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  • 1.
    Dahl, G.B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Stade, Ronald
    Stockholm University.
    Anthropology, Museums and Contemporary Cultural Processes: An Introduction2000In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 157-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of ethnographic museums was, to begin with, that of imparting information about foreign cultures. These were, often enough, described as the polar opposites of the civilized places in which ethnographic museums could be found. The museum objects metaphorically represented primitive stages in human development. They appeared like relics even if produced recently. Anthropology, ethnography, or ethnology was the academic discipline which concerned itself with primitive cultures. The ethnographic museum with its harvests of colonial booty therefore seemed like the self-evident medium for conveying anthropological information. Today the preconditions for this constellation have changed. Have museums become inappropriate to communicate anthropological knowledge?

  • 2. Peters, Rebecca Warne
    et al.
    Stade, Ronald S
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hyatt, Susan
    Brown, Keith
    Green, Maia
    Rubinstein, Robert A.
    Anthropology's Contributions to Training in the Policy Professions: An Association for the Anthropology of Policy (ASAP) RoundtableChicago, November 20132015In: Political and Legal Anthropology Review (PoLAR), ISSN 1081-6976, E-ISSN 1555-2934, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Rapport, Nigel
    et al.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Debating Irony and the Ironic as a Social Phenomenon and a Human Capacity2014In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 443-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What follows is a set of paired articles, followed by a statement by both authors where they debate their distinct positions. Both articles treat irony, but while Rapport looks to it as a possible liberal virtue, a means of dealing with radical difference in a modern democracy, including the illiberal, Stade approaches irony from an ontological position that considers social relationships and cultural contingencies to be but one facet of human existence and irony and alienation to have an existential depth, the study of which can facilitate a rapprochement between sociocultural and philosophical anthropology. The paired articles are pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, perhaps: irony as world-mocking as well as world-tolerant.

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  • 4.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Citizens of Everything: The Aporetics of Cosmopolitanism2014In: We the Cosmopolitans: Moral and Existential Conditions of Being Human / [ed] Lisette Josephides; Alexandra Hall, Oxford and New York: Berghahn Books, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Commentary: A Matter of Relevance2001In: Anthropology News, ISSN 1541-6151, E-ISSN 1556-3502, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 7-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Continental encampment: genealogies of humanitarian containment in the Middle East and Europe2023In: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, ISSN 1359-0987, E-ISSN 1467-9655, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 978-979Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Cosmos and Polis, Past and Present2007In: Theory, Culture and Society. Explorations in Critical Social Science, ISSN 0263-2764, E-ISSN 1460-3616, Vol. 24, no 7-8, p. 295-298Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Debating the Politics of Hope: An Introduction2016In: Voice and Matter: Communication, Development and the Cultural Return / [ed] Thomas Tufte; Oscar Hemer, Göteborg: Nordicom , 2016, p. 203-211Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, Arjun Appadurai has discussed the unequal distribution and development of the human capacity to aspire in an attempt to synthesize different analytical strands into a unified perspective on poverty. In this chapter, the concept of the capacity to aspire is disaggregated into its constituent conceptual parts for the sake of advancing the discussion on the politics of hope, especially with regard to the philosophical legacy of Ernst Bloch.

  • 9. Stade, Ronald
    Designs of Identity: Politics of Aesthetics in the GDR1993In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 58, no 3-4, p. 241-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within less than five decades we could witness the ascent and descent of a national project in East Germany. From the very start, the scope of this project was total, this resembling a kind of Gesamtkunstwerk. Various cultural themes, with which competing designs for a socialist nation on German soil resonated, gained or lost in force in accordance with historical trends. Such cultural themes, especially those relating to images of collective identity, are interpreted with regard to the aesthetic cum political efforts that went into the construction of a new nation and a new people.

  • 10.
    Stade, Ronald
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Diffusion: Anthropological Aspects2001In: International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences / [ed] Neil Smelser; Paul Baltes, Oxford: Elsevier, 2001, p. 3673-3676Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A chronological account of the anthropological study of cultural diffusion is presented, starting with nineteenth-century, and early twentieth-century, reconstructions of the cultural history of diffusion. Subsequent approaches, in particular the study of culture contact, acculturation, and culture change, as well as world-system and globalization studies, are presented and discussed in the remainder of the text. In this context, issues such as colonialism, underdevelopment, and cultural imperialism are also touched upon. A change in research focus is described in which the key topic of cultural origins has been replaced by a concern with questions of cultural homogenization and diversity. In conclusion, an argument is made for the relevance of diffusion studies for contemporary anthropology.

      

  • 11.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Emergent Concept Chains and Scenarios of Depoliticization: The Case of Global Governance as a Future Past2014In: Anthropology Now and Next: Essays in Honor of Ulf Hannerz / [ed] Shalini Randeria, Thomas Hylland Eriksen and Christina Garsten, Oxford and New York: Berghahn , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    From Distant Object to Close Subject: The Concept of Culture in Political Science2005In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 279-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between researchers and their objects of study has varied and continues to vary across time and disciplinary traditions. A key element in such variations is the degree of reflexivity involved in the process of knowledge production. To what extent are researchers aware of how they themselves produce knowledge? This question is discussed in the context of political science. It is suggested that the various forms the study of culture has taken in political science can serve as an indicator of different levels of reflexivity or modes of engagement. Three influential conceptualizations of “culture” in political science are presented as examples: political culture theory, civilizational theory, and constructivism. Toward the end, the case is made for a cosmopolitan engagement with culture and examples from political science of this type of engagement are introduced.

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  • 13.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    In Memoriam: Karen Armstrong2015In: Conflict and society: Advances in research, ISSN 2164-4543, E-ISSN 2164-4551, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1p. 225-225Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Stade, Ronald
    Stockholm University.
    "In the Immediate Vicinity a World Has Come to an End": Lucie Varga As an Ethnographer of National Socialism2000In: Excluded Ancestors, Inventible Traditions: Essays Toward a More Inclusive History of Anthropology / [ed] Richard Handler, Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 2000, p. 265-283Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Introduction: The Social Life of Contentious Concepts2017In: Conflict and society: Advances in research, ISSN 2164-4543, E-ISSN 2164-4551, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 73-77Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Concepts have cultural biographies and social lives. Some concepts become social and political keywords that can be both indicative of and instrumental in social and political conflicts. (It might even be possible to speak of conceptual violence.) But they are not just contentious; they also tend to be contested. Contentious and contested concepts have been studied by historians and social scientists from varying temporal and spatial horizons. It is a research area that lends itself to cross-disciplinary approaches, as is demonstrated in the three contributions to this section, the first of which investigates the Russian obsession with the concept of “Europe.” The second contribution to the section explores the military roots of the concept of “creative thinking,” and the final contribution examines the social life of “political correctness” as a fighting word.

  • 16.
    Stade, Ronald
    Stockholms universitet.
    Pacific passages: World culture and local politics in guam1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Stade, Ronald
    Stockholm University.
    Review of Settling Accounts: Violence, Justice, and Accountability in Postsocialist Europe2000In: American Ethnologist, ISSN 0094-0496, E-ISSN 1548-1425, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 205-207Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Stade, Ronald
    Stockholm University.
    Review of The Cultures of Globalization1999In: American Ethnologist, ISSN 0094-0496, E-ISSN 1548-1425, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 780-781Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Review of The Fate of "Culture": Geertz and Beyond2001In: American Ethnologist, ISSN 0094-0496, E-ISSN 1548-1425, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 449-450Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The Capacity to Aspire: An Interview with Arjun Appadurai2016In: Voice and Matter: Communication, Development and the Cultural Return / [ed] Thomas Tufte; Oscar Hemer, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2016, p. 211-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Stade, Ronald
    Stockholm University.
    The Production of Sovereignty: Cultural Readings of an Ambiguous Concept1998In: The Task of Ethnology/Cultural Anthropology in Unifying Europe / [ed] Aleksander Posern-Zielinski, Poznan: Prace Komitetu Nauk Etnologicznych, Polskiej Akademii Nauk , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The Social Life of Fighting Words: The Case of Political Correctness2017In: Conflict and society: Advances in research, ISSN 2164-4543, E-ISSN 2164-4551, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 108-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political correctness has become a fighting word used to dismiss and discredit political opponents. The article traces the conceptual history of this fighting word. In anthropological terms, it describes the social life of the concept of political correctness and its negation, political incorrectness. It does so by adopting a concept-in-motion methodology, which involves tracking the concept through various cultural and political regimes. It represents an attempt to synthesize well-established historiographic and anthropological approaches. A Swedish case is introduced that reveals the kind of large-scale historical movements and deep-seated political conflicts that provide the contemporary context for political correctness and its negation. Thereupon follows an account of the conceptual history of political correctness from the eighteenth century up to the present. Instead of a conventional conclusion, the article ends with a political analysis of the current rise of fascism around the world and how the denunciation of political correctness is both indicative of and instrumental in this process.

  • 23.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Violent Communication and the Tyranny of the Majority2017In: In the Aftermath of Gezi: From Social Movement to Social Change? / [ed] Oscar Hemer; Hans-Åke Persson, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 55-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, research on human violence in the social sciences and humanities has focused on debunking the notion that there is such a thing as senseless violence. All types of violence are said to carry meaning and violence ought therefore be considered a form of communication. The anthropologist David Graeber suggests instead that violence, including structural violence, is predicated on a reduction of meaning. According to Graeber, the charging of violence with meaning is an asymmetrical affair: the perpetrators need not bother with understanding their victims; the victims exert themselves to comprehend even the smallest gesture of the perpetrator. Consequently, the retention of power through violence produces systemic stupidity, which is enacted by bureaucrats, the police and other state institutions at all levels. The idea of systemic stupidity will be tested out with the case of Gezi and coupled to a discussion of the tyranny of the majority in order to show that the state monopoly on legitimate violence is not a sufficient precondition for systemic stupidity.

  • 24.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    戦争から学ぶ教訓 – 紛争解決, テロの時代, ヨーロッパの政策2010In: 紛争解決の国際政治学―ユーロ・グローバリズムからの⽰唆 / [ed] Jonathan Lewis, Ronald Stade and Izumi Nakamitsu, Kyōto: Mineruva Shobō , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Stade, Ronald
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Dahl, G.B.
    Introduction: Globalization, Creolization, and Cultural Complexity2003In: Global Networks, ISSN 1470-2266, E-ISSN 1471-0374, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Global Networks is devoted to the work of Ulf Hannerz, whose research in urban anthropology, media anthropology, and transnational cultural processes has established his international reputation.1 Over the years, this reputationhas earned him many distinctions – he is, for example, a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, former Chair of the European Association of Social Anthropologists, and anthropology editor for the new International Enyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Such honours, however, never led to complacence. There has been a steady stream of publications and a continuous series of research projects. Most recently, Hannerz not only completed a study of the work of news media foreign correspondents, which included field research that took him to four continents, he has already started a new research project about the cultural and political dimensions of cosmopolitanism. All this attests to some measure of curiosity and resolve.

  • 26.
    Stade, Ronald
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Rapport, Nigel
    A Cosmopolitan Turn – Or Return?2007In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 223-235Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Stade, Ronald
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Rapport, Nigel
    Univ St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland..
    An anthropological investigation of cruelty and its contrasts2023In: Philosophy & Social Criticism, ISSN 0191-4537, E-ISSN 1461-734X, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 1262-1285, article id 01914537221101319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In liberal political philosophy, from Michel de Montaigne to Judith Shklar, cruelty - the wilful inflicting of pain on another in order to cause anguish and fear - has been singled out as 'the most evil of all evils' and as unjustifiable: the ultimate vice. An unconditional rejection and negation of cruelty is taken to be programmatic within a liberal paradigm. In this contribution, two anthropologists triangulate cruelty as a concept with torture (Stade) and with love (Rapport). Treating the capability to practise cruelty and the liability to suffer from cruelty as universal aspects of a human condition, Stade and Rapport aim to instantiate the precise enactment of cruelty, firstly, and secondly, to propose a process of its social negation. CIA training manuals and quotidian practice within the British National Health Service are employed as illustrative materials.

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