Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Boije af Gennäs, Klara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Horse- and riding-related injuries among youth riders in Sweden2023In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 2023-09-13Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this feature article, Klara Boije af Gennäs presents her Ph.D. project at Malmö University Her main concern is the prevalence and severity of injuries in youth equestrian sports, and not only acute injuries from riding accidents but also overuse injuries resulting from hard labor in the stable. Applying a multi- and interdisciplinary research approach as well as a mix of qualitative and quantitative methodologies, her aim is to extend and strengthen the understanding of stable- and riding injuries among youth equestrians. (Published in English 230913.)

  • 2.
    Hausken-Sutter, Solveige E
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Boije af Gennäs, Klara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg ; Institute of Sociology and Gender Studies, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Grau, Stefan
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Jungmalm, Jonatan
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg; School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Interdisciplinary sport injury research and the integration of qualitative and quantitative data.2023In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To understand and prevent sport injuries, scholars have employed different scientific approaches and research methods. Traditionally, this research has been monodisciplinary, relying on one subdiscipline of sport science and applying qualitative or quantitative research methods. Recently, scholars have argued that traditional approaches fail to address contextual components of sport and the nonlinear interactions between different aspects in and around the athlete, and, as a way forward, called for alternative approaches to sport injury research. Discussion of alternative approaches are today taking place, however, practical examples that demonstrate what such approaches entails are rare. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to draw on an interdisciplinary research approach to (1) outline an interdisciplinary case analysis procedure (ICAP); and (2) provide an example for future interdisciplinary sport injury research.

    METHODS: We adopt an established definition and application of interdisciplinary research to develop and pilot the ICAP for interdisciplinary sport injury teams aiming to integrate qualitative and quantitative sport injury data. The development and piloting of ICAP was possible by drawing on work conducted in the interdisciplinary research project "Injury-free children and adolescents: Towards better practice in Swedish football" (the FIT project).

    RESULTS: The ICAP guides interdisciplinary sport injury teams through three stages: 1. Create a more comprehensive understanding of sport injury aetiology by drawing on existing knowledge from multiple scientific perspectives; 2. Collate analysed qualitative and quantitative sport injury data into a multilevel data catalogue; and 3. Engage in an integrated discussion of the collated data in the interdisciplinary research team.

    CONCLUSION: The ICAP is a practical example of how an interdisciplinary team of sport injury scholars can approach the complex problem of sport injury aetiology and work to integrate qualitative and quantitative data through three stages. The ICAP is a step towards overcoming the obstacles of integrating qualitative and quantitative methods and data that scholars have identified.

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  • 3.
    Broms, Lovisa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Boije af Gennäs, Klara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Radmann, Aage
    Department of Teacher Education and Outdoor Life Studies, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Hedenborg, Susanna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Accessibility, Agency, and Trust: A Study About Equestrians' (Online) Learning Repertoires2022In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 4, article id 863014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Todays' online media landscape facilitates communication on how sports practitioners can develop in their sport. Hence, sports and educational institutions need to recognize the increased role of the individual as “a facilitator of knowledge” through information and communications technology (ICT). For sport organizations and educational institutions to effectively reach out with knowledge and research, they need to know how individuals assess, value, and trust information sources. This article aims to increase the knowledge and understanding of how the traditional culture in equestrianism meets the contemporary media user. It is based on a study that uses a mixed methods design, containing a questionnaire with 1,655 respondents and 28 focus group interviews with Swedish and Norwegian equestrians, to investigate how equestrians create their own repertoires of horse-knowledge online and what sources of knowledge they trust and prioritize. The results show that accessibility, agency, and trust are key terms when mapping equestrians' preferred knowledge platforms, and that equestrians are generally not satisfied with the availability and the quality of horse-related online content. Horse experience is the most important positional factor influencing online repertoires in the equestrian community. Riders with less experience turn to Social Network Sites (SNS) to a higher extent than riders with more experience. Further, equestrians find the ability to assess information as an important yet challenging task. This article shows that the term (online) learning repertoires is appropriate when discussing the relationship (or clash) between the traditional culture in equestrian sports and the contemporary media user. On the one hand, many equestrians clearly express that they would rather stay away from obtaining information about horses and riding on ICTs. On the other hand, the data, together with previous research, indicates that many equestrians see ICTs as important platforms for discussing and exchanging information about horses and riding.

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  • 4.
    Boije af Gennäs, Klara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Equestrians' online communities and their impact on horse-related injuries: norms, attitudes and risk-taking ideals2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hausken-Sutter, Solveig E.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Box 300, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Schubring, Astrid
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Box 300, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Grau, Stefan
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Box 300, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Boije af Gennäs, Klara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Box 300, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Methodological implications of adapting and applying a web-based questionnaire on health problems to adolescent football players2021In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Questionnaire on Health Problems (OSTRC-H) has become a popular tool to monitor health status in athletes. Originally developed for adult athletes, the tool is today also being used in adolescent athletes. However, little is known on the suitability of the questionnaire for the adolescent age group and the methodological implications of applying the tool to prospectively monitor illness and injury. To address this gap in methodological knowledge, the aim of this study is to outline and discuss the adaption and application process of the OSTRC-H to adolescent football players. Method The adaption process included a slightly modified back-translation method to translate the questionnaire. The application process included a web-based version of the Swedish OSTRC-H sent out once a week over 23 weeks to 115 adolescent football players aged 10-19 attending two football schools in Sweden. The response rate and prevalence of health problems over 23 weeks were calculated as feasibility indicators. Additionally, comprehensibility questions were added to the questionnaire in the end of the study. Result No major disagreement was found between the original and translated versions of the questionnaire. However, significant changes to the wording of the questions and answer categories were necessary to adapt it to adolescents. A visual body figure was also added. The average weekly response rate was 38% (SD 13.5). To increase this rate, questionnaire data was gathered retrospectively through telephone and email contact with the participants and their parents, elevating the response rate to 53% (SD 15.5). The adolescents experienced the questionnaire as easy to understand and to cover all relevant health problems. Conclusion Our study demonstrates the importance of adapting the questionnaire to the adolescent target group through translation, pre-tests, adjustments of wording and the facilitation of answering the questionnaire using a visual body figure. The study further shows the importance of keeping close and personal contact with the participants, their parents, teachers, and coaches throughout data collection. Future studies should take into account the age group and study context when adapting and applying the OSTRC-H to adolescents.

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