Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Scaramuzzino, Gabriella
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Digitalization, stress, and social worker–client relationships during the COVID-19 pandemic2023In: Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1468-0173, E-ISSN 1741-296X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1080-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed the possibilities for people to interact and communicate. This article examines Swedish social workers’ experiences of the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the use of digital tools in their work, and whether this use has affected the social worker–client relationship and their stress levels. The article draws on a web survey (N  =  541) via a quantitative analysis of responses and a qualitative analysis of answers to an open-ended question.

    Findings: Most respondents agreed on experiencing increased use of digital tools in the relationship with the clients, increased skills in using digital tools, and a more positive view of digital tools in the social worker–client relationship. However, experiences on whether stress levels had increased and the relationship with the clients worsened, were divided. Age correlates positively with increased stress levels, and social workers working with social assistance, as well as women, are more likely to agree on that the relationship with the clients has worsened. Responses from open-ended questions highlight a rapid shift where social workers have gained a more positive view of digital tools, that video meetings can increase efficiency and flexibility, but also work environment problems.

    Applications: This article contributes with useful insights into how the use of digital tools during the COVID-19 pandemic has changed and affected stress and the social worker–client relationship. It can support discussions on the future implementation of digital tools in social work after the pandemic.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Evaluation Paradoxes: Responding to Tensions Between Stability and Change in Social Investment Evaluation2023In: American Journal of Evaluation, ISSN 1098-2140, E-ISSN 1557-0878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between stability and change is a central paradox of administration that pervades all forms of organizing. Evaluation is not unfamiliar with paradoxical objectives and roles, which can result in tensions for evaluators and stakeholders. In this article, paradoxes between stability and change in the implementation of evaluation, and responses to them, are investigated through the case of social investment funds in Swedish local government. From interviews with staff, managers, and evaluators, findings show how responses to four main paradoxes give priority to top-down summative evaluation that produces instrumental knowledge on outcomes and costs for decision makers. The responses show that the concept of social investment fund evaluation is elastic to contain paradoxes and address different audiences. Also, paradoxes within the structure of the organization develop into paradoxes concerning the roles and goals of evaluation, raising the question of whether individual actors can deal with paradoxes.

  • 3.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Ulmestig, Rickard
    Department of Social Work, Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Scaramuzzino, Gabriella
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Saving time for activation or relationships? The legitimation and performance of automated decision-making for time efficiency in two street-level bureaucracies serving poor and unemployed clients2023In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, digitalized automated decision-making (ADM) has been implemented in many Swedish municipal social services to achieve values such as legal security, client empowerment and time efficiency. The paper aims to understand how ADM policy is legitimized and performed through time efficiency, by a comparison of ADM policy in two Swedish municipalities’ social assistance agencies. It builds on 17 interviews with managers and professionals in two Swedish municipalities’ social assistance units. Findings show ADM is legitimized through arguments of activation and relationships, and performed by handling more applications or increasing time spent with clients, rather than being perceived as increasing the quality of social assistance services. This highlights the significance of organizational goals regarding how street-level bureaucrats perform tasks within their discretionary powers.

  • 4.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Att göra socialt arbete genom standardisering: Rättssäkerhet eller exkluderande praktik?2022In: Plats för vem?: Om arbetets inkludering och exkludering / [ed] Elin Ennerberg; Peter Gladoic Håkansson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2022, p. 283-299Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Ulmestig, Rickard
    Department of Social Work, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Denvall, Verner
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Coping with tensions between standardization and individualization in social assistance2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 435-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s ambition to adapt and individualize welfare delivery poses a challenge to human service organizations at the same time seeking to standardize clients, with consequences for street-level bureaucrats. In this article, the implementation of an instrument for standardized assessment of income support (IA) in Swedish social services is used to investigate what strategies street-level bureaucrats use to cope with tensions between standardization and individualization. Results from six focus groups in two organizations show how job coaches cope by individualizing their practice towards the client, while caseworkers equally often cope through standardization, which could work towards or against the client, in order to keep their discretion and handle organizational demands. Results point to a loose coupling between IA as an organizational tool for legitimacy, and as a pragmatically used questionnaire. Conflicts and contradictions are left to street-level bureaucrats to deal with.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Denvall, Verner
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Johansson, Kerstin
    Linköping University.
    Metagoverning social work knowledge structures2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 808-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing fragmentation and the rising number of organizations in society create major challenges when implementing knowledge structures. In this article, we propose that the concept of metagovernance is useful when addressing these challenges. The enhancement of knowledge structures in the Swedish social services is our study object. Networks at national, regional and local levels have been organized and facilitated by national resources and agreements since 2003. The shifting of participants, switching assignments and ambiguity about the networks’ purposes created difficult conditions for successful implementation. In this paper, we argue that fragile top-down government and shifting local network organization provide limited opportunities to ensure that new knowledge structures will have an impact on social work practice. Research is based upon monitoring a national program that started in 2003, affecting five universities and their surrounding regions and municipalities. The article is also based upon observations and interviews among national and regional actors. Results show that national agencies are hands-off, but still in control by setting up legal and discursive frameworks for those networks. It is argued that this creates new challenges for participating organizations and professionals in social work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Scaramuzzino, Gabriella
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ulmestig, Rickard
    Department of Social Work, Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    The social worker-client relationship in the digital era: a configurative literature review2022In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 303-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The social worker-client relationship is described as essential to social work but is a broad and multi-layered concept. Today, the relationship is strengthened and challenged by digitalisation. The aim of this configurative literature review is to understand how research on social work from 2015 to 2020 describes and analyses digitalisation’s significance for the social worker-client relationship. Three themes depict the benefits and disadvantages of digitalisation, how digitalisation generates new ethical questions and dilemmas, and the different theoretical perspectives used. Future research should go beyond the pros and cons of digitalisation and should use various theoretical approaches to challenge data, illuminate client perspectives, and pose additional questions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Denvall, Verner
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Bortom det instrumentella idealet: Om kunskapsanvändning i utvärderingssystem2021In: Välfärdens aktörer: Utmaningar för människor, professioner och organisationer / [ed] Stig Linde; Kerstin Svensson, Social Work Press , 2021, p. 101-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Fred, Mats
    Department of Political Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Special Issue Introduction: The Power of Evaluation2021In: Offentlig Förvaltning. Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2000-8058, E-ISSN 2001-3310, Vol. 25, no 3/4, p. 3-15Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this special issue is to invite scholars in public administration to address issues of power in relation to evaluation practices in the public sector. Power is one of those big, difficult, and inherently nebulous concepts that both scholars and practitioners appear to consciously or unconsciously avoid. Our ambition in this introduction is not to present a comprehensive conceptual review of power, let alone to present the many different aspects of evaluation. Rather, this is a humble attempt to foster a more explicit discussion of the relationship between power and evaluation. The aim of this introduction is, firstly, to introduce a few basic distinctions and conceptualisations of the relationship between power and evaluation. Secondly, we would like to highlight three themes where power may be an especially fruitful lens when analysing, or just trying to make sense of, evaluation procedures. These are themes found in evaluation research, but where power is not always acknowledged or accounted for. We call them (1) Evaluation and instrumental power, (2) Evaluation and contextual power, and (3) Evaluation and performative power.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 10.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    The constitutive effects of social investment evaluation2021In: Evaluation, ISSN 1356-3890, E-ISSN 1461-7153, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 210-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation has different uses and impacts. This article aims to describe and analyse the constitutive effects ? how evaluation forms and shapes different domains in an evaluation context ? of evaluation related to an evidence-based policy and practice, by investigating how the evaluation of social investment fund initiatives in three Swedish municipalities is organized and implemented. Through interviews and evaluation reports, the findings show how this way of evaluating may contribute to constitutive effects by defining worldviews, content, timeframes and evaluation roles. The article discusses how social investment fund evaluation contributes to a linear knowledge transfer model, promotes a relation between costs and evidence and concentrates the power over evaluation at the top of organizations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11. Ulmestig, Rickard
    et al.
    Denvall, Verner
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    “Claiming” equality and “doing” inequality: Individual action plans for applicants of social assistance2020In: Social Work and Society, E-ISSN 1613-8953, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how formal equality is “done” in 48 individual action plans for social assistance. We use a street-level perspective to understand how policy is “done” to enhance equality for social assistance applicants. The analysis is based on the theory of street-level bureaucracy as well as on the concept of equality. Formal equality was inhibited by weak legal security, vague rights and duties, the inability to advocate for one’s own case, and difficulties with ambiguous and incomprehensible language in individual action plans. Establishing formal equality is made even more difficult because of the individual means testing used to determine social assistance. We argue that applicants of social assistance might experience inequality that is greater than the inequality they experienced before the implementation of their individual action plans, despite the intent of these plans to decrease inequality.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Denvall, Verner
    et al.
    Socialhögskolan, Lunds universitet.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Ulmestig, Rickard
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Dunderhonung för socialt arbete?: En studie av MI:s användbarhet inom försörjningsstöd2020In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, E-ISSN 2003-5624, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. 227-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MI, motivational interviewing, is a counselling method for increasing a person’s motivation for behaviour change that is prevalent in social work. MI emphasizes building trusting social worker-client relationships and is presented as concrete and simple to follow. The benefit of MI is limited by actual opportunities for change through poverty, the labour market and health. The article aims to critically examine the usefulness of MI in connection with the handling of social assistance. It is based on a study of the use of an assessment instrument and of individual action plans (contracts) in a municipality where MI is a central tool. The study is based on analyses of documents, individual interviews and group interviews with staff as well as observations of meetings and training. The results show that MI has been integrated into a comprehensive implementation of other elements to standardize initiatives within income support. The client’s obligations are emphasized through a strong individual focus, although extensive efforts may be needed from surrounding actors. The action plans have inherent problems in terms of clarity and legal certainty. The authors argue that it is paradoxical to use a method based on alliances and collaboration in connection with conditional decisions. The use of MI becomes a commitment that lacks reciprocity and whose activation of self-technologies can be questioned.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Framing Standardization: Implementing a Quality Management System in Relation to Social Work Professionalism in the Social Services2020In: Human service organizations, management, leadership & governance, ISSN 2330-3131, E-ISSN 2330-314X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 229-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes and analyzes how standardization is framed and adapted in relation to social work professionalism, by investigating how a regulation on quality management systems is implemented in a Swedish social service organization. A decoupling between department and unit frames enables the organization to fulfill objectives of organizational professionalism and external legitimacy while professionals can participate in the formulation of procedural standards relating to an occupational professionalism. Tensions are delegated to street-level. An implication is the possibility for managers and professionals to adapt standards to a professional practice, although this may undermine the uniformity of standards.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Instrumental, Interpersonal or Holistic: Social Work Managers’ Conceptions of Safety in the Psychosocial Work Environment2020In: Journal of social service research, ISSN 0148-8376, E-ISSN 1540-7314, Vol. 46, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social work managers are accountable for risks and safety in the psychosocial work environment. This article aims to understand how social work managers deal with safety in the psychosocial work environment in social service organizations with potentially conflicting logics of regulation and security, by answering the questions: How do social work managers conceptualize safety in the psychosocial work environment?; What are the implications of different conceptions of safety in the psychosocial work environment for social work management? Through a qualitative phenomenographic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 27 managers in the Swedish social services, three conceptions were found: an instrumental, interpersonal and holistic conception. As each conception encompasses the former and thus increases the level of comprehensiveness, tensions between the logics of regulation and security increases. Managers with a comprehensive conception must therefore reflect on the way regulations for safety may conflict with social relationships. Implications for social work management are the need to discuss how safety management relates to social work professionalism, and the self-regulation due to the integration of safety thinking in social work professionalization. Future research could investigate how the conceptions relate to managerial and professional practice and how different parts of the social services conceptualize safety.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Linnaeus University.
    Made in Sweden: The translation of a European evaluation approach2019In: Evaluation, ISSN 1356-3890, E-ISSN 1461-7153, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 189-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand how evaluation approaches change between contexts, they need to be studied in relation to their social, cultural, organizational and political contexts. The aim of the article is to describe and analyse how the European Union evaluation approach, ongoing evaluation, was translated in Swedish public administration. A case study shows how institutional entrepreneurs promote their evaluation norms of participatory evaluation and attach evaluation to a less dominant governance logic in the Swedish evaluation field. This raises questions about the role of the evaluator, evaluation terminology, and the unclear and weak borders of the evaluation field where evaluation approaches can be launched and translated with relative ease.

  • 16.
    Fred, Mats
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Effektmätning: en överblick2018In: Alla pratar om det, men få gör det: en handbok i effektmätning / [ed] Erika Augustinsson, Mötesplats Social Innovation , 2018, p. 62-67Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi lever i en tid där så gott som allt skall dokumenteras, mätas och utvärderas. Men det är inte vilken typ av utvärdering som helst som på senare tid uppmuntras och förespråkas, utan framför allt den som säger sig sätta fokus på effekter, och det är just denna typ av mätning som är ämnet för detta kapitel.

  • 17.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Andersson, Mats
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Samverkan Malmö stad: Malmö högskola. En kartläggning av samverkansaktiviteter 20102010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En översiktlig kartläggning och försök till kategorisering av olika former av samverkan mellan Malmö stad och Malmö högskola under 2010

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 18.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Joint University Administration and Services, Enheten för kompetensutveckling och utvärdering.
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Joint University Administration and Services, Enheten för kompetensutveckling och utvärdering.
    Ek, Anne-Charlotte
    Malmö högskola, Joint University Administration and Services, Enheten för kompetensutveckling och utvärdering.
    Tranquist, Joakim
    Malmö högskola, Joint University Administration and Services, Enheten för kompetensutveckling och utvärdering.
    Självklar mångfald - oklar strategi2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På uppdrag av Kultur Skåne har Malmö högskola genomfört en kartläggning av mångfaldsarbetet vid scenkonstinstitutionerna i Region Skåne. Studien har ett enomgripande mångfaldsperspektiv och har inneburit att ur ett kultursociologiskt perspektiv kartlägga arbetet med mångfald på regionens dans-, teater- och musikinstitutioner. Syftet har varit att få en överblick över hur mångfaldsarbetet ser ut vad gäller såväl organisation, rekrytering, produktion, som publikarbete. Författarna arbetar på Enheten för kompetensutveckling och utvärdering på Malmö högskola, och rapporten SJÄLVKLAR MÅNGFALD – OKLAR STRATEGI är en rapport från enhetens rapportserie Malmö högskolas utvärderingsrapporter.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf