Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Exploring Ways to Design Mathematics Education Promoting Inclusion and Equity for Every Student2023In: Building Inclusive Education in K-12 Classrooms and Higher Education: Theories and Principles / [ed] Kiyoji Koreeda; Masayoshi Tsuge; Shigeru Ikuta; Elizabeth Minchin Dalton; Linda Plantin Ewe, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2023, p. 166-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter aims to reflect on how to promote inclusion and equity in mathematics education by moving from defining them theoretically and identifying critical aspects to using them practically in designing the education. In this chapter, inclusive and equitable education is understood as an education striving to provide every student an opportunity to take part in learning processes in mathematics. Theoretically, the chapter combines Ainscow’s (2020) framework for inclusion and equity with Skovsmose’s (2019) notions of inclusive landscapes of investigation to create a conceptual framework for promoting inclusion and equity in mathematics education. The results of the meta-analysis display seven interrelated critical aspects: seeing the students; developing and anchoring inclusion and equity principles; having supportive administration and organization; employing educational strategies; utilizing tasks; recognizing representations; and having collaborations and mathematical discussions. These aspects need to be considered in the implementation of an inclusive and equitable mathematics.

     

  • 2.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Fälth, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nilvius, Camilla
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Idor
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Promoting basic arithmetic competence in early school years–using a response to intervention model2023In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 313-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether mathematics education based on a multi-tiered response to intervention (RTI) model can support students' arithmetic competence in primary schools in Sweden. The intent was to identify and support students at risk of failure. In this study, 113 students participated in the intervention, and 30 students participated in the control group. Both groups were followed from Grade 1 to the end of Grade 2 and compared. During the first semester in Grade 1, all students were taught basic addition and subtraction with explicit instructions in Tier 1. Those who did not respond to Tier 1 after one semester were provided support within Tier 2 during the second semester. The same was repeated in grade 2 and the students that did not respond to Tier 2 were supported within Tier 3. At the end of Grade 2, students in the intervention group performed significantly higher on the basic arithmetic competence in the number range 1–9 than the control group. No significant difference was found in a test measuring basic arithmetic competence in the number range 10–19. This study shows that using multi-tiered RTI might be sufficient to identify and support students at risk in early arithmetic competence.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Students’ voices of inclusion in mathematics education2023In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 229-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study foregrounds three students who are regarded by their teachers as being in special educational needs in mathematics (SEM) and these same students voicing what inclusion in mathematics education means to them. In this study, inclusion is defined as processes of participation. Discourse analysis was applied when analysing these students’ voices of inclusion in mathematics education in two inclusive mathematics classrooms, with both classes aiming to include every student in the mathematics education. The three main Discourses which were identified were the Discourse of assessment, the Discourse of being in a mathematics classroom setting, and the Discourse of accessibility in mathematics education. The analysis of the Discourses indicates that they were affected by wider sociopolitical discourses. Furthermore, when inclusion is regarded as processes of participation in mathematics education, the results indicate that participation becomes more complex. Therefore, in this process, both ideological and societal issues, as well as individual and subject-specific issues, must be considered in the educational endeavour.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Bagger, Anette
    Örebro Universitet.
    Explicit instruction and special educational needs in mathematics in early school years2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an exploration of how an educational method, Explicit Instruction (EI), is used and reflected upon in research in relation to special educational needs in mathematics (SEM) in early school years. The current research front is put in relation to the Swedish curricula in mathematics and the Swedish school act (steering documents) to explore potential possibilities and challenges of the research findings in a Swedish context. The analysis was done in three steps: 1) a systematic search of research literature, 2) a content analysis of the literature 3) a relation of the results of to the steering documents. The exploration of the possibilities of EI displays that EI can contribute to every student’s learning by providing a distinct structure in relation to the mathematical content. It displays challenges for special education in mathematics regarding collaboration between teachers, the competence of teachers, and time to plan the EI and time for the students working with EI.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Andersson, Christian H.
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Boistrup, Lisa Björklund
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Mathematics curriculum discourses on democracy: Critical thinking in the age of digital traces2022In: Proceeding of the twelfth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of people’s online digital traces has given rise to concerns for democracy. The digital traces may affect the individual’s life in unexpected and negative ways. Such traces may also be of importance for understanding the spread of disinformation and the like. This paper reports on a Foucault inspired discourse analysis of the Swedish upper secondary mathematics curriculum. Two discourses are construed in the intersection of critical thinking, democracy, and this new technology. Skovsmose’s concept of mathemacy is used to identify what is critical knowledge and what is not. The first construed discourse is, “With knowledge in formal mathematics, critical thinking on democracy will follow.” The second is, “Rather a personal career than a critical citizenship.” Neither of the discourses promotes a need for mathematics education to change due to new technology with regards to critical thinking.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Grundén, Helena
