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  • 1.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Holmberg, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Johansson, Simon
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Assessing Aesthetic Criteria in the Evolutionary dungeon Designer2018In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, ACM Digital Library, 2018, article id 44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Evolutionary Dungeon Designer (EDD) [1] is as a mixed-initiative tool for creating dungeons for adventure games. Results from a user study with game developers positively evaluated EDD as a suitable framework for collaboration between human designers and PCG suggestions, highlighting these as time-saving and inspiring for creating dungeons [2]. Previous work on EDD identified the need of assessing aesthetic criteria as a key area for improvement in its PCG Engine. By upgrading the individual encoding system and the fitness evaluation in EDD's evolutionary algorithm, we present three techniques to preserve and account the designer's aesthetic criteria during the dungeon generation process: the capability of locking sections for preserving custom aesthetic structures, as well as the measurement of symmetry and similarity in the provided suggestions.

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  • 2.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Togelius, Julian
    Empowering Quality Diversity in Dungeon Design with Interactive Constrained MAP-Elites2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose the use of quality-diversity algorithms for mixed-initiative game content generation. This idea is implemented as a new feature of the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer, a system for mixed-initiative design of the type of levels you typically find in computer role playing games. The feature uses the MAP-Elites algorithm, an illumination algorithm which divides the population into a number of cells depending on their values along several behavioral dimensions. Users can flexibly and dynamically choose relevant dimensions of variation, and incorporate suggestions produced by the algorithm in their map designs. At the same time, any modifications performed by the human feed back into MAP-Elites, and are used to generate further suggestions.

  • 3.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, José
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Holmberg, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Nolasco, Chelsi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Österman, Axel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Fostering Creativity in the Mixed-Initiative Evolutionary Dungeon Designer2018In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, ACM Digital Library, 2018, article id 50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed-initiative systems highlight the collaboration between humans and computers in fostering the generation of more interesting content in game design. In light of the ever-increasing cost of game development, providing mixed-initiative tools can not only significantly reduce the cost but also encourage more creativity amongst game designers. The Evolutionary Dungeon Designer (EDD) [3] is a mixed-initiative tool with a focus on using evolutionary computation to procedurally generate content that adhere to game design patterns. As part of an ongoing project, feedback from a user study on EDD's capabilities as a mixed-initiative design tool pointed out the need for improvement on the tool's functionalities [4]. In this paper we present a review of the principles of the mixed-initiative model, as well as the existing approaches that implement it. The outcome of this analysis allows us to address the appointed needs for improvement by shaping a new version of EDD that we describe here. Finally, we also present the results from a user study carried out with professional game developers, in order to assess EDD's new functionalities. Results show an overall positive evaluation of the tool's intuitiveness and capabilities for empowering game developers' creative skills during the design process of dungeons for adventure games. They also allow us to identify upcoming challenges pattern-based mixed-initiative tools could benefit from.

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  • 4.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font Fernandez, Jose Maria Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Togelius, Julian
    Computer Science and Engineering, New York University, New York, New York, United States.
    Interactive Constrained MAP-Elites: Analysis and Evaluation of the Expressiveness of the Feature Dimensions2022In: IEEE Transactions on Games, ISSN 2475-1502, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 202-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose the Interactive Constrained MAP-Elites, a quality-diversity solution for game content generation, implemented as a new feature of the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer (EDD): a mixed-initiative co-creativity tool for designing dungeons. The feature uses the MAP-Elites algorithm, an illumination algorithm that segregates the population among several cells depending on their scores with respect to different behavioral dimensions. Users can flexibly and dynamically alternate between these dimensions anytime, thus guiding the evolutionary process in an intuitive way, and then incorporate suggestions produced by the algorithm in their room designs. At the same time, any modifications performed by the human user will feed back into MAP-Elites, closing a circular workflow of constant mutual inspiration. This paper presents the algorithm followed by an in-depth evaluation of the expressive range of all possible dimension combinations in several scenarios, and discusses their influence in the fitness landscape and in the overall performance of the procedural content generation in EDD.

  • 5.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Learning the Designer’s Preferences to Drive Evolution2020In: EvoApplications 2020: Applications of Evolutionary Computation, Springer, 2020, p. 431-445Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the Designer Preference Model, a data-driven solution that pursues to learn from user generated data in a Quality-Diversity Mixed-Initiative Co-Creativity (QD MI-CC) tool, with the aims of modelling the user’s design style to better assess the tool’s procedurally generated content with respect to that user’s preferences. Through this approach, we aim for increasing the user’s agency over the generated content in a way that neither stalls the user-tool reciprocal stimuli loop nor fatigues the user with periodical suggestion handpicking. We describe the details of this novel solution, as well as its implementation in the MI-CC tool the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer. We present and discuss our findings out of the initial tests carried out, spotting the open challenges for this combined line of research that integrates MI-CC with Procedural Content Generation through Machine Learning.

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  • 6.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    TropeTwist: Trope-based Narrative Structure Generation2022In: FDG '22: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, ACM Digital Library, 2022, article id 69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Games are complex, multi-faceted systems that share common elements and underlying narratives, such as the conflict between a hero and a big bad enemy or pursuing a goal that requires overcoming challenges. However, identifying and describing these elements together is non-trivial as they might differ in certain properties and how players might encounter the narratives. Likewise, generating narratives also pose difficulties when encoding, interpreting, and evaluating them. To address this, we present TropeTwist, a trope-based system that can describe narrative structures in games in a more abstract and generic level, allowing the definition of games’ narrative structures and their generation using interconnected tropes, called narrative graphs. To demonstrate the system, we represent the narrative structure of three different games. We use MAP-Elites to generate and evaluate novel quality-diverse narrative graphs encoded as graph grammars, using these three hand-made narrative structures as targets. Both hand-made and generated narrative graphs are evaluated based on their coherence and interestingness, which are improved through evolution.  

     

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  • 7.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    TropeTwist:Trope-based Narrative Structure Generation2022In: Proceedings of the 13th Workshop on Procedural Content Generation, FDG, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Games are complex, multi-faceted systems that share common elements and underlying narratives, such as the conflict between a hero and a big bad enemy or pursuing a goal that requires overcoming challenges. However, identifying and describing these elements together is non-trivial as they might differ in certain properties and how players might encounter the narratives. Likewise, generating narratives also pose difficulties when encoding, interpreting, and evaluating them. To address this, we present TropeTwist, a trope-based system that can describe narrative structures in games in a more abstract and generic level, allowing the definition of games' narrative structures and their generation using interconnected tropes, called narrative graphs. To demonstrate the system, we represent the narrative structure of three different games. We use MAP-Elites to generate and evaluate novel quality-diverse narrative graphs encoded as graph grammars, using these three hand-made narrative structures as targets. Both hand-made and generated narrative graphs are evaluated based on their coherence and interestingness, which are improved through evolution.

  • 8.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Togelius, Julian
    New York University.
    Assessing the Effects of Interacting with MAP-Elites2021In: Proceedings of the seventeenth {AAAI} Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence , 2021, Vol. 17, p. 124-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MAP-Elites has been successfully applied to the generation of game content and robot behaviors. However, its behavior and performance when interacted with in co-creative systems is underexplored. This paper analyzes the implications of synthetic interaction for the stability and adaptability of MAP-Elites in such scenarios. We use pre-recorded human-made level design sessions with the Interactive Constrained MAP-Elites (IC MAP-Elites). To analyze the effect of each edition step in the search space over time using different feature dimensions, we introduce Temporal Expressive Range Analysis (TERA). With TERAs, MAP-Elites is assessed in terms of its adaptability and stability to generate diverse and high-performing individuals. Our results show that interactivity, in the form of design edits and MAP-Elites adapting towards them, directs the search process to previously unexplored areas of the fitness landscape and points towards how this could improve and enrich the co-creative process with quality-diverse individuals.

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    fulltext
  • 9.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Togelius, Julian
    Game Innovation Lab, New York University, United States.
    Story Designer: Towards a Mixed-Initiative Tool to Create Narrative Structures2022In: FDG '22: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, ACM Digital Library, 2022, article id 42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narratives are a predominant part of games, and their design poses challenges when identifying, encoding, interpreting, evaluating, and generating them. One way to address this would be to approach narrative design in a more abstract layer, such as narrative structures. This paper presents Story Designer, a mixed-initiative co-creative narrative structure tool built on top of the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer (EDD) that uses tropes, narrative conventions found across many media types, to design these structures. Story Designer uses tropes as building blocks for narrative designers to compose complete narrative structures by interconnecting them in graph structures called narrative graphs. Our mixed-initiative approach lets designers manually create their narrative graphs and feeds an underlying evolutionary algorithm with those, creating quality-diverse suggestions using MAP-Elites. Suggestions are visually represented for designers to compare and evaluate and can then be incorporated into the design for further manual editions. At the same time, we use the levels designed within EDD as constraints for the narrative structure, intertwining both level design and narrative. We evaluate the impact of these constraints and the system’s adaptability and expressiveness, resulting in a potential tool to create narrative structures combining level design aspects with narrative.  

     

     

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    fulltext
  • 10.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Togelius, Julian
    Computer Science and Engineering, New York University, New York, New York, United States.
    Toward Designer Modeling Through Design Style Clustering2022In: IEEE Transactions on Games, ISSN 2475-1502, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 676-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose modeling designer style in mixed-initiative game content creation tools as archetypical design traces. These design traces are formulated as transitions between design styles; these design styles are in turn found through clustering all intermediate designs along the way to making a complete design. This method is implemented in the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer, a research platform for mixed-initiative systems to create adventure and dungeon crawler games. We present results both in the form of design styles for rooms, which can be analyzed to better understand the kind of rooms designed by users, and in the form of archetypical sequences between these rooms, i.e., Designer Personas.

  • 11.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Grevillius, Eric
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Olsson, Elin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Questgram [Qg]: Toward a Mixed-Initiative Quest Generation Tool2021In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, p. 1-10, article id 6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quests are a core element in many games, especially role-playing and adventure games, where quests drive the gameplay and story, engage the player in the game’s narrative, and in most cases, act as a bridge between different game elements. The automatic generation of quests and objectives is an interesting challenge since this can extend the lifetime of games such as in Skyrim, or can help create unique experiences such as in AI Dungeon. This work presents Questgram [Qg], a mixed-initiative prototype tool for creating quests using grammars combined in a mixed-initiative level design tool. We evaluated our tool quantitatively by assessing the generated quests and qualitatively through a small user study. Human designers evaluated the system by creating quests manually, automatically, and through mixed-initiative. Our results show the Questgram’s potential, which creates diverse, valid, and interesting quests using quest patterns. Likewise, it helps engage designers in the quest design process, fosters their creativity by inspiring them, and enhance the level generation facet of the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer with steps towards intertwining both level and quest design.

  • 12.
    Baldwin, Alexander
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Holmberg, Johan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Mixed-initiative procedural generation of dungeons using game design patterns2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG), IEEE, 2017, p. 25-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Procedural Content Generation (PCG) can be a useful tool for aiding creativity in the process of designing game levels. Mixed-initiative level generation tools where a designer and an algorithm collaborate to iteratively generate game levels have been used for this purpose. However, it can be difficult for designers to work with tools that do not respond to the common language of games: game design patterns. We present the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer, the first step towards a mixed-initiative dungeon design tool which evolves dungeon rooms using game design patterns, as well as several metrics regarding the placement of treasures and enemies, in the fitness function of a genetic algorithm. Our results show that we are able to control the frequency, shape and type of design patterns, as well as properly place enemies and treasures in the generated rooms, using design pattern-related input parameters.

  • 13.
    Baldwin, Alexander
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Holmberg, Johan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Towards Pattern-Based Mixed-Initiative Dungeon Generation2017In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games;12, ACM Digital Library, 2017, article id 74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed-initiative Procedural Content Generation uses algorithms to assist human designers in the collaborative creation of game content. Different mixed-initiative approaches use different methods to engage with the design material while supporting the designer’s intentions. However, the designer runs the risk of misunderstanding the system’s abilities and how to control them. In order to limit miscommunication during the design process, heuristics could be applied. In this paper we present a mixed-initiative tool for evolving dungeons with the aid of game design patterns as heuristics. The tool, the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer, uses a genetic algorithm that searches for levels containing game design patterns on two hierarchical levels of abstraction to express more complex gameplay in the game level. We evaluate the tool through a series of lab experiments and a user study conducted with professional game developers. Our results demonstrate that we are able to control the generation of the different patterns with the aid of design pattern-related input parameters, as well as identifying a number of features a design pattern-based mixed-initiative tool could benefit from.

  • 14.
    Bothén, Simon
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Nilsson, Patrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    An analysis and comparative user study on interactions in mobile virtual reality games2018In: FDG '18: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile Virtual Reality (MVR) makes Virtual Reality games more accessible to a broader audience. Interaction design guidelines and best practices for MVR experiences are available for developers. In this paper, we specifically explore interactions in MVR games, a particular subset of MVR experiences that is becoming popular. A set of MVR games is analyzed with a special focus on head gaze, categorizing and isolating their mechanics implemented with this common MVR technique. This analysis is the basis of a test application in the MVR interactions are implemented and later compared to a traditional game pad controller in three different challenges. A comparative user study has been carried out from the perspective of both gamers and non-gamers facing these challenges. Results show the preferences and performances of the players using all the interactions, highlighting an interesting generalized preference for MVR interactions over the traditional controller in some of the analyzed cases.

  • 15.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Patterns and procedural content generation in digital games: automatic level generation for digital games using game design patterns2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of content in digital games, such as game worlds, quests, levels, 3D-models, and textures, is costly and time consuming. To address this, different approaches to automate the process of creating game content, often referred to as procedural content generation (PCG), has been suggested. However, PCG is a complex task and include challenges such as creating content with variation, coherent style, speed, and correctness. The research in the thesis is concerned with generating game content with the aid of game design patterns, both by establishing models and exploring different methods to generate actual game content for different games. The methods include implementations of evolutionary computation, i.e. a set of search-based approaches that searches for instances of game design patterns on different abstraction levels that make up Super Mario Bros. (SMB) levels and a learning algorithm implementation based on a model (n-grams) of patterns from the original SMB-game. The different generators were evaluated with metrics concerned with the expressive range of the generators and with user tests.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 16.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Playing Together: The Player’s Repertoire, an Obstacle to Learning2012In: Computer Games and New Media Cultures - A Handbook of Digital Games Studies / [ed] Johannes Fromme, Alexander Unger, Springer, 2012, p. 329-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Massively multiplayer online games have become a common research subject in game studies. Several of these studies have focused on how the player interacts with the game and other players through the game, but often the fact is neglected that there are other games besides MMOGs that allow players to interact with each other. Two-player off-line games, for example, also allow for interaction between players, both through the game and in the physical world. This chapter focuses on the improvement of skills while such a game is being played. We use interaction analysis to understand how the player learns to play the game and how to play together with someone else. By observing how players interact with each other and with the game in a setting with only two players, we find different learning situations than one would find in a single-player or MMOG environment. These learning situations show that the formulation of an understanding of a game and the incorporation of the game into the player’s repertoire are obstructed by the repertoire itself, and they show that players may have trouble adapting to a reflective playing style. This case study is part of a larger project on situated play with multiplayer off-line and colocated video games.

  • 17.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Björk, Staffan
    Togelius, Julian
    Patterns, Dungeons and Generators2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses dungeons, of the varieties commonly found in role-playing games, into several sets of design patterns at different levels of abstraction. The analysis focuses on mechanical patterns that could be either straightforwardly instantiated or recognized by a well-defined process. At the most concrete level a set of fundamental components were identified, followed by a long list of micropatterns which can be directly instantiated. Shorter lists of meso- and macro-patterns, which can be identified mechanically, are also identified. The direct motivation for this analysis is to find building blocks and objectives for a search-based procedural dungeon generator, however we believe the analysis can be useful for understanding this class of game artifacts in general. In particular, the constraints on patterns being instantiable or recognizable leads to a stricter pattern analysis than many other attempts at analyzing game design.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 18.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Kamstrup, Andreas
    Aarseth, Espen
    Mapping the game landscape: Locating genres using functional classification2009In: Breaking New Ground: Innovation in Games, Play, Practice and Theory. Proceedings of DiGRA 2009, DiGRA , 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Are typical computer game genres still valid descriptors and useful for describing game structure and game content? Games have changed from simple to complex and from single function to multi function. By identifying structural differences in game elements we develop a more nuanced model to categorized games and use cluster analysis as a descriptive tool in order to do so. The cluster analysis of 75 functionally different games shows that the two perspectives (omnipresent and vagrant), as well as challenges, mutability and savability are important functional categories to use in order to describe games.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Togelius, J
    Davidsson, P
    Player Experience Evaluation of Level Generators in the Mario AI Framework2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Togelius, Julian
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    A multi-level level generator2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generating content at multiple levels of abstraction simultaneously is an open challenge in procedural content generation. Representing and automatically replicating the style of a human designer is another. This paper addresses both of these challenges through extending a previously devised methodology for pattern-based level generation. This method builds on an analysis of Super Mario Bros levels into three abstraction levels: micro-, meso- and macro-patterns. Micro-patterns are then used as building blocks in a search-based PCG approach that searches for macro-patterns, which are defined as combinations of meso-patterns. Results show that we can successfully generate levels that replicate the macro-patterns of selected input levels, and we argue that this constitutes an approach to automatically analysing and replicating style in level design.

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  • 21.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Togelius, Julian
    Patterns and procedural content generation: revisiting Mario in world 1 level 12012In: Proceedings of the First Workshop on Design Patterns in Games, ACM Digital Library, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Procedural content generation and design patterns could potentially be combined in several di erent ways in game design. This paper discusses how to combine the two, using automatic platform game level design as an example. The paper also present work towards a pattern-based level generator for Super Mario Bros, namely an analysis of the levels of the original Super Mario Bros game into 23 di erent patterns.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 22.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Togelius, Julian
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Patterns as Objectives for Level Generation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how to use design patterns in procedural level generation, with particular reference to the classic console game Super Mario Bros. In a previous paper, we analyzed the levels in this game to nd a set of recurring level design patterns, and discussed an implementation where levels were produced from concatenation of these patterns. In this paper, we instead propose using patterns as design objectives. An implementation of this based on evolutionary computation is presented. In this implementation, levels are represented as a set of vertical slices from the original game, and the tness function count the number of patterns found. Qualitative analysis of generated levels is performed in order to identify strengths and challenges of this method.

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  • 23. Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Togelius, Julian
    IT Univ Copenhagen, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Procedural Content Generation Using Patterns as Objectives2014In: APPLICATIONS OF EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTATION / [ed] Esparcia Alcazar, A I, Springer, 2014, p. 325-336Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a search-based approach for procedural generation of game levels that represents levels as sequences of micro-patterns and searched for meso-patterns. The micro-patterns are "slices" of original human-designed levels from an existing game, whereas the meso-patters are abstractions of common design patterns seen in the same levels. This method generates levels that are similar in style to the levels from which the original patterns were extracted, while still allowing for considerable variation in the geometry of the generated levels. The evolutionary method for generating the levels was tested extensively to investigate the distribution of micro-patterns used and meso-patterns found.

  • 24.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Togelius, Julian
    Procedural Content Generation Using Patterns as Objectives2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a search-based approach for procedural generation of game levels that represents levels as sequences of micro-patterns and searched for meso-patterns. The micro-patterns are “slices” of original human-designed levels from an existing game, whereas the meso-patters are abstractions of common design patterns seen in the same levels. This method generates levels that are similar in style to the levels from which the original patterns were extracted, while still allowing for considerable variation in the geometry of the generated levels. The evolutionary method for generating the levels was tested extensively to investigate the distribution of micro-patterns used and meso-patterns found.

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  • 25.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Togelius, Julian
    IT University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nelson, Mark J.
    IT University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Linear Levels Through n-grams2014In: AcademicMindTrek '14: Proceedings of the 18th International Academic MindTrek Conference: Media Business, Management, Content & Services, ACM Digital Library, 2014, p. 200-206Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We shown that novel, linear game levels can be created using n- grams that have been trained on a corpus of existing levels. The method is fast and simple, and produces levels that are recognisably in the same style as those in the corpus that it has been trained on. We use Super Mario Bros. as an example domain, and use a selection of the levels from the original game as a training corpus. We treat Mario levels as a left-to-right sequence of vertical level slices, allowing us to perform level generation in a setting with some formal similarities to n-gram-based text generation and music generation. In empirical results, we investigate the effects of corpus size and n (sequence length). While the applicability of the method might seem limited to the relatively narrow domain of 2D games, we argue that many games in effect have linear levels and n-grams could be used to good effect, given that a suitable alphabet can be found.

  • 26.
    Embring Klang, Carl-Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Enhörning, Victor
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Alvarez, Alberto
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Assessing Simultaneous Action Selection and Complete Information in TAG with Sushi Go!2021In: Proceedings of the 3rd Conference on Games, IEEE, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalizing tabletop games for general game playing(GGP) AI research is a continuously growing field. TabletopGames Framework (TAG) is a framework developed to simplifythe process of implementing tabletop board games to digital form.Sushi Go! is a game that combines simultaneous action selectionand complete information. This creates a unique combination ofmechanics, which presents a new challenge for GGP agents. Byimplementing Sushi Go! into TAG, we can test different agent’sperformance using these mechanics and compare them to theirexisting performances in the other games of TAG. Results ofthis testing are presented, which display that the framework iscapable of implementing Sushi Go! and that the agents performwith mixed results. Further developing heuristics for the agentsshould prove to increase their performance when faced with thesetypes of games.

  • 27.
    Font, Jose
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Contreras, Eudy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Johnsson, Mats
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Linderman, Kristoffer
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Vault! Learning Through Creativity: A Parkour Based Educational Model and Application2018In: Proceedings of the 12th European conference on games based learning (ECGBL 2018), Acad Conferences Ltd , 2018, p. 876-880Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, the way people learn has seen a big shift from the traditional classroom that purely uses printed material to the contemporary classroom that utilizes digital technologies for the teaching material (Al-Emran and Shaalan, 2015). In this paper we present Vault!, an Android mobile app that combines the benefits of mobile learning and relational learning, while at the same time reaps the reward of the community-based learning model existing in parkour. We also provide a theoretical support for parkour as a general-purpose challenge-based educational model, as well as an analysis of popular mobile learning apps, both of them resulting in the design and development of the presented application.

  • 28.
    Font, Jose
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Johnsson, Mats
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Elbæk, Lars
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Kaos, Maximus D.
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Using and facilitating social videogames as warm-ups for embodied design2023In: Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ACI Academic Conferences International, 2023, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 171-179Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Warm-ups, as preliminary activities to physical training, are an inherent part of any physical exercise and sports practice. Rooted in the concept of embodied cognition, embodied design is a paradigm that shifts the focus of interaction design from external artefacts and devices to the human body (Svanæs & Barkhuus, 2020). A body-centred design emphasises the importance of having the human body at the centre of the entire design cycle, conveying movement, physical expressivity, feelings, and aesthetics, in a design process that uses the body as both a resource and target. Designing with the body is, therefore, a physically demanding activity that requires a specific set of warm-ups to educate and prepare designers mentally, socially, and physically for the act of embodied design. We propose social videogames as a resourceful framework for creating such a set of warm-up exercises. This paper presents a methodology comprising off-the-shelf commercial videogames whose rules have been adapted for embodied design. Three studies have been executed to validate the game's capacity as warm-up activity and icebreaker for embodied creativity and to study the conditions for an optimal method facilitation to external instructors in preparation for an applied session. The method applied is qualitative and quantitative feedback data gathered from the three studies using questionnaires, tests, observation, and open interviews. The results of the series of studies showed the potential of the proposed methodology as warm-ups for teaching, training, and practising embodied design, as well as giving insights on how to facilitate it. Overall, the game-based warm-ups for embodied design preparation using off-the-shelf movement games have a social and playful nature. The proposed twisted gameplays make them suitable to exert body moves and get ready to think and design with their bodies. The study on facilitation shows the need for a preparation session supported by an experienced person. However, one introductory session is enough for the toolbox to become an easily configurable resource that adapts to the facilitator's needs and goals. We suggest including sample implementation cases along with instruction cards of the embodied games. Further, the warm-up games are customisable using the toolbox's modifier cards. 

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  • 29.
    Font, Jose M
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Hedvall, Alexander
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Svensson, Emil
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Towards Teaching Maternal Healthcare and Nutrition in Rural Ethiopia through a Serious Game2017In: CHI PLAY '17 Extended Abstracts Extended Abstracts Publication of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, ACM Digital Library, 2017, p. 187-193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethiopia has one of the highest maternal and child mortality rates in the world, partly due to the low accessibility of educational content regarding nutrition and healthcare in the rural regions. This paper presents the first step for tackling this problem by means of a serious game, Easycare, designed for teaching illiterate users, with almost no previous experience with digital games, good practices for healthcare and nutrition. Promising results from a field study conducted in Ethiopia are also presented, showing the potential of the tool for education in developing countries.

  • 30.
    Font, Jose M.
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Mahlmann, Tobias
    Dota 2 Bot Competition2019In: IEEE Transactions On Games, ISSN 2475-1502, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 285-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA) games are a recent huge success both in the video game industry and the international eSports scene. These games encourage team coordination and cooperation, short and long-term planning, within a real-time combined action and strategy gameplay. Artificial intelligence (AI) and computational intelligence (CI) in games research competitions offer a wide variety of challenges regarding the study and application of AI techniques to different game genres. These events are widely accepted by the AI/CI community as a sort of AI benchmarking that strongly influences many other research areas in the field. This paper presents and describes in detail the Dota 2 (Defense of the Ancients 2) Bot competition and the Dota 2 AI framework that supports it. This challenge aims to join both the MOBAs and AI/CI game competitions, inviting participants to submit AI controllers for the successful MOBA Dota 2 to play in 1v1 matches, which aims for fostering research on AI techniques for real-time games. The Dota 2 AI framework makes use of the actual Dota 2 game mudding capabilities to enable to connect external AI controllers to actual Dota 2 game matches using the original F2P game.

  • 31.
    Font, Jose M
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Manrique, Daniel
    Larrodera, Sergio
    Ramos Criado, Pablo
    Towards a hybrid neural and evolutionary heuristic approach for playing tile-matching puzzle games2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games (CIG), IEEE, 2017, p. 76-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: In this paper we explore the hybrid application of evolutionary computation and artificial neural networks in the development of intelligent systems able to solve the problem of approximating the optimal strategy in a tile-matching puzzle game. Three intelligent systems are proposed: an evolutionary heuristic technique, artificial neural networks, and a hybrid approach that combines both. Results show that the hybrid approach, which combines the advantages of the two previous solutions, performs better at both, the number of completed lines and the average piece placement time. These results aim to serve as the basis for a later comparative study against state- of-the-art techniques in the topic.

  • 32. Horn, Britton
    et al.
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Shaker, Noor
    Smith, Gillian
    Togelius, Julian
    A Comparative Evaluation of Procedural Level Generators in the Mario AI Framework2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation is an open problem in procedural content generation research. The eld is now in a state where there is a glut of content generators, each serving di erent purposes and using a variety of techniques. It is difficult to understand, quantitatively or qualitatively, what makes one generator di erent from another in terms of its output. To remedy this, we have conducted a large-scale comparative evaluation of level generators for the Mario AI Benchmark, a research-friendly clone of the classic platform game Super Mario Bros. In all, we compare the output of seven different level generators from the literature, based on different algorithmic methods, plus the levels from the original Super Mario Bros game. To compare them, we have de ned six expressivity metrics, of which two are novel contributions in this paper. These metrics are shown to provide interestingly di erent characterizations of the level generators. The results presented in this paper, and the accompanying source code, is meant to become a benchmark against which to test new level generators and expressivity metrics.

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  • 33.
    Kadish, David
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Sarkheyli-Hägele, Arezoo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Hägele, Georg
    Autonomous Operations and Services, Husqvarna AB, Sweden.
    Niehorster, Diederick C.
    Lund University Humanities Lab and Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Pederson, Thomas
    School of Business, Economics and IT, University West, Sweden.
    Towards Situation Awareness and Attention Guidance in a Multiplayer Environment using Augmented Reality and Carcassonne2022In: CHI PLAY '22: Extended Abstracts of the 2022 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, ACM Digital Library, 2022, p. -9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented reality (AR) games are a rich environment for researching and testing computational systems that provide subtle user guidance and training. In particular computer systems that aim to augment a user’s situation awareness benefit from the range of sensors and computing power available in AR headsets. The main focus of this work-in-progress paper is the introduction of the concept of the individualized Situation Awareness-based Attention Guidance (SAAG) system used to increase humans’ situating awareness and the augmented reality version of the board game Carcassonne for validation and evaluation of SAAG. Furthermore, we present our initial work in developing the SAAG pipeline, the generation of game state encodings, the development and training of a game AI, and the design of situation modeling and eye-tracking processes.  

     

  • 34.
    Larchen Costuchen, Alexia
    et al.
    Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, s/n, 46022 València.
    Font Fernández, José María
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Stavroukalis, Minos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    AR-Supported Mind Palace for L2 Vocabulary Recall2022In: International Journal: Emerging Technologies in Learning, ISSN 1868-8799, E-ISSN 1863-0383, Vol. 17, no 13, p. 47-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MnemoRoom4U is an AR (Augmented Reality) tool that uses a memory-palace strategy for foreign-language training. A memory palace helps information recall with the aid of object association in visualizations of familiar spatial surroundings. In MnemoRoom4U, paper or digital flashcards are re-placed with virtual notes containing L1 words and their L2 translations that are placed on top of real physical objects inside a familiar environment, such as one’s room, home, office space, etc. The AR-supported notes aid associative memory by establishing a relationship between the physical objects in the user’s mind and the virtual lexis to be retained in L2. Learners first set up a path through their familiar environment, attaching virtual sticky notes—each containing a target word to be memorized together with its corresponding source-language translation—to real-life objects (e.g. furniture in their homes or offices). They then take the same path again, reviewing all the words, and finally carry out a retention test. MnemoRoom4U is a technological artifact designed for specific didactic purposes in the Unity game engine with the ARCore augmented-reality plug-in for Android. This work takes a Design-Science approach with phenomenological, exploratory underpinnings tracking back to the efficiency of spatial mnemonics previously reported quantitatively and combines it with AR technology to effect L2 vocabulary recall.

  • 35.
    Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Ekblad, Jonas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Alvarez, Alberto
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    A Comparative UX Analysis between Tabletop Games and their Digital Counterparts2020In: Extended Abstracts of the 2020 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 301-305Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As tabletop games are ported to digital versions to increase their accessibility, the expected User Experience (UX) might be degraded in the transition. This paper aims to understand how and why playing tabletop games differentiates depending on the platform. Seven tabletop games have been chosen from different genres with an official digital adaptation. Our approach has been to do a comparative analysis of both versions followed by a user study to analyze and measure the UX differences, measuring five key factors, Usability, Engagement, Social Connectivity, Aesthetics, and Enjoyment. Our results indicate that games that rely on imperfect information offer a much higher social connectivity and engagement when played around a table. Meanwhile, games relying on tile-placement offers higher usability and engagement when played digitally due to the assistance provided by the game. However, the physical versions got, in general, a higher rating than the digital versions in all key factors except slightly in the usability. Physical versions are the preferred options, but the digital versions' benefits, such as accessibility and in-game assistance, makes them relevant for further analysis.  

  • 36.
    Larsson, Tinea
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Alvarez, Alberto
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Towards AI as a Creative Colleague in Game Level Design2022In: Proceedings of the 18th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment, AAAI Press, 2022, Vol. 18, p. 137-145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Mixed-Initiative Co-Creative tools, the human is mostly in control of what will and can be created, delegating the AI to a more suggestive role instead of a colleague in the co-creative process. Allowing more control and agency for the AI might be an interesting path in co-creative scenarios where AI could direct and take more initiative within the co-creative task. However, the relationship between AI and human designers in creative processes is delicate, as adjusting the initiative or agency of the AI can negatively affect the user experience. In this paper, different degrees of agency for the AI are explored within the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer (EDD) to further understand MI-CC tools. A user study was performed using EDD with three varying degrees of AI agency. The study highlighted elements of frustration that the human designer experiences when using the tool and the behavior in the AI that led to possible strains on the relationship. The paper concludes with the identified issues and possible solutions and suggested further research.

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  • 37.
    Olsson, Carl Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Björk, Staffan
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    The conceptual relationship model: understanding patterns and mechanics in game design2014In: DIGRA '14 - PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2014 DIGRA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE, DIGRA , 2014, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rooted in the complexity of purposeful design, this paper embraces a phenomenological perspective of design as both a process and artifact. We use this perspective to interpret why the conceptualization and realization of design intentions can be difficult to achieve and why design is often perceived as a so called ‘wicked problem’. This paper revisits the concepts of game design patterns and game mechanics, arguing that refactoring these concepts is needed to clarify their relationships and motivations. We outline the separation of concerns between them and suggest that an additional contextualizing layer should be added to the discourse. Using this, we define and reflect upon what we refer to as the conceptual relationship model.

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  • 38.
    Ovesdotter Alm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Rochester Institute of Technology, United States.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, José
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Liapis, Antonios
    Institute of Digital Games University of Malta, Malta.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Salo, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Workshop on Invisible AI-driven HCI Systems: When, Why and How2020In: NordiCHI '20: Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Extended Abstract: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society / [ed] Ilja Šmorgun, Gerd Berget, ACM Digital Library, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The InvisibleAI (InvAI’20) workshop aims to systematically discuss a growing class of interactive systems that invisibly remove some decision-making tasks away from humans to machines, based on recent advances in artificial intelligence (AI), data science, and sensor or actuation technology. While the interest in the affordances as well as the risks of hidden pervasive AI are high on the agenda in public debate, discussion on the topic is needed within the human-computer interaction (HCI) community. In particular, we want to gather insights, ideas, and models for approaching the use of barely noticeable AI decision-making in systems design from a human-centered perspective, so as to make the most out of the automated systems and algorithms that support human activity both as designers and users. Concurrently, these systems should safeguard that humans remain in charge when it counts (high stakes decisions, privacy, monitoring lack of explainability and fairness, etc.). What to automate and what not to automate is often a system designer’s choice [8]. By taking the established concept of explicit interaction between a system and its user as a point of departure, and inviting authors to provide examples from their own research, we aim to stimulate dynamic discussion while keeping the workshop concrete and system design-focused. The workshop especially directs itself to participants from the interaction design, AI, and HCI communities. The targeted scientific outcome of the workshop is an up-to-date ontology of invisible AI-HCI systems and hybrid human-AI collaboration mechanisms, and approaches. Additionally, we expect that the workgroups and the roundtables will provide starting points shaping continued discussions, new collaborations, and innovative scientific contributions that springboard from the workgroups’ findings. The focus of the proposed workshop involves the bridging of two spaces of computational research that impact user experiences and societal domains (HCI and AI). Thus, the proposed workshop topic aligns well with the theme of this year’s NordiCHI conference which is Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society.

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  • 39.
    Tolinsson, Simon
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Flodhag, Alexander
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Alvarez, Alberto
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    To Make Sense of Procedurally Generated Dungeons2020In: Extended Abstracts of the 2020 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 384-387Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growth of procedural content generation in game development, there is a need for a viable generative method to give context and make sense of the content within game space. We propose procedural narrative as context through objectives, as a useful means to structure content in games. In this paper, we present and describe an artifact developed as a sub-system to the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer (EDD) that procedurally generates objectives for the dungeons created with the tool. The quality of the content within rooms is used to generate objectives, and together with the distributions and design of the dungeon, main and side objectives are formed to maximize the usage of game space and create a proper context.  

  • 40.
    van Delden, Robby
    et al.
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Reidsma, Dennis
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Postma, Dees
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Weijdom, Joris
    University of Twente, Netherlands and HKU University of the Arts, Netherlands.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain.
    Vega-Cebrián, José Manuel
    Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain.
    Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana
    Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain and University College London, UK.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Park, Solip
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Hämäläinen, Perttu
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Johnsson, Mats
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Rasmussen, Lærke Schjødt
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Elbæk, Lars
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Technology, Movement, and Play Is Hampering and Boosting Interactive Play2023In: CHI PLAY Companion '23: Companion Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 231-234Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we highlight how including technology, movement or play can boost a design process but with unbalanced amounts can also hamper the process. We provide a set of examples where we miscalculated the amount of technology, movement, or play that was needed in a design activity in such a way that it became counterproductive and for each example mention possible adaptations. Finally, we highlight three existing approaches that can balance the overabundance of technology, movement, and play in design processes: activity-centered design, somaesthetic design, and perspective-changing movement-based design.  

     

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