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  • 1.
    Markstöm, Annica
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Björkhagen Turesson, Annelie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    A collaborative process: child participation in interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services2024In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The right of children to express their views on matters concerning them is a core principle of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, as defined in Article 12. However, research shows that interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services are planned and based on parents' perspectives even though research suggests that child participation results in welfare service provision that is better matched to the children's needs. The aim of this study is to explore how child participation is constructed in interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services and to study which elements are of importance to this process. The article is based on a qualitative interview study with 14 family social workers and 11 children aged 7-16 with experience of family interventions provided by the child and family welfare services. The results suggest that child participation is a collaborative process in which both the child and the FSW have an active role to play. Participation is constructed through a series of seemingly small, everyday actions in the meeting between the child and the FSW. By actively asking questions and allowing the child to practice participation and influence the process, the FSW can, together with the child, work towards increased child participation in interventions.

  • 2.
    Lindroth, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Husén, Elin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Social Workers as Allies? Gender Confirming Practices and Institutional Limitations in Youth Residential Homes2024In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that LGBTQ+ youth are over-represented in out-of-home care and that especially transgender andnon-binary youth face challenges during their placement. These challenges stem from, among other factors, the lack ofknowledge and competence of professionals regarding the unique needs of transgender and non-binary youth. In Sweden,there are policies that aim to protect transgender and non-binary youth from discrimination and to promote their sexualand reproductive health and rights, and an increasing number of residential homes claim to have LGBTQ competencewhen competing for placements. However, it is unclear how this affects the everyday experiences of trans and non-binaryyouth at residential homes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the practices and challenges of clinical social workers at residential care homes when working with gender identity and sexual health issues among young transgender andnon-binary youth. Eight semi-structured interviews focusing on professionals’ knowledge and experiences were conductedand analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Four themes emerged: i) Knowledge being a personal matter; ii) Heteronormativity and binarity creating consequences; iii) Handling discrimination and harassments; and iv) Creating a trustfulalliance. The results show that knowledge is a personal matter, and social work professionals seek the knowledge theyneed instead of receiving it in education or training. The contextual heteronormativity and binarity creating consequencesat the residential care home pose challenges for social workers and they have to find creative ways to support transgenderand non-binary youth and address the harassments and discrimination that these youth face. Moreover, the social workersshare their strategies regarding how they are creating a trustful alliance. Overall, they identify significant challenges todeveloping clinical social work that is affirming of transgender and non-binary youth.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Amroussia, Nada
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Lindroth, Malin
    Department for behavioural science, Faculty for Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Using Twelve-Step Treatment for Sex Addiction and Compulsive Sexual Behaviour (Disorder): A Systematic Review of the Literature2024In: Sexual Health & Compulsivity, ISSN 2692-9953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the current scientific evidence for using the twelve-step method as a treatment method for sex addiction and compulsive sexual behavior (disorder). Peer-reviewed empirical articles on the twelve-step method and sex addiction and compulsive sexual behavior (disorder) written in English, Danish, Norwegian, or Swedish, retrievable in selected databases were included. No limits were set on publication date or study design. The systematic review resulted in eight empirical studies which were read and assessed according to the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. The results were inconclusive, and we found only three articles of high quality, where the samples were composed mainly by men, which indicate that peer-therapy in combination with individual therapy might be beneficial. That twelve-step treatment rests heavily on the idea of sex addiction was unproblematized in most of the publications. Overall, the findings raise issues concerning who benefits from this treatment.

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  • 4.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Björkhagen Turesson, Annelie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Bedtime stories from inside - family practices and affinities in families with incarcerated fathers2023In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 218-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper aims to explore whether a prison literacy project, Bedtime stories from inside, can contribute to improving and maintaining relationships between incarcerated fathers and their children. The analysis is focused on the concepts "doing family" and "affinities". The material consists of anonymous evaluation forms from the incarcerated fathers (70) and the carers (46). The results show that deeper familial connections are possible when fathers are allowed to interact with their children in a way that includes attending to practicalities like reading fairy tales to their children. The family practices within the project contribute to challenging norms of masculinity and overcoming impulses to shut down emotionally. The project highlights the need for the prison system and social work practice to support families in the hard work of forming and maintaining connections.

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  • 5.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Lindroth, Malin
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    LGBTQ plus Affirmative State Care for Young People in Sweden: New Knowledge and Old Traditions2023In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 3744-3760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young LGBTQ+ people are over-represented in various forms of state care. They experience hardships during their placements and staff competence in addressing specific needs among LGBTQ+ youth is lacking. In this article, we investigate whether and how LGTBQ+ issues are considered and described in digital marketing for state care providers. The material consists of the homepages of residential care homes and secure state care institutions, which we analyse using critical discourse analysis. The results show that LGBTQ+ issues are largely invisible. Of the approximately 1,000 existing state care providers, only twenty stated that they worked with or had competence in LGBTQ+ issues. Among these, no secure state care institution offered LGBTQ+ competence at the time of the study. The descriptions of how care providers work with LGBTQ+ issues are characterised by heteronormativity where there is a mix of two types of language on the homepages regarding LGBTQ+ youth; on the one hand, a heteronormative, traditional description based on a binary understanding of gender; and, on the other, an LGBTQ+ inclusive language is used. However, the LGBTQ+ affirmative language has been imposed upon the traditional rather than being integrated into it, which comes across as superficial and unclear. International studies show that LGBTQ+ youth are over-represented in various forms of state care. Using critical discourse analysis, we investigated how LGBTQ+ youth, as a target group, are described and how LGBTQ+ competence is presented on the home pages of residential care homes and secure state care institutions for young people in Sweden. The results show that LGBTQ is largely invisible. Of the approximately 1,000 existing residential care homes, only 20 stated that they worked with or had competence in LGBTQ+ issues. No secure state care institution offered LGBTQ+ competence at the time of the study.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Södertörn Univ, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Swedish poly utopia: Dreams, revolutions, and crushed hopes2023In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 695-710, article id 13634607211056887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyamory means having a sexual and/or intimate relationship with more than one person at a time. In this study, we use in-depth interviews with 22 persons in Sweden who have experience of polyamorous or non-monogamous relationships to explore how polyamory can include imagining utopian relationships and spaces. Thematic analysis was done which indicated narratives of politically invested attempts to create communal living or societal change that resists capitalist and heteronormative nuclear-family arrangements as well as stories of everyday events that do not explicitly involve political ambitions. The range of utopian dreams and practices of the non-monogamous participants in our study, we argue, are examples of what Munoz calls concrete utopias, filled with joy and laden with disappointment in the face of potentiality and reality.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Drawing the line at infidelity: negotiating relationship morality in a Swedish context of consensual non-monogamy2022In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, ISSN 0265-4075, E-ISSN 1460-3608, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1917-1933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consensual non-monogamy (CNM) involves being in a relationship that allows participants multiple concurrent sexual and/or intimate partners. Previous studies exploring attitudes toward different types of extra-dyadic sexual activity (EDSA) has typically distinguished between, on the one hand, polyamory/open relationships/swinging and, on the other, infidelity. The aim of this article is to develop further these discussions by showing how the distinctions between relationship types are drawn and/or blurred in social interactions, and how this requires moral work and negotiations of what ethical polyamory is. The research questions are as follows: 1. How are different CNM relationship types distinguished from each other, as well as intertwined and negotiated in social interactions? 2. How are ideals of consent, honesty, and communication reproduced and renegotiated in CNM relationships? 3. How does moral work become important for responding to negative attitudes toward CNM? The material consists of interviews with 22 persons practicing polyamory, CNM, or relationship anarchy, analyzed using thematic analysis. Results show that CNM relationship types are not clearly distinguishable but rather negotiated in social interactions both within a relationship and with others. Interviewees express that consent, honesty, and communication are central for their relationships, but also that they are negotiated. For example, honesty can be renegotiated by introducing an option of not telling your partner everything. Consent can also be renegotiated with some conditions, such as not actively searching out potential partners. They describe several different types of moral work: negotiating and reformulating others’ moral opinions, reversing moral hierarchies, and taking responsibility to explain and to soothe situations. These results contribute to existing research on attitudes toward CNM practices pointing out the importance of taking social interactions into account in order to explore the full extent of negative attitudes toward people involved in CNM relationships and how they handle these interactions.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Polyamorous Parenthood – Kinship, Gender and Morality2021In: Close Relations: Family, Kinship and Beyond / [ed] H Wahlström Henriksson; K Goedecke, New York: Springer, 2021, p. 139-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on polyamorous parenthood has mainly focused on aspects of interactions with schools and authorities, where polyamorous parents have had to develop strategies of openness and concealment and dealing with stigmatization (Palotta-Chiarolla 2010; Riggs 2010; Sheff 2010). Aspects of sex and morality have primarily been explored in general in relation to non-monogamous practice and not specifically in relation to parenthood (Ritchie 2010; Samuels 2010). Based on interviews with 22 persons in Sweden who in different ways have experience of non-monogamous practice, we explore polyamorous parenthood, focusing on kinship practices, gender and sexual morality. The results of these analyses show that there are recurring themes of promiscuity as a risk that polyamorous parents have to handle. This can take the form of negative interactions with family members and society, practical issues with having sex with several partners or identity issues where good parenthood risks being at odds with non-monogamous practices. The boundaries of good parenthood and promiscuity and the negotiations between them are rarely highlighted in research, but have implications for the moral order of kinship for non-monogamous practice today. 

  • 9.
    Lindroth, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    SGBA and the social determinants of health: Public health, human rights and incarcerated youth2021In: Sex and gender-based analysis in public health / [ed] Jacqueline Gahagan; Mary K. Bryson, Switzerland: Springer, 2021, 1, p. 139-148Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we focus on a sex- and gender-based analysis (SGBA) concerning young people incarcerated in state institutions in Sweden. We identify and discuss specific areas concerning sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) wherein normative assumptions affect incarcerated young people’s sexual health and their access to sexual health services.

    Governments and related public health agencies must ensure, on both policy and practice levels, that inequalities in access to sexual health care and related sexual health outcomes for incarcerated young people are addressed. In Sweden, policies exist, including the use of a sex- and gender-based analysis, but clear action on the practice level is lacking. The national Public Health Agency has addressed young people in secure state care as a group in need of interventions, but in light of the analysis made, we see several challenges that need to be addressed: (1) the lack of SRHR competence in staff, (2) the organization of sexual and reproductive health care being unclear and risking the accessibility for incarcerated youth, and (3) the organization of secure state care builds on gender-stereotypical, heteronormative, and cis-normative ideas of youth sexualities and identities, which risks emphasizing existing vulnerabilities. This is evident both in the case of gender-separated wards and in the implicit ideas of youth sexualities and identities that organize the care. In conclusion, public health at all levels has a key role to play in working concretely to address the sex- and gender-based challenges to sexual health outcomes of youth in secure care.

  • 10.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Living Outside Protocol: Polyamorous Orientations, Bodies, and Queer Temporalities2019In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 1315-1331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates experiences of polyamory in a society where monogamy is the norm. Polyamory is when more than two people are involved in an intimate and/or sexual relationship. The relationships are known to those involved, and everyone has the opportunity to have multiple relationships at the same time. In-depth interviews were completed with 22 persons in Sweden who identify as polyamorous. Drawing on Ahmed’s phenomenological concepts of turning points and lines and Halberstam’s concept of queer time and temporality, the following questions are explored: What turning points can be seen in the informants’ stories? And what consequences are the informants exposed to when heteronormative expectations are not followed? In the theoretical language of Ahmed, living a life within monogamous boundaries would be considered as being “in line”. Going beyond these monogamous heteronormative lines can result in more relational choices by which one has to find out what kind of relationship works best instead of following a ready-made template. The majority of the informants feel forced to conceal their relationship constellations in several situations and contexts. Living a queer life is seen by others in society as not only incomprehensible but also immature and inexperienced. Interactions with healthcare professionals seldom offer any relief from this; instead, the informants’ stories of these encounters can be interpreted as instances of being stopped and blocked, resulting in stress and shame.

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  • 11.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    More-Than-Two-Parent Families: Displaying Legitimate Parenthood in Swedish Media2019In: Lambda Nordica, ISSN 1100-2573, E-ISSN 2001-7286, Vol. 24, no 2-3, p. 81-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norms concerning family formation are generally based on ideals of coupled love and the two-parent-family, however, family practices frequently go beyond these norms. Families consisting of more than two parents that are co-parenting have only been studied to a small extent. Analysing Swedish newspaper and magazine articles on more-than-two-parent families between 1992 and 2016 we ask: How are more-than-two-parent families displayed in Swedish media stories? Are they portrayed as legitimate families, and if so, how is this legitimacy discursively constructed? What role does recognition play in the media stories and how is it negotiated in the narratives? We use the concepts display (Finch 2007) and recognition/redistribution (Fraser 1998; 2003) in exploring the significance that recognition and legitimacy have for the depiction of families with more than two parents in the media material. The display of more-than-two-parent families in the Swedish media stories analysed is generally characterised by repertoires of modern family life, of love and intimacy and responsible and successful parenting. These repertoires are used to display the families as normal, modern, and legitimate. In addition to the repertoires mentioned, there are repertoires of importance of geographical location, of strategies and of critique of current legislation that further emphasise the legitimacy of the more-than-two-parent families in contrast to an outdated legislation that forces these legitimate families to strategise their intimate relationships. Despite several of the people interviewed being described as polyamorous or gay/lesbian, there are no tendencies in the empirical material to motivate the need for rights based on an essentialised polyamorous identity; rather, the focus is on the fact that it is the practical care relations that need to be protected.

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  • 12.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Serial Monogamy2019In: Macmillan Encyclopedia of Families, Marriages, and Intimate Relationships, Macmillan Reference USA , 2019, p. 802-803Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    The queer spaces of BDSM and non-monogamy2019In: Journal of Positive Sexuality., Vol. 5, no 1, p. 14-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on interviews and ethnographic fieldwork within BDSM communities in Sweden, this article focuses on links between non-monogamy and BDSM. Drawing on Halberstam´s concept of queer space, the following questions are investigated: What are the connections between BDSM and non-monogamous communities? How does interaction between BDSM and non-monogamous practices create non-normative logic? The transgression of one norm makes it easier to transgress other norms as well, providing opportunities to find new ways of organizing relationships beyond the norms of monogamy. In order for an individual to be able to fully explore kinks in BDSM practices and at the same time respect the boundaries of a partner, nonmonogamy emerges as one logical answer.

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  • 14.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Governing through love: Same-sex cohabitation in Sweden2017In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382, Vol. 20, no 5-6, p. 604-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of love was introduced into a Swedish policy context in the early 1980s as regulations of same-sex cohabitation were proposed. The same-sex cohabitation legislation was presented as a tool in the battle against discrimination of lesbian women and gay men in the government commissioned reports, and offered an inclusion of same-sex couples based on the idea of same-sex love and heterosexual love as fundamentally the same. The article demonstrates how this governing of same-sex relationships rested heavily on authenticity and inclusion/exclusion of wanted/unwanted non-heterosexual subjects. By creating a concept of gay identity based on an essentialist notion of orientation, love was used as a sign of normality indicating authentic homosexual orientation' and restricting this authenticity to individuals in monogamous and stable same-sex relationships. Nevertheless, the act only recognized a selected few and created new lines of division between different non-heterosexual subjectivities.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Parenthood beyond the norm of coupledom: Negotiating legal vulnerability in a welfare state context2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Theorists point to late modernity as a time of new intimacies where individualism and self-knowledge are central components (Giddens, 1992; Beck & Beck-Gernsheim, 1995). According to Plummer (1995), one of the major shifts in intimacy and sexuality the last decades of the 20th century is the constitution of the family. Previous ideas of nuclear family and traditional values has shifted to how family members are chosen rather than biologically given. One of the kinds of relationships and families that represent this move away from the heterosexual nuclear family with biological children is the family with more than two parents, for example one based on a polyamorous relationship. Polyamory means that more than two people are involved in an intimate and/or sexual relationship with one another. Polyamory as a relationship practice bears many similarities with how late modern intimacy is described, and could, according to Barker (2005), be seen as part of a wider transformation of intimacy in postmodern society. Preliminary results from analysis of media representations of polyamorous families show that explicit strategies are deemed necessary for handling the legal vulnerability of the families, but that these strategies depend on the families having both social and economic resources to draw from. Contacts with school and health institutions are reported as both positive and negative, but there is a recurring theme of invisibility that the families perceive – the system is generally designed for coupled parents. Lastly, there are also stories of the importance of community and thus how geography and place are central for offering contact with other families in a similar situation. These conclusions point to the need for further studies of the legal situation for non-coupled families – how are the families faring that do not have the social or economic resources to navigate the legal vulnerability, and how are invisibility and lack of community affecting families outside norms of coupledom?

  • 16.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Bad sex, good love: Homonormativity in the Swedish Gay Press, 1969–19862016In: GLQ - A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, ISSN 1064-2684, E-ISSN 1527-9375, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss “love” as a rhetorical strategy in the Swedish gay press, 1969–86, in relation to shifting meanings of sex and love. During this period, meanings of homosexual subjectivity were rapidly changing at several societal levels. New ideals of openness and monogamous love became more dominant and tended to exclude expressions of sexual practices based primarily on pleasure. Using the analytical terms unconditioned versus conditioned, we discern a shifting relative strength between discursive constructions of unconditioned sex/sex conditioned on love, and love for love's sake/love conditioned on coupledom.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    När staten talar om kärlek: Normalitet och temporalitet i svenska statliga utredningar om äktenskap och samboende2016In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 57-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the introduction of the concept of love in government commissioned reports in the 1980s as it was used for portraying same-sex relationships as normal and comparable to heterosexual relationships. The article is a discourse analysis focusing on the uses of love and constructions of homosexuality and the normal couple in governmental inquiries. Following international studies on love as a political technology, the article concludes, on the one hand, that the concept of love in the Swedish case creates sameness and makes possible an inclusion of same-sex relationships in the regulations of intimacy. On the other hand, the article concludes that the inclusion of same-sex relationships in the regulations of intimacy is conditioned on constructions of normality and on same-sex couples living up to expectations of coupledom and stability. Temporality is central for this process of normalization as it points to discursive constructions of historical and contemporary Sweden as tolerant and modern.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    A Genealogy of Serial Monogamy: Shifting Regulations of Intimacy in Twentieth-Century Sweden2015In: Journal of Family History, ISSN 0363-1990, E-ISSN 1552-5473, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 195-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces a genealogy of serial monogamy in Swedish policy documents (SOU) during the twentieth century. Analyses of renegotiations of marital morality, introduction of more liberal divorce laws, and the introduction of regulations of unmarried cohabitation show that societal norms as well as legal reforms have normalized serial monogamy as state regulation and social practice. The role of marriage as a societal stabilizer has increasingly been taken over by the idea of family, but interestingly durability and stability are concepts invoked during the process of decline of the ideal of lifelong marriage.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Feministiskt tänkande och sociologi: Teorier, begrepp och tillämpningar, Anna Hedenus, Sofia Björk & Oksana Shmulyar Gréen (red.). Lund: Studentlitteratur, 20152015In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 400-402Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 20.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Svenska lesbiska föräldrar och deras barn i en ny tid2015In: Lambda Nordica, ISSN 1100-2573, E-ISSN 2001-7286, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 135-138Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Malmquist, A. Pride and Prejudice: Lesbian Families in Contemporary Sweden (diss.). Linköpings universitet: Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande 2015 (106 sidor)

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  • 21.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Bach, Anna-Sofie
    Hvidt Breengard, Michala
    Indledning: Familier og forældreskaber anno 20142014In: Kvinder, Køn & Forskning, no 1-2, p. 3-8Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 22.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Från barnlösa clowner till fertila goda medborgare2013In: Lambda Nordica, ISSN 1100-2573, E-ISSN 2001-7286, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 138-141Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Jens Rydström, Odd couples: a history of gay marriage in Scandinavia. (2011).

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  • 23.
    Markström, Annica
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Björkhagen Turesson, Annelie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    “Instead I started solving my problems myself": exploring children's actions of participation in social workManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children have the right to be heard on matters concerning them, but research indicates that children’s participatory rights are not adequately met. The Swedish Child Welfare Services constitute an arena in which a significant portion of open care interventions for children and their families take place, and thus a context in which children’s participation should be realized. This article explores children's actions of participation, and how these can be understood in relation to situational constraints, using the concept of agency. The study is based on social constructionist theory and includes interviews with 11 children aged 7-16. Thematic analysis revealed that children's actions, as described by the children, are formed in relation to situational constraints ranging from actions that are accepted and sometimes encouraged, to actions that challenge the boundaries ofwhat is permitted by their position as children: Permissible actions, Actions beyond the permissible, and Actions that disturb the existing order. The article contributes to a broader understanding of children’s actions of participation in asocial work context.

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