with a lower educational level, they never catch up with their native counterparts.

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  • 90.
    Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Introduction: Museums in a Time of Migration2017In: Museums in a Time of Migration: Rethinking Museums' Roles, Representations, Collections and Collaborations / [ed] Christina Johansson, Pieter Bevelander, Nordic Academic Press, 2017, p. 9-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, PieterMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Museums in a Time of Migration: Rethinking Museums’ Roles, Representations, Collections and Collaborations2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration in all its forms is a prominent phenomenon, with far-ranging implications for society. Museums, being important educational institutions, not only reflect society, but what they display has the potential to affect our understanding of the world. When museums become places where people can explore the realities of migration, transnational connections, and human rights, they become even more relevant as cultural institutions, and can help drive positive social change, encouraging solidarity and sustainable development. In the book Museums in a Time of Migration, leading scholars and museum curators reflect on museums’ engagement in migration issues. New and innovative museum projects around the world are presented in telling analyses of the theoretical and practical realities. Special attention is paid to the museums’ roles, representations, collections, and collaborations in a time of migration.

  • 92.
    Korol, Liliia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). University of Girona, Spain; National University of Ostroh Academy, Ukraine.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Does young adults' life satisfaction promote tolerance towards immigrants?: The role of political satisfaction and social trust2023In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 5599-5610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much prior research relies on the idea that antipathy towards immigrants is primarily driven by natives' perceptions of the threat that immigrants represent to their economic, cultural or national well-being. Yet little is known about whether subjective well-being affects attitudes toward immigrants. This study aimed to examine whether life satisfaction would foster tolerance towards immigrants over time via the indirect influence of political satisfaction and social trust. The sample comprised young native adults (N = 1352; M age = 22.72; SD = 3.1) in Sweden. The results revealed that young adults who were satisfied with important life domains were more likely to extend their satisfaction towards the political system, which consequently resulted in a generalised expectation of trustworthiness and a widening of their circles of trusted others. This then translates into more positive attitudes toward immigrants. The findings provide evidence that it is the causal relationship between political satisfaction and social trust (rather than social trust in itself) which promotes the positive impact of life satisfaction on tolerance towards immigrants. The study highlights that fostering political satisfaction and social trust may play an important role in shaping young people's positive attitudes towards immigrants.

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  • 93.
    Korol, Liliia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). University of Girona, Spain; National University of Ostroh Academy, Ukraine.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Ethnic Harassment and the Protective Effect of Positive Parenting on Immigrant Youths' Antisocial Behavior2021In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 50, p. 805-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The existing literature suggests that positive parenting might serve as a protective factor against immigrant adolescents' engagement in externalizing difficulties when they are exposed to negative experiences of ethnic derogation. To date, little is known, however, about whether different dimensions of positive parenting may moderate the detrimental impact of ethnic harassment at school on immigrant youth's antisocial behavior. Objective This study aimed to investigate which specific dimensions of positive parenting may act as a buffer against the detrimental impact of ethnic harassment at school on immigrant adolescents' antisocial behavior (i.e., delinquency and violence). Method Using longitudinal data, we followed first- and second-generation immigrant adolescents (N = 365; Mage = 13.93, SD = .80; 46% girls; 37% first-generation) in Sweden over a period of one year. Data collection at Time 1 (T1) was completed in the spring semester of the school year, and Time 2 (T2) assessments took place a year after the first data collection. We ran a series of regressions analyses via the SPSS PROCESS macro for each dimension of positive parenting behavior and each type of antisocial behavior. Results We found that ethnically harassed immigrant adolescents who received parental warmth, perceived their influence on family decisions and whose parents were aware of their children's daily activities were less likely to engage in delinquency and violence one year later. In addition, we saw that immigrant youth whose parents actively sought information about their offsprings' lives were less prone to display violence in the face of ethnic harassment. Conclusions The results suggest that parents are important in overriding the noxious effects of negative peer interactions targeting their children's ethnic background, even during an adolescence marked by significant changes in child-parent and child-peer relationships. These findings might inform the development of intervention components for testing in interventions studies aimed at preventing immigrant youths' antisocial behavior and future involvement in violent criminal offences.

  • 94.
    Korol, Liliia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). National University of Ostroh Academy , 2 Seminarska Street, 35800 Ostroh, Rivne Region, Ukraine.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Power of Positive Thinking: How Positive Opinions of Refugees’ Impact on the Host Society Generate Positive Behavioural Intentions2023In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 22-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much prior research has focused on understanding how host nationals’ negative opinions of the impact of migration and arriving communities affect their attitudes towards newcomers. Yet, the role of host nationals’ positive opinions has remained largely underinvestigated. The present study aims to move beyond the negative intergroup paradigm and contribute to the literature by examining whether positive opinions of refugees’ impact on the host society are related to host nationals’ positive behavioural intentions towards them. Specifically, the study investigated (1) the mediating role of social proximity in the relationship between positive opinions of refugees’ impact and readiness to assist them and (2) symbolic and realistic threats as potential moderators that might influence this direct/indirect relationship. The results provide initial evidence of the important role of positive opinions of refugees’ impact on the host community in promoting positive behavioural intentions towards newcomers via indirect association with closer social proximity. Moreover, our findings suggest that this relationship might be particularly beneficial for host nationals who perceive immigrants as imposing a realistic threat to their lives and to society as a whole—individuals who tend to be amongst the most prejudice-prone and resistant to change. 

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  • 95.
    Korol, Liliia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Natl Univ Ostroh Acad, Ostroh, Ukraine.
    Fietzer, Alexander W.
    Hunter Coll CUNY, New York, NY USA..
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Pasichnyk, Ihor
    Natl Univ Ostroh Acad, Ostroh, Ukraine..
    Are Immigrants Scapegoats?: The Reciprocal Relationships Between Subjective Well-Being, Political Distrust, and Anti-immigrant Attitudes in Young Adulthood2023In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 126, no 3, p. 1392-1415, article id 00332941211065951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the impact of native youth's subjective well-being on exclusionary attitudes toward immigrants, seeking to understand the relationship between subjective well-being, political distrust, and anti-immigrant attitudes over time. Using longitudinal data, we followed three cohorts of native young adults (N = 1352; Mage = 22.72, SD = 3.1) in Sweden over a period of 2 years. The results showed that subjective well-being did not predict an increase in anti-immigrant attitudes among native youth, but anti-immigrant attitudes had a significant impact on subjective well-being. The data also found bidirectional and mutually reinforcing relationships between subjective well-being and political distrust, and between political distrust and anti-immigrant attitudes. These results highlight that improving young adults' subjective well-being represents an important basis for preventing the development of political distrust, which in turn could reduce native youth's susceptibility to adopt hostile attitudes toward immigrants.

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  • 96. Luik, Marc André
    et al.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Explaining the Male Native-Immigrant Employment Gap in Sweden: The Role of Human Capital and Migrant Categories2018In: Journal of Population Research, ISSN 1835-9469, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 363-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite having a celebrated labor market integration policy, the immigrant–native employment gap in Sweden is one of the largest in the OECD. From a cross-country perspective, a key explanation might be migrant admission group composition. In this study we use high-quality detailed Swedish register data to estimate male employment gaps between non-EU/EES labour, family reunification and humanitarian migrants and natives. Moreover, we test if differences in human capital are able to explain rising employment integration heterogeneity. Our results indicate that employment integration is highly correlated with admission category. Interestingly, differences in human capital, demographic and contextual factors seem to explain only a small share of this correlation. Evidence from auxiliary regressions suggests that low transferability of human capital among humanitarian and family migrants might be part of the story. The article highlights the need to understand and account for migrant admission categories when studying employment integration.

  • 97. Luik, Marc-André
    et al.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Explaining the Male Native-Immigrant Employment Gap in Sweden: The Role of Human Capital and Migrant Categories2016In: IZA Discussion papers, ISSN 2365-9793, no 9943Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite having one of the most celebrated labor market integration policies, the native immigrant employment gap in Sweden is one of the largest among the OECD countries. In this study, we use unique Swedish register data to try to explain the employment gap between male immigrants and natives. The results show that the traditional human capital theory only explains a small share of the immigrant-native gap. After controlling for human capital, demographic and contextual factors, large unexplained employment gaps still persists between immigrants and natives and between migrant categories. Our analysis indicates that admission category is an important determinant of employment integration, and that humanitarian and family migrants suffer from low transferability of their country specific human capital. The article highlights the need to consider migrant categories in integration research, and take into account international human capital transferability when explaining employment outcomes for immigrants.

  • 98. Midtboen, Arnfinn H.
    et al.
    Brochmann, Grete
    Erdal, Marta Bivand
    Kruse, Mathias
    Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Mouritsen, Per
    Bech, Emily Cochran
    Assessments of citizenship criteria: are immigrants more liberal?2020In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 46, no 13, p. 2625-2646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on citizenship policies is flourishing, yet we know little of which naturalisation requirements majorities and minorities find reasonable, and how they view existing citizenship regimes. Drawing on original survey data with young adults in Norway (N = 3535), comprising immigrants and descendants with origins from Iraq, Pakistan, Poland, Somalia and Turkey, as well as a non-immigrant majority group, this article examines whether perceptions of ideal citizenship criteria and assessments of Norway's current rules differ between groups. In terms of ideal citizenship criteria, we find a striking similarity across groups when looking at six different dimensions of citizenship policy. When merged into an index and estimated in a multivariate regression model, we find that both immigrants and descendants are significantly more liberal than natives are, yet the differences are small. When assessing the semi-strict citizenship regime in Norway, we find that immigrants are significantly more positive towards the current rules than natives. The results lend little support to recent work on 'strategic' and 'instrumental' citizenship and point instead to a close to universal conception of the terms of membership acquisition in Norway. This suggests that states may operate with moderate integration requirements while maintaining the legitimacy of the citizenship institution.

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  • 99. Ohlsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Broomé, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Egenföretagande bland invandrare och svenskfödda i Sverige - en flernivåanalys2011In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 37-52Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskningen om etniskt företagande har ökat internationellt och efter hand också i Sverige. Motivet är både teoretiskt och praktiskt. Man vill förklara de skillnader som finns mellan olika etniska gruppers företagande t ex beträffande drivkrafter för företagandet. Man vill också visa möjligheterna till integration genom egenföretagande t ex genom att peka på hinder för företagandet som bör undanröjas. En viktig fråga, som också är en huvudfråga i denna artikel, är vilka faktorer som har betydelse för den individuella benägenheten att vara egenföretagare. Det är en fråga som ofta tar sin utgångspunkt i de skillnader som finns mellan olika etniska gruppers andel egenföretagare.

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  • 100. Ohlsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Broomé, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Self-employment of immigrants and natives in Sweden: a multilevel analysis2012In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 405-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research suggests that self-employment among immigrants is due to a combination of multiple situational, cultural and institutional factors, all acting together. Using multilevel regression and unique data on the entire population of Sweden for the year 2007, this study attempts to quantify the relative importance for the self-employed of embeddedness in ethnic contexts (country of birth) and regional business and public regulatory frameworks (labour market areas). This information indicates whether the layers under consideration are valid constructs of the surroundings that influence individual self-employment. The results show that 10% (women) and 8% (men) of the total variation in individual differences in self-employment can be attributed to the country of birth. When labour market areas are included in the analyses, the share of the total variation increases to 14% for women and 12% for men. The results show that the ethnic context and the economic environment play a minor role in understanding individual differences in self-employment levels. The results can have important implications when planning interventions or other actions focusing on self-employment as public measures to promote self-employment often are based on geographic areas and ethnic contexts.

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