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  • 1.
    Hylén, Mia
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;Department of Intensive and Perioperative Care, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Striberger, Rebecka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sjögran, Lotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Samuelsson, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Pediatrics, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    A cross-sectional study of career paths for Swedish registered nurses with a doctoral degree: When aspirations and possibilities collide2023In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses with a doctoral degree are important for the quality of care, nursing education, and nursing research. Still, postgraduate career paths are criticized for being too vague. To enable career path development, mapping of the current situation appears fundamental. The objective was therefore to chart the current professional positions and work conditions and to explore the future career aspirations of registered nurses with a doctoral degree in Sweden. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted including 118 participants, all nurses with a doctoral degree earned between 2016 and 2022. This study is reported in accordance with STROBE. The participants reported a significant change from hospital-based positions before doctoral studies, towards university-based positions after graduation. This is clearly in contrast to their expressed aspiration to hold a shared position, remaining in contact with the clinical context. In conclusion, a national collaboration is needed and wanted regarding career opportunities for registered nurses with a doctoral degree in Sweden. Furthermore, career paths within nursing science need to be established within the clinical context.

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  • 2.
    Striberger, Rebecka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Zarrouk, Moncef
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Health literacy in patients with intermittent claudication in relation to clinical characteristics, demographics, self-efficacy and quality of life: A cross-sectional study2022In: Journal of Vascular Nursing, ISSN 1062-0303, E-ISSN 1532-6578, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intermittent claudication requires treatment with secondary prevention to reduce disease progression and the risk of cardiovascular events and to improve quality of life. Health literacy and self-efficacy are important preconditions for the health behaviour changes necessary for adhering to secondary prevention.

    Aim: Evaluate health literacy in patients with intermittent claudication regarding clinical characteristics, demographics, self-efficacy and quality of life.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study evaluating health literacy, self-efficacy and quality of life using questionnaires. Patients with intermittent claudication from vascular units in the south of Sweden were included.

    Results: In total, 158 patients were included, of which, 52.5% reported “inadequate” (0-8 points) or “problematic” (9-12 points) health literacy with no differences between men and women. A significant higher proportion of patients living alone reported “inadequate” or “problematic” health literacy than “sufficient” (13-16 points) health literacy. Patients with “sufficient” health literacy reported significantly higher self-efficacy and quality of life and were more physically active than patients with “inadequate” or “problematic” health literacy. Also, patients with a university degree reported a significantly higher ability to “access” (seek, find and obtain) and “understand” (comprehend the accessed) information relevant to health.

    Conclusion: The majority of patients with intermittent claudication have “inadequate” or “problematic” health literacy. Also, an “inadequate” or “problematic” health literacy level is more common among patients living alone, and education level appears to be more important when “accessing” and “understanding” information relevant to health. This illuminates the importance of not only the patients’ health literacy but also demographics when planning for secondary prevention.

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  • 3.
    Striberger, Rebecka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Vascular Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Zarrouk, Moncef
    Vascular Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Vascular Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Illness perceptions in patients with peripheral arterial disease: A systematic review of qualitative studies2021In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 116, article id 103723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic diseases create their own subjective beliefs about their conditions based on their illness perceptions. In the common-sense model, illness perceptions constitute personal beliefs about illness with regard to five components: identity, timeline, cause, control/cure, and consequences. Patients' illness perceptions affect both their management of their disease and their adherence to treatment. Since patients with peripheral arterial disease need life-long treatment for secondary prevention, generating knowledge about illness perceptions in patients with peripheral arterial disease is essential.

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review and synthesise the literature on illness perceptions in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    DESIGN: A systematic review DATA SOURCES: PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO.

    REVIEW METHODS: A systematic search strategy was conducted in December 2017, with an update in July 2019. Two team members independently screened all titles and abstracts. A relevance and quality appraisal of the studies was performed. The references from the included studies were evaluated for additional studies. The data from 14 studies were extracted and synthesised using a "best-fit" approach to framework analysis. A deductive analysis was conducted using the common-sense model. The data not suitable for the framework were analysed separately using inductive conventional content analysis, yielding an additional component representing the retrospective consequences of peripheral arterial disease.

    FINDINGS: The findings showed diversity in illness perceptions in each of the five components of the framework as well as in the additional component. The findings showed participants' lack of understanding of the chronic nature of the disease, i.e., about the timeline, the identity of the symptoms and the cause of the disease. The patients' beliefs about control and cures varied from having high motivation to engage in physical activity to thinking that walking could make their situations worse. There was fear about the future, as patients perceived disease progression and decreasing control to be consequences of their illness. Living with the disease, the emphasis in the additional component, was a process for regaining control and adapting to their situations.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with peripheral arterial disease shape their own understandings of their conditions. These beliefs may influence their management of their disease and adherence to treatment. Therefore, the current study suggests that illness perceptions should be addressed when planning secondary prevention for patients with peripheral arterial disease.

  • 4.
    Striberger, Rebecka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Vasc Ctr, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmö, Sweden..
    Zarrouk, Moncef
    Skane Univ Hosp, Vasc Ctr, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden..
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Vasc Ctr, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmö, Sweden..
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Illness perception, health literacy, self-efficacy, adherence and quality of life in patients with intermittent claudication - a longitudinal cohort study2023In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with intermittent claudication need lifelong treatment with secondary prevention to prevent cardiovascular events and progression of atherosclerotic disease. Illness perception, health literacy, self-efficacy, adherence to medication treatment, and quality of life are factors influencing patients' self-management. Knowledge of these factors could be important when planning for secondary prevention in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Aim: to compare illness perception, health literacy, self-efficacy, adherence to treatment, and quality of life in in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted with 128 participants recruited from vascular units in southern Sweden. Data were collected through medical records and questionnaires regarding illness perception, health literacy, self-efficacy, adherence to treatment, and quality of life.

    Results: In the subscales in illness perception, patients with sufficient health literacy reported less consequences and lower emotional representations of the intermittent claudication. They also reported higher self-efficacy and higher quality of life than patients with insufficient health literacy. In comparison between men and women in illness perception, women reported higher illness coherence and emotional representations associated with intermittent claudication compared to men. A multiple regression showed that both consequences and adherence were negative predictors of quality of life. When examining changes over time, a significant increase in quality of life was seen between baseline and 12 months, but there were no significant differences in self-efficacy.

    Conclusion: Illness perception differs in relation to level of health literacy and between men and women. Further, the level of health literacy seems to be of importance for patients' self-efficacy and quality of life. This illuminates the need for new strategies for improving health literacy, illness perception, and self-efficacy over time. For example, more tailored information regarding secondary prevention could be provided to strengthen self-management to further improve quality of life in patients with intermittent claudication.

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