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Planera för inkluderande matematikundervisning i ett stormigt landskap2022In: Matematikundervisningens sociopolitiska utmaningar / [ed] Valero, Paola ; Björklund Boistrup, Lisa ; Christiansen, Iben Maj ; Norén, Eva, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2022, p. 281-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta kapitel diskuteras hur olika sociopolitiska vindar som blåser runt matematikundervisning påverkar förutsättningarna för både lärare och elever på olika nivåer. Fokus ligger på planering för en inkluderande matematikundervisning under dessa förutsättningar. Detta belyses utifrån de tidigare kapitlens ’vindriktningar’ samt vår egen forskning som fokuserar planering och inkludering i matematikundervisning. Utifrån de sociopolitiska beskrivningar som finns av mötet mellan elever, lärare och matematik kan vi se att det dels finns skillnader som uppträder över tid —förändringar som går från något mot något annat, men också förändringar som visar återkommande företeelser. För att synliggöra frågor om inkludering och planering inom ramen för dessa förändringar behövs en ständigt pågående debatt men det behövs också samverkan mellan forskare och lärare för att tillsammans kunna möta sociopolitiska utmaningar som uppstår när vi arbetar för en mer likvärdig och rättvis matematikundervisning. Det behövs även stöd och utrymme för lärare så att de kan tolka och navigera och genom ett informerat handlande planera för en inkluderande matematikundervisning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Linnaeus University.
    Repeated interviews with students – critical methodological points for research quality2022In: International Journal of Research and Method in Education, ISSN 1743-727X, E-ISSN 1743-7288, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 423-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a reflection on what the qualitative interview method conducted with students can provide to (mathematics) education research in terms of in-depth knowledge and what critical methodological points should be taken into consideration. Repeated interviews with the same students in relation to research quality is considered. The argument is that repeated interviews can provide in- depth knowledge and a grasp of students’ understandings. Critical points to consider when gaining in-depth knowledge are person- dependency, process ethics, connections between repeated interviews as a method and the aim, and the re-interview effect. These are important to discuss and reflect on throughout the research process, as they can function as quality criteria when producing in-depth knowledge in qualitative research with repeated interviews.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Students’ meanings of inclusion in mathematics – implication for practice2022In: / [ed] Mattsson, L., Häggström, J., Carlsen, M., Kilhamn, C., Palmér, H., Perez, M. & Pettersson. K., 2022, Vol. 16, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight implications for practice reflecting on the results of a study of students’ meanings of inclusion in mathematics education. The main result from the prior study suggest that three Discourses influences students meaning(s) of inclusion: Discourse of mathematics classroom setting, of assessment, and of accessibility in mathematics education. The implication for practice building on these Discourses concerns construction of tests, grading in relation to what students perceive as mathematics, (un)challenge and theme of tasks, a pedagogical stance and tactfulness of the teacher, valuing of students, organization in terms of the use of textbooks, discussions and ”going-through”, variation in teaching approaches, being in a small group, and how the label of ”SEM student” may affect participation and access.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Linnéuniversitetet .
    The governing of inclusion: Policy in Swedish school regulations and mathematics education2021In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 75-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study Swedish school regulations are investigated concerning inclusion and mathematics education. The texts are seen as socially produced written language. Discourse analysis is used focusing social interaction in the texts. The research question is, what in the regulation texts denotes and connotes inclusion, and how does this influence and govern inclusion in the case of mathematics education? Four Discourses were construed: the discourses of democracy and citizenship, of equity, of possibilities for participation and access, and of knowledge and assessment in mathematics. These Discourses make governing functions of inclusion visible. The functions are mostly ideological, and there appears to be a gap to how to actually do inclusion in the education. How this gap can be bridged needs to be considered by principals and teachers in their work for inclusion. Also, there are contradictions in the regulations. This implies that how in(ex)clusion in mathematics education is produced needs to be reconsidered by policy makers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Bagger, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Engvall, Margareta
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Directions of intentionalities in special needs education in mathematics2020In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 104, p. 41-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article builds upon a systematic review of 53 articles in international research journals and makes three main contributions. First, it develops a method for identifying motives, values, and assumptions in research by analysing segments of text in journal articles. Second, it represents a reflective account of research within the field of mathematics education. Third, it captures the ongoing directions of intentionalities inherent in the diverse field of special education mathematics and, thereby, some of the characteristics of the core issues in this field. Three directions of intentionalities were identified: towards teachers and teaching competence, towards enhanced mathematical achievement, and towards every student's learning. The results indicate that each direction has specific limitations and potentials. In order to improve special education mathematics, we recommend that researchers and practitioners remain broadly informed and involved in all three directions of intentionalities.

  • 11.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Linfors, Maria
    Umeå Universitet.
    Bagger, Anette
    Örebro University.
    Educational settings in relation to special educational needs in mathematics2020In: Nordisk matematikkdidaktikk, NOMAD: [Nordic Studies in Mathematics Education], ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 95-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on students in need of special education in mathematics (SEM students) and highlights teachers’ and principals’ reflections upon these students’ construction of knowledge in relation to two educational settings: the regular teach- ing setting and the test setting. The findings indicate that SEM students’ knowledge is legitimized only when displayed. However, there appear to be differences according to the specific setting. Different settings imply different knowledge representations, norms, and practices that need to be taken into account when reflecting, planning, and carrying out teaching in mathematics in relation to SEM.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Roos, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Inkluderande matematikundervisning: Tidiga insatser i FK-62020 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Inkluderande matematikundervisning – tidiga insatser i FK–6 ­ger teoretiska och didaktiska perspektiv på hur inkludering kan omsättas, såväl ­inom organisationen som i den praktiska matematikundervisningen i klassrummet.

    Här får du kunskap om orsaksförklaringar till särskilda utbildningsbehov i matematik (SUM) och om hur kartläggning för att ringa in behov och lämpliga åtgärder kan gå till. Med denna grund ligger fokus sedan på innehåll, planering och utvärdering av undervisningen och frågor som:

    • Hur kan gruppindelningar användas på ett inkluderande vis?
    • Hur stimuleras elevernas meningsfulla deltagande?
    • Hur kan man anpassa undervisningsinnehållet?
  • 13.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Challenges at the border of normality: Students in special educational needs in an inclusive mathematics classroom2019In: Proceedings of the tenth international mathematics education and society conference: Mathematics Education and Society, Hyderabad, India, Jan 28th-Feb2nd, 2019 / [ed] Subramanian, J., Hyderabad: Mathematics Education and Society , 2019, p. 928-940Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research describes how students perceived as being in special educational needs in mathematics (SEM), either as students in access to mathematics, or as students in struggle to get access, are challenged in their participation in mathematics education. Discourse analysis is used as a tool and a theory to construe discourses from students own stories of participation in an inclusive mathematics classroom. Distinguishing between (d)iscourse as stories in texts, and (D)iscourses as social and political recognisable units, the result shows the same, yet different, discourses; tasks, the importance of the teacher, to be (un)valued and math is boring, all indicating a Discourse of accessibility in mathematics education. The accessibility is challenged in two ways, the students are challenged in their participation since they do not fit into the ‘normal’ education, and the mathematics education is challenged to meet every students’ need to promote equity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 14.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    I just don’t like math, or I think it is interesting, but difficult …: Mathematics classroom setting influencing inclusion2019In: Proceedings of the Eleventh Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education. / [ed] U. T. Jankvist, M. van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, & M. Veldhuis, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education , 2019, article id hal-02431497Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research reports on a study investigating how three students perceived as being in special educational needs in mathematics (SEM), either as students in access to mathematics or as students in struggle to get access, talk about participation in mathematics education. Discourse analysis is used as a theory and a tool to investigate the students’ own stories of learning and teaching in an inclusive mathematics classroom. The results show that students’ participation in mathematics education is influenced by how the mathematics education is set up. That is, how the organisation of the mathematics classroom and students being in a small group influence students’ participation.The results also show that even though the same issues of the organisation influence the three students, there is a diversity within the issues, calling for a critical question, is the inclusive classroom setting really inclusive in terms of participation and access to mathematics?

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Inclusion in mathematics education: an ideology, a way of teaching, or both?2019In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This literature review focuses on the definitions and roles of inclusion in the field of mathematics education to help promote the sustainable development of inclusion in the discipline. Discourse analysis was used to analyse 76 studies published between 2010 and 2016. The results show that the term inclusion is used both for an ideology and a way of teaching, and these two uses are most often treated separately and independently of each other. When inclusion is treated as an ideology, values are articulated; when treated as a way of teaching, interventions are brought to the fore. When the notion of inclusion is used as an ideology, the most extensive discourse concerns equity in mathematics education; when it is used as a way of teaching, the most extensive discourse relates to teaching interventions for mathematical engagement. Based on the literature review, if sustainable development of inclusion in mathematics education is to be promoted, scholars need to connect and interrelate the operationalisation and meanings of inclusion in both society and in mathematics classrooms, and take students’ voices into consideration in research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 16.
    Scherer, Petra
    et al.
    University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany.
    Kroesbergen, Evelyn
    Radboud University, Netherlands.
    Moraová, Hana
    Charles University, Czech Republic.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Introduction to the work of TWG25: Inclusive Mathematics Education: challenges for students with special needs2019In: Proceedings of the Eleventh Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education. / [ed] U. T. Jankvist, M. van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, & M. Veldhuis, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education , 2019, article id hal-02431468Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 17.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    The meaning(s) of inclusion in mathematics in student talk: Inclusion as a topic when students talk about learning and teaching in mathematics2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contributes to research and practice within the field of special education in mathematics with more knowledge about, and an understanding of, students´ meaning(s) of inclusion in mathematics education. Three research questions guide the study: What meaning(s) is/are ascribed, and how is inclusion used, in mathematics education research? What meaning(s) do the students ascribe to inclusion in mathematics learning and teaching? And what frames students´ meaning(s) of inclusion in mathematics learning and teaching?The first part of this study began with a systematic literature review on the notion of inclusion in mathematics education research, and the search resulted in 1,296 research studies. Of these, 76 studies were retained after the criteria for time span and peer-reviewed research were applied and 19 duplicates had been removed. The second part of the study involves a case study of three students and their meaning(s) of inclusion in mathematics education. The selected school was a lower secondary school in an urban area of Sweden. The school had set out to work inclusively, meaning their aims were to include all students in the ordinary classroom teaching in every subject and to incorporate special education into the ordinary teaching with no fixed special education groups. Three students were chosen for this part of the study: one in Grade 7 and two in Grade 8. Edward, one of the students in Grade 8, was chosen because he was thought to be a student in access to mathematics education. The other two students were chosen because they were thought to be struggling to gain access to mathematics education: Veronica in Grade 7 and Ronaldo in Grade 8 (the same class as Edward). In this study, the object of the study is the meaning(s) of inclusion in student talk. This study is an instrumental and collective case (Stake, 1995), as it involves several students’ meaning(s) aimed at developing a more general understanding of inclusion in mathematics education. The case is also an information-rich case (Patton, 2002), with contributions from students in mathematics education at an inclusive school. Applying Flyvbjerg’s (2006; 2011) notions, one can also call this kind of selection “information-oriented”, and the case is an extreme one – a choice made in order to get “a best case scenario”. An extreme case is a case used to “obtain information on unusual cases  which can be especially problematic or especially good in a more closely defined sense” (Flyvbjerg, 2011, p. 307). The data in this study consists of both observations and interviews conducted during the spring semester 2016. The observations took place in a Grade 7 and Grade 8 classroom at the same school where the interviewed students were enrolled. At least one mathematics lesson each month for each class was observed, and student interviews followed each observation. The observations were used to provide a context for the interviews and to support the analysis. In this study, discourse analysis (DA) as described by Gee (2014a; 2014b) was chosen as both the theoretical frame and as an analytical tool because of its explanatory view on discourse, with description foregrounded. With the help of DA, this study describes both the meaning(s) and the use of the notion of inclusion in mathematics education research. It also describes students’ meaning(s) of inclusion in mathematics education as well as framing issues in student talk of inclusion in mathematics education. From Gee´s point of view, DA encompasses all forms of interaction, both spoken and written, and he provides a toolkit for analysing such interaction by posing questions to the text. Gee distinguishes two theoretical notions, big and small discourses, henceforth referred to as Discourse (D) and discourse (d). Discourse represents a wider context, both social and political, and is constructed upon ways of saying, doing, and being: “If you put language, action, interaction, values, beliefs, symbols, objects, tools, and places together in such a way that other recognize you as a particular type of who (identity) engaged in a particular type of what (activity), here and now, then you have pulled of a Discourse” (Gee, 2014 a, p. 52, Gee’s italics). When looking at discourse (with a small d), it focuses on language in use – the “stretches of language” we can see in the conversations we investigate (Gee, 2014a, 2014b), meaning the relations between words and sentences and how these relations visualize the themes within the conversations. These small discourses can inform on how the language is used, what typical words and themes are visible, and how the speakers or writers design the language. According to Gee (2015), big Discourse sets a larger context for the analysis of small discourse. The results of the first part of the study answer to the research question, What meaning(s) is ascribed, and how is inclusion used in mathematics education research? They show that research on inclusion in mathematics education use the term inclusion when both referring to an ideology and a way of teaching, although these two uses are usually treated separately and independently of each other. The results of the second part of the study answer to the following research questions: What meaning(s) do the students ascribe to inclusion in mathematics learning and teaching? And what frames students´ meaning(s) of inclusion in mathematics learning and teaching? These questions show how meaning(s) of inclusion in student talk can be described by three overarching Discourses: the Discourse of mathematics classroom setting, of assessment, and of accessibility in mathematics education. Within these Discourses, smaller discourses make issues of meanings of inclusion for the students visible in terms of: testing, grades, tasks, the importance of the teacher, (not) being valued, the dislike of mathematics, the classroom organization, and being in a small group. This study shows the complexities and challenges of teaching mathematics, all while simultaneously handling students’ diversity and promoting the mathematical development of each student. To enhance students’ participation and access demands that the teacher knows her or his students, is flexible, has a pedagogical stance and tactfulness, and is knowledgeable in mathematics and mathematics education. It also demands that the teacher is able to take a critical stance and resist the prevailing discourse of assessment that can sometimes overshadow the mathematics education, and in a sense, almost become mathematics for the students. Furthermore, this study also shows how complex and challenging it is to be a mathematics student: they are required to relate to, understand, and participate in many Discourses existing at the same time in a single mathematics classroom. These Discourses interrelate and are embedded in power relations between students and teachers and institutions. This demands that the students are alert and able to use various symbols and objects as well as recognize patterns, and then act accordingly. Hence, to be able to fully participate, you have to be able to talk the talk and walk the walk (Gee, 2014a). This means that not only do you have to use the language correctly, but also you have to act properly at the right time and place.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 18.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Ljungblad, Ann-Louise
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Att skapa tillgänglighet till matematik – vilka är de pedagogiska utmaningarna?: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematik - Specialpedagogik, Matematikdidaktik och specialpedagogik, Del 1: Tillgänglighet till matematik, årskurs 4-6 ]2018Other (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Ljungblad, Ann-Louise
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Att skapa tillgänglighet till matematik – vilka är de pedagogiska utmaningarna?: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematik - Specialpedagogik, Matematikdidaktik och specialpedagogik, Del 1: Tillgänglighet till matematik, årskurs 7-9 ]2018Other (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 20.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Ljungblad, Ann-Louise
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Att skapa tillgänglighet till matematik – vilka är de pedagogiska utmaningarna?: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematik - Specialpedagogik, Matematikdidaktik och specialpedagogik, Del 1: Tillgänglighet till matematik, årskurs 1-3 ]2018Other (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 21.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Trygg, Lena
    NCM, Sweden.
    Begrepp och representationer: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematik - Specialpedagogik, Matematikdidaktik och specialpedagogik, Del 2: Begrepp och representationer, årskurs 1-3 ]2018Other (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 22.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Trygg, Lena
    NCM, Sweden.
    Begrepp och representationer: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematik - Specialpedagogik, Matematikdidaktik och specialpedagogik, Del 2: Begrepp och representationer, årskurs 4-6 ]2018Other (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 23.
    Trygg, Lena
    et al.
    NCM, Sweden.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Begrepp och representationer: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematik - Specialpedagogik, Matematikdidaktik och specialpedagogik, Del 2: Begrepp och representationer, årskurs 7-9 ]2018Other (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 24.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Bagger, Anette
    Engwall, Margareta
    Investigating the politics of meaning(s) in Nordic research on special education mathematics: developing a methodology.2018In: Perspectives on professional development of mathematics teachers: Proceedings of MADIF 11 : The eleventh research seminar of the Swedish Society for Research in Mathematics EducationKarlstad, January 23–24, 2018 / [ed] J. Häggström, Y. Liljekvist, J. Bergman Ärlebäck, M. Fahlgren & O. Olande, Göteborg: Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF , 2018, p. 141-150Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to develop a methodology to explore the politics of meaning in special education mathematics research. Mediated meaning, directions of intentionalities and perspectives on special education have been analysed in eight reviewed articles. Results indicate that the politics of meaning in the Nordic sample are about processes of normalisation and effectiveness through methods and approaches. The teacher is emphasised as the centre for change and development also when it comes to organi-sational factors. Disabilities are not researched, perhaps cloaked by an overall rela-tional approach or due to research paying attention to milder difficulties. The deve- loped methodology seems to be fruitful and will be applied on a broader interna-tional sample.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 25.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Gadler, Ulla
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för pedagogik och lärande (PEL).
    Kompetensens betydelse i det didaktiska mötet: en modell för analys av möjligheter att erbjuda varje elev likvärdig utbildning enlig skolans uppdrag2018In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 23, no 3-4, p. 290-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Skolans uppdrag är att erbjuda likvärdig utbildning till varje elev med utgångspunkt från deras varierande förutsättningar. Uppdraget, kan benämnas som det dubbla uppdraget, omfattar såväl kunskapsuppdrag som socialisationsuppdrag. I ett flertal rapporter från bl.a. Skolverket och Skolinspektionen (Skolverket, 2011, 2015; Skolinspektionen, 2014, 2016) framgår det att det finns en diskrepans mellan formuleringar i statliga styrdokument och det som sker i skolan med avseende på varje elevs möjlighet till likvärdig utbildning. Villkor för att genomföra skolans dubbla uppdrag belyses i denna artikel genom att fokusera på betydelsen av kvalitén på det didaktiska mötet i relation till varje elevs rätt till likvärdig utbildning och livslång lust att lära. Syftet med artikeln är att skapa en modell för att kunna analysera kvaliteten på det didaktiska mötet. Denna modell innehåller tre komponenter; elevers varierande förutsättningar i relation till likvärdig utbildning, professionell kompetens att genomföra innehålls-, dynamisk och deltagande inkludering samt tolkning och genomförande av skolans dubbla uppdrag. Kvaliteten på det didaktiska mötet påverkas av hur dessa tre komponenter samvarierar med varandra.

  • 26.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    The Influence of Assessment on Students’ Experiences of Mathematics2018In: Students' and Teachers' Values, Attitudes, Feelings and Beliefs in Mathematics Classrooms: Selected Papers from the 22nd MAVI Conference / [ed] Hanna Palmér, Jeppe Skott, Springer , 2018, p. 101-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The empirical material and results presented in this paper come from an ongoing ethnography-inspired study of inclusion in mathematics as seen from a student perspective. This study did not initially focus on assessment, but when investigating what influences students’ experiences of school mathematics, assessment came out as a result. The research participants are not ordinary students, but students who need some degree of special education in mathematics, either as gifted or as low-performing students. For these students, traditional assessment in mathematics does not provide any relevant feedback to support them. On the whole, assessment primarily influences either how they write solutions to tasks, but not exactly how they solve them, or else how they feel about themselves as low performers in mathematics.

  • 27.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Connections between situations and connections of content – a support for recognition of similarities in mathematics: Conexiones entre situaciones y conexiones de contenido – Un apoyo para el reconocimiento de similaridades en matemáticas2017In: Journal of Mathematical Education - SBEM, E-ISSN 1518-8221, Vol. 3, no 18, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How to work inclusively and engage students in special educational needs in the mathematics is a difficult task. In this article, I discuss teachers’ awareness of connections between different teaching and learning situations, and the awareness of connections of content in the teaching as one way of including students who are in special educational needs in mathematics (SEM-students) in the mathematics taught in school. The importance of considering situated knowledge in the teaching of mathematics is highlighted through the notions prepare, immerse and repeat along with an awareness of mathematical tasks and representations. If focusing on how and what to teach in mathematics, the teachers can help the students to recognise similarities in mathematics between different teaching and learning situations, and enhance the inclusion process in the mathematics education.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Diversity in an inclusive mathematics classroom: A student perspective2017In: Proceeding of the tenth congress of the European society for research in mathematics education, Dublin, (CERME10, February 1-5, 2017) / [ed] T. Dooley & G. Gueudet, Dublin, Ireland: European Society for Research in Mathematics Education , 2017, p. 1533-1560Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a study exploring inclusion in mathematics education from a student perspective. The theoretical and analytical approach in the study is discourse analysis. The results presented in this paper are based on 8 interviews with students from lower secondary school and 4 observations of mathematics lessons. The teachers describe the students as students in special needs in mathematics (SEM). The results show that, from a student perspective, the teaching and learning of mathematics in an inclusive classroom is complex and diverse. At the same time, as these students are similar in that they are SEM-students, they are different when it comes to how they themselves want to be included in the mathematics. These differences regard both the organization and the content. Thus, diversity among students demands diversity in the mathematics education. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 29.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematik (MA).
    What is implied when researchers claim to use a theory?2017In: International Journal of Research and Method in Education, ISSN 1743-727X, E-ISSN 1743-7288, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 471-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on the use of theories and on what we imply when we in research claim to use a theory. In this article, diverse uses of one theory will be illustrated with reference to ten different studies. The aim is not to evaluate or judge how the theory is used in these studies, but to discuss how the diverse uses of one and the same theory may infer very different things in research. Questions are raised about what happens with the hierarchy and the coherence of an argument and what conclusions can be drawn when only some parts of a theory are used.

  • 30.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Discourse Analysis as a Theory and Tool Investigating Inclusion in Mathematics2016In: ICT in mathematics education: the future and the realities: Proceedings of MADIF 10 The tenth research seminar of the Swedish Society for Research in Mathematics Education Karlstad, January 26–27, 2016, Karlstad: Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF , 2016, p. 149-149Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Inclusion in mathematics: the impact of the Principal2016In: Cursiv [publisher: Institut for Didaktik, Danmarks Pædagogiske Universitetsskole, Aarhus Universitet, DK], ISSN 1901-8878, E-ISSN 1901-8886, no 18, p. 107-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to describe the means by which the principal affects the process of inclusion in mathematics from a teacher perspective. Two notions form the theoretical foundation: participation and inclusion. The participatory perspective is provided by Wenger’s theory of communities of practice (1998). When discussing inclusion, Asp-Onsjö’s (2006) notions of didactical, spatial, and social inclusion have been used. The results are presented in two parts: the first presents identified communities at the investigated school and the second identifies codes of impact pointing towards inclusion in mathematics. When combining the participatory and the inclusive perspectives, codes of impact regarding inclusion in mathematics in the different communities were identified. Although there are different codes of impact in the different communities, one can identify several recurring codes when investigating the impact of the principal. The most frequent is courses. Competence, didactical discussions and planning also recur in the different communities. Investigating these codes of impact, there appears to be a gap between the steering of the principal and what actually occurs. The results indicate that the principal’s impact on inclusion in mathematics in the realisation arena is relatively weak.

  • 32.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Inkludering i matematik: vad kan det vara?2016In: Nämnaren : tidskrift för matematikundervisning, ISSN 0348-2723, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 18-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Communities of practice: exploring the diverse use of a theory2015In: CERME9 Proceedings of the Ninth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education / [ed] Konrad Krainer, Naďa Vondrová, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education , 2015, p. 2702-2708Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The social learning theory of communities of practice is frequently used in mathematics education research. However, we have come to recognise that the theory is used in diverse ways, regarding both the parts that are used and the ways in which those parts are used. This paper presents an overview of this diverse use of the theory based on three themes: Are communities of practice viewed as pre-existing or are they designed within the study? Are individuals or groups foregrounded in the study? Which parts of the theory are mainly used? The aim of the paper is twofold: to make visible the diverse possibilities within one single theory, and to make visible how, even though we might think we know what a theory implies in research, if we look beneath the surface we may find that “the same” theory can imply many different things.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 34.
    Bagger, Anette
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    How Research Conceptualises the Student in Need of Special Education in Mathematics2015In: Development of Mathematics Teaching: Design, Scale, Effects. Proceeding of MADIF 9. The Ninth Swedish Mathematics Education Research Seminar Umeå February 4-5, 2014 / [ed] O. Helenius, A. Engström, T. Meaney, P. Nilsson, E. Norén, J. Sayers, M. Österholm, Linköping: Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF , 2015, p. 27-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is the conceptualisation of students in special educationalneeds in mathematics (SEM students) in the research fields of mathematics andspecial education. A difference between fields regarding the perspectives takenon the SEM student is obvious in the reviewed articles. Those in the specialeducational field were individual oriented in their view of the difficulties, whilstreviewed articles from the field of mathematics education more often discusssocio-cultural settings. The content in the selected 28 articles reveals that theoverall conceptualisation of SEM student has to do with the social construct ofthe SEM student, as well as with students’ experiences, affects, andprerequisites; with the specific training methods or interventions applied; withspecial areas in the subject of mathematics; with special groups of students; andwith teachers’ knowledge about all these factors.

  • 35.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Frithiof, Elisabet
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för pedagogik (PED).
    Gadler, Ulla
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för pedagogik (PED).
    Lundbäck, Birgitta
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för pedagogik (PED).
    Sandberg, Ingmarie
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för pedagogik (PED).
    If a Sprawling Teacher Education of Special Education Needs (SEN) is the Answer, What is the Question?2015In: WSNE 2015 Proceedings / [ed] C. A. Shoniregun, G.A. Akmayeva, Philadephia, USA: Infonomics Society , 2015, p. 71-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Teacher education of SEN looks different over the globe. This paper discusses the notion of SEN in the light of Swedish teacher education of SEN at Linnaeus University. An analysis of institutional documents governing the education has been made. The results show that SEN is expressed in different ways in the documents and is very much connected to needs in the education. It also shows, even though the directions has different target groups, that the notion of SEN has a common basis in facing the needs of all children and students. The differences can be seen in what kind of mission the teacher of SEN has. The results show that the mission of the special pedagogue is more on an overall level and the mission of special teachers is more connected to the learning of the individual child, even though both of the SEN teachers have much the same mission.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 36.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Inclusion in mathematics in primary school: what can it be?2015Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 37.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Inkludering i matematik i grundskolan - vad kan det vara?2015In: Specialpedagogisk tidskrift - att undervisa, ISSN 2000-429X, no 3, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Developing Inclusion in Mathematics: The Impact of the Principal2014In: Nordic Research network on Special Needs Education in Mathematics (NORSMA 7), 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the present research project is to empirically investigate what inclusion in mathematics education can be and how it is possible to develop inclusive mathematics education, based on special educational needs in mathematics. In this paper, the aim is to present how the impact of the principal affects the development of inclusion in mathematics from a teacher perspective. The study has an ethnographic approach, where a large primary School is being studied.  The results indicate that the principal’s impact on inclusion in mathematics at the realisation arena is relatively weak. In this study, inclusion in mathematics has strong connections with didactical issues.

  • 39.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Inclusive mathematics from a special education perspective: how can it be interpreted?2013In: The proceedings of CERME8, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to present a way of understanding the phenomenon of inclusion in mathematics. The theoretical framework consists of the connection between two theoretical perspectives and is tested in an empirical example of inclusive mathematics from the perspective of special education. The theory of communities of practice is used as an overall theoretical perspective along with a theoretical framework regarding inclusion. Sub codes were extracted from the empirical example to create a more fine-grained conceptual framework. The results show that the conceptual structure is beneficial for extracting a fine-grained conceptual tool in understanding and developing inclusion in mathematics.

  • 40.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Lantz, Susanne
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för matematikdidaktik (MD).
    Strukturerad intensivundervisning i aritmetik2013In: Nämnaren : tidskrift för matematikundervisning, ISSN 0348-2723, no 1, p. 6-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    en undervisning som är inkluderande betraktas olikheter som tillgångar och alla elever ges möjligheter att vara aktiva. Här beskriver författarna ett examensarbete, på speciallärarprogrammet, om strukturerad intensivundervisning där utgångspunkten var att alla elever skulle arbeta i klassrummet.

  • 41.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, fysik och matematik, DFM.
    Nilsson, Per
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, fysik och matematik, DFM.
    An Inclusive Perspective on a Pedagogy for Students in Special Needs in Mathematics2012In: Evaluation and Comparison of Mathematical Achievment: Dimensions and Perspectives : proceedings of MADIF 8 : the eighth Swedish mathematics education research seminar, Umeå, January 24-25, 2012 / [ed] C. Bergsten, E. Jablonka & M. Raman, 2012, p. 217-218Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Ebbelind, Andreas
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, fysik och matematik, DFM.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, fysik och matematik, DFM.
    Nilsson, Per
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, fysik och matematik, DFM.
    Learning fractions: transformations between representations from a social semiotic perspective of multimodality2012In: Proceedings of Norma 11: The Sixth Nordic Conference on Mathematics Education / [ed] Gunnarsdottir, Hreinsdottir, Palsdottir, Hannula, Hannula-Sormunen, Jablonka, Jankvist, Ryve, Valero and Waege., University of Iceland Press , 2012, p. 217-226Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a tentative framework for studying the learning of fractions in the context of transformations between different forms of representations. The framework is used in an empirical sample of how eight 10-year-old students express understanding of activities which were developed to challenge them to reflect on different ways of representing aspects of the concept of fractions. The framework is based on a social semiotic perspective of multimodality.

    The analysis discloses how the framework helps in structuring our understanding of the interplay between representations in the learning of fractions. Specifically, we saw how concrete physical material and gestures complemented the symbolic and spoken language in the students’ solution strategies of different tasks. 

  • 43.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, fysik och matematik, DFM.
    How students in mathematical difficulties deal with representations in a social setting2011Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf