Malmö University Publications
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  • 1. Bannon, Liam
    et al.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design matters in participatory design2012In: Routledge international handbook of participatory design / [ed] Jesper Simonsen, Toni Robertson, Routledge, 2012, p. 37-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the ways in which the field of Participatory Design engages with the field of design–as both a topic, a research field and a practice. We highlight what we consider are core themes in design, especially as they relate to Participatory Design concerns. The chapter is not intended as a review of the whole design field, nor is it a comprehensive overview of work being done by the Participatory Design community. Rather, our purpose is to mine both traditions for insights into the relation between design topics ...

  • 2. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    Brandt, Eva
    Ehn, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Halse, Joachim
    Democratic design experiments: between parliament and laboratory2015In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 152-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than four decades, participatory design has provided exemplars and concepts for understanding the democratic potential of design participation. Despite important impacts on design methodology, participatory design has, however, been stuck in a marginal position as it has wrestled with what has been performed and accomplished in participatory practices. In this article, we discuss how participatory design may be reinvigorated as a design research programme for democratic design experiments in the light of the decentring of human-centredness and the foregrounding of collaborative representational practices offered by the ANT tradition in the tension between a parliament of things and a laboratory of circulating references.

  • 3. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wagner, Ina
    Design Things2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design Things offers an innovative view of design thinking and design practice, envisioning ways to combine creative design with a participatory approach encompassing aesthetic and democratic practices and values. The authors of Design Things look at design practice as a mode of inquiry that involves people, space, artifacts, materials, and aesthetic experience, following the process of transformation from a design concept to a thing. Design Things, which grew out of the Atelier (Architecture and Technology for Inspirational Living) ...

  • 4. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wagner, Ina
    What is the object of design?2012In: Proceeding: CHI EA '12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA , 2012, p. 21-30Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we reflect upon design at a conceptual level, discussing how creativity can be coupled with participation and experience, dialoguing with philosophers and social theorists, and looking for the experiential grounds of our understanding of the very nature of design. Three words:'drawing','thing'and'together', are at the center of our discourse. We propose a view of design as accessing, aligning, and navigating among the'constituents' of the object of design. People interact with the object of design through its constituents. The ...

  • 5.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Birt, Arlene
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ginslov, Jeannette
    Gustafsson Friberger, Marie
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Hobye, Mads
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Jacobson, Bob
    Jacobsson, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Kozel, Susan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Peterson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Rosenqvist, Karolina
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Prototyping Futures2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prototyping Futures gives you a glimpse of what collaborating with academia might look like. Medea and its co-partners share their stories about activities happening at the research centre – projects, methods, tools, and approaches – what challenges lie ahead, and how these can be tackled. Examples of highlighted topics include: What is a living lab and how does it work? What are the visions behind the Connectivity Lab at Medea? And, how can prototyping-methods be used when sketching scenarios for sustainable futures? Other topics are: What is the role of the body when designing technology? What is collaborative media and how can this concept help us understand contemporary media practices? Prototyping Futures also discusses the open-hardware platform Arduino, and the concepts of open data and the Internet of Things, raising questions on how digital media and connected devices can contribute to more sustainable lifestyles, and a better world.

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  • 6.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Agonistic participatory design: working with marginalised social movements2012In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 8, no 2-3, p. 127-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory design (PD) has become increasingly engaged in public spheres and everyday life and is no longer solely concerned with the workplace. This is not only a shift from work-oriented productive activities to leisure and pleasurable engagements, but also a new milieu for production and ‘innovation’. What ‘democratic innovation’ entails is often currently defined by management and innovation research, which claims that innovation has been democratised through easy access to production tools and lead-users as the new experts driving innovation. We sketch an alternative ‘innovation’ practice more in line with the original visions of PD based on our experience of running Malmö Living Labs – an open innovation milieu where new constellations, issues and ideas evolve from bottom–up long-term collaborations among diverse stakeholders. Three cases and controversial matters of concern are discussed. The fruitfulness of the concepts ‘agonistic public spaces’ (as opposed to consensual decision-making), ‘thinging’ and ‘infrastructuring’ (as opposed to projects) are explored in relation to democracy, innovation and other future-making practices.

  • 7.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design things and design thinking: contemporary participatory design challenges2012In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 101-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design thinking has become a central issue in contemporary design discourse and rhetoric, and for good reason. With the design thinking practice of world leading design and innovation firm IDEO, and with the application of these principles to successful design education at prestigious d. school, the Institute of Design at Stanford University, and not least with the publication of Change by Design, in which IDEO chief executive Tim Brown elaborates on the firm's ideas about design thinking, ...

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 8.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Participatory design and “democratizing innovation”2010In: PDC '10: Proceedings of the 11th Biennial Participatory Design Conference, ACM Digital Library, 2010, p. 41-50Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory design has become increasingly engaged in public spheres and everyday life and is no longer solely concerned with the workplace. This is not only a shift from work oriented productive activities to leisure and pleasurable engagements, but also a new milieu for production and innovation and entails a reorientation from “democracy at work” to “democratic innovation”. What democratic innovation entails is currently defined by management and innovation research, which claims that innovation has been democratized through easy access to production tools and lead-users as the new experts driving innovation. We sketch an alternative “democratizing innovation” practice more in line with the original visions of participatory design based on our experience of running Malmö Living Labs - an open innovation milieu where new constellations, issues and ideas evolve from bottom-up long-term collaborations amongst diverse stakeholders. Two cases and controversial matters of concern are discussed. The fruitfulness of the concepts “Things” (as opposed to objects), “infrastructuring” (as opposed to projects) and “agonistic public spaces” (as opposed to consensual decision-making) are explored in relation to participatory innovation practices and democracy.

  • 9.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design av alla?2007In: Under ytan: en antologi om designforskning / [ed] Sara Ilstedt, Åsa Harvard, Raster förlag, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design things: drawing things together and making things public2011In: Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 31-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This assemblage is based on the talk I gave at the EASST010 conference in Trento, Italy, September 03, 2010. It is composed of several kinds of materials. The ground structure is formed by the slides I showed at that occasion. These slides are commented in three different ways. Firstly by excerpts from the talk, secondly by comments added now when this assemblage is put together, and finally quotes from “Design Things”, the book manuscript around which the talk circulated

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  • 11.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    DOC and the Power of Things and Representatives2008In: Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Design of Communication, ACM Digital Library, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social life is communication. To live in a society means sharing things. And this we do not through, but in, communication. That is how things become common, and hence how communities are formed.  

  • 12.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Participation in Design Things2008In: Proceedings Participatory Design Conference 2008, ACM Digital Library, 2008, p. 92-101Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the design of things. This is done in an attempt to conceptually explore some of the political and practical challenges to participatory design today. Which things, and which participants? The perspective is strategic and conceptual. Two approaches are in focus, participatory design (designing for use before use) and meta-design (designing for design after design). With this framing the challenge for professional design to participate in public controversial things is considered.

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  • 13.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Participation in Interaction Design: Actors and artifacts in interaction2006In: Theories and Practice in Interaction Design / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Gillian Crampton Smith, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2006, p. 137-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Partizipation an Dingen des Designs2013In: Wer gestaltet die Gestaltung: Praxis, Theorie und Geschichte des partizipatorischen Designs / [ed] Claudia Mareis, Matthias Held, Gesche Joost, Transcript Verlag, 2013, p. 79-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The End of the User: The Computer as a Thing2013In: End-User Development: 4th International Symposium, IS-EUD 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 10-13, 2013. Proceedings, Springer, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We may all agree on the importance of end users, as in end user programming, human centred design or user driven innovation. But are there theoretical limits with political implications to this anthropocentric understanding of our engagement with users, technology and the artifacts we call computers? Has the end user been patronised by contemporary progressive design and taken hostage by neo-liberal capitalism? In sociology it is becoming clear that society is not just social, but also material. The neglected objects strike back. Just think of global environmental crises. With design research it might be just the same. We know design cannot be reduced to the shaping of dead objects, as in object oriented programming, but humans are neither users living external to objects. Where sociology have had to acknowledge that society is a collective of humans and non-humans, design might have to do away with both users and objects to remain socially and politically relevant. This talk explores the consequences of replacing the object and the user with the thing. Etymologically the thing was originally not an objective matter, but a political assembly dealing with matters of concern. Which humans and non-humans should be invited to participate in contemporary design things? Who invites? Who is marginalised or excluded? What issues should be dealt with? Which designarly and parliamentary technologies should be invoked in prototyping futures? If the computer is to become a controversial thing, is that a well-grounded end of the user?

  • 16.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The semantic turn: a new foundation for design2006In: Artifact, Vol. 1, no 11Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Utopia things2012In: Design and Antropology / [ed] Wendy Gunn, Jared Donovan, Ashgate, 2012, p. 233-242Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What can we learn about participatory design of "utopian technology" in relation to producing (anthropology), designing and using (design) and people and things (philosophy).

  • 18.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Utopias lost and futures-in-the-making: marginal notes on innovation, design and democracy2014In: PDC '14: Proceedings of the 13th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Industry Cases, Workshop Descriptions, Doctoral Consortium papers, and Keynote abstracts - Volume 2, ACM Press, 2014, p. 191-193Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Peterson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Niedenthal, Simon
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Binder, Thomas
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Kuutti, Kari
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Rumpfhuber, Andres
    Wagner, Ina
    Opening the Digital Box for Design Work: Supporting performative interactions, using inspirational materials and configuring of place2007In: The Dissapperaing Computer: Interaction Design, System Infrastructures and Applications for Smart Environments / [ed] Norbert Streitz, Achilles Kameas, Irene Mavrommati, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2007, p. 50-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Embodied Interaction: Designing Beyond the Physical-Digital Divide2004In: DRS2004: Futureground / [ed] Redmond, J.; Durling, D.; de Bono, A, Design Research Society, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical and digital worlds are wide apart. Each has its own design professionals: product designers and human-computer interaction experts. However, as computers are becoming ubiquitous, embedded in our everyday objects and environments and embodied in the way we experience them in our everyday lives, this divide becomes problematic. This dilemma is accentuated by the parallel threat of demassification, the potential loss of material and social properties when artefacts become digital. In this paper we argue for embodied interaction as a useful stance for designing beyond this physical-digital divide. This term has been coined by Paul Dourish in the phenomenological tradition, for the creation, manipulation and sharing of meaning through engaged interaction with artefacts. 

  • 21.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Löwgren, JonasMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design [x] research: Essays on interaction design as knowledge2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can design be performed as a means of constructing relevant knowledge for other designers, as opposed to performing design in order to create new products? This question is addressed in nine essays by PhD students from interaction design, product design, and human-computer interaction. Many interesting perspectives and ideas are provided for the ongoing debate on the relation between design and research.

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  • 22.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Löwgren, JonasMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Searching voices: Towards a canon for interaction design2003Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, information and communication technology has taken on whole new meanings in Western society and everyday life: from productivity tools for industry and administration, to everyday household activities, major entertainment sectors, new modes of communication and cohabitation, digitally enhanced pervasive infrastructures and more. In this situation, interaction design is emerging as a new and challenging design discipline. It has a design-oriented focus on human interaction and communication mediated by digital artefacts. This report presents a contribution to the emerging understanding of interaction design and its theory. Six doctoral students of the School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, present canonical work in relevant disciplines including media studies, virtual reality, work life studies and the arts. They analyze the works they have chosen from an interaction design perspective and contextualize it in the knowledge field of designing digital artefacts and media.

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  • 23.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Joint University Administration and Services.
    Introduction2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 24.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).Topgaard, RichardMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation and design need not be about the search for a killer app. Innovation and design can start in people’s everyday activities. They can encompass local services, cultural production, arenas for public discourse, or technological platforms. The approach is participatory, collaborative, and engaging, with users and consumers acting as producers and creators. It is concerned less with making new things than with making a socially sustainable future. This book describes experiments in innovation, design, and democracy, undertaken largely by grassroots organizations, non-governmental organizations, and multi-ethnic working-class neighborhoods. These stories challenge the dominant perception of what constitutes successful innovations. They recount efforts at social innovation, opening the production process, challenging the creative class, and expanding the public sphere. The wide range of cases considered include a collective of immigrant women who perform collaborative services, the development of an open-hardware movement, grassroots journalism, and hip-hop performances on city buses. They point to the possibility of democratized innovation that goes beyond solo entrepreneurship and crowdsourcing in the service of corporations to include multiple futures imagined and made locally by often-marginalized publics.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 25.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

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  • 26.
    Telier, A
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Telier, A
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Drawing things together2012In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 34-37Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This shift in meaning of the word thing is also of interest when reflecting on the practice of design. We suggest that we revisit and partly reverse the etymological history of things. A major challenge for design today has to do with what is being designed—not just a thing

  • 27. Watts, Laura
    et al.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Suchman, Lucy
    Prologue2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Ehn, Pelle (Creator)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Löwgren, Jonas (Creator)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Peter, Ullmark (Arranger)
    Jannick, Kirk Sørensen (Videographer)
    Som en fågel i skogen: Glimtar från ett seminarium till Donald Schöns minne2004Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I samband med Donald Schöns bortgång hölls ett minnesseminarium i Malmö i april 1998. De medverkande talade om Schöns arbete och vad det betytt för dem. I den här filmen har vi samlat delar av tre inlägg. Erik Stolterman karakteriserar Schöns sätt att arbeta i relation till mer vedertagna uppfattningar om vad god forskning är. Bertil Rolf kritiserar Schön för att ge upp anspråken på sanning. Jerker Lundequist pekar på att Schöns teori saknar estetiska begrepp. Filmen vänder sig till den som studerar Schöns arbete och vill ta del av andra perspektiv på det.

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    film
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