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  • 1.
    Akama, Yoko
    et al.
    RMIT University.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex.
    Kamihira, Takahito
    Senshu University.
    Expanding Participation to Design with More-Than-Human Concerns2020In: PDC '20: Proceedings of the 16th Participatory Design Conference 2020 - Participation(s) Otherwise - Volume 1, ACM Digital Library, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory Design's focus on people comes from a social democratic vision. However, as climate and existential crises press us to consider wellbeing beyond humans alone, we ask what a pluriversal design agenda might include and what could be articulated as ‘participatory’? Necessarily, this inquiry has limits, as participation usually implies human voice, rights, representation and structures of decision-making. This paper commits to these concerns while asking ethical, political and onto-epistemological questions regarding how worlds and futures are shaped when more-than-human entities – plants, animals, rocks, rivers and spirits – participate in our becoming? We offer a meeting of feminist techno-science with practices and philosophies from Japan and beyond to offer thought experiments in engaging with difference and plurality. And we give several examples of practice situated at ontological boundaries to offer some novel thoughts on ‘participation otherwise’, always-participating-with-many and the futures this could usher in.  

     

  • 2. Avram, Gabriela
    et al.
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    De Paoli, Stefano
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lyle, Peter
    Teli, Maurizio
    Repositioning CoDesign in the age of platform capitalism: from sharing to caring2019In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 185-191Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    et al.
    Penn State Univ, State Coll, PA 16801 USA..
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    Penn State Univ, State Coll, PA 16801 USA..
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Univ Sussex, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Wanting To Live Here: Design After Anthropocentric Functionalism2021In: CHI '21: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2021 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ACM Digital Library, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research has recently turned to theoretical perspectives, including care ethics and posthumanism, to counter the industrial processes that have led to climate crisis. As design theorists and ethnographers of interaction, we researched experimental eco-farming in a community that shared many of these theoretical and ideological commitments. Our goal was not to offer an account of use and provide design implications in support of it. Instead, we chose to identify concrete practices and artifacts that embody the sorts of industrial transformations that we are seeking-even if they are manifest in an imperfect or partial form. We encountered practices focused on community building, local resilience to climate disruptions, experiments in eco-farming, economic survival, and attracting the next generation. One interlocutor translated these concerns into a simple binary, asking, "do we want to live here?" This paper contributes to a design research agenda that might (eventually) provide an afirmative answer.

  • 4.
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    et al.
    RMIT.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex and Malmö University.
    'The co-': feminisms, power and research cultures2020In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is polyvocal and tentative. We, Jaz and Ann, are exploring the beliefs that motivate our work, in this first of Jaz’s columns. For both of us, collaborative working is a method but also an end point—a goal that recognizes the interdependent nature of all life and looks to support it. Here we discuss the “co-” in co-design through a dialogical reflection on feminism and process.

  • 5.
    Erickson, Ingrid
    et al.
    School of Information Studies, Syracuse University.
    Lewkowicz, Myriam
    Université de Technologie de Troyes.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex.
    Ciolfi, Luigina
    Sheffield Hallam University.
    Krischkowsky, Alina
    Center for Human-Computer Interaction, University of Salzburg .
    Muller, Michael
    AI Experiences, IBM Research.
    Envisioning Futures of Practice-Centered Computing2019In: Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Demos and Posters, European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET) , 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this panel, we will engage with the conference's membership and friends to consider directions for the possible futures of practice-centered computing. This panel is not targeting or aiming to result in a single, agreed "universal” vision, nor to ask for a shared vision among the panelists and the audience. Rather, we offer several and diverse vision statements by distinguished and innovative ECSCW scholars, being experts in their specific domain or context of research. These statements will be necessarily incomplete until the ECSCW membership has joined the discussion, offering their own, additional visions of the futures of the field. With this, the panel aims to engage in a discussion that foresees exciting future research directions for the field of ECSCW but likewise also unveils potential hurdles the community might face.

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  • 6.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    University of Sussex, UK.
    Future public policy and its knowledge base: Shaping worldviews through counterfactual world-making2020In: Policy Design and Practice, E-ISSN 2574-1292, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 109-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in diverse areas such as climate change, happiness and wellbeing emphasizes the need for transformative change, stressing the importance of rethinking established values, goals and paradigms prevailing among civil servants, policy- and decision makers. In this paper, we discuss a role that design can play in this, especially how processes of counterfactual world-making can help facilitate reflection on worldviews and the shape of future forms of governance. By exploring different presents, rather than conditions in the future, this approach allows civil servants to consider, create and resist playful alternatives to business-as-usual. In this way, we demonstrate how design can stimulate imagination both as to futures and people’s role in shaping these futures.

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  • 7.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

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  • 8.
    Huybrechts, Liesbeth
    et al.
    Uhasselt, Uhasselt, Belgium.
    Zuljevic, Mela
    Uhasselt, Belgium.
    Devisch, Oswald
    Faculty of Architecture& Arts, Universiteit Hasselt, Belgium.
    Tassinari, Virginia
    LUCA school of Arts, Belgium.
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex, UK.
    De Blust, Seppe
    Department of Architecture, ETH Zurich, Germany.
    Panagiotis, Antoniadis
    Department of Architecture, ETH Zurich, Germany.
    Bassetti, Chiara
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Bidwell, Nicola
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Teli, Maurizio
    Aalborg University (DNK), Denmark.
    Storni, Cristiano
    csis, university of limerick, Ireland.
    Avram, Gabriela
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Marshall, Mark
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Majetic, Filip
    Pillar, USA.
    Declerck, Joachim
    Architecture Workroom, Belgium.
    Reworlding: Participatory Design Capabilities to Tackle Socio-Environmental Challenges2022In: PDC '22: Proceedings of the Participatory Design Conference 2022 - Volume 2, ACM Digital Library, 2022, p. 173-178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rising societal polarisations around health and climate crises have brought more attention to the close relations between social and environmental challenges. These polarisations triggered an interest in the participatory design (PD) field in developing approaches that enhance connections between diverse actors operating across societal and environmental sectors. However, the capabilities needed for these approaches have not been sufficiently articulated in PD research and education. To fill in this gap, we define ‘reworlding’ as an operation of self-critique within PD that engages with capabilities needed to reveal and articulate radical interdependencies between humans and more-than-humans, across social and environmental worlds, and within situated contexts. We propose both the redefinition of the design capabilities needed for (re)connecting these worlds (retracing, reconnecting, reimagining and reinstitutioning), as well as a reconsideration of learning environments where these capabilities can be tested and enhanced.  

     

  • 9.
    Jönsson, Li
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University.
    How Can We Come to Care in and Through Design?2019In: Proceedings of the 8th Bi-Annual Nordic Design Research Society Conference.: Who Cares?, 2019, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On a generic level, caring can be described as "everything that we do to maintain, continue, and repair our 'world' so that we can live in it as well as possible" (Fisher and Tronto, 1990). This paper asks how we as design researchers in Scandinavia come to care, for our world and more specifically for the local NORDES community. We do this by describing how we have maintained, continued and added (as a practice of repair) in relation to the most recent NORDES summer school (2018). The summer school invited students to work with tensions between despair, in a site marked and haunted (Tsing et al., 2017) by the aftermath of industrial design practices and hope, by making time for soil (Puig de la Bellacasa, 2017) in a community-supported agricultural scheme. The paper invites you to share some cruxes and insights that emerged, and to imagine teaching with care as a collective process that attempts to bring things together, not as oppositions, but as generative and productive relations.

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  • 10.
    Korsmeyer, Hannah
    et al.
    Monash University, Australia.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex, United Kingdom.
    Grocott, Lisa
    Monash University, Australia.
    Understanding feminist anticipation through ‘back-talk’: 3 narratives of willful, deviant, and care-full co-design practices2022In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 136, p. 102874-102874, article id 102874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how co-design workshops might engage with the conditions that constrain our anticipation of more just futures. We discuss how practitioner commitments to feminisms might contribute to more critical exploration. Rather than exploring what practitioners should be doing in feminist futures-focused co-design, we seek a better understanding of how this practice unfolds and evolves. Therefore, the article discusses feminist anticipation from the perspective of three, first-person narratives. These accounts explore how practitioner ‘feminist tendencies’ become manifested in co-design materials. We also explore how the multi-directional ‘back-talk’ of workshop materials mediates how stakeholders, participants and the designers themselves co-anticipate contested, deviant, and plural futures. Borrowing the words from feminist scholar Sara Ahmed, these stories from practice seek to both answer and provoke the question: how are we unmaking how hard it is to deviate from what is expected?

  • 11.
    Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fedosov, Anton
    University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Bassetti, Chiara
    University of Trento & Italian National Research Council (CNR), Trento, Italy.
    Bernat, Aniko
    TARKI Social Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary.
    Travlou, Penny
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Avram, Gabriela
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Processes of Proliferation2022In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, E-ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 6, no GROUP, p. 1-22, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While scalability and growth are key concerns for mainstream, venture-backed digital platforms, local and location-oriented collaborative economies are diverse in their approaches to evolving and achieving social change. Their aims and tactics differ when it comes to broadening their activities across contexts, spreading their concept, or seeking to make a bigger impact by promoting co-operation. This paper draws on three pairs of European, community-centred initiatives which reveal alternative views on scale, growth, and impact. We argue thatproliferation -- a concept that emphasises how something gets started and then travels in perhaps unexpected ways -- offers an alternative toscaling, which we understand as the use of digital networks in a monocultural way to capture an ever-growing number of participants. Considering proliferation is, thus, a way to reorient and enrich discussions on impact, ambitions, modes of organising, and the use of collaborative technologies. In illustrating how these aspects relate inprocesses of proliferation, we offer CSCW an alternative vision of technology use and development that can help us make sense of the impact of sharing and collaborative economies, and design socio-technical infrastructures to support their flourishing.  

     

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  • 12.
    Larsen-Ledet, Ida
    et al.
    Microsoft Research Cambridge.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University.
    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Berns, Katie
    Stockholm University.
    Khojasteh, Negar
    Cornell University.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University.
    (Un) scaling computing2022In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 72-77Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Collaborative speculation: Anticipation, inclusion and designing counterfactual futures for appropriation2021In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 134, article id 102855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do people become conversant with futures-in-the-making? This paper explores speculative design from the position that futures have agency in the present and therefore forms of speculation - as well as futures - need to be inclusive. Regarding this as a democratic right throws attention on engagement processes, noting that speculation is often centred on the designer's interests rather than seeding appropriation by publics. I argue that situating speculation in a way that is accessible for negotiation requires careful attention to the hybrid process + objectartifacts that result from designing both a provocation and a process for encountering it. My central case study describes one such hybrid artifact, a counterfactual workshop for considering futures by exploring different imagined pasts and making a journey towards alternative presents. This play of temporalities - and the accompanying methods for opening and narrowing the creative work of taking these journeys - suggest a means that speculative design might be situated with participants, thereby simultaneously reflecting on and mitigating the anticipatory nature of the materials. I deconstruct this instance of curating speculative artifacts to reveal not only its mechanisms, but the many points where engagement processes reflect political choices.

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  • 14.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design and Social Innovation at the Margins: Finding and Making Cultures of Plurality2019In: Design and Culture, ISSN 1754-7075, E-ISSN 1754-7083, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 13-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design has become a global activity dominated by one set of cultural interests to produce a consistency of practice. This essay uses an experience of design for social innovation in northern Finland, inspired by land and place, to speculate upon the dimensions across which plurality in designing could be embraced in an increasingly globalized world. Informed by discussions while helping to run the Design and Social Innovation in Asia-Pacific events of 2016, it uses Kasulis' analysis of cultural orientation and his insight that a key difference underpinning cultures is how people may orientate towards intimacy and integrity. It then explores what a form of intimate design might look like. In doing so, it uses Ingold's study of North-ness to challenge totalizing narratives of progress and explore what a marginal view can offer to address site-specific needs and dispense with design orthodoxies.

  • 15.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Design and Creative Technology, University of Sussex, United Kingdom.
    Designing the economics of the sharing economy: towards sustainable management2019In: Handbook of the Sharing Economy / [ed] Russell W. Belk, Giana M. Eckhardt, Fleura Bardhi, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 105-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy is a recent construct that brings together digital networks, platforms, resources and people in different constellations to promote resource exchange. Some of these constellations constitute markets; others thrive on and contribute to community well-being. While aspects of these arrangements are happenstance or emergent, a sequence of design decisions has led to the structuring of platforms, business models and relations in each case. These decisions were influenced by digital innovation as well as ideas about trust, sociability and the future of resource management. They respond to the global economy and also the economics of the social systems that structure resource exchange at a local level. Thus, to understand the sharing economy, we need to understand how economic systems and design decisions interact. This chapter looks at what and how people share through a study of two contrasting British sharing economy platforms to consider sustainably managing local resources in a networked age.

  • 16.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex.
    Ecologies of subversion2022In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 34-38Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 17.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex.
    In Dialogue with the More-than-Human: Affective Prefiguration in Encounters with Others2023In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 18.
    Light, Ann
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Sussex University, United Kingdom.
    Briggs, Jo
    School of Design, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom.
    The Design of Paying Publics2020In: CrowdAsset: Crowdfunding for Policymakers / [ed] Oliver Gajda; Dan Marom; Tim Wright, World Scientific, 2020, p. 105-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crowdfunding offers a different approach to social innovation undertakings at a time of rapidly shrinking state support. Social innovation involves new social practices that aim to better meet the social needs and shape collective futures. The innovation here hinges on the way in which crowdfunding platforms can change the way that society works as well as the financial details of individual campaigns. Working alongside the design features of the platform are the social, economic, and legal aspects of financial systems that evolve over time and shape what platforms can enable. In this chapter, we discuss how publics form around platforms with an interest in what is being supported. We use the term “paying publics” to refer to the way in which the four UK-based platforms we feature are using this relationship with their funders and supporters to change how funding affects communities and environmental behaviour. We can be quite precise about who the individual members of a crowd contributing through a particular platform to a specific campaign might be, whether friends and family or international networks of backers. So, we suggest that we are not served well by the term “crowd.” In talking about publics, we refer to the way that particular groups may be brought into being by the actions of the platform. No single platform is redesigning economic life. However, each offers possibilities for linking private, public, and personal money and services in new ways; together, that signals societal as well as financial innovation. New common interests grow around the platform and can take on a life of their own.

  • 19.
    Light, Ann
    et al.
    University of Sussex, UK .
    Gray, Collin M
    Purdue University, USA .
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Forlano, Laura
    Illinois Institute of Technology, USA .
    Lockton, Dan
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Speed, Chris
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Designing transformative futures2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What makes the design of futures sufficiently transformative? Worldwide, people are aware of the need to change and keep changing to address eco-social challenges and their fall-out in an age of crises and transitions in climate, biodiversity, and health. Calls for climate justice and the development of eco-social sensibilities speak to the need for dynamic and provisional engagements. Such concerns raise age-old issues of inequality and colonialist destruction. Our designs carry the imprint of this current politics, wittingly or unwittingly, into worlds to come. This conversa- tion asked how might we respond fluidly to coming uncertainties, questioning our own practices to sow the seeds of more radical transformation, while recognizing the structural forces that can limit or temper opportunities for design activism. It was or- ganized in three quadrant exercises, which we also reflect upon.

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  • 20.
    Light, Ann
    et al.
    University of Sussex, United Kingdom.
    Malmborg, Lone
    IT University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen S.
    Messeter, Jörn
    IT University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen S.
    Brandt, Eva
    The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Philip de Langes Allé, Copenhagen K.
    Halse, Joachim
    The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Philip de Langes Allé, Copenhagen K.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Mattelmäki, Tuuli
    Aalto University, Aalto, Finland.
    Writing participatory design2016In: PDC '16: Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Interactive Exhibitions, Workshops - Volume 2, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 119-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop asks participatory designers and researchers to consider how they write about their work and what role there is for novel approaches to expression, forms drawn from other disciplines, and open and playful texts. As we bring social science and humanities sensibilities to bear on designing with others; as we conduct experiments in infrastructuring and sociotechnical assemblages; as we ask what participation means in different contexts and types of futuring, can we find voice to match our innovations? How do reflexivity, positionality, autobiography and auto-ethnography fit into our reflections on designing? How far are we making our practice even as we write? Is the page a contemplative or collaborative space? Does the tyranny of the conference paper overwrite everything? Join us for this day of reading, writing and discussion about how we tell the stories that matter most to us.  

     

  • 21.
    Light, Ann
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Miskelly, Clodagh
    Platforms, Scales and Networks: Meshing a Local Sustainable Sharing Economy2019In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, Vol. 28, no 3-4, p. 591-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "sharing economy" has promised more sustainable use of the world's finite resources, exploiting latency and promoting renting rather than ownership through digital networks. But do the digital brokers that use networks at global scale offer the same care for the planet as more traditional forms of sharing? We contrast the sustainability of managing idle capacity with the merits of collective local agency bred by caring-based sharing in a locality. Drawing on two studies of neighbourhood sharing in London and analysis of the meshing of local sharing initiatives, we ask how "relational assets' form and build up over time in a neighbourhood, and how a platform of platforms might act as local socio-technical infrastructure to sustain alternative economies and different models of trust to those found in the scaling sharing economy. We close by proposing digital networks of support for local solidarity and resourcefulness, showing how CSCW knowledge on coordination and collaboration has a role in achieving these ends.

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  • 22.
    Light, Ann
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The breakdown of the municipality as caring platform: lessons for co-design and co-learning in the age of platform capitalism2019In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 192-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If municipalities were the caring platforms of the 19-20th century sharing economy, how does care manifest in civic structures of the current period? We consider how platforms – from the local initiatives of communities transforming neighbourhoods, to the city, in the form of the local authority – are involved, trusted and/or relied on the design of shared services and amenities for the public good. We use contrasting cases of interaction between local government and civil society organisations in Sweden and the UK to explore trends in public service provision. We look at how care can manifest between state and citizens and at the roles that co-design and co-learning play in developing contextually sensitive opportunities for caring platforms. In this way, we seek to learn from platforms in transition about the importance of co-learning in political and structural contexts and make recommendations for the co-design of (digital) platforms to care with and for civil society.

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  • 23.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Collaboration: Collaborative future-making2021In: Routledge Handbook of Social Futures / [ed] Carlos Lépes Galviz and Emily Spiers, London and New York: Routledge, 2021, p. 104-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter will outline what we label ‘collaborative future-making’ (CFM), which can be understood as an interplay between critical imagination and collaborative engagements in future-making processes. Using critical imagination to break out of (imagined) political and scholarly deadlocks is an important theme within collaborative future-making. Imagining should not be confused, however, with an abstract practice. Instead, critical imagination links directly to forms of participation and engagement. Collaborative engagement concerns how we can work together. At the centre is an ethos of democratizing processes of change, that is, to acknowledge people’s skills and rights to influence their everyday environments. This approach should be understood as a shift from engaging with the future through forecasting to a concern with how critical imagination can challenge basic assumptions, norms and structures to widen the perspectives on what constitutes socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable futures, engaging not only professionals and policymakers, but also citizens and civil society. This chapter presents opportunities in what we call ‘collaborative future-making’, as well as highlighting the potential problems and challenges in collaborating. This critical perspective is illustrated through a series of empirical examples that combines critical perspectives with constructive and collaborative aspects.

  • 24. Reitsma, Lizette
    et al.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Zaman, Tariq
    Rodgers, Paul
    A Respectful Design Framework Incorporating indigenous knowledge in the design process2019In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no Suppl 1, p. 1555-1570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To stay within the planetary boundaries, we have to take responsibility, and this includes designers. This requires new perspectives on design. In this work, we focus on a co-design project with indigenous communities. Within such communities, indigenous knowledge is central. Indigenous knowledge acknowledges that the world is alive and that we, as humans, are merely a small part. Central in our approach is Sheehan's respectful design, which ensures a central place for indigenous knowledge in the design process. However, Sheehan's approach does not state in pragmatic terms how such a design approach can be achieved. Some of the co-design processes we engaged in led to respectful design spaces, others did not. This helped us to identify patterns of dynamics that are essential for respectful design. At the core of our findings lies the observation that in order to reach a respectful design space, in which indigenous knowledge is embedded, a shared dialogical space between community and designer is essential.

  • 25.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Kista, Sweden.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Kista, Sweden.
    Bødker, Susanne
    Aarhus University, Aarhus,.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
    Berns, Ketie
    Stockholm University, Kista, Sweden.
    Hui, Julie
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Reconsidering Scale and Scaling in CSCW Research2020In: CSCW '20 Companion: Conference Companion Publication of the 2020 on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 493-501Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This one-day workshop invites discussion on the various socio-technical processes and dynamics that characterize scale and scaling in local, community-sited initiatives. Seeking to move beyond a view of scale as mere growth in numbers and a matter of technology-mediated replication, the workshop aims at developing a nuanced vocabulary to talk about various forms of scale and practices of scaling in CSCW research. It will bring together interdisciplinary scholars, activists, practitioners and representatives of the public sector who wish to question and further develop the notion of scale generally associated with processes of upscaling. The workshop provides a forum to discuss:i) concepts, theories and empirical cases that broaden our view of what constitutes scale; andii) the implications for CSCW research in assessing the long-term impact and sustenance of socio-technical innovations. The workshop will accommodate up to twenty participants and will be run virtually.

  • 26.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Diogo, Vera
    School of Higher Education, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Bernat, Aniko
    TÁRKI Social Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary.
    Travlou, Penny
    ESALA, Edinburgh College of Art, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Why Are We Still Using Facebook? The Platform Paradox in Collaborative Community Initiatives2021In: Becoming a Platform in Europe: On the Governance of the Collaborative Economy / [ed] Maurizio Teli; Chiara Bassetti, Now Publishers Inc., 2021, p. 90-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 27.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Emilson, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Metelo Seixas, Luisa
    Interactive Technologies, Institute Instituto Superior Técnico, Portugal.
    Arthur Cabrera, Nicole
    TBA21–Academy, Spain.
    The co-design template2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document is a guide for the development of local co-design activities, produced within the project Bauhaus of the Seas Sails (Project ID: 101079995). It aims to provide indications and support for howto conduct codesign locally, addressing the important aspects to consider and questions to reflectabout. It starts by identifying and defining four core principles for the development of thedemonstrators (sustainable, inclusive, aesthetic, and locally grounded) and then introduces how co -design engages with these four principles. It overviews the different actors involved and a generaltimeline for the co-design process. Further, it provides specific suggestions on how to develop thecodesign practice locally and with relevance to the area in which you are introducing it.

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  • 28.
    Smedberg, Alicia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Autonomy and control in Orkney: An inquiry into the social benefits of community wind energy2018In: Control, Change and Capacity-building in Energy Systems / [ed] Patrick Sumpf, Christian Büscher, Shape Energy Research Design Challenge , 2018, p. 18-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The poet George MacKay Brown (1921-1996) lived most of his life in Orkney and dedicated his life’s work to the poetry he saw in an island shaped by its people and a people shaped by their island. In his book An Orkney Tapestry, originally published in 1969, he returns, time and again, to the analogy of the loom and the tapestry to describe the islands. As in the quote above, where he describes the “different estates [...] stitched together in a single garment”, he also refers to the islands as a tapestry woven by history, people and things. The Orkney with which we concern ourselves in this paper is still Brown’s Orkney; it is still a place of almost indefinable integrity and its history still has an undeniable presence. In this paper, we look at the growth and impact of socio-material power infrastructures, in and around Orkney, over the past thirty years, based on two visits to observe, solicit diverse perspectives upon and study the development of “community energy” (Smith et al., 2016; Seyfang et al., 2013). We use onshore wind turbines as an inquiry into how the tapestry of Orkney is interwoven with the Scottish mainland, the UK and Westminster. By tracing the development of renewable energy here, we offer the reader an account of local control and agency, in response to the SHAPE ENERGY ‘control’ challenge. In bringing a historical socio-technical inquiry to bear on energy production and local control, we draw attention, also, to the language of our account and, indeed, any account that deals with power supplies. The word ‘power’ comes to English from the Latin, via Old French, meaning ‘ability to act or do’. ‘Energy’, ‘agency’ and ‘control’ also relate to the means to perform actions and alter states. In this account, we juxtapose the ethereality of electricity, with its technical power to enact change through chemistry in ways determined by physics, with the equally immaterial flows of power that arise in the socio-technical sphere of erecting wind turbines, seeing the history of control of energy in Orkney as a meeting – and intertwining – of these technical and socio-technical factors, playing through the material infrastructure of cables, turbines, batteries and the grid.

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  • 29. Veijola, Soile
    et al.
    Hockert, Emily
    Carlin, David
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Saynajakangas, Janne
    The Conference Reimagined Postcards, Letters, and Camping Together in Undressed Places2019In: Digithum, E-ISSN 1575-2275, no 24, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, five authors account for the rethinking of a conference as a series of postcards, letters, rules and silent moments so that traditional hierarchies of knowledge could be overturned or, at least, sidelined. We recount how the place we convened was enlisted as an actor and the dramas and devices we applied to encounter it. We use this accounting to problematize the conventional practices of goal-oriented meetings and co-authored papers as forms of academic meaning-making. In finding a meeting point where expertise was disorientated and status undressed, we were able to investigate the idea of co-being between human and nonhuman realities as the step social theory needs to take to become a point of connection with the social world, instead of an escape from it. Our conclusion is that this involved silence and necessary fictions as a means to consider the future and past in the moment of meeting.

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  • 30.
    Vervoort, Joost M.
    et al.
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Smeenk, Tara
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Zamuruieva, Iryna
    Sniffer, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Re, Lisa L.
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Veldhoven, Mae van
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Rutting, Lucas
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands.;CGIAR Initiat Climate Resilience ClimBeR, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Univ Sussex, Sch Engn & Informat, Brighton, England..
    Houston, Lara
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, Global Sustainabil Inst, Cambridge, England..
    Wolstenholme, Ruth
    Sniffer, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Dolejsova, Marketa
    Aalto Univ, Sch Arts Design & Architecture, Helsinki, Finland..
    Jain, Anab
    Superflux, London, England.;Univ Appl Arts Vienna, Design Invest, Vienna, Austria..
    Ardern, Jon
    Superflux, London, England..
    Catlow, Ruth
    Furtherfield, London, England..
    Vaajakallio, Kirsikka
    Hellon, Weybridge, England..
    von Flittner, Zeynep Falay
    Falay Transit Design, Helsinki, Finland..
    Putrle-Srdic, Jana
    Kersnikova, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Lohmann, Julia C.
    Aalto Univ, Sch Arts Design & Architecture, Helsinki, Finland..
    Moossdorff, Carien
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Mattelmaki, Tuuli
    Aalto Univ, Sch Arts Design & Architecture, Helsinki, Finland..
    Ampatzidou, Cristina
    Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, RMIT Europe, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    Amsterdam Univ Appl Sci, Civ Interact Design, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Botero, Andrea
    Aalto Univ, Sch Arts Design & Architecture, Helsinki, Finland..
    Thompson, Kyle A.
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Torrens, Jonas
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Lane, Richard
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Mangnus, Astrid C.
    Netherlands Environm Assessment Agcy, The Hague, Netherlands..
    9 Dimensions for evaluating how art and creative practice stimulate societal transformations2024In: Ecology and Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 29, no 1, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an urgent need to engage with deep leverage points in sustainability transformations-fundamental myths, paradigms, and systems of meaning making-to open new collective horizons for action. Art and creative practice are uniquely suited to help facilitate change in these deeper transformational leverage points. However, understandings of how creative practices contribute to sustainability transformations are lacking in practice and fragmented across theory and research. This lack of understanding shapes how creative practices are evaluated and therefore funded and supported, limiting their potential for transformative impact. This paper presents the 9 Dimensions tool, created to support reflective and evaluative dialogues about links between creative practice and sustainability transformations. It was developed in a transdisciplinary process between the potential users of this tool: researchers, creative practitioners, policy makers, and funders. It also brings disciplinary perspectives on societal change from evaluation theory, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and more in connection with each other and with sustainability transformations, opening new possibilities for research. The framework consists of three categories of change, and nine dimensions: changing meanings (embodying, learning, and imagining); changing connections (caring, organizing, and inspiring); and changing power (co-creating, empowering, and subverting). We describe how the 9 Dimensions tool was developed, and describe each dimension and the structure of the tool. We report on an application of the 9 Dimensions tool to 20 creative practice projects across the European project Creative Practices for Transformational Futures (CreaTures). We discuss user reflections on the potential and challenges of the tool, and discuss insights gained from the analysis of the 20 projects. Finally, we discuss how the 9 Dimensions can effectively act as a transdisciplinary research agenda bringing creative practice further in contact with transformation research.

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  • 31.
    Yoo, Daisy
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Bekker, Tilde
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Dalsgaard, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Aaarhus University, Denmark.
    Fougt Skov, Simon
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Frauenberger, Christopher
    University of Salzburg, Austria.
    Friedman, Batya
    University of Washington, USA.
    Giaccardi, Elisa
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Hansen, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Sussex.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wakkary, Ron
    Simon Fraser University, Canada; Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University; Chalmers University of Technology.
    More-Than-Human Perspectives and Values in Human-Computer Interaction2023In: CHI EA '23: Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] Albrecht Schmidt; Kaisa Väänänen; Tesh Goyal; Per Ola Kristensson; Anicia Peters, ACM Digital Library, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 1-3, article id 516Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this special interest group (SIG) we invite researchers, practitioners, and educators to share their perspectives and experiences on the expansion of human-centred perspective to more-than-human design orientation in human-computer interaction (HCI). This design for and with more-than-human perspectives and values cover a range of fields and topics, and comes with unique design opportunities and challenges. In this SIG, we propose a forum for exchange of concrete experiences and a range of perspectives, and to facilitate reflective discussions and the identification of possible future paths.

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