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  • 1.
    Baard, Patrik
    et al.
    Universitetet i Oslo.
    Melin, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Justice in energy transition scenarios: Perspectives from Swedish energy politics2023In: Etikk i praksis, ISSN 1890-3991, E-ISSN 1890-4009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we justify why justice ought to be considered in scenarios of energy transitions, stipulate what dimensions should reasonably be considered, and investigate whether such considerations are taken in Swedish parliamentary debates on energy policies. Through interviews we investigated how Swedish parliamentary politicians think through justice in energy transitions, providing a practical perspective. We conclude that while there is some overlap between minimal conditions for energy justice and the issues brought forward by Swedish politicians,several issues are omitted. Examples include procedural justice and recognizing Sámi interests. On the other hand, principles of energy justice omit economic issues, which are however often brought up by respondents. It can be argued that justice issues, and not only the technical and economic issues that currently dominate the political debate, should be considered in energy transitions. It is therefore unfortunate that questions about justice are not adequately recognized by Swedish members of parliament, as outlined here by interview results. Stronger conclusions would require more empirical work, but the article points out several discrepancies between the topics discussed in the research literature on energy policies, and the topics discussed by elected parliamentarians having a specific focus on energy policies.

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  • 2.
    Bendel, Jana
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Opportunities and Challenges of a Small State Presidency: The Estonian Council Presidency 20172017In: Administrative Culture, ISSN 1736-6089, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 27-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses some of the opportunities and challenges that the Estonian Council Presidency is facing during its first term in 2017. We also explore how Estonia is likely to appreach this position. The Council presidency provides a position to propagate national interests and an opportunity for leadership within the Council but can also be preceived as a silencer of domestic narrative. We claim that the Estonian presidency is expected to silence its interests in most policy areas in order to portray Estonia as a pro-European mediator. Through qualitative text analysis of key documents, interviews with Estonian, Danish, Finnish, and Latvian officials and comparative reflections on these states' presidencies, we find that Estonia is likely to excercise a problem-solving leadership during its term and that the main challenge and opportunity will be the further Europeanization of its public administration.

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  • 3.
    Kronsell, Annica
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Gender, Intersectionality and Institutions2021In: Gender, Intersectionality and Climate Institutions in Industrialised States / [ed] Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily and Kronsell, Annica, London: Routledge, 2021, 1, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate institutions at different levels – i.e. intergovernmental organisations, national, regional and municipal authorities as well as sectorial institutions – are authoritative key actors in climate policy-making. There are, however, often shortcomings in their policy-making, most prominently their prevalent focus on technical innovations and economic incentives, and the lack of attention to social dimensions. There are important climate-relevant social differences that deserve recognition. If social differences are left unattended, climate policy will likely reinforce existing inequalities, but it will also risk overlooking differential effects and ending up becoming ineffective and give rise to protests among groups who feel unjustifiably challenged by climate policies and decisions.

    The chapter outlines a theoretical framework based on institutional approaches combined with gender and intersectional perspectives to explore both formal and informal climate institutions and how they work with gender and other intersecting social categories. The chapter discusses how such theoretical approaches can contribute to an increased understanding about power relations and social differences in climate policy-making and climate-relevant sectors in industrialised states and thereby highlight the challenges and opportunities for advancing gender equality, equity and social justice.

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    Gender, Intersectionality and Institutions
  • 4.
    Kronsell, Annica
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Rask, Nanna
    Gothenburg University.
    Singleton, Benedict
    Gothenburg University.
    An Intersectional Exploration of Climate Institutions2021In: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Environmental Politics / [ed] Jeannie Sowers, Stacy D. VanDeveer, and Erika Weinthal, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governing bodies at different levels are authoritative institutions and civil servants/policy-makers are key actors in realizing global and national climate objectives. They have largely failed to create effective, legitimate, democratic, and just policies. This is problematic in light of research that views the climate transition as a social and behavioral concern and stresses the importance of paying attention to social effects in policy-making. The authors explore the Swedish climate institutions: the Environmental Protection Agency, the Traffic Administration, the Energy Agency, and the Innovation Agency. They analyzed key policy documents and 31 interviews questions on how social issues are understood and dealt with in institutional practices. The authors confirmed that emphasis has been on technological innovations and economic incentives. Although policy-makers recognize the relevance of social concerns, efforts to date seem insufficient. The main challenge is how to incorporate such concerns when action is restricted by institutional path dependencies. The authors’ approach starts in feminist institutionalism and adds intersectionality in an analytical lens that helps explore how power relations are embedded within climate institutions and can explain their effects. Insights are that power relations are context-specific and situated in a certain place and time. The authors’ method of how to pursue contextually sensitive and situated analyses of complex intersections of power can be used across contexts in further comparative studies.

  • 5.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Kronsell, Annica
    The Double Democratic Deficit in Climate Policy-making by the EU Commission2016In: Femina Politica, ISSN 1433-6359, E-ISSN 2196-1646, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 64-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abels and Mushaben (2012) argue that there is a double democratic deficit in the EU regarding gender: women are underrepresented within the EU institutions and gender awareness is lacking in EU policymaking. This article contributes to that scholarship with its specific focus on the climate domain. EU is an important constructor of the international climate regime and the Union is committed to gender mainstream all its policies and processes. Furthermore there are documented gender differences in Europe regarding behavior and views on climate change. (Räty and Carlsson-Kanyama 2010, Goldsmith et al. 2013). This article investigates the relevancy of the double democratic deficit for EU´s climate policymaking. We map the representation of female and male experts at the Commission´s climate units and search for gender recognition in EU´s climate documents. There we discover silence regarding gender, confirmed through interviews with policy-makers. Using feminist institutionalism we conclude that existing gender power relations within the Commission affect the explored climate units, which reproduce masculine institutional practices.

  • 6.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Icelandic Climate Politics: Ways Forward to a Green Welfare State?2023In: Climate Change and the Future of Europe: Views from the Capitals / [ed] Michael Kaeding; Johannes Pollak; Paul Schmidt, Cham: Springer, 2023, p. 139-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various overlapping crises, climate change, conflicts around the world along with the COVID-19 pandemic seem to be symptomatic of this current era. All serve to highlight the commonalities of crises and how social differences such as age, class, gender, location, and education mean that not all people are affected in the same way. An exploration of Iceland’s climate goals demonstrates that social differences, are recognised to some extent and arguably more than in the European green deal. Iceland however needs to further address challenges related to heavy emitting industries, car-centrism, as well as tensions between urban and rural areas in the context of a sustainable future.

  • 7.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Immigrant Representation in the Swedish Parliament: Towards Homogeneity or United Diversity?2016In: Social Change Review, ISSN 2068-8016, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 97-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study explores how immigrants are represented within the two largest political parties in Sweden, the Social Democratic Party and the Moderate Party. Apart from exploring the descriptive representation of immigrants in the Swedish parliament, this article explores whether immigrant representation in the two parties in question results in visible diversity in views on immigration and in particular asylum politics. We are predominantly interested in exploring whether immigrant parliamentarians, who might have identities and experiences differing from the majority of the parliamentarians, represent views departing from the general party lines. The theoretical underpinnings of the article are based on an intersectionality approach and historical and feminist institutionalism, specifically the politics of presence, which explores the link between a critical mass in politics and critical acts or substantive representation. The first findings of the study, which have been reached primarily through a qualitative comparative analysis of survey material, are mixed. The number of Social Democratic and Moderate immigrant parliamentarians does not reach the level of foreign-born citizens in Sweden. Nevertheless, there appears to be room for diverse views on immigration and asylum politics that depart from the general party lines in both parties.

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  • 8. Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Norræn áhrif á umhverfisstefnu ESB: Nordic influences on EU Environmental Politics2007In: Altjodastjornmal vid upphaf 21. aldar: Rannsoknir ungra fraedimanna i altjodastjornmálum / [ed] Magnúsdottir, R; Ómarsdottir, S.B.; Ingimundarson, V., Reykavik: Institute of International Affairs- University of Iceland , 2007, 1, p. 141-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the possible influences of Sweden, Denmark and Finland on the Environmental Policy of the EU. We focus specifically on the reputation, expertise and role model behaviour of the Nordic EU members and their possibilities to use these factors as cognitive power resources.The chapter discusses several examples where the Nordic EU member states have successfully promoted their national environmental interests within the EU. We also make use of interviews with environmental representatives at the Swedish, Danish and Finnish Permanent Representations  to the EU in Brussels, officials from other member states, DG Environment of the Commission and the European Environment Agency. The results indicate that the Nordic EU members  have to some extent minimised their quantitative disadvantages, such as small administrations and limited voting powers, by successfully using the cognitive power resources in question within the Environmental Policy of the European Union.

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  • 9. Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Small States as Role Models and Norm-setters2005In: Rannsóknir í félagsvísindum VI. / [ed] Ulfar Hauksson, Reykjavik: Social Science Research Institute- University of Iceland , 2005, p. 577-591Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International Relations (IR)-theorists argue that state’s power is built on its geographical size, its population size, and economic status. According to this view small states lack power in international relations (Goetschel, 1998). This paper challenges this view and points out various cognitive power resources, influenced by leadership theorists, which can be of great advantage to small states. Cognitive resources are by definition qualitative resources such as negotiating skills, expertise knowledge, ideas, example-setting, norm setting and mediation, in contrast to quantitative power resources, such as financial strength and number of votes (Peterson and Bomberg, 1999). A key element associated with the use of cognitive resources is the ability to persuade others of the rightfulness of your own way, by using variety of reasons such as technical knowledge, emphasis on moral principles and/or by setting good examples (Malnes, 1995; see also e.g. Ingebritsen, 2002; Kronsell, 2002) In this paper it is claimed that small states have been known, (and can), take the lead in certain policy areas in order to make their voice heard, if they already have an established image as experts, norm-setters, role models or mediators, in the policy areas in question. This leads us to the main hypothesis which can be summarized as follows:

    Small states can take the lead and increase their influences in certain policy areas of concern to them by using “cognitive power resources” such as expertise knowledge, norm setting, example-setting or mediation. 

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  • 10. Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Small States at the Helm of the EU Council Presidency2007In: Rannsóknir í félagsvísindum VIII / [ed] Gunnar Thor Johannesson, Reykjavik: Social Science Research Institute- University of Iceland , 2007, 1, p. 647-656Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 11.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Small States' Power Resources in EU Negotiations: Nordic Eco-entrepreneurship within the Environmental Policy of the EU2011Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Still Making their Voices Heard within the EU? The Nordic States' Experience of the Effects of the Financial Crisis on their Environmental Goals: The Nordic States' Experience of the Effects of the Financial Crisis on their Environmental Goals2012In: 19th International Conference of Europeanists- Council for European Studies (CES)https://councilforeuropeanstudies.org/conferences/past-conferences/19th-international-conference/, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThe Nordic EU members, Sweden, Denmark and Finland have a well-established reputation as environmental forerunners (Magnúsdóttir 2009, 2011, Liefferink and Andersen 2005, Ingebritsen 2002, Kronsell 2002). Hitherto they have on various occasions been able to act as “eco-entrepreneurs” within the EU and have actively used their reputation and strong image to promote their environmental objectives (Kronsell 2002, Magnúsdóttir 2009, 2010, Ingebritsen 2006). Today however, much of the world´s attention is still focused on the extensive effects of the global financial crisis and solutions for recovery. Consequently the crisis put economic concerns at the top of the agenda of most states at the expense of environmental issues. The poor results of the COP15 climate summit, in December 2009 and the succeeding COP summits indicate that advocates of a progressive climate policy, such as the Nordic states, are still met with skepticism. In the light of the present state of affairs we want to shed light on the current environmental reputation or image of the Nordic EU member states within the EU and ask; how, if in any ways, has the self-image and/or the international image of the Nordic EU members in environmental politics been affected by the crisis? Furthermore, we ask; how, if in any ways, have the environmental goals and preferences of the Nordic EU members been affected by the crisis? Accordingly, the article explores the reputation and preferences of the Nordic EU member states within the Environmental Policy of the EU in 2011-2014. We make use of our own previous research on the images and preferences of the Nordic EU members in the pre-crisis period of 2002-2008 for comparative purposes. The first preliminary findings of the article indicate that the crisis has to some extent affected the preferences of the Nordic EU members and also had some effects on their self-images. Key words: Nordic EU members, environmental politics, normative power, images, and preferences.

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  • 13. Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    The Importance of Image in the Environmental Policy of the European Union2006In: Rannsóknir í félagsvísindum VII / [ed] Ulfar Hauksson, Reykjavik: Social Science Research Institute- University of Iceland , 2006, 1, p. 673-684Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 14.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Kronsell, Annica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Climate institutions matter: The challenges of making gender-sensitive and inclusive climate policies2024In: Cooperation and Conflict, ISSN 0010-8367, E-ISSN 1460-3691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), with its expert panel the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and the European Union, as well as national and local authorities in various sectors (such as transport, industry, energy, and agriculture), play a central role in developing and enacting climate strategies. Climate institutions, particularly in the Global North, have however been slow in their recognition of gender and other climate-relevant social aspects. With the help of feminist institutionalism, we analyze the contemporary climate regime and how it deals with gender and social differences, asking how climate institutions, originating in the Global North, organize bodies and institutionalize gender norms and relations. The main aim is to highlight existing institutional inertia and obstacles to transformative institutional practices that are needed for just and inclusive climate policies. The article is conceptual with examples drawn from institutional literature as well as empirical research on the United Nations, the European Union, and states in the Global North. We conclude that there is an increasing recognition of the gendered effects of climate change particularly in terms of the need for diverse representation in decision making. Institutional inertia, in particular path-dependent policy-making in climate institutions, however makes gender often invisible or associated with women only and therefore remains a major obstacle for the realization of inclusive and equal climate policies.

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    Climate institutions matter: The challenges of making gender-sensitive and inclusive climate policies
  • 15.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Kronsell, AnnicaGothenburg University.
    Gender, Intersectionality and Climate Institutions in Industrialised States2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This book explores how climate institutions in industrialized countries work to further the recognition of social differences and integrate this understanding in climate policy making.

    With contributions from a range of expert scholars in the field, this volume investigates policy-making in climate institutions from the perspective of power as it relates to gender. It also considers other intersecting social factors at different levels of governance, from the global to the local level and extending into climate-relevant sectors. The authors argue that a focus on climate institutions is important since they not only develop strategies and policies, they also (re)produce power relations, promote specific norms and values, and distribute resources. The chapters throughout draw on examples from various institutions including national ministries, transport and waste management authorities, and local authorities, as well as the European Union and the UNFCCC regime. Overall, this book demonstrates how feminist institutionalist theory and intersectionality approaches can contribute to an increased understanding of power relations and social differences in climate policy-making and in climate-relevant sectors in industrialized states. In doing so, it highlights the challenges of path dependencies, but also reveals opportunities for advancing gender equality, equity, and social justice.

    Gender, Intersectionality and Climate Institutions in Industrialized States will be of great interest to students and scholars of climate politics, international relations, gender studies and policy studies.

      

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    Gender, Intersectionality and Climate Institutions in Industrialised States
  • 16.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Kronsell, Annica
    Gothenburg University.
    Moving forward: Making equality, equity, and social justice central2021In: Gender, Intersectionality and Climate Institutions in Industrialised States / [ed] Gunnhildur Lily Magnusdottir, Annica Kronsell, London: Routledge, 2021, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fortunately, the climate crisis is increasingly recognised across the world. Associated with this recognition is a crisis discourse. While crises may encourage action, the crisis discourse also conveys a message that all individuals are implicated in the crises on equal terms and in equal ways. This is not the case. Paraphrasing Cynthia Enloe 1 (see also Chapter 3, this volume): We are not all in this together. We’re on the same rough seas, but we’re in very different boats. And some of those boats are very leaky. And some of those boats were never given oars. And some of those boats have high-powered motors on them. We are not all in the same boat.

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  • 17.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Kronsell, Annica
    The In(visibility) of gender in Scandinavian climate policy-making2015In: International feminist journal of politics, ISSN 1461-6742, E-ISSN 1468-4470, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 308-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the link between gender representation and climate policy-making in Scandinavia. We ask to what extent equal descriptive representation (critical mass) results in substantive representation (critical acts). Our study shows that women and men are equally represented in administrative and political units involved in climate policy-making, and in some units women are in the majority. However, a text analysis of the outcomes, that is, the Scandinavian climate strategies, reveals a silence regarding gender, further confirmed through interviews. Accordingly, a critical mass of women does not automatically result in gender-sensitive climate policy-making, recognizing established gender differences in material conditions and in attitudes toward climate issues. In interviews, we also note that policy-makers are largely unaware of gender differences on climate issues in the Scandinavian context. We discuss why a critical mass of women in climate policy-making has not led to critical acts and offer alternative explanations informed by feminist IR theory. For example, poststructural feminism claims that masculine norms are deeply institutionalized in climate institutions; hence, policy-makers adapt their actions to the masculinized institutional environment. Thus, substantive representation should be understood in relation to gendered institutional processes.

  • 18.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Thorhallsson, Baldur
    The Nordic States and Agenda-setting in the European Union: How Do Small States Score?2011In: Icelandic Review of Politics and Administration/Stjornmal og stjornsysla, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 205-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines whether particular subjective features are better suited than objective feature, to study the ability of the Nordic EU member states to have a say within the environmental policy of the EU. The Nordic states will be placed within a conceptual framework intended to explain states’ ability to exercise influence internationally. The paper will argue that traditional quantitative measures normally defining size of states, such as the population, territorial size, GDP and military strength, do not give a clear picture of their influence within the EU. The paper argues that subjective features, which are concerned with how various domestic and external actors regard the Nordic states in environmental matters, have enabled the Nordic states to punch above their weight in EU environmental policy-making. Also, it is maintained here that features such as Nordic politicians’ ambitions and prioritizations and their ideas about EU decision-making processes may indicate their states’ ability to influence within the Union. Furthermore, we claim that states’ administrative competence and the degree of domestic cohesion, combined with the degree to which the state maintains an external united front are important indicators of their success in the EU.

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  • 19.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Widengård, Marie
    chool of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sweden´s conflicting green leadership in the European Union2024In: European Politics and Society, ISSN 2374-5118, E-ISSN 2374-5126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the nuanced dynamics of green leadership within the European Union (EU), focusing on Sweden. Sweden has long been heralded as an exemplar of environmental and climate leadership within the European Union as well as a frontrunner in the adoption of green policies, notably in the realms of bioenergy and biofuels. However, its leadership stance has come under scrutiny due to the inherent conflicts within green initiatives, often referred to as ‘green-green dilemmas’ that arise when environmental actions, despite their sustainable intentions, clash over competing interests. Drawing on a variety of sources we delve into the complexities surrounding Sweden's green leadership. The article highlights how Sweden’s enthusiastic endorsement of bioenergy and biofuels, integral to its climate action strategy, has sparked debates and raised questions about Sweden´s perceived green leadership within the European Union. Sweden's approach to navigating these conflicts, alongside its efforts to negotiate and balance economic interests with environmental ambitions, offers a compelling insight into the challenges of maintaining green leadership in the face of conflicting green agendas.

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    Sweden´s conflicting green leadership in the European Union
  • 20.
    Melin, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Energiscenarier och rättvisa: Sammanfattning och policyrekommendationer2023Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 21.
    Melin, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Baard, Patrick
    Oslo universitet.
    Politiska åtgärder som underlättar hög energikonsumtion är problematiska ur ett rättviseperspektiv2022In: Sydsvenskan, ISSN 1652-814X, no 2022-09-04Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Melin, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Baard, Patrik
    University of Oslo.
    Deltagande rättvisebedömningar av energiscenarier: Teori och empiriska resultat2023Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport beskriver den teoretiska bakgrunden till och resultaten från fyra workshopar om energiscenarier och rättvisa som genomfördes i Stockholm och Malmö från och med november 2021 och till och med december 2022. Deltagarna var representanter för myndigheter, miljöorganisationer, organisationer för olika kraftslag, fackföreningar och politiska partier. Under workshoparna diskuterade deltagarna olika energiscenarier ur ett rättviseperspektiv, vilka beskrev den framtida energiproduktionen och energikonsumtionen för Sverige respektive Skåne.

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  • 23.
    Melin, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Baard, Patrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Energiscenarier och rättvisa: Uppfattningar om rättvisefrågor relaterade till energi- produktion och -konsumtion samt energiscenarier inom svensk politik och svenska myndigheter2021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna populärvetenskapliga rapport redogör för de viktigaste empiriska resultaten från den första delen (work package 1) av projektet ’Energiscenarier och rättvisa – en fallstudie av Sve-rige’, vilken genomfördes år 2020. Resultaten kommer att analyseras ytterligare med avsikt att publicera dem i vetenskapliga tidskrifter. Projektet i sin helhet pågår år 2020-2022. Under projektets andra del (work package 2) som pågår år 2021-2022 kommer vi att genomföra fokusgrupper som syftar till att bedöma energiscenarier ur ett rättviseperspektiv. Deltagare kommer att vara olika intressenter såsom politiker, tjänstemän och representanter för frivillig-organisationer. Ytterligare två populärvetenskapliga rapporter baserade på projektets andra del kommer att författas. Projektet beviljades medel av Energimyndigheten inom ramen för forskningsprogrammet Människa, Energisystem och Samhälle (MESAM). Det övergripande syftet med projektet är att utveckla metoder och riktlinjer för deltagan-de scenarier som på ett systematiskt sätt kan integrera frågor som rör nationell, global och intergenerationell rättvisa. Projektets första del syftar till att ge en översikt av rättviseuppfatt-ningar i den politiska och administrativa kontexten för energiscenarier. Vi har genomfört en analys av riksdagsmotioner för att förstå vilka explicita och implicita rättviseuppfattningar som dominerar i dessa dokument. För att skapa en bredare bild av rättviseuppfattningar relaterade till energiscenarier inom svensk politik och svenska myndigheter har vi dessutom intervjuat politiker och tjänstemän på nationell nivå och inom region Skåne. 

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    Energiscenarier och rättvisa
  • 24.
    Melin, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Baard, Patrik
    Department of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and Ideas, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Energy Politics and Justice: An Ecofeminist Ethical Analysis of the Swedish Parliamentarian Debate2022In: Ethics, Policy & Environment, ISSN 2155-0085, E-ISSN 2155-0093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We contribute to the scientific debate by studying the storylines, discourses and related normative judgments in parliamentary motions by private members of the Swedish parliament from the time period 2010–2019. The paper makes use of an ecofeminist theoretical framework to problematize these storylines, discourses and normative judgments. We conclude that the focus in the material is on economic and technical issues, while issues of justice play a marginal role. None of the important dimensions of energy justice are adequately considered and many of the dominant storylines and discourses are based on the implicit assumption that issues of justice are insignificant.

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    fulltext
  • 25.
    Singleton, Benedict E.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Take a ride into the danger zone?: Assessing path dependency and the possibilities for instituting change at two Swedish government agencies2021In: Gender, Intersectionality and Climate Institutions in Industrialised States / [ed] Gunnhildur Lily Magnusdottir, Annica Kronsell, London: Routledge, 2021, 1, p. 86-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate institutions, such as government agencies, are important sites for climate change action. However, the type of action available to any institution will relate to the historical experiences of the institution and those embedded within it. Thus, institutions may exhibit path-dependency, based on previous experiences, such as gender-blindness. This may make the inclusion of gender and other climate-relevant social factors appear less appropriate in comparison to technical and economic solutions. This has direct consequences for the types of climate action undertaken and how climate change is framed, thus often as a scientific, technical problem rather than a societal problem with intersectional dimensions. This chapter focuses upon two climate institutions: the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the Swedish Transport Administration. Based on the interview data, it explores how civil servants frame possibilities for institutional action and changes in climate policy-making. It highlights that respondents would alternatively see change resulting from government direction and as something that motivated civil servants could lead on. Respondents often asserted that civil servants should aspire to remain apolitical and serve the will of the democratically elected government. Drawing on an intersectionality-inspired feminist institutionalism and organisational studies literature, we suggest several ways for civil servants to take action without damaging their institutional legitimacy. This will increase the possibility of further intersectional understanding and recognition of climate-relevant social differences in climate policy-making.

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    Take a ride into the danger zone?
  • 26.
    Singleton, Benedict
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rask, Nanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Magnusdottir, Gunnhildur Lily
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Kronsell, Annica
    University of Gothenburg.
    Intersectionality and climate policy-making: The inclusion of social difference by three Swedish government agencies2022In: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, ISSN 2399-6544, E-ISSN 2399-6552, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 180-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change effects, views and approaches vary based on geographical location, class, gender, age and other climate related social factors. It is thus relevant to explore how various government bodies/authorities involved in dealing with climate change represent and act on social difference across diverse societies. This article performs a discourse analysis of climate policy documents from three Swedish government agencies: the Transport Administration, the Energy Agency, and the Environmental Protection Agency. This in order to explore how the different agencies represent social difference: what is made visible; what is obscured; what are the impli-cations? We collected a purposive, collated sample of literature through online searches and personal communications with agency staff. We apply an intersectional approach to the sampled literature. The article finds that while each agency articulates an awareness of social difference, this tends to manifest in broad terms. It argues that this has the effect of obscuring differential climate impacts and effects of climate action, with potential environmental justice implications. Finally, the article concludes by proposing that incorporating intersectional approaches will support more effective, inclusive and equitable climate action, in Sweden and elsewhere.

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    fulltext
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