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  • 1. Albrecht, Karin
    et al.
    Greindl, Melanie
    Deutel, Britta
    Kremser, Christian
    Wolf, Christian
    Talasz, Heribert
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Debbage, Paul
    Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas
    In Vivo Investigation of Thiomer-Polyvinylpyrrolidon Nanoparticles Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging2010In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, ISSN 0022-3549, E-ISSN 1520-6017, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 2008-2017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on the investigation of the permeation enhancing effects of a stomach targeted, nanoparticulate drug delivery system. The polyacrylic acid–cysteine/polyvinylpyrrolidon nanoparticles were loaded with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium( III)dihydrogen salt (Gd-DTPA). Average particle size was determined to be 130nm and the optimum for stability was found to be below a pH of 4.5. In vitro permeation studies were performed on rat gastric mucosa and revealed an eightfold increase in Gd- DTPA uptake when incorporated in the nanoparticles compared to evaluation in the presence of unformulated polyacrylic acid–cysteine. In vivo investigations with rats were performed via the noninvasive MRI method in order to track the nanoparticles way through the gastrointestinal tract. When Gd-DTPA was administered orally as nanoparticulate suspension, an increased MRI signal in the urinary bladder was detected after 34 min, providing evidence for systemic uptake and renal elimination of the contrast agent. As control experiments with Gd-DTPA only or in combination with unformulated polyacrylic acid–cysteine revealed no MRI signal increase at all, the significant permeation enhancing effect could be identified based on the nanoparticulate formulation.

  • 2. Ares, Mikko PS
    et al.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Inflammatory effects of very low-density lipoprotein and fatty acids.2006In: Future Cardiology, ISSN 1744-8298, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 315-323Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High plasma triacylglycerol (triglyceride, TG) levels is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Very large lipoproteins, such as chylomicrons, alone are not considered atherogenic, but TG-rich remnant lipoproteins can penetrate into the vascular wall. Importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that all TG-rich lipoproteins stimulate cytokine expression in circulating monocytes. Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) stimulates monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and expression of inflammatory genes in macrophages. Furthermore, fatty acids released from large lipoproteins can stimulate both vascular cells and circulating monocytes. It is likely that fatty acids released from TG-rich lipoproteins contribute to atherogenesis, but the role of fatty acids in ischemic heart disease is not as direct as that of cholesterol. Fatty acids influence plasma lipoprotein levels and either stimulate or suppress numerous cellular functions relevant to atherogenesis. While certain n-3 fatty acids are good for health, most other medium- to long-chain fatty acids appear to promote inflammation in cell culture studies and need to be studied further. Nevertheless, the existing evidence supports the general conclusion that TG-rich lipoproteins and fatty acids greatly accelerate the progression of atherosclerosis. This may be because of their inflammatory effects.

  • 3.
    Beyer, Sarah
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Kimani, Martha
    Chemical and Optical Sensing Division, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Richard-Willstätter Straße 11, 12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Zhang, Yuecheng
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Verhassel, Alejandra
    Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland; FICAN West Cancer Centre, Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland.
    Sternbæk, Louise
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Phase Holographic Imaging AB, SE-223 63 Lund, Sweden.
    Wang, Tianyan
    Department of Molecular Biology, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Persson, Jenny L.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Molecular Biology, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Härkönen, Pirkko
    Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland; FICAN West Cancer Centre, Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland.
    Johansson, Emil
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Centre for Microbial Research, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Caraballo, Remi
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Centre for Microbial Research, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Centre for Microbial Research, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Gawlitza, Kornelia
    Chemical and Optical Sensing Division, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Richard-Willstätter Straße 11, 12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Rurack, Knut
    Chemical and Optical Sensing Division, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Richard-Willstätter Straße 11, 12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Ohlsson, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Stollenwerk, Maria M
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Layers against Sialic Acid on Silica-Coated Polystyrene Cores-Assessment of the Binding Behavior to Cancer Cells.2022In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 14, no 8, article id 1875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sialic acid (SA) is a monosaccharide usually linked to the terminus of glycan chains on the cell surface. It plays a crucial role in many biological processes, and hypersialylation is a common feature in cancer. Lectins are widely used to analyze the cell surface expression of SA. However, these protein molecules are usually expensive and easily denatured, which calls for the development of alternative glycan-specific receptors and cell imaging technologies. In this study, SA-imprinted fluorescent core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer particles (SA-MIPs) were employed to recognize SA on the cell surface of cancer cell lines. The SA-MIPs improved suspensibility and scattering properties compared with previously used core-shell SA-MIPs. Although SA-imprinting was performed using SA without preference for the α2,3- and α2,6-SA forms, we screened the cancer cell lines analyzed using the lectins Maackia Amurensis Lectin I (MAL I, α2,3-SA) and Sambucus Nigra Lectin (SNA, α2,6-SA). Our results show that the selected cancer cell lines in this study presented a varied binding behavior with the SA-MIPs. The binding pattern of the lectins was also demonstrated. Moreover, two different pentavalent SA conjugates were used to inhibit the binding of the SA-MIPs to breast, skin, and lung cancer cell lines, demonstrating the specificity of the SA-MIPs in both flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy. We concluded that the synthesized SA-MIPs might be a powerful future tool in the diagnostic analysis of various cancer cells.

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  • 4.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Stigmar, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Falk, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Enskär, Karin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Students´ Experiences of Participation in a Research Team: Evaluation of a Research-based Teaching Activity in HigherEducation2022In: International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning, E-ISSN 1931-4744, Vol. 16, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractIn Sweden as well as internationally the teaching and research nexus has been described as the defining charac-teristics of higher education promoting generic skills such as information analysis and critical reflection. Vertically Integrated Projects has been proposed as one educational strategy where research and teaching are linked by in-viting students to take active part in actual research projects. The strategy is well aligned to Scholarship of teaching and learning enabling the transition from a teacher-centred accepted knowledge to a student-centred perspective where students are invited as producers of knowledge. The aim of the current study was to explore students’ experiences of participation in a research-based learning activity with academia and industrial partners, designed as a qualitative explorative study using focus group interviews. Findings describe not only factors students find motivating for learning, but also their experience of being part of professional life with its benefits and challenges.

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    fulltext
  • 5.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Zhang, Yuecheng
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Feith, Marek
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Beyer, Sarah
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sternbæk, Louise
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Ohlsson, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Molecularly imprinted polymers in biological applications.2020In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 69, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are currently widely used and further developed for biological applications. The MIP synthesis procedure is a key process, and a wide variety of protocols exist. The templates that are used for imprinting vary from the smallest glycosylated glycan structures or even amino acids to whole proteins or bacteria. The low cost, quick preparation, stability and reproducibility have been highlighted as advantages of MIPs. The biological applications utilizing MIPs discussed here include enzyme-linked assays, sensors, in vivo applications, drug delivery, cancer diagnostics and more. Indeed, there are numerous examples of how MIPs can be used as recognition elements similar to natural antibodies

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  • 6. Goncalves, Isabel
    et al.
    Stollenwerk, Maria M
    Lindholm, Marie W
    Dias, Nuno
    Pedro, Luis M
    Fernandes e Fernandes, José
    Moses, Jonatan
    Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Ares, Mikko PS
    Activator protein-1 in carotid plaques is related to cerebrovascular symptoms and cholesteryl ester content2011In: Cardiovascular pathology, ISSN 1054-8807, E-ISSN 1879-1336, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transcription factor activator protein-1 regulates genes involved in inflammation and repair. The aim of this study was to determine whether transcription factor activator protein-1 activity in carotid plaques is related to symptoms, lipid accumulation, or extracellular matrix composition. Methods: Twenty-eight atherosclerotic carotid plaques were removed by endarterectomy and divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of ipsilateral symptoms (b1 month ago). Activator protein-1 DNA binding activity was assessed, and subunit (c-Jun, JunD, JunB, c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, Fra-2) protein levels analyzed by immunoblotting. Distribution of c-Jun in plaques was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Plaques associated with symptoms had increased activator protein-1 activity and increased expression of c-Jun and JunD, as compared to asymptomatic plaques. Fra-1 and Fra-2 were present in equal amounts in both groups, whereas JunB, FosB, and c-Fos were undetectable. Activator protein-1 activity correlated with cholesteryl ester and elastin in plaques and decreased with age. Activator protein-1 activity did not correlate with collagen, calcified tissue, or proteoglycan content. Conclusions: Activator protein-1 is increased in plaques associated with symptoms. The correlation between activator protein-1 and cholesteryl esters suggests that high activator protein-1 is a marker of plaque vulnerability. Activator protein-1 expression can also reflect the activation of repair processes.

  • 7.
    Slates, Sarah
    et al.
    Seton Hill University.
    Cook-Sather, Alison
    Bryn Mawr College, USA.
    Aghakhani, Sima
    University of Toronto.
    Al-Humuzi, Ali
    McMaster University.
    Alonso, Dulce
    The University of Texas at Austin.
    Borgström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Boyle, Fiona
    University of Cumbria.
    Cachia, Chris
    Toronto Metropolitan University.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Cole, Jonathan
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Dennehy, Tadhg
    University College Cork.
    Väfors Fritz, Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Gadzirayi, Marlene
    University of Sussex.
    Goff, Loretta
    University College Cork.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Han, Yang
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Hellman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Holder, Kal
    Purdue University.
    Hou, Sixun
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Hughes, Julie
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Jennings, Jimmy
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Jegliska, Wiki
    University of Warwick.
    Kaur, Amrita
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Kehan, Lu
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Kelly, Andrew
    Edith Cowan University.
    Lee, Carrie
    Blackpool and The Fylde College.
    Leonard, Constance
    United States Air Force Academy.
    Lewitzky, Rachael
    George Brown College.
    Majeed, Asia
    University of Toronto.
    Marquart, Matthea
    Columbia University.
    Marsden, Joshua
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Marshall, Lia
    Columbia University.
    Matu, Florina
    U.S. Air Force Academy.
    Molefe, Tsholo
    University of Sussex.
    Mori, Yoko
    University of Otago.
    Morrell-Scott, Nicola
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Mullenger, Elizabeth
    Oxford Brookes University.
    Obregon, Monica
    University of Texas.
    Pearce, Matt
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Pike, Claire
    Anglia Ruskin University.
    Pol, Hurshal
    Purdue University.
    Riva, Elena
    University of Warwick.
    Sands, Caitlin
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Sinanan, Rachel
    Deakin University.
    Smart, Kelsey
    Purdue University.
    Smeltzer, Sandra
    Western University.
    Spence, Abi
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Maggard Stephens, Teresa
    RN P.R.E.P.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Sum, Kiu
    Solent University.
    Van-Ess, Josephine
    University of Sussex.
    Vick, Dustin
    Air University.
    Wong, Michael
    McMaster University.
    Wright, Heather
    University of Texas.
    Wright, Jasmine
    University of Texas.
    Zou, Wei
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    How can students-as-partners work address challenges to student, faculty, and staff mental health and well-being?2023In: International Journal for Students as Partners, E-ISSN 2560-7367, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 221-240Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    Voices
  • 8.
    Stigmar, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Davidsson, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Stollenwerk, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Orsaker till doktorandavhopp - hur kan risken för doktorandavhopp begränsas?2023In: Forskning om högre utbildning, konferens i Stockholm, 11-12 maj 2023: Översiktligt program och abstracts, 2023, p. 63-64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Avhopp från doktorandstudier är ett problem för universitet över hela världen och bör undvikas av flera skäl. Avhopp innebär personliga svårigheter och nederlag för doktoranden, handledare, examinator, institutionen, fakulteten och universitetet. Utöver oro och tidsförlust medför avhoppen kostnader och flera parter har därför intresse av ett framgångsrikt slutförande av doktorandstudierna. Tidigare forskning har pekat på att den främsta orsaken till avhopp är en dåligt fungerande relation mellan doktorand och handledare, och därför fokuserar vår studie speciellt på ickefungerande handledningsrelationer.  

    Det är dock fortfarande oklart vad som orsakar ickefungerande handledningsrelationer, problem och konflikter. Doktorander hoppar ofta av sin utbildning utan att ge en förklaring (Sverdlik et al., 2018). För att summera problemet och kunskapsluckan så vet vi fortfarande inte vad som orsakar avhopp, dåliga relationer och konflikter mellan doktorander och handledare. Vi menar att handledare, behöver ökad förståelse för de bakomliggande orsakerna till avhopp och hur handledare kan bidra till en ömsesidig, pålitlig och robust handledningsrelation.

    Syftet med studien är att klargöra orsaker till varför doktorander hoppar av sina forskarstudier. I syftet ingår att undersöka relationen mellan doktorand och handledare och ringa in vad som kan göras för att begränsa risken för avhopp. Syftet omfattar att lyfta fram vad som kännetecknar en solid och stödjande handledningsrelation enligt intervjupersonerna. I studien kartläggs både doktoranders och handledares perspektiv. Följande forskningsfrågor kommer att fokuseras:

    RQ 1: vilka är orsakerna till att doktorander hoppar av?

    RQ 2: vilka problem i doktorand- och handledarrelationen kan leda till avhopp?

    RQ3: hur kan risken för avhopp begränsas?

    RQ 4: vad kännetecknar en solid och stödjande handledningsrelation?

    Data kommer att insamlas genom, en webbenkät till doktorander som hoppat av och handledare vid flera lärosäten. Uppföljande intervjuer på Zoom och/eller ansikte mot ansikte, med doktorander och handledare kommer också att genomföras.

    Enkäterna kommer att vara webbaserade vari personuppgifter kommer att insamlas kring: kön, ålder, år för avhopp, antal terminer i doktorsutbildningen innan avhopp, antal handledare, ämne och avhandlingens inriktning. Avhoppare samt huvudhandledare (huvudhandledaren kommer i första hand kontaktas, om huvudhandledaren är omöjlig att få kontakt med, så kommer övriga handledare att kontaktas) kommer att erbjudas möjlighet att besvara enkätfrågor om: orsaker till avhopp från doktorsutbildningen; vilka specifika problem i förhållandet mellan doktorand och handledare som kan leda till avhopp; hur kan risken för avhopp begränsas samt vad som kännetecknar en solid och stödjande handledningsrelation?  

    En innehållsanalys kommer att göras för att identifiera eventuella mönster och dra slutsatser i enkätsvaren från doktorander och huvudhandledare/handledare. Vilka generella orsaker till avhopp anges? Vilka problem i relationen mellan doktorander och handledare redovisas i enkätsvaren? Vilka åtgärder föreslår enkätrespondenterna för att begränsa risken för avhopp? Vad anges i enkätsvaren som kännetecken för en solid och stödjande handledningsrelation?

    Det huvudsakliga bidraget med vår studie är att presentera fallbaserad kunskap kring allmänna orsaker till avhopp och specifikt om relationen mellan doktorand och handledare. Vidare kommer studien att redovisa en förståelse för vad som kännetecknar en gedigen handledningsrelation. Vår forskning kommer att ge såväl doktorander som handledare möjlighet att reflektera över hur de kan agera för att begränsa risken för avhopp och istället sikta på ett framgångsrikt fullföljande av doktorsutbildningen.

    Referenser

    Corcelles, M., Cano, M., Liesa, E., González-Ocampo, G., & Castelló, M. (2019). Positive and negative experiences related to doctoral study conditions. Higher Education Research & Development, 38(5), 922-939.

    Högskoleverket (2012). Orsaker till att doktorander lämnar forskarutbildningen utan examen –  en uppföljning av nybörjarna på forskarnivå läsåren 1999/2000 och 2000/01. Rapport 2012:1 R.

    Sverdlik, A., Hall, N. C., McAlpine, L., & Hubbard, K. (2018). The PhD experience: A review of  the factors influencing doctoral students’ completion, achievement, and well-being. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 13, 361-388. 

  • 9.
    Stollenwerk, Maria M
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lindholm, Marie
    Lund University.
    Pörn-Ares, Isabella
    Lund University.
    Larsson, Anna
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Lund University.
    Ares, Mikko PS
    Lund University.
    Very low-density lipoprotein induces interleukin-1beta expression in macrophages2005In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 335, no 2, p. 603-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated plasma level of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) is a risk factor for coronary heart disease. We investigated the effect of VLDL on expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. IL-1beta mRNA and protein expression was analysed by PCR and ELISA, respectively. Caspase activation was assessed by immunoblotting. Apart from potentiating lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of IL-1beta, VLDL alone induced secretion of IL-1beta from human monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was suppressed by an inhibitor of caspase-1, the protease which cleaves pro-IL-1beta. VLDL treatment activated caspase-1, as indicated by increased levels of the caspase-1 p20 subunit. Furthermore, VLDL increased IL-1beta mRNA expression, which was associated with activation of transcription factor AP-1. Inhibition of caspase-1 did not influence IL-1beta mRNA expression. In conclusion, VLDL induces IL-1beta mRNA expression, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1beta release from macrophages, suggesting that VLDL can promote inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions.

  • 10.
    Stollenwerk, Maria M
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Pashkunova-Martic, I
    Kremser, Christian
    Talasz, H
    Thurner, GC
    Abdelmoez, AA
    Wallnöfer, EA
    Helbok, A
    Neuhauser, E
    Klammsteiner, N
    Klimaschewski, L
    von Guggenberg, E
    Fröhlich, E
    Keppler, B
    Jaschke, W
    Debbage, Paul
    Albumin-based nanoparticles as magnetic resonance contrast agents: I. Concept, first syntheses and characterisation2010In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 133, no 4, p. 375-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract To develop a platform for molecular magnetic resonance imaging, we prepared gadolinium-bearing albumin-polylactic acid nanoparticles in the size range 20–40 nm diameter. Iterative cycles of design and testing upscaled the synthesis procedures to gram amounts for physicochemical characterisation and for pharmacokinetic testing. Morphological analyses showed that the nanoparticles were spheroidal with rough surfaces. Particle sizes were measured by direct transmission electron microscopical measurements from negatively contrasted preparations, and by use of photon correlation spectroscopy; the two methods each documented nanoparticle sizes less than 100 nm and generally 10–40 nm diameter, though with significant intrabatch and interbatch variability. The particles’ charge sufficed to hold them in suspension. HSA retained its tertiary structure in the particles. The nanoparticles were stable against turbulent flow conditions and against heat, though not against detergents. MRI imaging of liquid columns was possible at nanoparticle concentrations below 10 mg/ml. The particles were non-cytotoxic, non-thrombogenic and non-immunogenic in a range of assay systems developed for toxicity testing of nanoparticles. They were micellar prior to lyophilisation, but loosely structured aggregated masses after lyophilisation and subsequent resuspension. These nanoparticles provide a platform for further development, based on non-toxic materials of low immunogenicity already in clinical use,not expensive, and synthesized using methods which can be upscaled for industrial production.

  • 11.
    Stollenwerk, Maria M
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Svensson, Olof
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Schiopu, Alexandru
    Jansson, Bo
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Adsorption of low-density lipoprotein, its oxidation, and subsequent binding of specific recombinant antibodies: an in situ ellipsometric study2011In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects, ISSN 0304-4165, E-ISSN 1872-8006, Vol. 1810, no 2, p. 211-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles accumulate in the arterial wall and become oxidized during atherogenesis, leading to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. The major protein of the LDL particle, apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), becomes fragmented during oxidation and a target for the immune system. METHODS: In this study we used in situ ellipsometry to monitor the adsorption of LDL to solid silica surfaces and the effects of oxidation on the structure of the adsorbed LDL layer. We additionally investigated the binding kinetics of two recombinant human antibodies with different specificities recognizing epitopes of apoB-100 in surface-bound native and CuCl₂-oxidized LDL (oxLDL). The latter process was studied by adsorbing LDL and then adding the antibody and CuCl₂ while continuously monitoring adsorbed amount and the thickness of the film. The molar ratios between the antibodies and surface-bound LDL and oxLDL were calculated from these data. RESULTS: Our results indicate that oxidation of surface-bound LDL induces swelling of the layer, accompanied by a slight desorption. We further found that both antibodies were able to recognize LDL and oxLDL in its adsorbed orientation. Quantitative information was obtained on the number of available binding sites on surface-bound LDL and oxLDL for these two antibodies. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: Using ellipsometry for real-time monitoring of adsorption, in situ oxidation of LDL and binding of specific recombinant antibodies to surface-bound LDL, will open up possibilities to map different conformations and orientations of LDL in the adsorbed state.

  • 12.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gustafsson, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Edgren, Gudrun
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Ctr Teaching & Learning, Lund, Sweden..
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lindqvist, Magnus
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services.
    Eriksson, Tommy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Core competencies for a biomedical laboratory scientist - a Delphi study2022In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background After completing university education, biomedical laboratory scientists work in clinical laboratories, in biomedical research laboratories, in biotech, and in pharmaceutical companies. Laboratory diagnostics have undergone rapid development over the recent years, with the pace showing no signs of abatement. This rapid development challenges the competence of the staff and will most certainly influence the education of future staff. This study aimed to examine what was considered the necessary competencies needed to pursue a career as a biomedical laboratory scientist. Methods A modified Delphi technique was used, with the panel of experts expressing their views in a series of three questionnaire. Consensus was defined as the point which 75 % or more of the panel participants agreed that a particular competency was necessary. Results The study highlights the perceived importance of mostly generic competencies that relate to quality, quality assurance, and accuracy, as well as different aspects of safety, respect, trustworthiness (towards patients/clients and colleagues), and communication skills. The results also stress the significance of self-awareness and professionality. Conclusions We identified important competencies for biomedical laboratory scientists. Together with complementary information from other sources, i.e., guidelines, laws, and scientific publications, the competencies identified can be used as learning outcomes in a competency-based education to provide students with all the competencies needed to work as professional biomedical laboratory scientists.

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  • 13.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Lasson, Åke
    Andersson, Roland
    Active site-inactivated factor VIIa inhibits nuclear factor kappa B activation in intestinal ischemia and reperfusion2012In: Journal of Surgical Research, ISSN 0022-4804, E-ISSN 1095-8673, Vol. 178, no 2, p. 692-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury is a pivotal mechanism in critical illness and in the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, in which the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation plays a central role. Intestinal I/R injury initiates the extrinsic tissue factor or factor VIIa-dependent pathway of coagulation, also of importance in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Our aim was to analyze NF-κB activation in I/R injury in the rat intestine and in two main "shock" organs, that is, the liver and lungs. Pretreatment with active site-inactivated factor VII (FVIIai), an inhibitor of the extrinsic pathway, was evaluated.

  • 14. Wallnöfer, E A
    et al.
    Thurner, G C
    Kremser, C
    Talasz, H
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Helbok, A
    Klammsteiner, N
    Albrecht-Schgoer, K
    Dietrich, H
    Jaschke, W
    Debbage, P
    Albumin-based nanoparticles as contrast medium for MRI: vascular imaging, tissue and cell interactions, and pharmacokinetics of second-generation nanoparticles2021In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 155, p. 19-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This multidisciplinary study examined the pharmacokinetics of nanoparticles based on albumin-DTPA-gadolinium chelates, testing the hypothesis that these nanoparticles create a stronger vessel signal than conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents and exploring if they are safe for clinical use. Nanoparticles based on human serum albumin, bearing gadolinium and designed for use in magnetic resonance imaging, were used to generate magnet resonance images (MRI) of the vascular system in rats ("blood pool imaging"). At the low nanoparticle doses used for radionuclide imaging, nanoparticle-associated metals were cleared from the blood into the liver during the first 4 h after nanoparticle application. At the higher doses required for MRI, the liver became saturated and kidney and spleen acted as additional sinks for the metals, and accounted for most processing of the nanoparticles. The multiple components of the nanoparticles were cleared independently of one another. Albumin was detected in liver, spleen, and kidneys for up to 2 days after intravenous injection. Gadolinium was retained in the liver, kidneys, and spleen in significant concentrations for much longer. Gadolinium was present as significant fractions of initial dose for longer than 2 weeks after application, and gadolinium clearance was only complete after 6 weeks. Our analysis could not account quantitatively for the full dose of gadolinium that was applied, but numerous organs were found to contain gadolinium in the collagen of their connective tissues. Multiple lines of evidence indicated intracellular processing opening the DTPA chelates and leading to gadolinium long-term storage, in particular inside lysosomes. Turnover of the stored gadolinium was found to occur in soluble form in the kidneys, the liver, and the colon for up to 3 weeks after application. Gadolinium overload poses a significant hazard due to the high toxicity of free gadolinium ions. We discuss the relevance of our findings to gadolinium-deposition diseases.

  • 15.
    Yeung, Sing Yee
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sergeeva, Yulia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Pan, Guoqing
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Institute for Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212 013, China.
    Mittler, Silvia
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Division of Biophysics and Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
    Dam, Tommy
    Division of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Peter
    Division of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tillo, Adam
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Hsiung Mattisson, Sabrina
    ImaGene-iT AB, Medicon Village, Scheelevägen 2, 223 81 Lund, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Bo
    ImaGene-iT AB, Medicon Village, Scheelevägen 2, 223 81 Lund, Sweden.
    Stollenwerk, Maria M
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Reversible Self-Assembled Monolayers with Tunable Surface Dynamics for Controlling Cell Adhesion Behavior.2022In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 14, no 37, p. 41790-41799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cells adhering onto surfaces sense and respond to chemical and physical surface features. The control over cell adhesion behavior influences cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation, which are important considerations in biomaterial design for cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. Here, we report on a supramolecular-based approach to prepare reversible self-assembled monolayers (rSAMs) with tunable lateral mobility and dynamic control over surface composition to regulate cell adhesion behavior. These layers were prepared by incubating oxoacid-terminated thiol SAMs on gold in a pH 8 HEPES buffer solution containing different mole fractions of ω-(ethylene glycol)2-4- and ω-(GRGDS)-, α-benzamidino bolaamphiphiles. Cell shape and morphology were influenced by the strength of the interactions between the amidine-functionalized amphiphiles and the oxoacid of the underlying SAMs. Dynamic control over surface composition, achieved by the addition of inert filler amphiphiles to the RGD-functionalized rSAMs, reversed the cell adhesion process. In summary, rSAMs featuring mobile bioactive ligands offer unique capabilities to influence and control cell adhesion behavior, suggesting a broad use in biomaterial design, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

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