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  • 1.
    Cory, Erin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Echoes of the Club: Affective Materiality & Vinyl Records as Boundary Objects2023In: Riffs: A Popular Music Journal, ISSN 2513-8537, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 2.
    Gibbins, John R.
    et al.
    University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Reimer, Bo
    Department of Communication, San Jose State University; Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, Göteborg University.
    The politics of postmodernity: an introduction to contemporary politics and culture1998Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens to politics in the postmodern condition? The Politics of Postmodernity is a political tour de force that addresses this key contemporary question. Politics in postmodernity is carefully contextualized by relating its specific sphere - the polity - to those of the economic, social, technological and cultural. The authors confront globalization and the notion of postmodernity as disorganized capitalism. They analyze the role of the mass media, the changing ways in which politics is used, the role of the state and the progressive potential of politics in postmodern times. Closing with a postscript on the future of the discipline of political science, this book offers a profound yet highly accessible account                                                  

  • 3.
    Henriksen, Line
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Romic, Bojana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lively Media Technologies: Ethics, Monsters and New Imaginaries for the Future2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With this paper, we suggest a new ethical and conceptual framework for how to enter into companionships with digital technologies and digital creations in an increasingly media dominated society. We argue that such a framework is needed, as recent developments within digital technologies have sparked cultural anxieties concerning the agency and liveliness of such technologies to the extent of creating popular imaginaries of “technologies-as-monsters” (Suchman 2018). Examples of such imaginaries of monstrous technologies can be found within contemporary popular culture, but the ties between the monster and technological developments have a much longer history and have been explored within literature and art for centuries, the most notable example being Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein: Or the Modern Prometheus (1818/2003). Using discourse and textual analysis, as well as Monster Studies and Feminist Posthumanism, we investigate the legacy of the cultural and scientific imaginary of technologies-as-monsters, and the role played by media in transporting these imaginaries (Jasanoff, 2015). We offer an analysis of contemporary science fiction narratives across media – such as TV, film and novels – and discuss how they influence imaginaries of the technologies of the future. We also propose new methods based on creative writing for rethinking and retelling stories of future co-existence and companionship with techno-monsters. 

    References

    Jasanoff, Sheila (2015) “Future imperfect: Science, Technology, and the Imaginations of Modernity”, pp. 1-34 in Sheila Jasanoff and Sang-Hyun Kim (eds.) Dreamscapes of Modernity. Sociotechnical Imaginaries and the Fabrication of Power. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Shelley, Mary (1818/2003) Frankenstein: Or the Modern Prometheus. London: Penguin.

    Suchman, Lucy (2018) “Frankenstein’s Problem”, pp. 13-18 in Ulrike Schultze, Margunn Aanestad, Magnus Mähring, Carsten Østerlund and Kai Riemer (eds.) Living with Monsters? Social Implications of Algorithmic Phenomena, Hybrid Agency, and the Performativity of Technology. Cham: Springer.

  • 4.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

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  • 5.
    Lagerkvist, Amanda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Bothering the binaries: unruly AI futures of hauntings and hope at the limit2023In: Handbook of Critical Studies of Artificial Intelligence / [ed] Lindgren, Simon, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, p. 199-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AI is not only a technology but also a powerful story about the latent future present. This narrative assemblage is visible across domains of industry, policy, academia, and debate. Characteristically, it bifurcates into binaries of possibility versus risk, augmentation versus replacement, and so on. This calls for a renewed critique. In this chapter, we argue for the importance of bothering these binaries by re-thinking AI as anticipatory existential media that allows for the unexpected, the impredicative, and the uncanny. Three voices from the continental tradition of philosophy offer possibilities for pluralizing the AI imaginary. Jaspers’ existentiality brings the reality of the vulnerabilities of the present digital limit situation to the fore, requiring response; Derrida’s hauntings allow the past to return as friendly and wise ghosts; and Bloch’s hopefulness challenges the inevitability of the processes at hand. Together, they allow us to reimagine more unruly AI futures in fruitful and urgent ways.

  • 6. Larsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Lindstedt, Inger
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    From timeshift to shapeshift: Towards nonlinear production and consumption of news2008In: Changing Television Environments (Proc. EuroITV 2008), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2008, p. 30-39Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lindberg, Ulf
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Bildning och estetik i utbildning2005Report (Other academic)
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  • 8.
    Lindstedt, Inger
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nonlinear news production and consumption: A collaborative approach2009In: Computers in Entertainment, ISSN 1544-3574, E-ISSN 1544-3981, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People depend on news to make sense of happenings in the world, but current digital news products do not live up to their potential in this regard. Interactivity in relation to news is often seen as a way to give the consumer control over when to consume something and on which platform. Less attention has been placed on what should be consumed and how. Within the project MyNewsMyWay, a news service was constructed that makes possible a more in-depth and varied media consumption than what traditional news services offer today. In the follow-up design study OurNewsOurWays, additional attention was put on the possibility of combining professional news material with user-generated content.

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  • 9.
    Lindstedt, Inger
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    News, Interactivity and the Digital Divide. Practice-Based Research and the Contextualization of News. Paper presented at the IAMCR Conference, The Communication Policy and Technology Section, Stockholm2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Collaborative Media. Production, Consumption, and Design Interventions2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With many new forms of digital media–including such popular social media as Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr—the people formerly known as the audience no longer only consume but also produce and even design media. Jonas Löwgren and Bo Reimer term this phenomenon collaborative media, and in this book they investigate the qualities and characteristics of these forms of media in terms of what they enable people to do. They do so through an interdisciplinary research approach that combines the social sciences and humanities traditions of empirical and theoretical work with practice-based, design-oriented interventions.

  • 11.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Designing collaborative media: A challenge for CHI?2012In: Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2012 Extended Abstracts), ACM Press, 2012, p. 31-40Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative media refers to digital media where people outside the traditional media industries participate in production as well as infrastructural design. We argue that (1) people’s use of computers today increasingly comprise communicating in collaborative media, and that (2) designing collaborative media implies fundamental changes to design processes and designer roles, which in turn (3) forms a challenge to the proactive position of the CHI community in shaping future computer use.

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  • 12.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The computer is a medium, not a tool: collaborative media challenging interaction design2013In: Challenges, E-ISSN 2078-1547, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 86-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative media entail an emerging set of digitally mediated practices, characterized by collaborative communicative action within organically developing, cross-medial infrastructures. We argue that computers are increasingly turning from tools into (collaborative) media in everyday use, and that this shift poses a significant challenge to the discipline of interaction design. Particularly prominent aspects of the challenge include the way design processes are conceptualized and structured, and the way in which communicative perspectives take precedence over instrumental ones.

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  • 13.
    Melin, Margareta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, BoMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).Sarrimo, CristineMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ingers bok2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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  • 14. Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Balsamo, Ann
    Farman, Jason
    Losh, Elizabeth
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    Hoyt, Eric
    McPherson, Tara
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Unintended Consequences2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 181-191Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses the complex, sometimes unintended—but also potentially very rewarding—consequences of intervening into practices that are more commonly studied from a distance, and the political and ethical implications of this work. The case studies for this chapter explore what happens when media scholars become actively involved in the reshaping of media experiences and infrastructures, and in some sense become part of the very processes they seek to critique. Contributors were asked, has your applied media studies work ever produced truly unexpected results that raised unintended ethical or legal issues you had to address? How have you managed issues relating to Intellectual Property regulations with open, collaborative work online? Have you discovered any novel ethical challenges or responsibilities from putting work online—including objects created by people, living and deceased, from cultures that are different than your own? Have you ever been unexpectedly drawn into an applied media studies project as a participant in ways that redefined your understanding of your role as scholar, or expert, or lead investigator? How did you respond, and has this changed the way you work now?

  • 15. Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Balsamo, Anne
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Losh, Elizabeth
    Hoyt, Eric
    McPherson, Tara
    Farman, Jason
    Foundations of Applied Media Studies2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 31-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Each of the collaboratively authored chapters of Applied Media Studies was produced through a series of interview-style questions that I, as editor, developed and circulated to the contributors. Through a dialogic process that took place in a deliberately conversational tone, I asked each contributor to answer questions related to a set of themes in the book as a whole, ranging from logistical concerns to methodological and theoretical problems. In this foundational chapter, I asked, “What does applied media studies mean to you? How and why did you start doing applied media studies? In your view, what is the theoretical, historical, and/or political rationale for reimagining humanistic media studies as an applied practice?” In addition to their written responses, contributors created short videos for a web-based companion to the book, hosted on the open-access Scalar platform (http://scalar.usc.edu/works/applied-media-studies/index).

  • 16. Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Farman, Jason
    Balsamo, Anne
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Losh, Elizabeth
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    McPherson, Tara
    Hoyt, Eric
    Conceptual Models and Helpful Thinkers2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 253-262Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter serves as a conclusion by way of annotated compilation, gathering the contributors’ favorite resources for helping them, their colleagues, and their students do applied media studies work. I asked participants what conceptual models they have found helpful for extending and applying media theory as they move between making, writing, and teaching. Additional questions included, what articles, books, blogs, and Twitter streams would you urge readers to look into? And finally, what are the gaps in this field where you feel future research should be focused?

  • 17. Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Hoyt, Eric
    McPherson, Tara
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Parks, Lisa
    Farman, Jason
    Losh, Elizabeth
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    Transdisciplinary Collaboration and Translational Media-Making2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 129-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, contributors address the core challenges of collaborating across academic divisions such as humanities and science, bridging academic and community practices, and translating between the diverse stakeholders involved in these projects. Much of the recent research on problem-based collaboration and innovation has noted the value of bringing together teams of people with radically different forms of expertise to solve complex challenges (Johnson 2010; Davidson 2011; Ness 2012). Contributors address a common question asked by academics interested in applied media studies, who don’t know where to begin: how do you find good collaborators in different, perhaps unfamiliar disciplines? Further, once those collaborators are found, how do you overcome the typical siloes of universities structured by departments within divisions like “humanities” and “sciences” to build effective working relationships with your collaborators? How do you translate between fields with radically different training, terminology, and theories of knowledge? What does it take to develop a shared vocabulary?

  • 18. Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    McPherson, Tara
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Parks, Lisa
    Farman, Jason
    Losh, Elizabeth
    Hoyt, Eric
    Balsamo, Anne
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Architectures of Sustainability2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 219-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While doing applied media studies generally requires far fewer financial resources than doing applied science, issues of funding and sustainability nonetheless play a significant role in these projects. The multidisciplinary teams assembled to create applied media projects need space, technology, supplies, and human capital to succeed, and the pipelines for securing those resources are particularly limited in the humanities. This chapter asks contributors how they have managed to attain the needed resources for their projects, and what kinds of institutional homes they have found to house them. Further, to cultivate the necessary team members as participants come and go, we discuss what kind of background, training, and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students, as well as faculty members, is needed to do this kind of work.

  • 19. Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Parks, Lisa
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Losh, Elizabeth
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    McPherson, Tara
    Farman, Jason
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    Hoyt, Eric
    Pleasures and Perils of Hands-On, Collaborative Work2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 81-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this collaboratively authored chapter, contributors discuss why they do applied media studies, addressing both the great rewards and the significant challenges to shifting away from traditional models of humanistic research and teaching.

  • 20.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Even better than the real thing: The cultural form of televised sport2013In: A History of Swedish Broadcasting: Communicative Ethos, Genres and Institutional Change / [ed] Monika Djerf-Pierre, Mats Ekström, Nordicom, 2013, p. 221-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Expressivist Politics, The Media and Citizenship: On Rationality and Emotions2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Journalism, Politics and the Public Sphere. On Emotions and and Objectivity2008In: New Publics With/Out Democracy / [ed] Henrik Bang, Anders Esmark, Samfundslitteratur, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Rationalitet, känslor och objektivitet. Valrörelser och det journalistiska uppdraget2006In: Valets mekanismer / [ed] Hanna Bäck, Mikael Gilljam, Liber, 2006, p. 303-313Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    “Shooting to Kill”. Impartiality, Language and Journalistic Practice on Swedish Television. Paper presented at the IAMCR Conference, The Journalism Research and Education Section, Stockholm2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Tools for Action: Media Research as Collaborative Action Research2021In: The SAGE Handbook of Participatory Research and Inquiry / [ed] Danny Burns, Jo Howard and Sonia M. Ospina, Los Angeles: Sage Publications, 2021, p. 569-581Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Transforming the Urban Envrironment: Media Interventions, Accountability and Agonism2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 203-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The media landscape has changed tremendously. New companies—Apple, Google, Facebook, and so on—have entered the landscape, reshaping it from the ground, and disrupting the business models of the traditional media companies. Media as such are increasingly being designed, produced and consumed collaboratively. And as evidenced in the Internet of Things discourse, more and more objects become media.

  • 27.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Uppspel: den svenska TV-sportens historia2002Book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Romic, Bojana (Researcher, Project director)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Reimer, Bo (Editor)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Rosenqvist, Karolina (Contributor)
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services.
    Topgaard, Richard (Editor)
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Artificial Creativity2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Artificial Creativity virtual conference aimed to stir a discussion about the cultural, societal and ethical aspects of artworks featuring artificial intelligence or robots engaged in creative production. The conference dates were 19–20 November 2020 and it was hosted by the research lab Medea, the School of Arts and Communication, and the Data Society research programme – all at Malmö University, Sweden. The conference received generous support from Riksbankens Jubileumsfond.

    Videos of keynotes and some participant presentations are available through Malmö University's video repository, MaU Play: https://play.mau.se/playlist/details/0_dvsr6i1f

    Keynote speakers:

    • Dr. habil. Andreas Broeckmann (Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany). "Robots versus Machines".
    • Professor Mark Amerika (University of Colorado, US). "Fatal Error: Artificial Creative Intelligence (ACI)".
    • Professor Joanna Zylinska (Goldsmiths University, UK). "Beyond Machine Vision: How to Build a Non-Trivial Perception Machine".

    Participants:

    • Arandas, Luís, Mick Grierson, and Miguel Carvalhais. "Continuous Contributions of Artificial Agents in Performance Regarding Static Artefacts".
    • Ashton, Daniel. "Assembling Creative Work Futures: Automation and Portfolio Working in the Creative Economy".
    • Axhamn, Johan. "EU Copyright Law and AI".
    • Balfour, Lindsay. "Beauty is in the Eye of the Algorithm: Artificially Intelligent Creativity and its Ethical Implications".
    • Carvalhais, Miguel and Rosemary Lee. "Spectral and Procedural: A Perspective on Artificial Creativity Through Computational Art".
    • Chia, Aleena. "Agency and Automation in Digital Game Production".
    • Chow, Pei-Sze. "Ghost in the (Hollywood) machine: emergent applications of artificial intelligence in the film industry".
    • Coelho, Inês Rebanda. "Authorship of fictional texts generated by AI".
    • Feher, Katalin. "Narrow AI results in narrow creativity: Concepts of creative process in a decade’s perspective from media to art".
    • Gallagher, Brad. "Do GPT-2s Dream of Electric Poetry?"
    • Goddard, Valentine. "Art can shape how AI is governed".
    • Ivanova, Nevena. "Computational Creativity: A Philosophical Study".
    • Kadish, David. "Designing Endemic Robots: An Experiment in Sound".
    • Koh, Immanuel. "AI-Urban-Sketching in the Age of COVID-19".
    • Leach, Neil. "AI and The Limits of Human Creativity".
    • Maraffi, Christopher. "Sherlock Frankenstein: Transmedia Character Design with AI Breeding Tools".
    • McGarrigle, Conor. "Art Washing Machine Learning".
    • Muia, Julian. "Downstream: New Developments in Algorithmic Composition and Music Streaming".
    • Olszewska, Anna. "Reflections on machine situationism".
    • Stephensen, Jan Løhmann. "Artificial Creativity, Anthropocentrism and Post-Creativity – The Political Stakes".
    • Trillo, Roberto Alonso, Peter Nelson, Daniel Shanken, François Mouillot, Mathis Antony, Ryan Au, and Maya Duan. "Collaborative Artistic Production Using Generative Adversarial Networks".
    • Wagman, Kelly B. "Ambii: An Ambient & Non-Anthropomorphic Digital Assistant".
    • Wasielewski, Amanda. "What role can AI play in the creation and study of art?"
    • Wellner, Galit. "Layers of Imagination".
    • Willcox, Stacey. "Artificial Synaesthesia: An exploration of machine learning image synthesis for soundscape audio visualisation".

    The conference also featured a virtual exhibition in Mozilla's Hubs with the following presentations:

    • Emard, Justine. "Supraorganism"
    • Partadiredja, Reza Arkan, Davor Ljubenkov, and Carlos Alejandro Entrena Serrano. "AI or Human?"
    • Goddard, Valentine. "Introducing the 'AI on a Social Mission' conference".

    The virtual exhibition was produced by Maria Engberg and Jay David Bolter within the research project "Virtual conferencing to promote research and scholarly exchange during the current pandemic and possible future disruptions".

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