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  • 1.
    Albèr, Cathrine
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Engblom, Johan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Hydration of Hyaluronan: Effects on Structural and Thermodynamic Properties2015In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 119, no 11, p. 4211-4219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a frequently occurring biopolymer with a large variety of functions in nature. During the past 60 years, there have been numerous reports on structural and dynamic behavior of HA in water. Nevertheless, studies covering a wider concentration range are still lacking. In this work, we use isothermal scanning sorption calorimetry for the first time to investigate hydration-induced transitions in HA (sodium hyaluronate, 17 kDa). From this method, we obtain the sorption isotherm and the enthalpy and the entropy of hydration. Thermotropic events are evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and structure analysis is performed with X-ray scattering (SWAXS) and light and scanning electron microscopy. During isothermal hydration, HA exhibits a glass transition, followed by crystallization and subsequent dissolution of HA crystals and formation of a one-phase solution. Structural analysis reveals that the crystal may be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with space group P212121. Crystallization of HA was found to occur either through endothermic or exothermic processes, depending on the temperature and water content. We propose a mechanism of crystallization that explains this phenomenon based on the interplay between the hydrophobic effect and strengthening of hydrogen bonds during formation of crystals. The combined results were used to construct a binary phase diagram for the HA–water system.

  • 2.
    Ali, Abdullah
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Speximo AB, Medicon Village, Lund.
    Ringstad, Lovisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Stockholm.
    Skedung, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Stockholm.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wahlgren, Marie
    Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition, Lund University.
    Engblom, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tactile friction of topical creams and emulsions: Friction measurements on excised skin and VitroSkin® using ForceBoard™.2022In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 615, article id 121502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tactile perception can be investigated through ex vivo friction measurements using a so-called ForceBoard™, providing objective assessments and savings in time and money, compared to a subjective human panel. In this work we aim to compare excised skin versus VitroSkin® as model substrates for tactile friction measurements. A further aim is to detect possible differences between traditional surfactant-based creams, and a particle-stabilized (Pickering) cream and investigate how the different substrates affect the results obtained. It was found that the difference in tactile friction between excised skin and VitroSkin® was small on untreated substrates. When topical creams were applied, the same trends were observed for both substrates, although the frictional variation over time relates to the difference in surface structure between the two substrates. The results also confirmed that there is a difference between starch-based Pickering formulations and surfactant-based creams after application, indicating that the latter is greasier than Pickering cream. It was also shown that the tactile friction of Pickering emulsions was consistently high even with high amounts of oil, indicating a non-greasy, and non-sticky formulation. The characteristics of starch-stabilized Pickering formulations make them promising candidates in the development of surfactant-free topical formulations with unique tactile properties.

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  • 3.
    Ali, Abdullah
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wahlgren, Marie
    Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rembratt-Svensson, Birgitta
    Bioglan AB, Malmö, Sweden.
    Daftani, Ameena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wollmer, Per
    Department of Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engblom, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Dehydration affects drug transport over nasal mucosa2019In: Drug Delivery, ISSN 1071-7544, E-ISSN 1521-0464, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 831-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formulations for nasal drug delivery often rely on water sorption to adhere to the mucosa, which also causes a higher water gradient over the tissue and subsequent dehydration. The primary aim of this study was therefore to evaluate mucosal response to dehydration and resolve the hypothesis that mucoadhesion achieved through water sorption could also be a constraint for drug absorption via the nasal route. The effect of altering water activity of the vehicle on Xylometazoline HCl and Cr-EDTA uptake was studied separately using flow through diffusion cells and excised porcine mucosa. We have shown that a modest increase in the water gradient over mucosa induces a substantial decrease in drug uptake for both Xylometazoline HCl and Cr-EDTA. A similar result was obtained when comparing two different vehicles on the market; Nasoferm (Nordic Drugs, Sweden) and BLOX4 (Bioglan, Sweden). Mucoadhesion based on water sorption can slow down drug uptake in the nasal cavity. However, a clinical study is required to determine whether prolonged duration of the vehicle or preventing dehydration of the mucosa is the most important factor for improving bioavailability.

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  • 4.
    Campos Pacheco, Jesus Enrique
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Riaz, Azra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Feiler, Adam
    Nanolog AB publ, Södertälje, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Surface & Corros Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekström, Mikael
    Iconovo AB, Lund, Sweden..
    Pilkington, Georgia
    Nanolog AB publ, Södertälje, Sweden..
    Valetti, Sabrina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Encapsulation of clofazimine in mesoporous silica as a potential dry powder formulation for treating tuberculosis2023In: Journal of Aerosol Medicine, ISSN 1941-2711, E-ISSN 1941-2703, Vol. 36, no 6, p. A13-A13, article id A13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Campos Pacheco, Jesús Enrique
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Yalovenko, Tetiana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Riaz, Azra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kotov, Nikolay
    Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Davids, Camilla
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Glycobiology, Institution of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Alva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Feiler, Adam
    Godaly, Gabriela
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Glycobiology, Institution of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johnson, C Magnus
    Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekström, Mikael
    Iconovo AB, Ideongatan 3A-B, 223 70 Lund, Sweden.
    Pilkington, Georgia A
    Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; Nanologica AB (publ), Forskargatan 20G, 151 36 Södertälje, Sweden.
    Valetti, Sabrina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Inhalable porous particles as dual micro-nano carriers demonstrating efficient lung drug delivery for treatment of tuberculosis2024In: Journal of Controlled Release, ISSN 0168-3659, E-ISSN 1873-4995, Vol. 369, p. 231-250, article id S0168-3659(24)00165-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhalation therapy treating severe infectious disease is among the more complex and emerging topics in controlled drug release. Micron-sized carriers are needed to deposit drugs into the lower airways, while nano-sized carriers are of preference for cell targeting. Here, we present a novel and versatile strategy using micron-sized spherical particles with an excellent aerodynamic profile that dissolve in the lung fluid to ultimately generate nanoparticles enabling to enhance both extra- and intra-cellular drug delivery (i.e., dual micro-nano inhalation strategy). The spherical particles are synthesised through the condensation of nano-sized amorphous silicon dioxide resulting in high surface area, disordered mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) with monodispersed size of 2.43 μm. Clofazimine (CLZ), a drug shown to be effective against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, was encapsulated in the MSPs obtaining a dry powder formulation with high respirable fraction (F.P.F. <5 μm of 50%) without the need of additional excipients. DSC, XRPD, and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption indicate that the drug was fully amorphous when confined in the nano-sized pores (9-10 nm) of the MSPs (shelf-life of 20 months at 4 °C). Once deposited in the lung, the CLZ-MSPs exhibited a dual action. Firstly, the nanoconfinement within the MSPs enabled a drastic dissolution enhancement of CLZ in simulated lung fluid (i.e., 16-fold higher than the free drug), increasing mycobacterial killing than CLZ alone (p = 0.0262) and reaching concentrations above the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against biofilms of M. tuberculosis (i.e., targeting extracellular bacteria). The released CLZ permeated but was highly retained in a Calu-3 respiratory epithelium model, suggesting a high local drug concentration within the lung tissue minimizing risk for systemic side effects. Secondly, the micron-sized drug carriers spontaneously dissolve in simulated lung fluid into nano-sized drug carriers (shown by Nano-FTIR), delivering high CLZ cargo inside macrophages and drastically decreasing the mycobacterial burden inside macrophages (i.e., targeting intracellular bacteria). Safety studies showed neither measurable toxicity on macrophages nor Calu-3 cells, nor impaired epithelial integrity. The dissolved MSPs also did not show haemolytic effect on human erythrocytes. In a nutshell, this study presents a low-cost, stable and non-invasive dried powder formulation based on a dual micro-nano carrier to efficiently deliver drug to the lungs overcoming technological and practical challenges for global healthcare.

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  • 6.
    Cao, Zhen
    et al.
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Box 118, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden.
    Zan, Wu
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Box 118, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden.
    Pham, Anh-Duc
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Yang, Yanjie
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Box 118, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden; College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073, China.
    Abbood, Sahar
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Box 118, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Albèr, Cathrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Sundén, Bengt
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Box 118, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden.
    Pool boiling of HFE-7200 on nanoparticle-coating surfaces: Experiments and heat transfer analysis2019In: International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, ISSN 0017-9310, E-ISSN 1879-2189, Vol. 133, p. 548-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, an electrophoretic deposition method was employed to modify copper surfaces with Cu-Zn (∼100 nm) nanoparticles. Pool boiling heat transfer of HFE-7200 on the modified surfaces was experimentally studied. The results showed that the heat transfer coefficient on the modified surfaces was significantly enhanced compared with that on a smooth surface, e.g., a maximum 100% enhancement, while the maximum superheat on the modified surfaces was around 20 K lower than that on the smooth surface. However, the critical heat flux (CHF) was not improved considerably, and supplementary tests indicated that the wickability of HFE-7200 was almost the same on the modified surfaces and the smooth surface. The departure diameters of bubbles were recorded by a high speed camera, which were compared with several models in literature. Active nucleation site sizes were evaluated by the Hsu nucleation theory and active nucleation site densities were estimated by appropriate correlations. In addition, a heat transfer model, considering natural convection, re-formation of thermal boundary layer and microlayer evaporation, was formulated to predict the heat transfer on the modified surfaces and the smooth surface. A relatively good prediction was achieved.

  • 7.
    Danielsson, Ravi
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Svensson, Andreas
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Eriksson, Håkan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Tracing Aluminium-based Adjuvants: Their Interactions with Immune Competent Cells and their Effect on Mitochondrial Activity2018In: Open Immunology Journal, ISSN 1874-2262, Vol. 8, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies revealing the immune stimulatory properties of aluminium-based adjuvants (ABAs) have been impaired by the absence of simple and reliable methods of tracing the adjuvants and their effect on biochemical processes upon endocytosis. Objective: To verify that labelling of ABAs with lumogallion doesn’t affect the physicochemical properties of the adjuvant; tracing cellular interaction with aluminium adjuvants; explore their effect on metabolic activity upon endocytosis. Methods: Physicochemical characterization by Z-potential and size distribution of ABAs labelled with lumogallion. Cellular interactions with ABAs by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Metabolic activity explored by measuring transformation of tetrazolium into formazan. Results: No or minor change of zeta potential and average particle size of lumogallion labelled aluminium oxyhydroxide, AlO(OH) and aluminium hydroxyphosphate, Al(OH)x(PO4 )y. Both phagocytosing and non-phagocytosing leukocytes became associated with ABAs at concentrations expected after in vivo administration of a vaccine. The ABAs were relatively toxic, affecting both lymphocytes and monocytes, and Al(OH)x(PO4 )y was more toxic than AlO(OH). Endocytosed aluminium adjuvant particles were not secreted from the cells and remained intracellular throughout several cell divisions. The presence of ABAs increased the mitochondrial activity of the monocytic cell line THP-1 and peripheral monocytes, as based on the transformation of tetrazolium into formazan. Conclusion: Lumogallion labelled ABAs is a valuable tool tracing interactions between ABAs and cells. Labelled ABAs can be traced intracellularly and ABAs are likely to remain intracellular for a long period of time. Intracellular ABAs increase the mitochondrial activity and the presence of intracellular Al ions is suggested to cause an increased mitochondrial activity. Keywords: Aluminium based adjuvant, Lumogallion, Mitochondrial activity, MTT assay, Phagocytosis, ABAS, Zeolites.

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  • 8.
    Digaitis, Ramūnas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Oltner, Viveca
    Magle Chemoswed AB, Malmö, Sweden.
    Briggner, Lars-Erik
    Magle Chemoswed AB, Malmö, Sweden; Adroit Science AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Hydration and dehydration induced changes in porosity of starch microspheres2022In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 291, p. 119542-119542, article id 119542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Characterization and tuning of the porosity of amorphous starch materials are important for many applications, including controlled release of encapsulated proteins. The porosities of these materials in dry and hydrated states can have different physicochemical origins and properties. Here, porosities of dry cross-linked starch microspheres and their hydration-induced transformations were characterized by small angle X-ray scattering, scanning electron and optical microscopies, thermogravimetric analysis, sorption calorimetry, nitrogen sorption, and helium-pycnometry. The analyses revealed that dry microspheres consist of porous cores with pore diameters below 100 nm and shells which appeared to be denser but contained wider pores (100–300 nm). The outer crust of the microspheres shell is non-porous, which restricts diffusion of nitrogen, water, and ethanol. Partial hydration triggered an irreversible collapse of dry porosity at 12 wt% water. Further hydration resulted in interfacial changes and promoted wet porosity, related to characteristic distances between polymer chains.

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  • 9.
    Falco, Cigdem Yucel
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Risbo, Jens
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Medronho, Bruno
    University of Algarve, Faculty of Sciences and Technology (MeditBio), Campus de Gambelas, Ed. 8, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal.
    Chitosan-Dextran Sulfate Hydrogels as a Potential Carrier for Probiotics2017In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 172, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical and chemical (crosslinked with genipin) hydrogels based on chitosan and dextran sulfate were developed and characterized as novel bio-materials suitable for probiotic encapsulation. The swelling of the hydrogels was dependent on the composition and weakly influenced by the pH of the media. The morphology analysis supports the swelling data showing distinct changes in microstructure depending on the composition. The viability and culturability tests showed approx. 3.6 log CFU/mL decrease of cells (L. acidophilus as model) incorporated into chemical hydrogels when compared to the number of viable native cells. However, the live/dead viability assay evidenced that a considerable amount of viable cells were still entrapped in the hydrogel network and therefore the viability is most likely underestimated. Overall, the developed systems are robust and their structure, rheology and swelling properties can be tuned by changing the blend ratio, thus constituting appealing bio-matrices for cell encapsulation.

  • 10.
    Falkman, Peter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Åberg, Christoffer
    Clemens, Anna
    Sparr, Emma
    Lyotropic Lipid Phases Confined in Cylindrical Pores: Structure and Permeability2011In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 115, no 49, p. 14450-14461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model membrane system based on lipid lyotropic phases confined inside the pores of a well-defined scaffold membrane, thereby forming a double-porous membrane structure, is described. The model membrane system is characterized with regard to lipid structure, lipid location, and phase transitions, using small-angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and confocal microscopy. The system enables studies of transport across oriented lipid bilayers as well as of lipids in confinement. The lipids are shown to be located inside the membrane pores, and the effect of confinement on lipid structure is shown to be small, although dependent on the surface properties of the scaffold membrane. For transport studies, Franz diffusion cells and different types of drugs/dyes are used, and the transport studies are complemented with theoretical modeling. Lipids investigated include monoolein, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, and E. coli total lipid extract. In the case of monoolein, the lipid structure can be changed from a bicontinuous cubic Ia3d phase to a liquid crystalline lamellar phase, by controlling the osmotic pressure of the surrounding solution through addition of water-soluble polymer. The osmotic pressure can thereby be used as a switch, changing the permeability of the lipid phase up to 100-fold, depending on the properties of the diffusing substance. The large effect of changing the structure implies an alignment of the lamellar phase inside the pores.

  • 11.
    Pankratov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Blum, Zoltan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    A hybrid electric power device for simultaneous generation and storage of electric energy2014In: Energy and Environmental Science, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 989-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein report on an entirely new kind of electric power device. In the hybrid device, chemical energy is directly converted into electric energy, which is capacitively stored within a singular contrivance. The device is built based on dual-function electrodes, viz. discrete electrodes manifesting simultaneous electrocatalytic and charge-storage features.

  • 12.
    Pankratov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, DK-2800, Denmark.
    Pankratova, Galina
    Department of Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden.
    Dyachkova, Tatiana
    Tambov State Technical University, Sovetskaya Street, 106, Tambov, 392000, Russian Federation.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Åkerlund, Hans-Erik
    Department of Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden.
    Toscano, Miguel
    Novozymes A/S, Krogshøjvej 36, Bagsværd, 2880, Denmark.
    Qijin, Chi
    Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, DK-2800, Denmark.
    Gorton, Lo
    Department of Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, Lund, SE-22100, Sweden.
    Supercapacitive Biosolar Cell Driven by Direct Electron Transfer between Photosynthetic Membranes and CNT Networks with Enhanced Performance2017In: ACS Energy Letters, E-ISSN 2380-8195, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 2635-2639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating photosynthetic cell components with nanostructured materials can facilitate the conversion of solar energy into electric power for creating sustainable carbon-neutral energy sources. With the aim at exploring efficient photoinduced biocatalytic energy conversion systems, we have used an amidated carbon nanotube (aCNT) networked matrix to integrate thylakoid membranes (TMs) for construction of a direct electron transfer-driven biosolar cell. We have evaluated the resulting photobioelectrochemical cells systematically. Compared to the carboxylated CNT (cCNT)-TMs system, the aCNT-TMs system enabled a 1.5-fold enhancement in photocurrent density. This system offers more advantages including a reduced charge-transfer resistance, a lower open-circuit potential, and an improved cell stability. More remarkably, the average power density of the optimized cells was 250 times higher than that of reported analogue systems. Our results suggest the significance of physical and electronic interactions between the photosynthetic components and the support nanomaterials and may offer new clues for designing improved biosolar cells.

  • 13.
    Parunova, Yulia
    et al.
    National Research Institute “Kurchatov Institute,”, Moscow, 123182, Russia.
    Bushnev, Sergey
    National Research Institute “Kurchatov Institute,”, Moscow, 123182, Russia.
    Gonzalez-Arribas, Elena
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Lipkin, Aleksey
    National Research Institute “Kurchatov Institute,”, Moscow, 123182, Russia.
    Popov, Vladimir
    National Research Institute “Kurchatov Institute,”, Moscow, 123182, Russia.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. National Research Institute “Kurchatov Institute,”, Moscow, 123182, Russia.
    Pankratov, Dmitry
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. National Research Institute “Kurchatov Institute,”, Moscow, 123182, Russia.
    Potentially implantable biocathode with the function of charge accumulation based on nanocomposite of polyaniline​/carbon nanotubes2016In: Russian journal of electrochemistry, ISSN 1023-1935, E-ISSN 1608-3342, Vol. 52, no 12, p. 1166-1171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A potentially implantable biocathode with the function of charge accumulation based on a nanobiocomposite including multiwall carbon nanotubes, polyaniline, and bilirubin oxidase is developed. The regularities of the functioning of the obtained electrode are studied in air-​satd. phosphate buffer soln., pH 7.4 (PB)​, and also in phosphate buffer soln. contg. redox-​active blood components (BMB)​. The open circuit potential of the biocathode is 0.33 and 0.08 V vs. the SCE in PB and BMB, resp.; it is completely restored after at least three self-​charge​/discharge cycles with connection to resistors with different resistance. Bioelectrocatalytic c.d. of oxygen redn. is 0.50 and 0.42 mA cm-​2 with the residual activity of 78 and 60​% of the initial value after 12 h of continuous operation in PB at 25°C and in BMB at 37°C, resp.

  • 14.
    Stenbæk, Jonas
    et al.
    Section of Microbiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Danish Technological Institute, Wood and Biomaterials, Gregersensvej 3, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark.
    Löf, David
    Perstorp AB, Industriparken, 284 91 Perstorp, Sweden.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Jensen, Bo
    Section of Microbiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    An alternative anionic bio-sustainable anti-fungal agent: Investigation of its mode of action on the fungal cell membrane2017In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 497, p. 242-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of a lactylate (the sodium caproyl lactylate or C10 lactylate), a typical food grade emulsifier, as an anionic environmental friendly anti-fungal additive was tested in growth medium and formulated in a protective coating for exterior wood. Different laboratory growth tests on the blue stain fungus Aureobasidium pullulans were performed and its interactions on a model fungal cell membrane were studied. Promising short term anti-fungal effects in growth tests were observed, although significant but less dramatic effects took place in coating test on wood panels. Scanning electron microscope analysis shows clear differences in the amount of fungal slime on the mycelium of Aureobasidium pullulans when the fungus was exposed of C10 lactylate. This could indicate an effect on the pullulan and melanin production by the fungus. Moreover, the interaction studies on model fungal cell membranes show that C10 lactylate affects the phospholipid bilayer in a similar manner to other negative charged detergents. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Valetti, Sabrina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Nanologica AB.
    Thomsen, Hanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Wankar, Jitendra
    Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattività, Italy.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Manet, Ilse
    Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattività, Italy.
    Feiler, Adam
    Nanologica AB; KTH.
    Ericson, Marica B
    University of Gothenburg.
    Engblom, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Can mesoporous nanoparticles promote bioavailability of topical pharmaceutics?2021In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 602, article id 120609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When applied to skin, particulate matter has been shown to accumulate in hair follicles. In addition to follicles, the skin topography also incorporates trench-like furrows where particles potentially can accumulate; however, the furrows have not been as thoroughly investigated in a drug delivery perspective. Depending on body site, the combined follicle orifices cover up to 10% of the skin surface, while furrows can easily cover 20%, reaching depths exceeding 25 µm. Hence, porous particles of appropriate size and porosity could serve as carriers for drugs to be released in the follicles prior to local or systemic absorption. In this paper, we combine multiphoton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Franz cell diffusion technology to investigate ex-vivo skin accumulation of mesoporous silica particles (average size of 400-600 nm, 2, and 7 µm, respectively), and the potential of which as vehicles for topical drug delivery of the broad-spectrum antibiotic metronidazole. We detected smaller particles (400-600 nm) in furrows at depths of about 25 µm, also after rinsing, while larger particles (7 µm) where located more superficially on the skin. This implies that appropriately sized porous particles may serve as valuable excipients in optimizing bioavailability of topical formulations. This work highlights the potential of skin furrows for topical drug delivery.

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  • 16.
    Wu, Zan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Energy Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Pham, Anh Duc
    Lund Univ, Energy Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Cao, Zhen
    Lund Univ, Energy Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Albèr, Cathrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Sunden, Bengt
    Lund Univ, Energy Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Pool boiling heat transfer of n -pentane and acetone on nanostructured surfaces by electrophoretic deposition2019In: Proceedings of the Asme International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, 2018, vol 8b, Amer Soc Mechanical Engineers , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to investigate pool boiling heat transfer enhancement by using nanostructured surfaces. Two types of nanostructured surfaces were employed, gold nanoparticlecoated surfaces and alumina nanoparticle-coated surfaces. The nanostructured surfaces were fabricated by an electrophoretic deposition technique, depositing nanoparticles in a nanofluid onto smooth copper surfaces under an electric field. N -pentane and acetone were tested as working fluids. Compared to the smooth surface, the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient has been increased by 80% for n -pentane and acetone. Possible mechanisms for the enhancement in heat transfer are qualitatively provided. The increase in active nucleation site density due to multiple micro/nanopores on nanoparticle-coated surfaces is likely the main contributor. The critical heat flux on nanostructured surfaces are approximately the same as that on the smooth surface because both smooth and modified surfaces show similar wickability for the two working fluids.

  • 17.
    Yang, Yanjie
    et al.
    College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073, China; Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Lund, 22100, Sweden.
    Wu, Zan
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Lund, 22100, Sweden.
    Chen, Xiaoqian
    National Institute of Defense Technology Innovation, Academy of Military Sciences China Beijing, 100091, China.
    Huang, Yiyong
    National Institute of Defense Technology Innovation, Academy of Military Sciences China Beijing, 100091, China.
    Wu, Binrui
    College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073, China.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sunden, Bengt
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Lund, 22100, Sweden.
    Transport dynamics of droplet impact on the wedge-patterned biphilic surface2020In: Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, ISSN 0894-1777, E-ISSN 1879-2286, Vol. 113, article id 110020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Droplet impact on biphilic surfaces with a wettability contrast has been intensively studied in recent years. In this work the effects of tilting and apex angles on droplet transport dynamics after impacting on a wedge-patterned biphilic surface at low Weber numbers were investigated experimentally. The biphilic surface was fabricated by applying a hydrophobic polymer coating on a bare silicon surface. According to the experimental results, a larger apex angle below 67.4 degrees can accelerate the droplet effectively at first. Then the friction force controls the droplet movement and reduces the speed. The tilting angle along the hydrophilic direction activates the droplet. If the gravity component is opposite to the hydrophilic direction and the tilting angle is over 15 degrees, the droplet can hardly move toward the hydrophilic area. By modeling the hydrodynamics of the droplet movement after impact on a biphilic surface with assumptions of no evaporation, no Marangoni effect, negligible dynamic contact angle variation and negligible rotation effect, the surface tension values versus the position at different apex angles are derived. The predicted position versus time trends agree well with the experimental data. This study aims to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of droplet hydrodynamics on wedge-patterned biphilic surfaces at low Weber numbers.

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