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  • 1.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Digitala medier, motoffentligheter och våldsbejakande extremism2017In: Våldsbejakande extremism: En forskningsantologi;67 / [ed] Amir Rostami, Christofer Edling, Statens offentliga utredningar , 2017, p. 323-355Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 2.
    Askanius, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    DIY Dying: Video activism as archive, commemoration and evidence2012In: International Journal of E-politics, ISSN 1947-9131, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 12-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines video activism in a context where ubiquitous camera technologies and online video sharing platforms are radically changing the media landscape in which demonstrations and political activism operates. The author discusses a number of YouTube videos documenting and narrating the recurring, anti-capitalist demonstrations in Europe in the past decade. With the death of Ian Tomlinson in London during the 2009 G20 protests as an empirical starting point, the author raises questions of how video documentation of this event links up with previous protest events by juxtaposing representations of ‘the moment of death’ (Zelizer, 2004, 2010) of protesters in the past. This article suggests that these videos work as (1) an archive of action and activist memory, (2) a site of commemoration in a online shrine for grieving, and (3) a space to provide and negotiate visual evidence of police violence and state repression. The author offers a re-articulation of the longstanding debate on visual evidence, action, and testimony in video activism. The results are suggestive of how vernacular commemorative genres of mourning and paying tribute to victims of police violence are fused with the online practices of bearing witness and producing visual evidence in new creative modes of using video for change.

  • 3.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Engaging with The Bridge: Cultural citizenship, cross-border identities and audiences as ‘regionauts’2019In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 271-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores civic engagement with the Danish/Swedish crime series The Bridge (Danmarks Radio/Sveriges Television 2011–) based on qualitative interviews with 113 audience members, and drawing on the notion of cultural citizenship. The perspective of cultural citizenship, as understood and operationalized mainly by Hermes, is married with critical perspectives on the crime drama genre and its audiences, along with cultural analysis of the construction of and engagement with the cross-border region in which the drama is set. The analysis shows that civic engagement with the crime series is prompted through the construction of community and allegiances through which audiences feel connected. This argument unfolds in three main analytical sections, detailing how audiences’ articulations of community are focused around distinct yet overlapping dimensions of community as (1) a national social ritual, (2) a sense of Nordic community, and finally (3) community as regional identity and sense of belonging to a borderless Öresund utopia – the integrated region between Denmark and Sweden. In so doing, the article offers rich insights into how audiences shape civic identities as members of nation states, of historical and cultural regions and as border-crossers between these geo-cultural entities - in dialogue with popular culture and around the boundary-work of the different communities offered by such texts.

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  • 4.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    “I just want to be the friendly face of national socialism": The turn to civil discourse in the online media of the Nordic Resistance Movement2021In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 42, no S1, p. 17-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a case study of the media narratives of the neo-Nazi organisation the Nordic Resistance Movement(NRM) which situates this particular actor within the broader landscape of violent extremism in Sweden today.[i] The empirical data consists of a strategic sample of the organisation’s online content (including web-TV, feature articles, and podcasts) all produced by and for members of the NRM and all presented as ‘culture’ and categorised under labels such as ’entertainment’, ‘pleasure’, ‘humour’ and ‘satire’[ii]. Drawing on a qualitative content analysis informed by the conceptual horizon of narrative inquiry, the paper examines various cultural expressions of neo-Nazi ideology in the organisation’s extensive repertoire of online media. Theoretically, it turns to the work of Miller-Idriss (2018) and Teitelbaum (2018) to bring centre stage the role of popular culture and entertainment in the construction of a meaningful narrative of community and belonging built around neo-Nazism in Sweden today. The paper demonstrates how the organisation with their efforts to boost the culture and entertainment-end of their media repertoire seek to add to the ordinariness and normalcy of neo-Nazi discourse and the banalisation and defusing of its underlying ideologies. Further, the analysis of the convergence between different genres, styles and content into new borderline discourses illustrate how contemporary extreme right movements are complicating the traditional binaries with which scholars have operated such as fascist versus liberal, totalitarian versus democratic and mainstream versus extremist.

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  • 5.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    “It feels like home, this is my Malmö”: Place, media location and fan experiences of The Bridge2017In: Participations, E-ISSN 1749-8716, Vol. 2, no 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on fan experiences of place in the Scandinavian crime series The Bridge (Bron||Broen). It offers four in-depth portraits of fans representing different modes of engaging with geographies of the imagination based on participant observations and qualitative semi-structured interviews with 80 audience members conducted in Denmark, Sweden and the UK. The analysis draws attention to fans’ emotional engagement with the show, and to how the experience of the media location of a drama set in the borderland between Denmark and Sweden induces a ‘sense of place’ in fans’ imagination. Based on the analysis of fans’ experience of place in the drama and the emotional landscapes of Scandinavian crime fiction more broadly, the article engages in a broader discussion of the significance and contingency of place to fans’ emotional experience of television drama. I argue that the relationship between media fandom and sites of media production is best understood in terms of a series of continuities and disjunctures between the materiality/virtuality of media tourism and travelling. These are actualised and shaped by the different dimensions of knowledge – from locality to genericity, embodied to imagined – that fans bring into the playful and affective process of engaging with media. The findings of this kind of longitudinal, empirical research into the lived experiences of place thus add to a nuanced understanding of the relationship between media fandom and sites of media production based on prolonged and in-depth interactions with audiences.

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  • 6.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Kritiske perspektiver på #MeToo i Norden:: Journalistikken, debatten, bevægelsen2020In: Journalistica, ISSN 1901-6220, E-ISSN 1904-7967, no 1, p. 7-13Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 7.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    On Frogs, Monkeys, and Execution Memes: Exploring the Humor-Hate Nexus at the Intersection of Neo-Nazi and Alt-Right Movements in Sweden2021In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 147-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a case study of the online media practices of the militant neo-Nazi organization the Nordic Resistance Movement, currently the biggest and most active extreme-right actor in Scandinavia. I trace a recent turn to humor, irony, and ambiguity in their online communication and the increasing adaptation of stylistic strategies and visual aesthetics of the Alt-Right inspired by online communities such as 4chan, 8chan, Reddit, and Imgur. Drawing on a visual content analysis of memes (N = 634) created and circulated by the organization, the analysis explores the place of humor, irony, and ambiguity across these cultural expressions of neo-Nazism and how ideas, symbols, and layers of meaning travel back and forth between neo-Nazi and Alt-right groups within Sweden today. 

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  • 8.
    Askanius, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Online video activism and political mash-up genres2013In: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article situates contemporary forms of video activism in online environments within a historical trajectory of radical film recruited for Left thinking and action. Focusing on the remix ethos and aesthetics of political mash-up videos, the article suggests how revisiting the analogue precursors of digital video may help contextualise and understand new forms of video activism, and politically committed media practices more generally. In the first part of the analysis, I engage with some of the principal conceptual themes and aesthetics that shape the various hybrid genres of the kind of visual activism we see emerging in YouTube and similar video platforms today. For these purposes, I propose atypology for understanding the motley array of video documentary and documentation available online as a hybrid and diverse range of media forms for political investigation and portrayal. The second part of the analysis demonstrates how such mash-up practices play out on three distinct levels when digital videos are put in circulation online. First, political mash-up is understood as a set of material practices in which online content is mixed and repurposed, second, in terms of a convergence between different styles, genres and modes of address, and finally, the concept of mash-up opens up for an understanding of the blurring of boundaries between different political actors and motives in online media environments.

  • 9.
    Askanius, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Protest movements and the spectacle of death:  From urban places to video spaces’2013In: Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change, ISSN 0163-786X, E-ISSN 1875-7871, Vol. 35, p. 105-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    (Social) Media Time, Connective Memory and Activist Television Histories: The Case of TV Stop2018In: Social Media Materialities and Protest: Critical reflections / [ed] Mette Mortensen, Christina Neumeyer, Thomas Poell, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a case study of the Copenhagen-based activist television channel TV Stop (1987-2005), this chapter examines how social media are used as archives in ways that seek to facilitate connective memory between past, present and future protest movements. Drawing on in-depth key informant interviews and a thematic analysis of the online spaces former activists appropriate to store, organise and reinvigorate the historical video material, the case of TV Stop is used to reflect upon memory, archival activism and media time/temporalities in relation to social media materialities. The chapter is concerned with materiality in the specific context of video and television production and the pre-digital properties of the media landscape in which the channel first operated. It follows a shift in the cultural form that the channel uses to express itself along with a general transition from analogue to digital video materiality, which involve different forms of temporality, storage and memory. The analysis shows how the relaunch of TV Stop in social media can usefully be understood as driven by three interlaced incentives to store and preserve time; to catch up with times and as impelled by the urge to remember times passed and reminding people of the value of remembering and making connections between past and present struggles.

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  • 11.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Social movement studies and citizen media2020In: The Routledge Encyclopedia of Citizen Media / [ed] By Mona Baker, Bolette B. Blaagaard, Henry Jones, Luis Pérez-González, London: Routledge, 2020, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 12.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Studying the Nordic Resistance Movement: three urgent questions for researchers of contemporary neo-Nazis and their media practices2019In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 878-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary provides critical reflections on a number of challenges related to research methodology and ethics when studying organized racism in online environments. Based on ongoing fieldwork of the Nordic Resistance Movement (NMR) in Sweden, I ask three critical questions about researching the neo-Nazi organization and organized racism more generally: (1) How do we produce valid knowledge of these ‘closed’ groups in their ‘open’ online spaces? What are the limitations of our research on hidden social life when we only have access to what they want us to know? (2) Why and for whom are we producing research on these groups? Or, put another way, what ethical considerations and problems related to intent and research agendas arise in studies of neo-Nazism and other forms of organized racism? (3) What is the emotional labour involved in studying these groups for the researcher and how might it be used in a productive manner?

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  • 13.
    Askanius, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Video activism 2.0: Space, place and audiovisual imagery2010In: Regional Aesthetics: Locating Swedish Media / [ed] Erik Hedling, Olof Hedling and Mats Jönsson, Stockholm: Kungliga Biblioteket , 2010, p. 337-358Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Video activism as technology, text, testimony - or practices?2019In: Citizen Media and Practice. Currents, Connections, Challenges, / [ed] Hilde Stephansen, Emiliano Treré, Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By situating debates on the virtues and limitations of practice theory in relation to the specific field of video activism, this chapter inscribes itself into the burgeoning area of scholarship on social movement media practices. First, by synthesizing scholarship on historical and contemporary forms of video activism, I identify three distinct foci in this literature, each adding valuable but essentially isolated insights to the phenomenon by considering video as either or primarily technology, text, or testimony. Based on this review, I then demonstrate how a practice-based approach allows us to appreciate this form of citizen media as not one, but all of these, and puts us in a position to ask holistic questions. Rather than repeating conceptual dichotomies such as online/offline, digital/analogue, old/new, mainstream/activist, a practice-based approach addresses the rich ways in which these categories impinge and encroach on each other. For the purpose of developing such a framework, I draw on the concepts of activist media practices (Mattoni, 2012) and citizen media practices (Stephansen, 2016) as theoretical orientations for further developing an understanding of video activism as the things activists do, think, and say in relation to video for social and political change.

  • 15.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Women in the Nordic Resistance Movement and their online media practices: Between internalised misogyny and ‘embedded feminism’2022In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 1763-1780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a case study of the online media practices of the neo-Nazi organisation, the Nordic Resistance Movement, conducted in the context of an ongoing project on contemporary forms of violent extremism in Sweden. Focusing on the activities of female “online influencers”, the paper explores the contradictory discourses around the role of women as “race warriors” and “Nordic wives” as this is articulated both by the women in the organisation themselves and in the online universe of the organisation more generally. On the one hand, women’s positions are determined and heavily policed by men in an organisation that openly propagates women’s subordination to men and their natural and biological role in the realm of homemaking. On the other, the discourses produced by these women are saturated by ideas of female empowerment, sisterhood, emancipation and the importance of women in the reproduction of the white race. The content analysis of online propaganda produced by female activists about the role of women positions these contradictory pulls of “White femininity” inherent to the white supremacist movements at the current political juncture in which the extreme right is growing and actively looking to recruit women as part of a broader strategy to “mainstream” in Sweden and mobilise internationally.

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  • 16.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Öresundsregionen som imaginär plats och utopiskt gränsland: Den dansk-svenska publikens upplevelse av TV-serien Bron2020In: Checkpoint 2020: Människor, gränser och visioner i Öresundsbrons tid / [ed] Markus Idvall, Anna Palmehag och Johan Wessman, Göteborg och Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Institute for Futures Studies.
    Bjork-James, Sophie
    Vanderbilt University, USA.
    Reporting on white supremacy: Challenges of amplification, legitimization and mainstreaming for political journalism2021In: The Routledge Companion to Political Journalism / [ed] James Morrison; Jen Birks; Mike Berry, Routledge, 2021, p. 279-290Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Gustafsson, Nils
    Lunds universitet.
    Mainstreaming the alternative: Changing media practices of protest movements2010In: Interface: A Journal for and about Social Movements, no 2, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article argues that contemporary protest movements are facing a convergence of what has traditionally been coined as mainstream and alternative media. Traditionally, the broad term ‘alternative media’ has been employed to embrace a wide range of oppositional media channels that can be considered to carry on the tradition of the early radical and party press: micro-media operating at the grassroots level, discontinuous, non-professional, persecuted or illegal. Today, heavily commercialised media and online communities such as Facebook, YouTube and MySpace constitute a common part of the repertoire of communication channels for activists engaged in alterative politics and protest movements. Are these new media channels a necessary means in order to reach beyond the circles ofthe likeminded? Or, do the use of these media point towards a mainstreamingprocess of political cultures of resistance to the establishment, eroding their very raison d’être? Combining a theoretical discussion of the inherent paradoxes in the celebration of new media technology as a source of democratisation and empowerment of civic cultures with an empirical focus aimed at exploring the changing repertoire of communicative tools used by social movement actors, this paper analyses two cases of online media practices in contemporary Scandinavian protest movements: 1) A series of civil disobedience actions and mobilisations of mass demonstrations before and after the eviction and destruction of the Youth House (Ungdomshuset) in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 2007-2008; 2) The populardemonstrations in connection with the European Social Forum in Malmö, Swedenin September 2008.

  • 19.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Haselbacher, Miriam
    Austrian Academy of Sciences.
    Reeger, Ursula
    Austrian Academy of Sciences.
    Stoencheva, Julietta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Visualisation report of emerging extremist narratives across Europe2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of existing knowledge on contemporary extremist narratives circulating online in three countries across Europe; Austria, Bulgaria and Sweden. To achieve this, the report draws on a review of an extensive body of previous research and secondary data sources, pursuing two primary objectives: firstly, it maps what kind of extremist narratives are on offer across Europe today, and second, it identifies where across the digital mainstream, these are currently in circulation.

    Upon reviewing the available evidence, two key topics emerge as central to the proliferation of extremist narratives in Europe. First, extremist narratives continue to predominantly emerge around anti-migration ideas and sentiments. Contemporary anti-immigration narratives echo familiar themes and long-standing ideas that European societies are collapsing under the weight of enforced multiculturalism and/or that European/white populations are being replaced by immigrant communities and in particular Muslim “invaders”.  Such anti-immigration narratives, which continue to take on new forms and tap into shifting conspiratorial beliefs and falsehoods, circulate openly today and in mainstream media.

    Second, the Covid19 pandemic gave rise to a host of anti-establishment narratives some of which veered towards illiberal and anti-democratic ideas and behaviours. These narratives peddled widely circulated conspiracy theories suggesting that a malevolent global elite exploited or orchestrated the pandemic to dismantle European societies, infringe upon civil liberties and harm populations through the vaccination programs.  Anti-establishment narratives sparked during the pandemic continue to circulate and take on new forms in online spaces today.

    Beyond the key topics outlined by OppAttune - vaccination, migration, silent narratives and protectionism - this report provides evidence that climate change and gender are emerging as key topics around which new extremist narratives and conspiracy theories tend to gravitate in Europe today.

    In its efforts to identify the key online spaces in which extremist narratives occur, the report finds that these move across a wide range of online spaces ranging from well-known global social media platforms to more fringe and country-specific sites operating at the margins of the digital mainstream. These range from alternative news sites, websites and blogs to fringe video sharing platforms such as Rumble, BitChute, Odysee; the online messaging services Telegram, Discord and Viber; discussion forums like Reddit and mainstream social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, X (formerly Twitter) and Instagram. Some of the online platforms identified are specific to the national contexts. In the Swedish landscape of online media discussion forums Flashback Forum and Familjeliv along with SwebbTube emerge as prominent conduits for extremist narratives and divisive discourse. Specific to the context of Bulgaria are Spodeli, Kaldata, Dir and BG-Mamma, all of which are online forums affording anonymous and relatively unmoderated discussions.

    In addition, focusing on the transnational and multi-language forum Reddit, the report provides preliminary analytical insights into the dynamics of online discussions on migration among ordinary citizens in the three countries. These empirical insights suggest that extremist narratives proliferate across the three subreddits and provide ample evidence of the increasing penetration of exclusionary and stigmatising discourse into the digital mainstream. 

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  • 20.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kavada, Anastasia
    Mattoni, Alice
    Uldam, Julie
    Kaun, Anne
    Tying up Goliath : Activist strategies for confronting and harnessing digital power2023In: State of power 2023: Digital power / [ed] Buxton, Nick, TNI : Transnational institute , 2023, p. 94-104Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 21.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Keller, Nadine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Murder fantasies in memes: fascist aesthetics of death threats and the banalization of white supremacist violence2021In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 24, no 16, p. 2522-2539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper traces the recent turn to humour, irony and ambiguity embodied in the adaptation of memes into the repertoire of online propaganda of the militant neo-Nazi group the Nordic Resistance Movement; in a process, we dub the ‘memefication’ of white supremacism. Drawing on a combination of quantitative visual content analysis (VCA) and in-depth visual analysis focused on iconography and symbolism, we explore all memes (N = 634) created and circulated by the group around the 2018 general elections in the country. The analysis proceeds in two steps: First, we present the results of the VCA in which we identified five thematic categories of memes crafting white supremacy, xenophobia, homophobia, misogyny and anti-Semitic ideas onto esoteric and popular culture iconography then to map these across a matrix of content and form. We then proceed to the analysis of the cluster of memes coded as violent to explore the iconography and symbolism used to promote violence and death threats and render them banal. We draw on a range of recent scholarship on the entanglement of memes in the rise of the far- right and engage critical perspectives on the necropower of fascism to explore the interplay between ambiguous, playful and jokey imagery on the one hand and the murder fantasies and serious threat of white supremacist violence at the heart of neo- Nazi ideology, on the other.

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  • 22.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Molas, Bàrbara
    ICCT, International Centre for Counter-Terrorism Netherlands, The Hague, Netherlands.
    Amarasingam, Amarnath
    School of Religion, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada.
    Far-right extremist narratives in Canadian and Swedish Covid-19 protests: A comparative case study of the Freedom Movement and Freedom Convoy2024In: Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression, ISSN 1943-4472, E-ISSN 1943-4480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative case study of the Freedom Movement in Sweden and the Freedom Convoy in Canada provides insights into the processes of transnationalization involved in the (re)production of far-right narratives around the COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on the online media of these protest movements we explore the extent to which the political and cultural context shaped far-right meta narratives and more universal concerns around the pandemic. The study finds significant similarities in how protest narratives in the two countries were constructed and appropriated to intersect with far-right extremism and anti-establishment ideas but also that these narratives were repurposed to make sense in two national contexts characterized by stark differences in the level of restrictions imposed and curtailment of civic rights. Unpacking the local/global intricacies of these narratives helps us understand the ubiquity of contemporary anti-government and anti-establishment discourse propelled by the far-right but also its malleability and flexibility in terms of how it is made to fit different political contexts and scenarios across liberal democracies. 

  • 23.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Mylonas, Yiannis
    Media and Communications’Department,National Research University, Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia..
    Extreme-Right Responses to the European Economic Crisis in Denmark and Sweden: The Discursive Construction of Scapegoats and Lodestars2015In: Javnost - The Public, ISSN 1318-3222, Vol. 1, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines extreme-right online media as a site of discursive struggle over definitions of the causes, consequences and remedies of the European economic crisis. The authors focus on two Scandinavian countries, Denmark and Sweden, which have seen a rise in extreme-right activities across different arenas and in different media in the turbulent years since the collapse of global financial markets in 2008. Drawing on a discourse-theoretical framework that builds on the work of Laclau and Mouffe, the paper examines how the currently most active and visible extreme-right groups in these two countries understand and respond to the crisis as an opportunity to fuel anti-immigration discourses and prey on sentiments of instability and insecurity in the broader population, using online media to “involve members and supporters in the discursive construction of racism”. The analysis demonstrates how these groups look to Greece, as the “crisis epicentre”, for culturalist explanations for the Eurozone crisis and to the rise there of Golden Dawn as an inspiration for future mobilisations in Nordic and pan-European coalitions.

  • 24.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Møller Hartley, Jannie
    Department of Communication and Arts, Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Framing gender justice: a comparative analysis of the media coverage of #metoo in Denmark and Sweden2019In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 2, no 40, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the media coverage of the #metoo movement in neighbouring countries Denmark and Sweden. A comparative content analysis shows differences in genres, sources and themes across the two samples. Further, the analysis shows that the coverage predomi- nantly positioned #metoo within an individual action frame portraying sexual assault as a personal rather than societal problem in both countries. However, the individual action frame and a delegitimising frame focused on critique of #metoo were more prevalent in the Danish coverage. A framing analysis revealed four different news frames in the coverage: #metoo as (1) an online campaign connecting networked individuals, (2) part of a broader and long-standing social movement for gender justice, (3) an unnecessary campaign fuelled by cultures of political correctness and, finally, (4) a witch hunt and “kangaroo court”. Finally, we discuss and relate these findings to the political and cultural contexts of the two countries and their different historical trajectories for the institutionalisation of feminism and implementation of gender equality policies.

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  • 25.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Stoencheva, Julietta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Modani, Hernan
    Umeå universitet; Stockholms universitet.
    The Alternative Influence Network (AIN) of the Swedish far-right on YouTube: a network analysis2022In: Influerarnas marknad, konsumtionskulturen, samhället och juridiken​, Lund, 2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Extended abstract

    This paper explores the influencer practices of an online network of individuals, extra-parliamentary groups, and alternative media on the far-right, promoting content ranging from mainstream conservatism and ethnopluralism all the way to overtly white supremacist ideas. These actors vary in their beliefs and values on the far-right spectrum, but unite in their opposition to feminism, social justice, left-wing politics and mainstream media creating a collaborative ecosystem around these issues that Lewis (2020) dubs the “alternative influence network.” This study identifies central nodes in and maps the composition of the alternative influence network (AIN) on YouTube distinct to the context of Sweden. We ask: How are YouTube channels networked to form an AIN connecting the extra-parliamentarian far-right in Sweden? To what extent does the extra-parliamentarian far-right in Sweden connect across individual influencers, groups/organisations and alternative far-right news media?  How do actors in the network engage in influencers practices combining commercial (self-)branding strategies, marketing and monetization schemes with political propaganda techniques?   

    The network analysis is based on a sample of YouTube channels which includes a combination of far-right groups (9), individual far-right influencers (32), and hyper-partisan/far-right alternative news media (11). In a first analytical step, drawing on the results of a network analysis of videos (n=8531), we show how these actors are connected by an interlocking series of connective practices including guest appearances on each other’s YouTube channels as well as a variety of referencing- and hyperlinking practices. We then take a qualitative case study approach to examine the influencer practices of central nodes in the network to provide an in-depth examination of the various ways political influencers on the far-right intersperse business strategies with political propagation techniques.  

    The analysis demonstrates how, much like online influencers in any other field, these actors conform to the market logics of attentional economy of the platform society (Van Djick Poell and de Waahl 2018). We may understand these “Political influencers” as content creators repurposing influencer marketing techniques to impart ideological ideas to their audiences (Lewis 2018). Similar to other creators aiming to reach influencer status in the digital sphere, they attempt to self-brand as micro celebrities and build an online following, encouraging listeners to subscribe to their channels, like their content, and engage with it and the creators via the comment field. Creating deeply intimate connections with their followers enables AIN actors to promote far right ideas and conspiracy theories, in ways very similar to how a fashion influencer will promote their clothing style or brand. To boost engagement, AIN actors address timely and controversial events from a unique angle – in their case, often with a shocking/conspiratorial element and strategic use of controversy. This distinctiveness in approach is arguably what attracts their increasingly large follower base, in addition to strategically mixing in misinformation and disinformation which are found to engage with their novelty element, and hence possess a larger spreadability potential than factual information (Vosoughi et al. 2018). However, due to the added challenge of being forced to “dance around” YouTube policies and carefully toe the lines of legality and the platform’s Community Guidelines, AIN creators are required to be creative in their linking and reference practices if they want to stay on the platform.

    A variety of different marketing and promotion techniques are at work just as the network of channels provide a window onto the broader commercial market of far-right merchandise in Sweden today. Although mostly unaffiliated with formal groups, actors in the so called “Swedish YouTube family” often stream wearing different forms of merchandise such as caps with AfS’ logo, t-shirts from Medborgerlig Samling or DFS and other attires produced and sold by actors on the extra parliamentarian far-right in Sweden today. Some channel hosts offer others in the network the opportunity to promote their products, events or news (e.g., on upcoming protests) in return for a fee. Others again use their channels as a platform for advertising specific products - anything from self-defense courses and pepper spray to protein powder and fruit juice – and promote brands or companies that either sponsor the channel or that the actors themselves are directly involved in.   

  • 26.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Stoencheva, Jullietta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    On memes and mugs: Everyday extremism in the (digital) mainstream2024In: The Psychologist, Vol. MayArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 27.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Uldam, Julie
    COVID-19 and Online Activism: A Momentum for Radical Change?2020In: e-International relations, E-ISSN 2053-8626, no Aug 21 2020, p. 1-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 28.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Uldam, Julie
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Online social media for radical politics: Climate change activism on YouTube2011In: International Journal of Electronic Governance, ISSN 1742-7509, E-ISSN 1742-7517, Vol. 4, no 1/2, p. 69-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In December 2009, political attention was turned towards the 15th UN Climate Conference, COP15. For the Global Justice Movement (GJM) this provided an opportunity to promote their agenda. The use of online media conjured up memories of the success of alternative media in mobilising large-scale protests around previous WTO and G8 counter-summits. However, the COP15 saw a turn to the use of what can be termed mainstream – online sites among activists. Drawing on a case study of the activist network NTAC, we explore how YouTube served both the purpose of reaching broader publics and of mobilising for confrontational direct action within activist circles.

  • 29.
    Askanius, Tina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Ulver, Sofia
    Market Radicalization: Exploring Reversed Co-optation in Far-Right Consumer Culture2020In: NA: Advances in Consumer Research / [ed] Argo, Jennifer; Lowrey; Tina M; Jensen Schau, Hope, Duluth, 2020, Vol. 48, p. 324-325Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Brock, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Raping turtles and kidnapping children: Fantasmatic logics of Scandinavia in Russian and German anti-gender discourse2023In: Nordic Journal of Media Studies, E-ISSN 2003-184X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 95-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the social, political, and fantasmatic logics involved in the production of contemporary discourses about Scandinavia as a symbolic site and imagined place of sexual and moral decay and as a gender dysphoric dystopia by actors in the global anti-gender movement. Empirically, we draw on a rich digital archive of multi-modal media texts from an ongoing research project on anti-gender movements in Russia and Germany – two countries which provide particularly poignant examples of sites in which this mode of anti-gender propaganda is currently on the rise. In the analysis, we explore the discursive workings of a particularly prominent node in the material – that of the vulnerable child – and show how this figure is construed and instrumentalised to add urgency and fuel outrage among domestic audiences in Russia and Germany.

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  • 31.
    Hill, Annette
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Media & Commun, Lund, Sweden.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kondo, Koko
    Univ Westminster, Business Sch, London, England.
    Live reality television: Care structures within the production and reception of talent shows2019In: Critical Studies in Television, ISSN 1749-6020, E-ISSN 1749-6039, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 7-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on production and reception practices for live reality television using critical theory and empirical research to question how producers and audiences co- create and limit live experiences. The concept of care structures is used to make visi- ble hidden labour in the creation of mood, in particular audiences as participants in the management of live experiences. In the case of Got to Dance, there was a play off between the value and meaning of the live events as a temporary experience captured by ratings and social media, and the more enduring collective-social experience of this reality series over time.

  • 32.
    Hill, Annette
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kondo, Koko
    Westminster University, London, United Kingdom.
    José Luis, Urueta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Provocative Engagement: documentary audiences and performances in The Act of Killing and The Look of Silence2019In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 5, no 22, p. 662-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through an analysis of The Act of Killing (2012) and The Look of Silence (2014), this article explores the idea of provocative engagement as a way of extending our understanding of the affective dimensions of documentary and its role in civic engagement. The study draws on qualitative research, based on interviews with the filmmaker, and interviews with 52 viewers in Denmark, Sweden, Japan and Colombia. This data is used to explore the idea of subjectivity in documentary through the performance of memory, power and impunity in both films concerning the perpetrators and victims of the Indonesian genocide of 1965. Overall, our analysis highlights how performance documentary challenges the affective relationships between filmmakers and their audiences, and in this particular case we see a type of raw, provocative engagement with the act of documenting genocide, the act of watching, and what this means to people in the context of their political and lived realities.

  • 33.
    Keller, Nadine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Combatting hate and trolling with love and reason?: a qualitative analysis of the discursive antagonisms between organised hate speech and counterspeech online2020In: SCM Studies in Communication and Media, E-ISSN 2192-4007, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 540-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasingly organized culture of hate is flourishing in today’s online spaces, posing a serious challenge for democratic societies. Our study seeks to unravel the work-ings of online hate on popular social media and assess the practices, potentialities, and limitations of organized counterspeech to stymie the spread of hate online. This article is based on a case study of an organized “troll army” of online hate speech in Germany, Re-conquista Germanica, and the counterspeech initiative Reconquista Internet. Conducting a qualitative content analysis, we first unpack the strategies and stated intentions behind organized hate speech and counterspeech groups as articulated in their internal strategic documents. We then explore how and to what extent such strategies take shape in online media practices, focusing on the interplay between users spreading hate and users counter-speaking in the comment sections of German news articles on Facebook. The analysis draws on a multi-dimensional framework for studying social media engagement (Uldam & Kaun, 2019) with a focus on practices and discourses and turns to Mouffe’s (2005) con-cepts of political antagonism and agonism to operationalize and deepen the discursive di-mension. The study shows that the interactions between the two opposing camps are high-ly moralized, reflecting a post-political antagonistic battle between “good” and “evil” and showing limited signs of the potentials of counterspeech to foster productive agonism. The empirical data indicates that despite the promising intentions of rule-guided counter-speech, the counter efforts identified and scrutinized in this study predominantly fail to adhere to civic and moral standards and thus only spur on the destructive dynamics of digital hate culture.

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  • 34.
    Møller Hartley, Jannie
    et al.
    Department of Communication and Arts, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Activist-journalism and the norm of objectivity: role performace in the reporting of the #metoo movement in Denmark and Sweden2021In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, ISSN 1751-2786, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 860-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a study examining the self-perceived roles of journalists covering the #MeToo movement in Denmark and Sweden. Drawing on qualitative interviews with journalists, editors and activists (N = 20) and participant observation at various #MeToo events, we examine the professional journalism cultures underpinning differences in the coverage and the broader public debate spurred by the movement in the two countries. The analysis is informed by the theoretical framework of role performance [Mellado, C. 2015. “Professional Roles in News Content: Six Dimensions of Journalistic Role Performance”. Journalism Studies. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2014.922276; Mellado, C., L. Hellmueller, and W. Donsbach. 2016. Journalistic Role Performance Concepts, Contexts, and Methods. Routledge) in combination with Tuchman’s (1972. “Objectivity as Strategic Ritual”. American Journal of Sociology 77 (4): 660–679) seminal work on “Objectivity as Strategic Ritual”. This combined framework enables an analysis of how journalists negotiate ideals of objective reporting and activist imperatives when covering the movement and issues of gender (in)equality more broadly. Our study shows that journalists, to a varying degree, felt torn between ideals of impartiality and objectivity and ideals of active reporting oriented towards action and problem-solving but that these experiences differed between the two countries and between newsrooms. We discuss these findings in light of differences in the political climates around issues related to gender in the two countries and partially diverging normative ideals and professional journalistic cultures regarding the extent to which journalism and activism can and should be combined.

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  • 35. Møller Hartley, Jannie
    et al.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Heksejagt eller revolution? En analyse af mediedækningen af #MeToo i Danmark og Sverige2020In: Samfundsøkonomen, ISSN 0108-3937, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [da]

    Denne artikel præsenterer en undersøgelse af mediedækningen af #MeToo-bevægelsen inabolandene Danmark og Sverige. En komparativ indholdsanalyse viser forskelle i genrer,kilder og temaer på tværs af de to lande. Analysen viser endvidere, at dækningen overvejendeplacerede #MeToo inden for en individuel handlingsramme, der fremstiller seksuelle overgrebsom et personlig snarere end samfundsmæssigt problem i begge lande. Imidlertid var denindivid-orienterede handlings-frame og en de-legitimerende frame fokuseret på kritik af#MeToo mere udbredt i den danske dækning. En framing-analyse viste ydermere, at deroverordnet kunne observeres fire forskellige nyhedsframes i dækningen: #MeToo som 1)en online kampagne, der forbinder individer i et netværk af personlige vidnesbyrd, 2) en delaf en bredere og langvarig historisk social bevægelse for ligestilling mellem kønnene 3) enunødvendig kampagne drevet af politisk korrektheds-kultur og til sidst 4) en heksejagt og enfolkedomstol. Artiklen diskuterer disse resultater i relation til de politiske og kulturelle forholdpå køn- og ligestillingsområdet i de to lande.

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  • 36.
    Møller Hartley, Jannie
    et al.
    Roskilde universitet.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    ”Man ska’ jo nødigt blive en kvinde med en sag”: Rolleforhandlinger på redaktionerne i dækningen af #metoo i Danmark og Sverige2020In: Journalistica, ISSN 1901-6220, E-ISSN 1904-7967, no 1, p. 71-97Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 37.
    Møller Hartley, Jannie
    et al.
    Roskilde University.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    #MeToo 2.0 as a Critical Incident: Voices, Silencing, and Reckoning in Denmark and Sweden2022In: Reporting on Sexual Violence in the MeToo Era / [ed] Andrea Baker; Usha Manchanda Rodrigues, London: Routledge, 2022, p. 33-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This empirical chapter examines the experience of reporting on, and advocating around, the #MeToo movement 2.0 in Denmark and Sweden, two Scandinavian countries that are ranked among the most gender-equal societies in the world. The #MeToo debates developed in different directions in the two countries, as well as over different time trajectories since its revitalization in 2017. Using the metaphor of “voice(s),” what voices were heard or silenced in the years following the initial #MeToo debate? How were the whys and hows of reporting on sexual violence renegotiated in the post-#MeToo era? We use a mixed methods approach that draws on quantitative and qualitative content analysis; in-depth interviews with journalists, nongovernmental organizations, and activists in both countries (n = 20); participant observations from #MeToo events; and our own participation as expert sources in the coverage of the development of #MeToo in Denmark and Sweden. The study shows how the different patterns of silencing and speaking up illustrate a broader renegotiation of boundaries along two axes. The first axis relates to objectivity/subjectivity in journalistic practices, and the second axis links to the structural/individual foci in the reporting on issues related to sexual violence. However, these renegotiations are highly contextual and intertwined with the political context and civil societal structures in Denmark and Sweden.

  • 38. Møller Hartley, Jannie
    et al.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    #MeToo er en vanskelig journalistisk balancegang2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Møller Hartley, Jannie
    et al.
    Roskilde Universitet.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    #MeToo: Stor forskel på dansk og svensk dækning2019In: Politiken, ISSN 0907-1814, no 28 Mars 2019Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Rostami, Amir
    et al.
    University of Gävle; Institutes for Futures Studies.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM). Institutes for Futures Studies.
    State Surveillance of Violent Extremism and Threats of White Supremacist Violence in Sweden2021In: Surveillance & Society, E-ISSN 1477-7487, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 369-373Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 41.
    Rostami, Amir
    et al.
    Institut för Framtidsstudier; Stockholm University.
    Modani, Hernan
    Institut för Framtidsstudier; University of Gävle.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM). Institut för Framtidsstudier .
    Saneski, Jerzy
    Institut för Framtidsstudier; Stockholm University, University of Gävle.
    Edling, Christofer
    Institut för Framtidsstudier; Lund University.
    Women in violent extremism in Sweden2021Report (Other academic)
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  • 42.
    Strange, Michael
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Migrant-focused inequity, distrust and an erosion of care within Sweden’s healthcare and media discourses during COVID-192023In: Frontiers in Human Dynamics, E-ISSN 2673-2726 , Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite initial suggestions that the COVID-19 pandemic affected everyone equally, it quickly became clear that some were much worse affected than others. Marginalization—including poverty, substandard accommodation, precarious or no employment, reduced access to healthcare and other key public goods—was clearly correlated with higher rates of both contagion and fatality. For Sweden, COVID-19 inequality could be seen along clear racial and socio-economic lines, with some of the first high death rates seen amongst Somali communities, where individuals had contracted the virus through unsafe employment as taxi drivers transporting wealthier Swedes home from their winter holidays. At the same time, actors on the extra parliamentarian far-right in Sweden were quick to blame the country's relatively high per-capita fatality rate on persons born outside Sweden working in the healthcare and care home sector. Media frames affirming racial stereotypes grounded in cultural racism circulated across the ecosystem of alternative media in the country. In both healthcare and the media, we see growing forms of exclusion disproportionately affecting migrants. Such intertwined exclusions in Sweden, as the article argues, are a sign of a wider disintegration of Swedish society in which individuals lose trust in both the core institutions as well as across different parts of society. Drawing on Davina Cooper's understanding of the relationship between the state and other public institutions with individuals as based on “touch,” the article explores how exclusionary practices impact this relationship. Our key argument is that, whilst ostensibly such practices often most materially hurt minority groups (e.g., migrants), they are indicative of—and accelerate—a broader disintegration of society through undermining a logic of “care” necessary to sustain social bonds.

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  • 43.
    Uldam, Julie
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Askanius, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Calling for confrontational action in online social media: Video activism as auto-communication2013In: Mediation and Protest Movements / [ed] Bart Cammaerts, Alice Mattoni and Patrick McCurdy, Bristol: Intellect Ltd. , 2013, p. 159-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44. Uldam, Julie
    et al.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    FV19 som klimamomentum?: Politiske aktørers brug af Twitter2020In: #FV19: Politisk kommunikation på digitale medier / [ed] Sine Nørholm Just og Ib Tunby Gulbrandsen, Frederiksberg: Samfundslitteratur , 2020, 1, p. 135-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Uldam, Julie
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Askanius, Tina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Time for Climate Action?: Political Actors’ Uses of Twitter to Focus Public Attention on the Climate Crisis During the 2019 Danish General Election2022In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, no 16, p. 385-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines civil society uses of Twitter to promote the climate crisis as an issue in the 2019 national election campaign in Denmark. Theoretically, we draw on Cammaerts’s notion of the mediation opportunity structure and Wright, Nyberg, De Cock, and Whiteman’s notion of climate imaginaries. Methodologically, we draw on Bennett and Segerberg’s approach to studying networked interactions on Twitter. Our findings show that neither the legacy press nor MP candidates used climate-related hashtags promoted by civil society actors. MP candidates did frequently use climate-related hashtags. Nonetheless, these were mainly center-left candidates who mostly called for climate action to be propelled by green growth and technological solutions, while civil society actors called for climate action to be propelled by solidarity and systemic change. We discuss how these articulations of the climate crisis have implications for climate imaginaries and, ultimately, possibilities to act.

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  • 46.
    Askanius, Tina (Creator, Actor, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Mårtensson, Lisa (Director)
    Martinez Barbieri, Nidia (Choreographer)
    Fahlén, Lotta (Composer)
    Renberg, Kicki (Lightning designer)
    Absurdum Temporary Art, * (Creator)
    "Den svenska kvinnan": [Performance lecture]2022Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    En iscensatt föreläsning i gränslandet mellan vetenskap och scenkonst om det våldsbejakande kvinnohatet i digitala miljöer.

    Sverige lyfts ofta fram som ett internationellt föregångsland när det gäller jämställdhet och kvinnors lika rättigheter. Men det är inte alla som håller med. Forskaren Tina Askanius tar med oss på en resa djupt ner i internets avkrokar där kvinnohatet frodas och Sverige framställs som ett land styrt av mansföraktspolitik och jämställhetsgalenskap. Här debatteras ”den svenska kvinnan” flitigt. Vem är egentligen ”den svenska kvinnan”? Varför betraktas hon som farlig? Varför var det ett misstag att ge henne rösträtt? Varför förtjänar hon att bli våldtagen? Varför ska hon dö?

    I den här föreställningen möts vetenskaplig forskning och scenkonstuttryck som ger nya perspektiv på denna högst aktuella samhällsfråga. Föreläsningen iscensätts av Absurdum Temporary Art som genom bland annat koreografi och musik ramar in olika delar av den digitala sfär som vi alla lever med dagligen, där den svenska kvinnan betraktas både som någon som måste skyddas, och någon som måste utplånas.

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