Publikationer från Malmö universitet
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 2 av 2
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Björkas, Robin
    Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS).
    Child welfare, young persons with substance abuse and sexual health2023Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Substance abuse and sexual ill health often go hand in hand. Despite this, no previous studies have investigated whether, and if so how, young people’s sexuality is given meaning in child welfare assessments due to suspected substance abuse. To investigate this, 15 child welfare workers in Sweden were recruited for a semi-structured interview through a strategic selection. The interviews were examined with the support of thematic analysis, which resulted in an overarching theme showing a lack of an area of knowledge. The social workers stated that they had not been trained in SRHR during their basic training or through further training in the roles as child welfare workers. However, this did not mean that they dismissed sexual health matters, rather that they developed individual approaches to face such questions. A common and recurring motto was “to not investigate more than necessary”, which meant that social workers often focused on risk and vulnerability in relation to substance use and related life conditions, and they also related to other areas of knowledge such as violence and crime. The social workers often referred to young persons’ right to confidentiality and privacy when it came to talking about positive aspects of young people’s sexuality, which meant that young people were rarely given space to talk about possible lustful connections between substance use and their sexuality. Overall, the lack of an area of knowledge within the child welfare services illuminates a need for targeted educational efforts toward child welfare professionals, efforts that are in line with the Swedish national strategy regarding sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.

  • 2.
    Björkas, Robin
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Centrum för sexologi och sexualitetsstudier (CSS).
    Larsson, Mariah
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Sex Dolls in the Swedish Media Discourse: Intimacy, Sexuality, and Technology2021Ingår i: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 25, s. 1227-1248Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex dolls are a complex phenomenon with several diverse possible emotional, sexual and therapeutic uses. They can be part of a broad variety of sexual practices, and also function as a sexual aid. However, the media discourse on sex dolls first and foremost concerns how we perceive the relationship between intimacy and technology. A critical discourse analysis of the Swedish media discourse on sex dolls reveals six themes which dominate the discourse: (a) the definition of what a human being is; (b) a discourse on the (technological and existential) future; (c) a social effort; (d) a loveless phenomenon; (e) men’s violence against women; and (f) pedophilia. Accordingly, this discourse is very conservative and normative in its view of sexuality, technology, and humanity. Overall, the dominant themes do not provide any space for positive effects of technology on human sexuality, and if they do, it is usually as a substitute for something else.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 2 av 2
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf