Publikationer från Malmö universitet
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 7 av 7
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Fingalsson, Rebecka
    Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö Universitet.
    Biological, Racialized and Pleasurable Bodies: Carl von Linné (Linnaeus) and sexuality education in the 1700s2024Ingår i: The 14th conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology, 2024Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 2.
    Fingalsson, Rebecka
    Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö Universitet.
    Naturalising difference: Carl von Linné (Linnaeus) and sexuality education in the 1700s2024Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    What can a lecture on sex from the 18th century inform about contemporary sexuality education? 

    One of the earliest accounts of sexuality education in formal education is provided by no less than the famous naturalist and botanist Carl von Linné (Linnaeus). In the lecture, Collegium Medicum - Om sättet att tillhopa gå [Regarding the way to come together] from the 1700s, Linnaeus allegedly provided a lively account on human sexuality. While sexual reproduction is necessary for all animals, Linnaeus distingued the human from other anthromoporfa species by the Greek motto Nosce te ipsum [know thyself] (Hoquet, 2014; Müller-Wille, 2014). Thereafter, he divided humankind into four racialized sub-groups. Over the course of 23 years and ten editions, Linneaus work and develop his classifications of man in Systema Naturae (1735-1758) and while his “races” sometimes shifted order, they remained (Linnaeus, 2023; Müller-Wille, 2014).

    In this presentation I aim to address the normative force of sexuality education by engaging with Linnaeus lecture on human sexuality and reproduction and his racial account in Systema Naturae. Reading Linnaeus work in paralell with his lecture is key, for while his classifications in Systema Naturae are restrained, his lecture on sex offers vivacious explanations of the “natural” sexual constitution of the homo sapiens. To guide my readning, I ask how and what Linnaeus lecture on sexuality and human reproduction can inform about the “thyself” that the homo sapiens ought themselves to “know”?

    Based on Müller-Wille (2014) epistemological understanding of “races” as mental tools, Linnaeus work and lecture are considered to be functional objects - anchoring points from which values, judgements, and consequences follows. I argue that Linnaeus sexuality education operates as a normative force as it provided a foundation for a particular biologization of the human body that naturalised distinction in both flesh and sensation. 

    References

    Hoquet, T. (2014). Biologization of Race and Racialization of the Human. Bernier, Buffon, Linnaeus. In N. Bancel, T. David, & D. R. D. Thomas (Eds.), The invention of race : scientific and popular representations. Routledge. 

    Linnaeus, C. (2023). A General System of Nature. In G. G. Harpham (Ed.), Theories of Race. An Annotated Anthology of Essays on Race, 1684⁠–⁠1900. Geoffrey Galt Harpham. https://www.theoriesofrace.com/7 

    Müller-Wille, S. (2014). Race and History: Comments from an Epistemological Point of View. Science, Technology & Human Values, 39(4), 597-606. https://doi.org/10.1177/0162243913517759 

  • 3.
    Fingalsson, Rebecka
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS).
    Junkala, Hannele
    Umeå Univ, Dept Sci & Math Educ, Umeå, Sweden.;Umeå Univ, Umeå Ctr Gender Studies, Umeå, Sweden..
    'Happy Stories' of Swedish Exceptionalism Reproducing Whiteness in Teaching and Biology Textbooks in Sexuality Education2023Ingår i: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexuality education (SE) takes place in fields of tension where biology, legislation, norms, and values intersect. Drawing on Ahmed's phenomenological account of whiteness, this article examines how Swedish whiteness is constructed and reproduced within SE. In Sweden, SE is formalised as an overarching, subject-integrated knowledge area where the biology subject plays a crucial role in its delivery. To include a wide spectrum of SE, where both planned and unplanned aspects of teaching are considered, as well as tensions in the content, we have analysed eight semi-structured teacher interviews and five biology textbooks. Our analysis shows how Swedish whiteness is reproduced as a form of institutionalised orientation constructed by norms, social values, people, subject knowledge, policies, and legislation, all intertwined in a complex web. This web places SE, teachers, and pupils in a racial landscape that constructs and reproduces specific forms of Swedish whiteness by assigning each a position in relation to familiarity. This familiarity provides a taken-for-granted starting point in SE, where 'here' is constructed as a place of progression, openness, and possibilities for happy future sexual lives, while other places come to stand out as hyper-visible examples of the less familiar, less happy, and 'far away'. From this outpost, teachers and biology textbooks construct and reproduce Swedish whiteness through 'happy stories' of Swedish exceptionalism. Although these positive messages in SE may stem from good intentions, our findings show that a colourblind view of racial hierarchies in the rendering of 'happy stories, about, for example, gay rights, free abortion, and equality also contributes to reproducing whiteness and reinforcing ideas about race and Swedish exceptionalism in SE.

  • 4.
    Fingalsson, Rebecka
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS).
    Limitations and Possibilities of Talking Sex in School - Intersections of Teachers’ Age, Gender, and Sexuality2023Ingår i: European Conference on Educational Research, ECER, 22 - 25 August 2023, University of Glasgow, ‘European Educational Research Association’ (EERA) , 2023Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents data from a larger thesis project that aims to explore how sexuality education (SE) take shape by interviewing teachers about their experiences of working with SE and observing a working group assigned to develop teachers’ practices concerning SE. In the teacher interviews I was surprised that some teachers began to talk about their own embodiments of age, gender, and sexuality to describe how they were able to teach and talk about sexuality and relationships with their students while others found it more difficult for the same reason. In this paper I ask, how do intersections of age, gender, and sexuality interfere teachers practises in teaching SE.

  • 5.
    Fingalsson, Rebecka
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS).
    The teaching body in sexuality education – intersections of age, gender, and sexuality2023Ingår i: Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, ISSN 1468-1811, E-ISSN 1472-0825, s. 1-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illuminates how teachers are influenced by age, gender and sexuality in teaching about sex and relationships. In this analysis grounded in feminist theory, age, gender and sexuality are considered to be enacted as doings. Six interviews with teachers working with sexuality education in K-12 schools in Sweden were chosen from of a larger body of material consisting of 21 interviews with professionals engaged in school-based sexuality education. The six interviewees were selected because they explicitly addressed how teachers’ age, gender and/or sexuality come to matter in the classroom. Findings show how male and female teachers organise their teaching in relation to normative expectations of age, gender and sexuality. In sexuality education, the diverse life-courses of (hetero)sexual women offer a wide range of pedagogic possibilities for female teachers to address issues of sexuality, consent and relationships whereas male teachers are constrained to doing safe(r) forms of masculinity by directing attention away from their bodies and experiences. In understanding these results, I argue that the figure of the tant has been key in forming the pedagogic backdrop to Swedish sexuality education, hence embedding a normative ‘who’ in the ‘how’ to teach sexuality education.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Fingalsson, Rebecka
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS).
    A solution, but what is the problem? – Contemplating the problem-solving ethos in Sexuality Education2022Ingår i: WPR Symposium on ritical Policy Studies- 17-18 August 2022, Karlstad University, Sweden, 2022Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Using sexuality education (SE) to solve different social problems has become a defining discourse to explain what SE does. Since the late 19th century, SE has been a tool for combating and preventing social problems stemming out of venereal diseases, unintended pregnancies, low sexual moral, sexual deviance, low sexual- and reproductive health, gender inequalities, sexism, sexual exploitation, sexual violence, and a general lack of knowledge about the body and sexualities. Although SE has developed differently in various countries and taken on different directions, it continues to appear as a solution to prevent and solve a multitude of social problems. But if solving and preventing problems is the very core and purpose of sexuality education, I think it is suitable to ask how policies and educational programs ‘knows’ what problems to solve?

    In response to this simple, yet important question, this paper, without denying the importance of SE, considers how the problem-solving ethos is discursively constructed and underpinned through problematisations. In this paper I use the WPR-approach to target the aftermath of policy. By departing from a policy that is already produced, I show how the Swedish Government first announced a policy reform and eight days later adjusted their message to correspond with public opinion. The empirical material consists of the announcement, a debate article by the Minister of Higher Education, and a selection of 20 newspaper articles published during the eight days in between. This paper provides an empirical example of how a problem-solving discourse underpins and narrates coherence between policy (solutions) and problems. In this paper I also consider how problematisations can work as a soothing technique of acceptance in which policy, as a solution, is in need for problems. 

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Fingalsson, Rebecka
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS).
    Junkala, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS).(UmSER, Umeå Science Education Research).
    Constructing a ‘Nordic Nativeness’ in Swedish Sexuality Education2022Ingår i: Education and involvement in precarious times: Abstract book / [ed] Michael Dal, Reykjavik, Iceland, 2022Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic countries' progressive sexuality education (SE) has become synonymous with gender equality, sex-positive attitudes, and norm-critical awareness (Allen & Rasmussen, 2016; Bengtsson & Bolander, 2020; Zimmerman, 2015). In global comparison, Nordic SE is perceived to be a queer utopia regarding LGBTQ rights (Kjaran, 2017). Despite the prominence, feminist scholars argue it to cultivate forms of sexuality through notions of secularism and progressive pedagogy (Scott, 2018). According to Scott (2018) has Western sexual freedom represented the “fulfilling of natural inclinations of all women” (p. 157) in which sexual desire becomes a defining attribute of the human and a form of “natural law outside of history” (ibid). Svendsen (2017) argues the secular logic within Norwegian SE to be an ‘operating technology’, constructing a secular native and a religious Other. Similar constructions have been found by Honkasalo (2018) in Finnish textbooks, where culture is assigned to non-Finnish Others in contrast to liberal and progressive ""Finnish"" sexuality.  When seemingly neutral and depoliticized notions of sexuality, the human body, health, and morality are addressed in SE, it becomes crucial to think about how these notions affect educational practices. In this paper we continue the path of critique and explore Swedish SE to understand how ‘Nordic nativeness’ is constructed through educational practices. Our data consists of observations, interviews, and textbooks in which we highlight how ‘the native’ and ‘the Other’ are represented. In our paper, we use a thematic analysis to flesh out how positions of ‘nativeness’ and ‘otherness’ are represented in SE. Our preliminary findings support previous research but also present a paradox in which attempts of widening perspectives simultaneously re-construct and re-position nativeness and otherness. Although the empirical example is from a Swedish context, the paper’s results are of interest to a wider audience because it contributes to an understanding of how sexuality education is actively positions different ethical, social, political, and cultural values. 

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 7 av 7
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf