Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 74
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Sarkheyli, Elnaz
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Pandemic, doctoral students’ motivation and the role of supervision2023In: Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, E-ISSN 2004-4097, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ph.D. research and supervision process passes through different momentums of ups and downs, demotivation, and stress. Unexpected situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, and its considerable influence on daily life and their working situation and research process, put new pressures on Ph.D. students. This study aims to investigate the COVID-19 pandemic on doctoral motivation, the supervisions' strategies, and the importance of supervisors in helping students tackle demotivation and stress situations. In this study, we conducted an online survey, including open-ended and Likert scale questions, distributed among the doctoral students and interviews with supervisors at Malmö University. According to the survey result, the pandemic has affected the doctoral students' research methodological process, communication frequency and efficiency with their supervisors, access to the office and laboratory, and motivation to write and finish their doctoral thesis. Stress, new life and family priorities, the uncertainty of fieldwork and research methods, isolation, skepticism about the importance of their research, and less connection with supervisors and peers have been mentioned as their reasons for demotivation. In addition, the survey results showed that most respondents emphasized the importance of the supervisors' role in their motivation. The message from this study is that the clarity of feedback, setting realistic goals, time management, mutual understanding, caring and support, flexibility and availability, regular and informal meetings, and positive attitudes are essential factors in doctoral supervision under stressful situations. The findings pinpoint the most efficient supervision strategies during challenging situations like the pandemic, which can be lessons for future similar events. However, the results also addressed the students' different needs and the importance of awareness and attention to the students' differences under supervision and mentoring.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Iarkov, Ilia
    Lund University.
    Rodil, Kasper
    Aalborg University.
    The ‘Z-Free’ Home: A Circular Thinking and Eco-Cycle Design Practice2023In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 16, p. 1-20, article id 6536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the need for affordable sustainable housing has increased. At the same time, there has been a gradual rising interest in compact living. With the mounting impacts of climate change, a new way of thinking is needed to develop more resilient and climate responsive ways of living that are compact, affordable, and climate-conscious. In response to this need, the idea of a ‘Z-Free Home’ was born. The ‘Z-Free Home’ is a tiny mobile house equipped with essential passive and eco-cycle systems that achieves nine zero targets. The main design and construction concept is based on circular design and a return to nature life cycle principles. In this paper, the architectural design concept, building energy modelling, and simulation for the Z-Free Home design proposal is discussed. This paper describes the concept design and design development phases together with building modelling and simulation. A focus was made on the use of virtual reality in design development assessment as a new method for evaluating passive and eco-cycle systems. The results show that it’s possible to achieve nine different zero goals while the analysis illustrates the challenges in achieving them. The paper also described the next steps planned for the proof of concept, i.e., the 1:1 house model. The project is ongoing, and it aims at a full-scale physical prototype as a proof of concept for the zero targets. The ‘Z-Free Home’ is designed for the cold Swedish climate but could be more widely applicable in other mild climates as well as hot climates.

  • 3.
    Wafa, Athmani
    et al.
    Laboratory of Design and Modeling of Architectural Ambiances and Urban Forms (LACOMOFA), Department of Architecture, Mohamed Khider University of Biskra, BP 145 RP, Biskra, 07000, Algeria.
    Sriti, Leila
    Laboratory of Design and Modeling of Architectural Ambiances and Urban Forms (LACOMOFA), Department of Architecture, Mohamed Khider University of Biskra, BP 145 RP, Biskra, 07000, Algeria.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Khadraoui, Mohamed Amine
    LGCA laboratory, Department of Architecture, Abderrahmane Mira University, Bejaia, Algeria.
    An Investigation on Using Passive Cooling Roofs Techniques for Improving Climatic Performance of Residential Buildings in Hot Arid Regions based on Post-Occupancy Evaluation of Inhabitants’ Thermal Comfort Appreciations2022In: Technium Social Sciences Journal, E-ISSN 2668-7798, Vol. 36, p. 685-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In hot dry climates, employing passive cooling roofs systems can providecooling needs with less amount of electrical energy. Furthermore, when focusing onliving spaces in terms of indoor thermal comfort and energy performance issues,occupant’s interaction with the building should not be underestimated. Recent studieswith occupant-based focus have shown that human behaviour significantly impactsenergy consumption, even more than building design. Likewise, understandingoccupant’s interactions within buildings plays a key role in enhancing the indoorenvironment performance. To examine the potential for cooling load reduction andthermal comfort enhancement by using cool roofs in residential buildings, a study wasperformed. Considering a sample of twelve multi-story houses located in the city ofBiskra (southern Algeria), thermal comfort conditions were analysed on the basis of apost-occupancy evaluation (POE) survey and in situ recorded measurementscampaign. The POE household survey indicated that out of 43 respondents, 54%perceive indoor thermal conditions as “hot” during summer period, while 79.33% ofthem operate HVAC device day and night. Using interviews, the study also exploressocial acceptability toward implementing passive roofing techniques. Results showedthat cool roof and cool tiles were the best accepted systems with 100% and 90% votedstrongly agree. Furthermore, the potential of thermal comfort and energy-efficiencyimprovements due to cool roofs was investigated through a dynamic simulation usingTRNSYS software. Results indicated that air temperature was reduced by an averageof 4.11°C to 3.28°C, and cooling loads have decreased to 508.60kWh/m² and384.54kWh/m² respectively during the hottest period of summer. Therefore, user-centric satisfaction as a research method would enhance future buildings design.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Circular Design for Zero Emission Architecture and Building Practice: It is the Green Way or the Highway2022 (ed. 1st Edition)Book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Maguid, Dalya
    Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt.
    El-Mahdy, Deena
    Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt.
    Circularity in the New Gravity—Re-Thinking Vernacular Architecture and Circularity2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mounting climate change crisis and the rapid urbanization of cities have pressured

    many practitioners, policymakers, and even private investors to develop new policies, processes, and methods for achieving more sustainable construction methods. Buildings are considered to be among the main contributors to harmful environmental impacts, resource consumption, and waste generation. The concept of a circular economy (CE), also referred to as “circularity”, has gained a great deal of popularity in recent years. CE, in the context of the building industry, is based on the concept of sustainable construction, which calls for reducing negative environmental impacts while providing a healthier indoor environment and closing material loops. Both vernacular architecture design strategies and circular economy principles share many of the same core concepts. This paper aims at investigating circular economy principles in relation to vernacular architecture principles in the built environment. The study demonstrates how circular principles can be achieved through the use of vernacular construction techniques and using local building materials. This paper will focus on Egypt as one of the oldest civilizations in the world, with a wide vernacular heritage, exploring how circularity is rooted in old vernacular settlements and how it can inspire contemporary circular practices.

  • 6.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Climate change adaptation at the margins: The case of Cairo, Egypt.2022In: Innovative Approaches and Climate Change Resilience in Urban Environments, Malmo, 2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Smart cities for ‘the privileged few’.2022In: Beyond Smart Cities Today- Power, Justice and Resistance., 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Athmani, Wafa
    et al.
    Laboratory of Design and Modeling of Architectural Ambiances and Urban Forms (LACOMOFA), Department of Architecture, Mohamed Khider University of Biskra, BP 145 RP, Biskra 07000, Algeria.
    Sriti, Leila
    Laboratory of Design and Modeling of Architectural Ambiances and Urban Forms (LACOMOFA), Department of Architecture, Mohamed Khider University of Biskra, BP 145 RP, Biskra 07000, Algeria.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Younsi, Zohir
    Department of Buildings & Urban Environment, JUNIA HEI 13, Rue de Toul, 59000 Lille, France.
    The Potential of Using Passive Cooling Roof Techniques to Improve Thermal Performance and Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings in Hot Arid Regions2022In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 21-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In hot dry regions, the building envelope receives abundant solar radiation, which contributes to heat stress and indoor thermal discomfort. To mitigate overheating inside spaces, cooling is the main basic requirement during most of the year. However, due to the harsh climatic conditions, buildings fail to provide passively the required comfort conditions. Consequently, they are fully dependent on-air conditioning systems, which are huge energy consumers. As roofs are exposed to the sun throughout the daytime, they are estimated to be the main source of heat stress. In return, they can contribute significantly to achieve optimum comfort and energy savings when efficient design strategies are used in an early design stage. To examine the potential for cooling load reduction and thermal comfort enhancement by using cooling roof techniques in residential buildings, a study was performed in the city of Biskra (southern Algeria). Accordingly, an in-field measurement campaign was carried out on test-cells during five days in summer. Three different cooling roof techniques were addressed: (a) cool reflective white paint (CR), (b) white ceramic tiles (CT) and (c) a cool-ventilated roof (C-VR). These roofing alternatives were investigated by monitoring both roof surface temperatures and indoor temperatures. Comparative analysis showed that a cool-ventilated roof is the most efficient solution, reducing the average indoor temperature by 4.95 °C. A dynamic simulation study was also performed based on TRNSYS software to determine the best roofing system alternatives in terms of thermal comfort and energy consumption, considering the hottest month of the year. Simulation tests were run on a base-case model representing the common individual residential buildings in Biskra. Results showed that a double-skin roof combined with cool-reflective paint is the most efficient roofing solution. By comparison to a conventional flat roof, meaningful improvements have been achieved, including reducing thermal discomfort hours by 45.29% and lowering cooling loads from 1121.91 kWh to 741.09 kWh.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Maguid, Dalya
    British Univ Egypt, Cairo, Egypt..
    Abodeeb, Rasha
    Ain Shams Univ, Cairo, Egypt..
    El Mahdy, Deena
    British Univ Egypt, Cairo, Egypt..
    The Practice and Politics of Urban Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Efforts: The Case of Cairo2022In: Urban Forum, ISSN 1015-3802, E-ISSN 1874-6330, Vol. 33, p. 83-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on climate change mitigation and adaptation is pressing in order to understand its implications and risks in different urban areas. It is especially critical for those who face high degrees of urban inequality in the context of an uneven state presence. This paper is an explorative and investigative study which uses Cairo as a case. The focus of the study is on mapping state and private sector efforts in mitigating climate change issues, specifically for vulnerable groups who have limited access to public services. The study adopted an investigative approach where a literature search and bibliometric mapping were used to identify the gap in knowledge in the field of architecture and urban climate change mitigation and adaptation, followed by a field survey which included conducting interviews and questionnaires with different stakeholders from the public and private sector to investigate the link between the efforts for climate change mitigation. The explorative part of the study concluded that there is a huge knowledge gap in the Middle East and in Egypt when it comes to research efforts related to climate change with a focus on the built environment. The results of the investigative part of this study revealed that-apart from already limited efforts on ground-there is no synchronization in efforts between the public and private sector. Climate change issues are still not a priority when poverty, economy, and health are still a prime concern and take precedence over climate change. There is uneven presence of public efforts for climate change adaptation and mitigation. The efforts that do exist in the public sphere are self-help unorganized work (efforts) conducted by the civil society.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Iarkov, Ilia
    Lund University.
    The Z free home from conceptual design to simulation results2022In: E3S Web of Conferences, E-ISSN 2267-1242, Vol. 362, article id 11001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for affordable housing requires more compact living. With the increasing frequency and impact of climate change incidents, a new way of thinking is needed to live in a more resilient and climate responsive way. The idea of a Z free home began by considering these two needs. As a tiny mobile house equipped with passive and eco-cycle systems, it achieves 9 zero targets. This paper evaluates the design concept, building modelling, and building simulation for the Z free home design. The project is ongoing and aims to model a full physical prototype as a proof of concept for the 9 zero targets in an urban living lab context in Lund Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    The Z Free Home: inspired by vernacular architecture2022In: HERITAGE2022 International Conference on Vernacular Heritage: Culture, People and Sustainability / [ed] C. Mileto; F. Vegas; V. Cristini; L. García-Soriano, Valencia: Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València , 2022, , p. 1075Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Z Free Home is an eco-cycle home that is meant to represent a return to natural design solutions inspired by the passive and low environmental impact principles found in vernacular architecture. Throughout the centuries, vernacular building has exemplified climate resilience, resource efficiency and circular economic principles. The house will thus use these principles as design guidelines. It will be designed to offset all of its carbon emissions and aim to reach a negative carbon footprint. The Z Free Home will be built using bio-based fibres that can be repurposed from agriculture waste, meaning that when it is time to demolish the building, all its main components can be re-used again as building materials, food for animals, or biofuel. Even if an uninhabited Z Free Home is not demolished, most components will eventually rot and return to nature as compost. Building materials from the kitchen and toilet should however be recycled and reused so as to maintain the standard of zero waste. The house will be designed so as to construct in only 7 days with the help of 7 volunteers through a ‘do-it-yourself’ methodology and using only screwdrivers. All of these factors - zero energy, zero waste, zero carbon, zero labour cost (if you build it yourself), zero impact on the environment when the building is demolished – make the Z Free Home a unique challenge to design and build. This paper will discuss the methodological approach and show some preliminary results from the proposed low impact building envelope using natural materials (clay and plant-based materials like straw, reeds, wood, kenaf and jute) together with the passive and eco-cycle systems. As the project is still underway, this paper will describe outcomes to date and ending with a discussion on the next steps.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Rodil, Kasper
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Bisbo, Kasper
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Thorsø Kronborg, Kasper
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Bisgaard Kristensen, Lukas
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Bloch Atkinson, Pelle
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Using Virtual Reality to Demonstrate Sustainable Architecture Concepts: Making Passive Systems Interactive2022In: NordiCHI '22: Adjunct Proceedings of the 2022 Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference / [ed] Bouvin, Niels Olof; Pakanen, Minna, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, p. 1-2, article id 29Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Rosa, Salvatore Paolo De
    et al.
    Lund Univ Ctr Sustainabil Studies LUCSUS, Biskopsgatan 5, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.;Charlotte Muncks Vej 4,1th, Copenhagen 2400, Denmark..
    de Moor, Joost
    Ctr European Studies & Comparat Polit, Sci Po, 27 Rue St Guillaume, F-75337 Paris, France..
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Vulnerability and activism in urban climate politics: An actor-centered approach to transformational adaptation in Malmö? (Sweden)2022In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 130, article id 103848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change adaptation is rising on the agenda of cities. However, critics have argued that urban adaptation efforts largely focus on preserving economic growth while overlooking the root causes of unequal vulnerability to climate impacts, giving rise to climate injustices. In response, literature on transformational adaptation has politicized these issues but it has remained largely conceptual, particularly in relation to the question of which actors can define and advance transformative approaches. Furthermore, existing empirical studies focus on positive cases while ignoring why these issues more commonly are not politicized. In this article, we add empirical rigour to these debates through an investigation into Malmo center dot's climate politics. We analyse what enables or inhibits the role of three political outsiders - disadvantaged communities, climate movements and social justice activists - in politicizing urban climate adaptation. We find that, while the most vulnerable social groups struggle with climatic impacts and experience difficulties in politicizing these issues, climate movements remain focused on climate mitigation and largely ignore local adaptation. In turn, we highlight the untapped capacity of social justice activism to act as social infrastructure for adaptation. Our findings suggest that alliances between the victims of adaptation injustices and local activist groups could support the politicization of those grievances by responding to emerging needs and by building policy-oriented pressure for transformational adaptation. However, we identify several factors that limit this potential, thereby contributing to an understanding of why social movements sometimes do not live up to their transformational potential.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Kazem, Medhat
    Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Transport (AASTMT), Cairo, Egypt.
    Michel Zakaria, Monica
    Eid Studio, Cairo, Egypt.
    A vernacular approach to passive cooling for low-income populations in informal settlements in hot climates2021In: Earthen and wood vernacular heritage and climate change / [ed] Marwa Dabaieh, Lund: Lunds universitet , 2021, p. 84-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise in frequency of severe climate change events, more and more vulnerable populations are suffering from extreme heat waves. This paper explains a hands-on experimental approach to testing vernacular passive cooling strategies using traditional Shisha clay funnels for the hot and dry Egyptian climate. Several clay funnels were investigated in terms of shape, size and form. The clay funnels were measured and simulated for their efficiency in accelerating air flow inside residential units and ability to enhance the air velocity if used in combination with cross ventilation strategies. Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted in ANSYS Fluent to understand the airflow behaviour inside the simulated test shoe boxes resembling living rooms - using the standard k-ε turbulence model - for single and multi-unit configurations. The results showed significant enhancement in air flow and air speed inside the test room compared to using the conventional windows. Further continuation for this study is needed for testing the thermal performance and the ability of the Shisha clay funnels to reduce indoor air temperature. The study proved that inspiration can be drawn from passive vernacular strategies to enhance thermal comfort and reduce the impact of climate change especially in hot and dry climates.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Earthen and wood vernacular heritage and climate change2021Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Zakaria, Monica Michel
    Kazem, Medhat
    Stay cool without fossil fuel: A passive eco-cooler for low-income population in informal settlements2021In: CISBAT 2021 Carbon-neutral cities - energy efficiency and renewables in the digital era, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2021, Vol. 2042, no 1, p. 1-7, article id 012155Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With climate change severe events, more and more vulnerable populations suffer from extreme heat waves. This paper presents a hands-on experimental idea for testing vernacular passive cooling strategies using traditional Shisha clay funnels for the Egyptian hot dry climate. Several clay funnels were investigated in terms of shape, size and form. The clay funnels were measured and simulated for their efficiency in accelerating air flow inside residential units and ability to enhance the air velocity if used combined with cross ventilation strategies. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted in ANSYS Fluent to understand the airflow behaviour inside the simulated test shoe boxes resembling living rooms - using the standard k-ε turbulence model - for single and multi-units’ configurations. Followed by experimental test cells application for the cooling system and monitoring for testing thermal performance. The simulation results showed significant enhancement in air flow and air speed inside the test room compared to conventional windows, while the test cells monitoring showed an average reduction in indoor temperature and humidity with 2 degrees and 15 % respectively. Further monitoring is needed for other alternations of the eco-cooler funnel design for better performance. 

  • 17.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Heinonen, Jukka
    El-Mahdy, Deena
    Hassan, Dalya M.
    A comparative study of life cycle carbon emissions and embodied energy between sun-dried bricks and fired clay bricks2020In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 275, article id 122998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a comparison of the life cycle carbon emission (LCCO2) and embodied energy calculation between two kinds of bricks, sun-dried and fired clay, as means of evaluating the energy and climate impact of each brick type and the economics of production. Focus is paid to the differences across the whole production chain between sun-dried clay bricks, which represent the traditional norm, and fired clay bricks, which are the most widely-used walling materials in conventional buildings. A case study was carried out in Dakhla Oasis in the Western Desert of Egypt. The results of this study show that if sun-dried bricks are used instead of fired bricks, a reduction of up to 5907 kg CO(2)e (in CO2 emissions) and 5305 MJ of embodied energy for every1000 bricks produced could be achieved. The paper concludes by offering alternative scenarios for brick-making and suggestions for improving sun-dried brick production. The methodology used in this study contributes to the development of an investigative-comparative way to assess choices between building materials. It also intends to help inform local homeowners and building practitioners not only in Egypt, but also globally, about resource depletion, energy consumption, and harmful emissions from fired industrial bricks as a common building construction material. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Emami, Nargessadat
    Heinonen, Jukka Taneli
    Marteinsson, Björn
    Univ Iceland, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Innovat Ctr Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    A life cycle assessment of a 'minus carbon' refugee house: global warming potential and sensitivity analysis2020In: Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research, ISSN 1994-6961, E-ISSN 1938-7806, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 559-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Over the last eight years, the Middle East has experienced a series of high profile conflicts which have resulted in over 5.6 million Syrians forced to migrate to neighbouring countries within the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region or to Europe. That have exerted huge pressure on hosting countries trying to accommodate refugees in decent shelters and in quick manner. Temporary shelters normally carry a high environmental burden due to their short lifespan, and the majority are fabricated from industrialised materials. This study assesses the carbon impact for a minus carbon experimental refugee house in Sweden using life cycle assessment (LCA) as tool. SimaPro and GaBi software were used for the calculations and the ReCiPe midpoint method for impact assessment. The results show that using local plant-based materials such as straw, reeds and wood, together with clay dug from close to the construction site, can drastically reduce the carbon footprint of temporary shelters and even attain a negative carbon impact of 226.2 kg CO2 eq/m2. Based on the results of the uncertainty importance analysis, the overall global warming potential impact without and with sequestration potential are mostly sensitive to the variability of the GWP impact of wood fibre insulation. Design/methodology/approach - The methodology is designed to calculate the GWP impact of the refugee house over its entire life cycle (production, operation and maintenance and end of life). Then, the sensitivity analysis was performed to explore the impact of input uncertainties (selection of material from the database and the method) on the total GWP impact of the refugee house with and without sequestration. The ISO standards (International Standard 14040 2006; International Standard 14044 2006) divide the LCA framework into four steps of Goal and scope, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation. Findings - This study has shown an example for proof of concept for a low impact refugee house prototype using straw, reeds, clay, lime and wood as the principle raw materials for building construction. Using natural materials, especially plant-based fibres, as the main construction materials, proved to achieve a minus carbon outcome over the life cycle of the building. The GWP of the shelter house without and with sequestration are found to be 254.7 kg CO2 eq/m(2) and -226.2 kg CO2 eq/m(2), respectively. Originality/value - As there are still very few studies concerned with the environmental impact of temporary refugee housing, this study contributes to the pool of knowledge by introducing a complete LCA calculation for a physical house prototype as a proof of concept on how using low impact raw materials for construction combined with passive solutions for heating and cooling can reach a minus carbon outcome. The GWP of the shelter house without and with sequestration are found to be 254.7 kg CO2 eq/m2 and -226.2 kg CO2 eq/m2.

  • 19.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Aalborg Univ, Dept Architecture Design & Media Technol, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Serageldin, Ahmed A.
    Hokaido Univ, Environm Syst Engn Lab, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.;Benha Univ, Shoubra Fac Engn, Banha, Egypt..
    Earth air heat exchanger, Trombe wall and green wall for passive heating and cooling in premium passive refugee house in Sweden2020In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 209, article id 112555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing number of migrants and refugees, there is a need for energy-efficient and low impact temporary housing that can accommodate millions of displaced peoples worldwide. This study describes a design proposal for a premium passive refugee house that uses three main passive heating and cooling solutions (Earth Air Heat Exchanger, Trombe wall, and green wall) and is suited to the Swedish climate. The purpose of the combination of the three passive systems is to reduce cooling and heating loads to conserve a significant amount of primary energy and thus mitigate the impact of the house's energy use on the environment through a reduction in emissions. The house is designed to fulfill its energy needs from renewable sources and produce an annual surplus of 180 kWh/m(2)/annum. The methodology applied is a dynamic system modeling and simulation approach using TRNSYS and ANSYS software. The simulation results showed a heating load of 7.9 kWh/m(2)/annum and a cooling load of 2.8 kWh/m(2)/annum, with total energy consumption reaching 18.4 kWh/m(2)/annum. Preliminary feasibility costing showed a payback time of 7.4 years out of the 25-years suggested lifetime of building using the three passive solutions. The amount of CO2 emissions is 231.1 kg CO(2)e/annum with a primary energy demand of 0.032 GJ/m(2)/annum. As a follow-up to the initial study, a proof of concept has been implemented in Lund, Sweden, in an urban living lab to verify the simulation results through a 12-month post-occupancy monitoring and evaluation study.

  • 20.
    Steinø, Nicolai
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Benbih, Karima
    World Bank, Washington, DC, USA.
    Post-conflict reconstruction in the Middle East and North Africa region: A Bidirectional Parametric Urban Design Approach2020In: International Journal of Architectural Computing, ISSN 1478-0771, E-ISSN 2048-3988, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 296-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-conflict reconstruction is a major topic in war-torn cities in the Middle East and North Africa region. Rather than being limited to re-establishing pre-conflict conditions, new formats of urban settings may be adopted, both for the design and quality of urban space, as well as for the design and building process. This article proposes a combined top-down and bottom-up design approach, supported by parametric urban design modelling. As sustainable (re-)development of the urban-scape requires coordination across different scales, a top-down approach is partly needed for reasons of coordination. As participatory design processes involving local stakeholders work from the partial to the whole, a bottom-up approach is partly needed for reasons of inclusion. By means of a parametric urban model combining both overview and detail, the two approaches can be combined. This article shows the theoretical framework and, by way of example, applies the model to Fallujah in Iraq as a case study.

  • 21.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Andriasyan, M.
    Department of architecture, built environment and construction engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Italy, Centre of Information Technologies and Architecture, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vernacular rehabilitation and rebuilding for post-conflict migration and resettling2020In: International Archives of the Photogrammetry Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences / [ed] C. Mileto; F. Vegas; L. García-Soriano; V. Cristini, Copernicus GmbH , 2020, Vol. 44, p. 901-906Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal and external migration from vernacular settlements is not a new phenomenon. However, the scale and scope increased when forced migration is becoming exacerbated due to both armed conflicts and climate change. Political tensions are one of the most common threats to vernacular dwellings in conflict areas. Not only do destruction and vandalism cause harm to vernacular architecture, but people living in vernacular buildings are often forced to leave their homes in order to seek safety. On the other hand, vernacular architecture can help refugee crises in hosting countries. Billions of dollars are invested in establishing temporary refugee camps, yet we know for a fact they are rarely temporary. People stay in such camps for decades, commonly Cons located on the outskirts of cities, where vernacular settlements also tend to be. Investments in rebuilding, restoring and reusing vernacular settlements can be a win-win situation. The time and cost of the rehabilitation process might also not be suitable to many camps, or camp-like, contexts. Also, encounters some regulations for listed vernacular heritage sites that cannot be used as dwellings and must be kept as open museums. In this study, a proposal for reusing and rehabilitating vernacular settlements will be discussed together with reflections on challenges and obstacles. The case study chosen for this research is in the Middle East, where the majority of refugees settled after the Arab Spring. This paper demonstrates a methodology in which algorithmic modelling is applied to refugee settlement site planning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    El Mahdy, Deena
    Maguid, Dalya
    Wanas, Omar
    An urban living lab monitoring and post occupancy evaluation for a Trombe wall proof of concept2019In: Solar Energy, ISSN 0038-092X, E-ISSN 1471-1257, Vol. 193, p. 556-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to extreme climate change events, achieving indoor thermal comfort has become a significant challenge in remote desert areas; particularly with the increasing number of energy shortages in these areas. This study uses participatory action research methodology by means of an occupant centred approach for the design and construction of a Trombe wall system, suitable for passive heating and cooling in hot arid climates. The Trombe wall is used as a low-tech retrofitting passive solution to provide deprived communities in off-grid desert areas with a better indoor climate. The paper presents data from one year of monitoring and post occupancy evaluation for the Trombe wall installed as a retrofit in a residential unit in Sinai, Egypt as a proof of concept. Available affordable local materials were of main concern because of the project’s remote location in a mountainous desert area with very limited natural resources. The idea was to involve the local community in the different phases of the project, then train them onsite on how to use the Trombe wall system. Results indicate that the use of the Trombe wall did in fact enhance indoor heating and cooling loads. In addition, the direct involvement of the local inhabitants proved to have a positive impact on the Trombe wall’s performance and efficiency. The discussion elaborates on key lessons learned and challenges faced from the urban living lab experience presented in the study. Lastly, recommendations for further implementation of the passive Trombe wall system are presented.

  • 23.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology, Aalborg University.
    Climate change and vulnerable groups in Cairo: Status quo and prospect low tech solutions2019In: The Practice and Politics of Urban ClimateMitigation and Adaptation Efforts at the Margins, Institute for urban research, Malmö University , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is now affecting every country on every continent. The most vulnerable to climate change are people in deprived areas with limited access to basic infrastructure. A one year exploratory and investigative action research study was carried out in Cairo in one of the historic neighborhoods that is now a mix of slums and poor-quality social housing. Walking interviews with local inhabitants supported by filed observations were the main tools used in this study supported by photo documentation and field notes for the main problems in the area. Also, locals’ adaptive solutions were discussed during the interviews and were noted during the site walks. After the investigative phase the site data were analyzed and synthesized to lay hands on the main problems with local comfort within their neighborhoods and inside their buildings specially in summer time. Some low-tech solutions were proposed and tested in small test cubes on one of the roof tops in the neighborhood. The test cubes were monitored for two weeks to test the thermal performance of the proposed solutions for reducing heat gains from fa\c cades and roofs. 8 cost efficient solutions were tried out from local recycled materials that can be found easily at almost no cost in the neighborhood. The 8 solutions were compared to each other to evaluate their efficiency and durability as well. The paper will discuss the outcome of the interviews and will shed lights on locals’ adaptive solutions to the gradual rise in temperature given the poor urban and building quality in their neighborhoods. In addition, the paper will show the outcome of the 8 test cells as a mitigation strategy and locals preference for the proposed solutions. There is evidence for climate change that can’t be denied and there are clear causes which have sever effects on our planet. Hopefully this research will contribute with some temporary solutions and pave the road for more actions to take.

  • 24.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Dare to build: Designing with earth, reeds and straw for contemporary sustainable welfare architecturedare2019In: Vernacular and earthen architecture towards local development: Proceedings of 2019 ICOMOS CIAV & ISCEAH International Conference / [ed] Shao Yong ; Gisle Jakhelln ; Mariana Correia, Tongji University , 2019, Vol. 1, p. 241-246Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earth, straw, reeds and wood are the main natural building materials in many parts of the world. These materials have several positive properties including thermal resilience, climatic adaptive performance, and a lower-impact on the environment, which have been tested and proven in vernacular architecture over the years. In contemporary practice there is still a very limited use of vernacular natural materials. Conventional industrial materials dominate, even when traditional materials offer the same quality with the same cost and performance, if not sometimes better. This study is part of a semester-long course in sustainable architecture for students completing masters. It will present students’ hands-on experimental work for 8 different wall sections using wood, earth, reeds and straw in several combinations. The wall sections are built at a 1:1 scale and tested in a living laboratory environment consistent with the Danish climate. Energy performance and U-values were mathematically calculated to assure compliance with Danish energy-efficient building standards. Life cycle costs and a life cycle analysis were calculated as they were of prime concern. Thermal performance, time lag and heat coefficient values were modeled and simulated as well. Students also had to consider water and fire resistance and the formation of moisture in their design proposals. The study proved that using traditional materials can provide equivalent thermal performance outcomes as contemporary industrial materials while producing better indoor air quality and a lower impact on the environment through their minimal carbon footprint (based on cradle-to-cradle calculations). The paper concludes that there are diverse challenges that still hinder the use of vernacular thinking in contemporary practice.

  • 25.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Aalborg, Denmark.
    Design and build with straw, earth and reeds for a minus carbon and plus energy building practice2019In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environment, ISSN 1755-1307, E-ISSN 1755-1315, Vol. 352, article id 012063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 6Zs target refers to the concept of a minus carbon and plus energy eco-cycle refugee house. A 37 m2 house was designed and constructed in a participatory manner in the City of Lund, Sweden. The 6Zs include: zero emissions, zero energy, zero waste, zero cost, zero indoor air pollutants and zero impact on the environment after the shelter is demolished. The key idea of this eco-cycle house is to reach net 6Zs during all stages—material extraction, building construction, operation and maintenance—until the shelter’s end of life. The main construction material is plant-based raw fibers (mainly straw and reed), which are available around the building site. This house is designed to accommodate the needs of two adults and one child. It was built with the help of 7 refugees in 11 working days through an experimental participatory urban living lab methodology. The paper discusses the 6Z design concepts and draws conclusions on the preliminary assessment of the house prototype that was built as a proof of concept. The beneficiaries of this project are not restricted to refugees but also include the majority of individuals and families seeking affordable ways of living with a low impact on the environment. The house is designed for the cold Swedish climate, but the design concept and methodological approach can be adjusted to other climates or geographical contexts.

  • 26. Makhlouf, Nahla N.
    et al.
    Maskell, Daniel
    Marsh, Alastair
    Natarajan, Sukumar
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Moemen Afify, Mohamed
    Hygrothermal performance of vernacular stone in a desert climate2019In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 216, p. 687-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote desert communities are often the most vulnerable to temperature extremes, as lack of access to reliable electricity prevents the use of active cooling or heating. Hence, there is a need to investigate how the building envelope itself can be used to passively regulate indoor environments. Readily available vernacular building materials in such areas are thought to aid in not only attenuating temperature swings but also moisture regulation, which improves comfort in a dry climate. Thus, the aim of this research is to investigate the hygrothermal properties of three different stone types commonly used as building materials in the Western Desert of Egypt: sandstone, limestone and, uniquely, Karshif, a rock rich in sodium chloride. The materials’ thermal conductivity, moisture sorption and buffering, water vapour resistance, porosity distribution and phase composition are experimentally investigated. Our results show that the local perception of limestone buildings having poor indoor comfort, despite the material’s superior thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity is only explainable through the relative superiority of sandstone and Karshif in moisture buffering. Vernacular materials need to be tested in environmental conditions representative of their local climate, rather than standardised conditions, as the latter may paint an incorrect picture of performance which, in the case of Karshif, led to partial dissolution under relative humidity of greater than 80%. However, testing under typical desert conditions demonstrates that both Karshif and sandstone are viable building materials that exhibit excellent moisture regulation behaviour. Since building materials in desert conditions may have to withstand atypical weather extremes, including rain, local materials need to be utilised within carefully designed wall assemblies or treated wall sections and, in the case of Karshif, not used in areas where relative humidity regularly reaches 80%. These findings are an important contribution in validating the performance of vernacular stone, and more widely, in demonstrating the importance of selecting appropriate testing conditions.

  • 27. Lundgren Kownacki, Karin
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Siri M.
    Gooch, Pernille
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Venugopal, Vidhya
    Increasing heat creates hardship for brick kiln workers in Chennai, India and the alternative pathways reducing it2019In: Climanosco Research Articles, ISSN 2673-1568, Vol. 2, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change brings new burdens to people working outdoors. Migrant populations working at brick kilns in India are one such group facing dangerously overheated working conditions. Many migrate to the kilns from rural areas under bonded labor conditions. We argue that solutions need to go beyond industry-oriented technology-based solutions and focus on the social problem and take a people focused stance. In addition to adopting more locally appropriate technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and heat in the work environment, solutions focusing on the workers situation must be considered from a human rights perspective.

  • 28.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology, Aalborg University.
    Urban dynamic in revolutionary cities: A case form Tahrir square in Cairo2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Lewis, Miles
    Vernacular Architecture in the Face of Change2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vernacular architecture is the natural and largely informal way of building in traditional communities. The papers presented in this book their importance are in their disparate origins. They discuss a range of vernacular traditions well beyond what which would be familiar to any scholar. They have been grouped here under the broad headings of Principles, Survey & Description, and Conservation, though of course there is much overlap. These papers consider an astonishing range of vernacular architecture, and bring out surprising analogies between disparate areas such as China and the Middle East, and Europe and South America. They reveal an equally extensive range of problems and threats, of which, inevitably, development pressure is the greatest. But the situation is not entirely hopeless, because there are some success stories here, and if those success can be imitated, then much can be saved.

  • 30.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Alwall, Jonas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Building now and building back: Refugees at the centre of an occupant driven design and construction process2018In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, no 37, p. 619-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forced migration is not a recent phenomenon, nor is the reality of the amount suffering of the displaced population fleeing from armed conflict. Finding housing for refugees has not only become an acute obligation for hosting countries but it is a situation predicted to continue, and possibly increase, in the future. This study is discussing and showing the results of the first phase of an ongoing project for designing and constructing an eco-cycle refugee shelter. The project discussed how an environmentally low impact shelter could be provided that pays respect to social norms, religious beliefs and cultural traditions of refugees. The study is applying a trans-disciplinary participatory methodology using an occupant centred approach. It is looking at current post conflict housing issues in hosting countries with a focus on Syrian refugees in Sweden, and it depicts a phase of the project where a foundation for subsequent phases – including constructing a physical house prototype through involving refugees in a construction training – was laid. The project aims at fulfilling refugees’ needs and involve them in the design and construction process as well as raising the awareness of a cost efficient and climate responsive way of building back better in the refugee’s home country.

  • 31.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Johansson, Erik
    Building Performance and Post Occupancy Evaluation for an off-grid low carbon and solar PV plus-energy powered building: A case from the Western Desert in Egypt2018In: Journal of Building Engineering, E-ISSN 2352-7102, Vol. 18, p. 418-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current trends in energy supply and use within the building sector in Egypt are patently unsustainable and uneconomical; they are not environmentally and sometimes not even socially viable. Renewable energy has recently started to attract considerable attention as a future energy source. After major problems with electricity blackouts the photovoltaic (PV) market, in particular, has been growing significantly in Egypt over the last 5 years. This study was conducted to develop an evaluation method to assess the potential of applying passive design and low carbon and construction strategies together with PV systems for electricity power supply. A one year Building Performance and Post Occupancy Evaluation was carried out for a selected case study in Baharia, Egypt using records of energy use, demand profiles, and monitored thermal behaviour in indoor environments, together with a review of occupants’ satisfaction. The outcome of this study offers an applicable methodology for assessing the performance of mixed use off-grid low carbon and PV plus-energy buildings. The results aim to serve as a base for future national legal requirements for a zero carbon and PV plus-energy solar building practice especially in off-grid desert settlements in Egypt.

  • 32. Lundgren Kownacki, Karin
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Siri M
    Gooch, Pernille
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Anandh, Latha
    Venugopal, Vidhya
    Climate change-induced heat risks for migrant populations working at brick kilns in India: a transdisciplinary approach2018In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254, Vol. 68, p. 347-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the summer of 2015, India was hit by a scorching heat wave that melted pavements in Delhi and caused thousands of deaths, mainly among the most marginalized populations. One such group facing growing heat risks from both occupational and meteorological causes are migrant brick kiln workers. This study evaluates both current heat risks and the potential future impacts of heat caused by climate change, for the people working at brick kilns in India. A case study of heat stress faced by people working at brick kilns near Chennai, India, is the anchor point around which a transdisciplinary approach was applied. Around Chennai, the situation is alarming since occupational heat exposure in the hot season from March to July is already at the upper limits of what humans can tolerate before risking serious impairment. The aim of the study was to identify new pathways for change and soft solutions by both reframing the problem and expanding the solution space being considered in order to improve the quality of life for the migrant populations at the brick kilns. Technical solutions evaluated include the use of sun-dried mud bricks and other locally Bappropriate technologies^ that could mitigate the worsening of climate change-induced heat. Socio- cultural solutions discussed for empowering the people who work at the brick kilns include participatory approaches such as open re-localization, and rights-based approaches including the environmental sustainability and the human rights-based approach framework. Our analysis suggests that an integrative, transdisciplinary approach could incorporate a more holistic range of technical and socio-culturally informed solutions in order to protect the health of people threatened by India’s brick kiln industry.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Maguid, Dalya
    British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Egypt.
    El Mahdy, Deena
    British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Egypt.
    Emulating the desert vernacular: Towards zero-carbon eco desert settlements in Egypt2018In: Proceddings of CIAV scientific committee annual conference. Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Development, ICOMOS CIAV International Conference , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zero carbon cities are relatively new concepts that aim to support cities in realizing ecological, social and economicsustainable futures. It is argued that urbanization in developing countries may be the distinct greatest challenge in thiscentury. It is expected that 400,000 square kilometers will be built in the coming 30 years. This is equivalent to the world’sbuilt-up urban area in last 2000 years, given that cities alone account for 78 % of anthropogenic carbon emissions.Furthermore, more devastation has been caused by the latest severe climate events, such as an increased average globaltemperature, flooding, and massive forest fires. Accordingly, a sense of urgency has turned about the necessity to adoptsustainable and ecological design principles for future cities development. Egypt as one of the developing countries thatis the third largest populated nation in Africa, is facing a series of threats. From which limited access to natural resourcesin relation to the population size and economic growth besides the continuous challenging climate change implications.Furthermore, Egypt is recently facing a major energy security problem, which strongly impacts all national plans foreconomic development. Despite that, till now there are no clear laws or legislations for eco cities like zero carbon citydesign and construction. The aim of this research paper is laying hands on hidden potentials and analyzing successfulprivate initiatives for existing eco communities in Egypt. Initiatives that have tried to apply some traditional zero carbondesign concepts based on lessons learned from vernacular architectural heritage in Egypt. The paper adopted an analyticalcase study method tackling different aspects like; renewable energy, permaculture, passive systems, green infra structurelike eco-sanitation, recycling and solid waste management ending with carbon free transportation and green circulareconomy. The research contributes by critically analyzing such attempts and concludes with design best practices andstrategies on how to reach an environmentally enriched, healthier, resilient and socially rewarding zero carbon cities,running on their own locally available resources. Hoping that the recommendations are a nucleus for a national designstandard or a best practice manual towards better equitable urban future.

  • 34.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    El Mahdy, Deena
    Maguid, Dalya
    Living Labs As A Pedagogical Teaching Tool For Green Building Design And Construction In Hot Arid Regions2018In: Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research, ISSN 1994-6961, E-ISSN 1938-7806, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 338-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability and environmental illiteracy is still common in architectural curricula for undergraduate education. This may lead to further generations of architects who are unequipped for global sustainability goals. This paper discusses a living lab teaching experience which investigates the roles of learning through doing and hands-on building experimentation to root an understanding of sustainability in architectural education. The design studio at the centre of this paper was focused on passive, low-cost and energyefficient approaches suitable for a hot arid climate. The students were asked to design a refugee shelter prototype that was cost- and time-efficient, that would also present the least impact on the environment after demolition. The course’s teaching process also included invited guest speakers, field trips and a hands-on workshop for low-tech building techniques as a prelude to designing and building a full-scale physical model. Thermal comfort and energy consumption for the design proposal were evaluated by simulation, and the physical model was evaluated by field monitoring. This paper outlines the design studio pedagogical experimental living lab process and the resulting students’ projects. It also shows the various skills the students acquired and suggests how this type of pedagogy can be viewed as a pilot model for green architecture education.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 35.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Minus Carbon and Plus Energy Design Home Kit2018Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 36.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Renewable energy optimization for vernacular settlement retrofitting2018In: Conservation and Rehabilitation of Vernacular Heritage: The Cultural Landscape of Wendland circular villages. / [ed] Machat, Christoph, ICOMOS CIAV International Conference , 2018, p. 65-70Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    The 5 Degrees of Forced Climate Refugees: negative carbon and positive energy eco-cycle housing solutions2018In: PLEA 2018: Smart and Healthy Within the Two-Degree Limit: Proceedings of the 34th International Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture, School of Architecture. The Chinese University of Hong Kong. , 2018, Vol. 3, p. 1083-1084, article id 106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe climate and weather events together with political conflicts linked to climate change are the most pressing driving forces for critical numbers of people to leave their homes seeking safe haven. Climate refugees are becoming the next captious challenge we will face. Temporary refugee settlements prove to have high environmental burdens given the short lifespan of the industrial materials produced with high embodied carbon that they are built with. Despite this finding, alternative natural-based low impact materials with a carbon neutral production and construction process do exist. This paper presents the outcomes of a one-year project in designing and constructing a negative carbon and positive energy eco-cycle home. The idea is to achieve a self-sufficient and low impact temporary shelter design with the lowest carbon emissions during construction and after demolition. The design complies with premium passive house standards and was constructed in an experimental urban living lab for proof of concept. The house is now under monitoring to evaluate its performance. The project was carried out in Sweden, but the methodology could be applied in other climatic contexts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 38.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    They didn’t ask to be refugees: Eco-cycle shelters for forced climate migration2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate and weather severe events together with political conflicts linked to climate change are the most driving force for mass population to leave their homes seeking safe heavens. Recent climate events showed that climate change is an increasing driver of forced displacement. Climate refugees are becoming and will be the next wicked challenges we will face. That means there is a need for quick and low-cost temporary shelters to host the mass forced migrants. Normally temporary humanitarian shelters are constructed with industrial materials that consume high amount of embodied carbon and energy in the production. They deteriorate quickly within couple of years and needs to be replaced leaving behind huge amounts of waste. Refugee temporary settlements should also be designed and constructed using means with minimal impact on the environment in order to prevent the mounting increase of climate change symptoms and reduce the associated humanitarian crises. Since long, alternative natural based low impact materials do exists using a carbon neutral production and construction process. This paper is presenting the outcome of one-year project in designing and constructing a minus carbon and plus energy eco-cycle home. The house prototype was designed following a participatory approach involving refugees in the design and construction process. The idea is to achieve a low impact design during construction and after demolition while providing refugees the chance to receive a training on construction methods. The design complies with premium passive house standards in Sweden. The net outcome of the building is negative carbon and plus energy. The project was implemented in Sweden but the methodology could be applied in different other climatic and geographical contexts.

  • 39. El-Sayed, Marwa Adel
    et al.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Ismaeel, Walaa S.E
    Kenawy, Inji
    Towards A Fossil Free Energy Production Using GIS Multi-criteria Decision-making Support Tool2018In: Green Heritage Conference: Chance - Change - Challenge, Elain Publishing House , 2018, p. 164-183Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Egypt’s Sustainable Development Strategy: Vision 2030 calls for renewable energy plans and the adoption of a sustainable development approach. Given the government’s gradual removal of energy subsidies for local citizens and the current energy crises, the study in hand aims to detect potential investment zones for free fossil fuel energy production. Site analysis for renewable energy allocation using GIS to identify potential capability to locate a renewable energy source was applied in the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt. The study used an accumulative co-relation matrix between different development sectors, Sinai’s geographical location and promising future investment scenarios. A set of data analysis process was developed to examine potentials and constraints. The analysis revealed that 36% of the area is suitable for the development of solar farms and a further 4% for wind farms. These findings could help decision makers to fill the gap between the country’s future energy needs and its available natural sources. Applying this methodology across the different areas offering similar potential in Egypt would help to identify more likely locations for renewable energy production. Wider replication of the method could also point to the significant contribution that different zones in Egypt, and even in other zones within the Middle East region, could make towards a more sustainable future.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 40.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    A minus carbon eco-cycle earthen refugee shelter: a feasibility study2017In: Vernacular and Earthen Architecture: Conservation and Sustainability (SosTierra 2017, Valencia, Spain, 14-16 September 2017), CRC Press, 2017, p. 367-372Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forced migration due to wars and political conflicts create an urgent need for temporary shelters in hosting countries. Constructing new housing projects is not only economically burdensome but also requires a great deal of time and, most important, represents an environmental burden when the shelter reaches its end of life. This study discusses a design proposal for a 37 m² eco-cycle earthen refugee shelter that could be built with the help of seven people in 11 working days. The study has adopted an experimental, participatory and living lab meth-odology for a physical prototype as a proof of concept. The key idea of this eco-cycle shelter is to reach net mi-nus carbon emissions during material extraction, building construction, operation and after end of life. As this project is still ongoing, this paper will confine itself to discussing the project’s main idea for reducing carbon emission and will focus on the feasibility of an earthen wall structure skeleton as a minus carbon agent. The pro-totype is designed for the cold climate of Sweden but the methodology can be applied in different climates. Ben-eficiaries of this project need not be confined to refugees. It can be extended to house the majority of the world’s urban poor.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 41.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lashin, Menna
    Elbably, Ahmed
    Going green in architectural education: An urban living lab experiment for a graduation green design studio in Saint Catherine, Egypt2017In: Solar Energy, ISSN 0038-092X, E-ISSN 1471-1257, Vol. 144, p. 356-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the current energy crises, recent efforts have been directed at bringing energy efficiency and environmental awareness across the board into architectural education in Egypt. Although interest in sustainable design teaching and learning started more than 20 years ago at both post graduate and undergraduate level in Egypt, ecological illiteracy persists in architecture education. There is a large gap between what our schools of architecture offer, what the regulations currently specify, and what the market demands. This paper investigates the role of the graduation design studio in rooting an understanding of sustainability in architectural higher education, taking an experimental design studio case as an example. During this studio, the students developed a range of skills and techniques that were of value to their graduation projects and which will stand by them later as architects in the future. Students were able to experience climatic conditions and building technology in a specific context and associated with specific local vernacular architecture. Such experience was used to develop new adaptive and responsive climatic architecture approaches by means of physical hands on test cell models in a living lab environment. The design studio focuses on passive solar approaches suitable for a hot arid climate. The paper aims to show how this design studio could be a pilot model for green architectural education in Egypt.

  • 42.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    The 6 Zs Refugee Shelter2017In: Design to Thrive: Proceedings;3, NCEUB , 2017, Vol. 3, p. 3967-3974Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various natural and man-made disasters force the affected population to flee from their homes to other safe places. Providing these affected people with quick and cost-efficient shelters is always a challenge. Recently, issues regarding the supply of energy to refugee camps have been a main concern given the crises of displaced populations and the problem of how to supply energy to the camps. This study has the purpose of discussing the design of an eco-cycle refugee emergency shelter with the aim to reach a six ‘Z’ target (i.e. ‘6Zs’), meaning zero emissions, zero energy, zero waste, zero cost, zero indoor air pollutants and zero impact on the environment after the shelter demolition. The key idea of this eco-cycle shelter is to reach a net 6Zs during all stages: material extraction, building construction, operation and maintenance until the shelter’s end of life, which depends on plant-based raw materials are brought in from the surrounding area to the building site. The study will discuss the design concepts involved and draw conclusions on the feasibility of achieving the 6Zs target through the modelling and simulation of the shelter’s energy consumption, thermal performance and net carbon emissions. The beneficiaries of this project include not only refugees but also the majority of the world’s urban poor. The shelter is designed for the cold Swedish climate, but the method can be adjusted to other climates or geographical contexts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 43. Fernandes, Jorge
    et al.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Mateus, Ricardo
    Monteiro Silva, Sandra
    Bragança, Luís
    Gervásio, Helena
    Thermal performance and comfort of vernacular earthen buildings in Egypt and Portugal2017In: Vernacular and Earthen Architecture: Conservation and Sustainability: Proceedings of Sostierra 2017 (Valencia, Spain, 14-16 September 2017) / [ed] Camilla Mileto, Fernando Vegas López-Manzanares, Lidia García-Soriano, Valentina Cristini, CRC Press, 2017, p. 95-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the far distance between Portugal and Egypt, it was possible to find points of similarity on the influence of Roman and Arab cultures, and on solar passive and construction techniques used in vernacular architecture. Earthen construction techniques are one of these examples, being used in both countries for thousands of years. Through an explanatory qualitative and quantitative analysis, this paper presents an overview of the effects of climate-responsive strategies on thermal performance and indoor comfort of earthen architecture from Northern Egypt and Southern Portugal. To understand the effectiveness of these strategies, measurements of hygrothermal parameters and surveys on occupants’ thermal sensation were conducted in two case studies. From the results, it has been found that the case studies have shown a good thermal performance only by passive means and that the occupants expressed as being comfortable. Thus, vernacular passive strategies still can contribute to achieve indoor comfort conditions and reduce the dependency on mechanical systems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 44.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    El Mahdy, Deena
    Maguid, Dalya
    Thinking hands: A hands-on, pedagogical living lab approach to green building methods in hot arid regions2017In: PLEA 2017 PROCEEDINGS, NCEUB , 2017, p. 2243-2251Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability and environmental illiteracy is still common in architectural curricula. This may lead to further generations of architects who are unequipped for global sustainability goals. This paper discusses a living lab teaching experience which investigates the roles of learning by doing and hands-on building experimentation to root an understanding of sustainability in architectural education. The design studio focused on passive, low-cost and energy-efficient approaches suitable for a hot arid climate. The students were asked to design a refugee shelter prototype that is cost- and time-efficient with the least impact on the environment after demolition. The course teaching process also included invited guest speakers, field trips and a practical hands-on workshop for low-tech building techniques – all that can serve as a foundation for designing and building a full-scale physical model of their refugee shelter proposal. Thermal comfort and energy consumption for the design proposal was evaluated by simulation, and the physical implementation was evaluated by field monitoring. This paper outlines the design studio pedagogical experimental process and the resulting students’ projects. It will also show the various skills the students had acquired and present how this type of pedagogy could be viewed as a pilot model for green architecture education.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 45.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Eybye, Birgitte Tanderup
    Aarhus School of Architecture, Aarhus, Denmark.
    A comparative study of human aspects in acclimatization of adobe vernacular architecture: a case from Denmark and Egypt2016In: Re-assessment of vernacular architechture: theory and practice, Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture , 2016, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 29-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s architecture swarms with concepts of energy and resource efficientbuildings. In contrast, vernacular buildings are characterized by low-tech climaticresponsive strategies and by their inhabitants’ resource and energy savings practices during construction and operation of their dwellings. That makes vernacular buildings highly relevant to resource efficiency in contemporary building research. The main focus of this study is to explore and analyse human behaviourto reach responsive and conscious resource efficient solutions in two differentclimatic context; in Egypt and Denmark. The aim is to suggest sustainable principles out of human conduct for contemporary resource efficient building practice.Though Danish and Egyptian climates and cultures are very different from eachother some human approaches to sustainability appeared to be similar. That wasevident through a comparative analytical study applying case-study methodologyfor two courtyard adobe dwellings; one in each country. The paper contributes toexisting vernacular sustainable building studies by filling a knowledge gap on howhuman factors is a key parameter in acclimatization in buildings and how that caninfluence resource efficient building practice.

  • 46.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Egypt.
    Kenawy, Inji
    British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Egypt.
    Salah, Walaa
    British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Egypt.
    Adel, Marwa
    British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Egypt.
    Carbon mapping for residential low carbon retrofitting2016In: Advanced Technologies for Sustainable Systems: Selected Contributions from the International Conference on Sustainable Vital Technologies in Engineering and Informatics, BUE ACE1 2016, 7-9 November 2016, Cairo, Egypt / [ed] Yehia Bahei-El-Din; Maguid Hassan, Cham: Springer, 2016, Vol. 1, p. 79-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund Universuty.
    Minus carbon and plus energy refugee shelter2016In: Zero carbon buildings today and in the future 2016: proceedings of a conference held at Birmingham City University, 8-9 September 2016 / [ed] Jankovic, Ljubomir, Birmingham School of the Built Environment, Birmingham City University , 2016, p. 71-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study discusses a proposal for a 37 m² refugeeearth shelter that could be built with the help of sevenpeople in 11 working days. The study is an experimental, participatory, living lab methodology for creating an eco-cycle shelter. The building’s skeleton is made from a minus carbon earth mix and is equipped with renewables that produce more energy than what the building consumes. No waste is generated during the building’s construction, operation and after end of life, and passive concepts for heating, cooling and daylight are used. The beneficiaries of this design include not only refugees but also the majority of the world’s urban poor.

  • 48.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Makhlouf, Nahla N
    Hosny, Omar M
    Roof top PV retrofitting: a rehabilitation assessment towards nearly zero energy buildings in remote off-grid vernacular settlements in Egypt2016In: Solar Energy, ISSN 0038-092X, E-ISSN 1471-1257, Vol. 123, p. 160-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vernacular buildings in Egypt express a variety of passive low-tech approaches in design and construction to achieve human comfort and fulfil inhabitants’ requirements. They have been devised to suit living in regions where local inhabitants had to invent various passive building strategies to live under severe local climatic conditions without depending on fossil fuels. This paper discusses a retrofitting approach for off-grid vernacular buildings in the Western Desert of Egypt. The study hypothesis argues that, when retrofitted and equipped with renewable energy solutions, vernacular structures can act as nearly zero energy buildings. A post occupancy evaluation was used as an assessment tool for two pilot projects that served as case studies. Results showed that combining vernacular passive strategies with affordable active renewables such as roof top solar panels results in a hybrid energy efficient retrofitting solution for deprived off-grid vernacular buildings. The intention is for the results to act as a basis for future retrofitting that would take into account the challenges and obstacles inherent in such work. This is an aim capable of contributing to a reduction of energy consumption that would also encourage retrofitting using renewable solutions for existing housing stock in Egypt.

  • 49.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    Architecture and Built Environment, LTH, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Vernacular architecture reflections: challenges and future2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund Universuty.
    Borham, Ahmed
    Acclimatization Measures for Temporary Refugee Shelters in Hot Arid Climates ; Low-Tech Mobile Solutions Using Bedouin Tents2015In: 15 PLEA : architecture in (R)Evolution : 31st International PLEA Conference, Bologna 9-11 September 2015: book of abstracts, Ass.Building Greeen Futuers , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 74
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf