Publikationer från Malmö universitet
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 14 of 14
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Angenius, Max
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Design Principles for Interactive and Reflective Journaling with AI2023Inngår i: Intelligent Computing: Proceedings of the 2023 Computing Conference, Volume 2 / [ed] Kohei Arai, 2023, s. 62-81Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for reflection and journaling have been prominent research areas in HCI and Interaction Design. However, designing for the experience of journaling that is supported by conversations with AI–Conversational Agent (CA)–to foster reflection seems to be a relatively unexplored area. Furthermore, while there are an abundant number of general guidelines and design principles for designing human-AI interactions, a set of guidelines for designing an interactive and reflective journaling experience with AI is lacking. This paper is a first attempt to address that need. We present the result of a qualitative user study on interactive and reflective journaling. We were interested in attending to our participants’ experiences and finding out their needs regarding the interactive journaling experience with CA. The user needs then were translated to design requirements and thereafter to themes or design principles. Some of our findings suggest that one of the important factors in journaling is the personal aesthetics of writing, by using carefully selected personal tools, specific materiality and interactions. Further, the flow of writing is considered sacred, hence it is almost like an untouchable, reflective ritualistic flow. Reflecting on the findings, we believe the outcome of this study can create opportunities for designing for human-AI interactions that are generative and reflective for activities that require such qualities, such as journaling or creativity.

  • 2.
    Angenius, Max
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Interactive Journaling with AI: Probing into Words and Language as Interaction Design Materials2023Inngår i: Chatbot Research and Design: 6th International Workshop, CONVERSATIONS 2022, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, November 22–23, 2022, Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2023, s. 150-170Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Conversational Agents (CAs) are making human-computer interaction more collaborative and conversational through using natural language. The HCI and interaction design communities, have been experimenting with and exploring the area of designing conversational interactions. Furthermore, interaction designers may need to acquire new skills for designing, prototyping, and evaluating artifacts that embody AI technologies in general, and CAs in particular. This paper builds upon a previous study on principles of designing interactive journaling experiences with CA and explores the practice of designing such experiences, using words, language, and conversations as design materials. We present a prototype for interactive and reflective journaling interaction with CA and the result of a Wizard of Oz experiment. Our findings suggest that designing interactions with CA challenges designers to use materials with inherently different natures and qualities. Despite this challenge, words appear to have unique characteristics to support designers to externalize and iterate on ideas, e.g., tone and intent. Hence, we suggest considering words, language, and conversations as the primary design materials, and the AI’s predictability, adaptivity, and agency as secondary materials, while designing human interactions with Conversational Agents.

  • 3.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Bardzell, Jaffrey
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Making AI Understandable by Making it Tangible: Exploring the Design Space with Ten Concept Cards2022Inngår i: OzCHI '22: Proceedings of the 34th Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction / [ed] Sweetser, Penny ; Lawrence Taylor, Jennyfer, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, s. 74-80Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The embodiment of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in everyday use products is raising challenges and opportunities for HCI and design research, such as human understandings of AI’s functions and states, passing back and forth of control, AI ethics, and user experi-ence, among others. There has been progress in those areas, such as works on explainable AI (XAI); fairness, accountability, and transparency (FAccT); human-centered AI; and the development of guidelines for Human-AI interaction design. Similarly, the in-terest in studying interaction modalities and their contributions to understandable and transparent AI has been also growing. How-ever, the tangible and embodied modality of interaction and more broadly studies of the forms of such everyday use products are relatively underexplored. This paper builds upon a larger project on designing graspable AI and it introduces a series of concept cards that aim to aid design researchers’ creative exploration of tangible and understandable AI. We conducted a user study in two parts of online sessions and semi-structured interviews and found out that to envision physicality and tangible interaction with AI felt challenging and “too abstract”. Even so, the act of creative exploration of that space not only supported our participants to gain new design perspectives of AI, but also supported them to go beyond anthropomorphic forms of AI.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Learning About Plant Intelligence from a Flying Plum Tree: Music Recommenders and Posthuman User Experiences2022Inngår i: Academic Mindtrek '22: Proceedings of the 25th International Academic Mindtrek Conference, ACM Digital Library, 2022, s. 343-346Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recommender Systems (RS) are used in many different applications such as ecommerce and for media streaming, including music. Recommenders not only help users discover new music, but they also help to create assemblages of songs into playlists. Intentionally or otherwise, playlists often manifest themes, that is, universal ideas that are expressed in particular songs, lyrics, or passages. In this paper we were interested to explore the capabilities of AI to introduce themes through generated playlists, them-selves seeded by the theme of plants. Taking a self-reflexive and user experience approach, we collaborated with AI to create four Plant Music playlists to subject ourselves to what came to refer to as a posthuman user experience.  

     

  • 5.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Synthesis of Forms: Integrating Practical and Reflective Qualities in Design2021Inngår i: CHI '21: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Yokohama, Japan, May 2021, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesis, or the integration of hitherto separated elements, is a prominent concept in theories of design processes. Synthesis often happens when there is a need to make a decision, though it is often the result of a combination of different alternatives, instead of deciding in favor of one and eliminating another. In many design studies, synthesis has been investigated in the contexts of everyday design—bicycle frames, sewing machines, commercial architecture. We were interested in how it might apply in contexts of reflective design, whose pragmatics often depend on different interrelationships between users and technological products. In this paper, we argue that designing everyday use objects for reflection requires a synthesis of two apparently opposite forms: conventionally practical forms, since they are everyday use objects, and evocative forms, since they make users think. We provide two examples of everyday objects for reflection that we believe synthesize both conventionally practical and evocative forms, analyzing the design processes that led to these forms, and discussing how these reflective designs embody different forms of synthesis.

  • 6.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    What design education tells us about design theory: a pedagogical genealogy2019Inngår i: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 30, nr 4, s. 277-299Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In design theory, we often come across scholarly efforts that seek to define design as a unique discipline and to characterize it as a distinct category of practice, with its own epistemology in that it differs from sciences, arts and humanities (Cross, N. 2011. Design Thinking: Understanding How Designers Think and Work. Oxford: Berg.; Dorst, K. 2015. Frame innovation: Create New Thinking by Design. Cambridge: The MIT Press. Nelson, H. G., and E. Stolterman. 2012. The Design Way: Intentional Change in an Unpredictable World. The MIT Press.; Redström, J. 2017. Making Design Theory. MIT Press.). Although such efforts are helpful in teasing forward the nature of design epistemologies and practices, we question them by critically engaging with epistemic paradigms informing design education, its structural forms, origins and purposes, historically, while suggesting the time has come to reevaluate design’s relationships with other epistemological traditions, including the sciences and humanities. We unpack history of design education, in order to problematize what we have come to view as overly schematized epistemological distinctions, most notably the asserted opposition between (what Schön calls) technical rationality and an alternative epistemology broadly linked to pragmatism and/or phenomenology. We do so by offering a genealogy of design education showing that since the nineteenth century, design programmes have continuously, if diversely, taught novice designers, methods, crafts, and attitudes that reflect diverse epistemological traditions. Theorists and educators of design have a shared interest in balancing the needs to appreciate and help develop that which is distinctive of design and also to build upon design’s rich epistemological connections to the sciences and humanities. Whereas the former helps the field improve its abilities to contribute to society, the latter provides many of the theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical resources that make such contributions possible.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Pennsylvania State University, USA.
    Alison, Smith-Renner
    Dataminr, USA.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Gall Krogh, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Graspable AI: Physical Forms as Explanation Modality for Explainable AI2022Inngår i: TEI '22: Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, Vol. 53, s. 1-4Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Explainable AI (XAI) seeks to disclose how an AI system arrives at its outcomes. But the nature of the disclosure depends in part on who needs to understand the AI and the available explanation modalities (e.g., verbal and visual). Users’ preferences regarding explanation modalities might differ, as some might prefer spoken explanations compared to visual ones. However, we argue for broadening the explanation modalities, to consider also tangible and physical forms. In traditional product design, physical forms have mediated people’s interactions with objects; more recently interacting with physical forms has become prominent with IoT and smart devices, such as smart lighting and robotic vacuum cleaners. But how tangible interaction can support AI explanations is not yet well understood.

    In this second studio proposal on Graspable AI (GAI) we seek to explore design qualities of physical forms as an explanation modality for XAI. We anticipate that the design qualities of physical forms and their tangible interactivity can not only contribute to the explainability of AI through facilitating dialogue, relationships and human empowerment, but they can also contribute to critical and reflective discourses on AI. Therefore, this proposal contributes to design agendas that expand explainable AI into tangible modalities, supporting a more diverse range of users in their understanding of how a given AI works and the meanings of its outcomes.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    IST, Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Lagerkvist, Love
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    A Redhead Walks into a Bar: Experiences of Writing Fiction with Artificial Intelligence2022Inngår i: Academic Mindtrek '22: Proceedings of the 25th International Academic Mindtrek Conference, ACM Digital Library, 2022, s. 230-241Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Human creativity has been often aided and supported by artificial tools, spanning traditional tools such as ideation cards, pens, and paper, to computed and software. Tools for creativity are increasingly using artificial intelligence to not only support the creative process, but also to act upon the creation with a higher level of agency. This paper focuses on writing fiction as a creative activity and explores human-AI co-writing through a research product, which employs a natural language processing model, the Generative Pre-trained Transformer 3 (GPT-3), to assist the co-authoring of narrative fiction. We report on two progressive – not comparative – autoethnographic studies to attain our own creative practices in light of our engagement with the research product: (1) a co-writing activity initiated by basic textual prompts using basic elements of narrative and (2) a co-writing activity initiated by more advanced textual prompts using elements of narrative, including dialects and metaphors undertaken by one of the authors of this paper who has doctoral training in literature. In both studies, we quickly came up against the limitations of the system; then, we repositioned our goals and practices to maximize our chances of success. As a result, we discovered not only limitations but also hidden capabilities, which not only altered our creative practices and outcomes, but which began to change the ways we were relating to the AI as collaborator.  

     

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Smith Renner, Alison
    Machine Learning Visualization Lab Decisive Analytics Corporation, United States.
    Gall Krogh, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Sweden.
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Boer, Laurens
    ITU, Denmark.
    Mikael, Wiberg
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    From "Explainable AI" to "Graspable AI"2021Inngår i: Fifteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI ’21), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, artikkel-id 69Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), researchers have asked how intelligent computing systems could interact with and relate to their users and their surroundings, leading to debates around issues of biased AI systems, ML black-box, user trust, user’s perception of control over the system, and sys- tem’s transparency, to name a few. All of these issues are related to how humans interact with AI or ML systems, through an interface which uses different interaction modalities. Prior studies address these issues from a variety of perspectives, spanning from under- standing and framing the problems through ethics and Science and Technology Studies (STS) perspectives to finding effective technical solutions to the problems. But what is shared among almost all those efforts is an assumption that if systems can explain the how and why of their predictions, people will have a better perception of control and therefore will trust such systems more, and even can correct their shortcomings. This research field has been called Explainable AI (XAI). In this studio, we take stock on prior efforts in this area; however, we focus on using Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI) as an interaction modality for understanding ML. We note that the affordances of physical forms and their behaviors potentially can not only contribute to the explainability of ML sys- tems, but also can contribute to an open environment for criticism. This studio seeks to both critique explainable ML terminology and to map the opportunities that TEI can offer to the HCI for designing more sustainable, graspable and just intelligent systems.

  • 10.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Indiana University Bloomingtonm,USA.
    Smith-Renner, Alison
    Dataminr, USA.
    Höök, Kristina
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Gall Krogh, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University.
    Tangible XAI2022Annet (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Computational systems are becoming increasingly smart and automated. Artificial intelligence (AI) systems perceive things in the world, produce content, make decisions for and about us, and serve as emotional companions. From music recommendations to higher-stakes scenarios such as policy decisions, drone-based warfare, and automated driving directions, automated systems affect us all.

    But researchers and other experts are asking, How well do we understand this alien intelligence? If even AI developers don’t fully understand how their own neural networks make decisions, what chance does the public have to understand AI outcomes? For example, AI systems decide whether a person should get a loan; so what should—what can—that person understand about how the decision was made? And if we can’t understand it, how can any of us trust AI?

    The emerging area of explainable AI (XAI) addresses these issues by helping to disclose how an AI system arrives at its outcomes. But the nature of the disclosure depends in part on the audience, or who needs to understand the AI. A car, for example, can send warnings to consumers (“Tire Pressure Low”) and also send highly technical diagnostic codes that only trained mechanics can understand. Explanation modality is also important to consider. Some people might prefer spoken explanations compared to visual ones. Physical forms afford natural interaction with some smart systems, like vehicles and vacuums, but whether tangible interaction can support AI explanation has not yet been explored.

    In the summer of 2020, a group of multidisciplinary researchers collaborated on a studio proposal for the 2021 ACM Tangible Embodied and Embedded (TEI) conference. The basic idea was to link conversations about tangible and embodied interaction and product semantics to XAI. Here, we first describe the background and motivation for the workshop and then report on its outcomes and offer some discussion points.

  • 11.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Persson, Jan A.
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Tegen, Agnes
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    The UX of Interactive Machine Learning2020Inngår i: NordiCHI 2020, 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society, New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, artikkel-id Article No.: 138Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine Learning (ML) has been a prominent area of research within Artificial Intelligence (AI). ML uses mathematical models to recognize patterns in large and complex data sets to aid decision making in different application areas, such as image and speech recognition, consumer recommendations, fraud detection and more. ML systems typically go through a training period in which the system encounters and learns about the data; further, this training often requires some degree of human intervention. Interactive machine learning (IML) refers to ML applications that depend on continuous user interaction. From an HCI perspective, how humans interact with and experience ML models in training is the main focus of this workshop proposal. In this workshop we focus on the user experience (UX) of Interactive Machine Learning, a topic with implications not only for usability but also for the long-term success of the IML systems themselves.

  • 12.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Annet (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Lagerkvist, Love
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Multiverse: Exploring Human Machine Learning Interaction Through Cybertextual Generative Literature2020Inngår i: 10th International Conference on the Internet of Things / [ed] Paul Davidsson, Marc Langheinrich, Per Linde, Simon Mayer, Diego Casado-Mansilla, Daniel Spikol, Frank Alexander Kraemer, Nancy Russo, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, s. 1-6, artikkel-id 1Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a prototype of a system for machine learning (ML) powered interactive generative literature called Multiverse. The system employs a set of neural networks models to dynamically generate a literary space from an initial writing prompt provided by its user-reader. The user-reader is able to choose the model used to generate the text as a kind of interactive machine learning (IML). The research explores how interaction design and HCI researchers can engage directly with ML by leveraging the powerful, yet accessible, models afforded by new developments in the field. User-readers testing the prototype found the imperfect aesthetics of the ML-generated texts to be entertaining and engaging but struggled to conceptualize the generated work as a navigable interactive literary space.

  • 14.
    Schröder, Anna Marie
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Unboxing the Algorithm: Designing an Understandable Algorithmic Experience in Music Recommender Systems2021Inngår i: Proceedings of the Perspectives on the Evaluation of Recommender Systems Workshop 2021. co-located with the 15th ACM Conference on Recommender Systems (RecSys 2021)., 2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    After decades of the existence of algorithms in everyday use technologies, users have developed an algorithmic awareness, but they still lack the confidence to grasp them. This study explores how understandability as a principle drawn from sociology, design, and computing can enhance the algorithmic experience in music recommendation systems. The preliminary results of this Research-Through-Design showed that users had limited mental models so far but had a curiosity to learn. Further, it confirmed that explanations as a dialogue could improve the algorithmic experience in music recommendation systems. Users could comprehend recommendations the best when they were easy to access and understand, directly related to user behavior, and when they allowed the user to correct the algorithm. To conclude, our study reconfirms that designing experiences that help users to understand the algorithmic workings will make authentic recommendations from intelligent systems more applicable in the long run.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Unboxing Algorithm
    Download (mp4)
    movie
1 - 14 of 14
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf