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  • 1.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece.
    Affective bodying of mathematics, children and difference: choreographing 'sad affects' as affirmative politics in early mathematics teacher education2019In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 319-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper responds to the frequently occurring phenomena of 'sad affects' experienced by student teachers as they confront the logic of 'proper mathematics' with young children of differently abled bodies. The notion of 'proper' entails a normalizing fixity of 'what counts' as mathematics for certain children and fails to recognize mathematics as a sensual encounter amongst bodies. The study draws upon Spinoza's notion of affect to consider the body's capacity to act, and makes the case for choreographing with body-movement, rather than disclosing, the politics involved in becoming teachers. It discusses how affective bodying with mathematics, children and difference in the classroom practice can be not only deconstructed but also reconstructed in affirmative terms, choreographically, as feeling and thinking-in-movement in ways that trouble and perturb the prevailing sharing of the 'sensible' in early childhood mathematics and in teacher education.

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  • 2.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Assembling MathLife Chronotopes: Street Mathematics as a Hybrid of Epistemic/Ontic Knowledge Discourses Urban Circulation in Teacher Education2017In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference: Mathematics Education and Life at Times of Crisis, vol 2, University of Thessaly Press , 2017, p. 427-441Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Could mathematics teacher education courses be part of assemblages that grasp and circulate affective, sensorial, mnemonic and political temporalities going beyond a mechanistic reincarnation of thinking that deprives mathematics from the drama of life? By means of the project ‘street mathematics’, a hybrid of assembling mathlife chronotopes, the present paper attempts to explore the above question and its political significance for student-teachers in a teacher education program at times of crisis. It is argued, that through specific urban interventions in the cityscape student-teachers can experience such assemblages as events of epistemic/ontic knowledge discourses circulation through the public space of teacher education institutions and/or the streets in the city.

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  • 3.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Univ Thessaly, Dept Early Childhood Educ, Volos, Greece.
    Becoming citizen subject in the body politic: antinomies of archaic, modern and posthuman citizenship temporalities and the political of mathematics education2023In: Research in Mathematics Education, ISSN 1479-4802, E-ISSN 1754-0178, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mathematics education in the body politic is commonly argued as important for citizenship, the citizen and the subject but, often, the concepts remain unexamined. Based on etienne Balibar's political philosophy, the "becoming citizen subject" is traced in antiquity, modernity and posthumanity, through strivings for democracy and its impact for mathematics education is discussed. The article argues that prevailing images of the becoming "competent", "insurgent" and "creative" citizen subject are haunted in antinomies with missing human and nonhuman others acting at the margins of history and determining the political of mathematics education.

  • 4.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Bodying Mathematical Concepts, Children and Diversity2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper responds to a frequent phenomenon of ‘sad affects’ that student-teachers experience when they confront a refuse in doing mathematics with young children of diverse abilities or cultural backgrounds as a logic of ‘proper’. Whilst this ‘proper’ denies mathematics as appropriate for certain categories of children on a view of mathematics as a ‘norm’ of austere rationality, at the same time, it fails to recognize mathematics as a potential affective, sensual and material encounter in-between diverse bodies. The study responds to experiences of ‘sad affects’ by a return to the mathematical body as bodying through creative choreographic propositions introduced by the work of Erin Manning and Brian Massumi. Based on the project maths moves me: maths moves with me, the paper discusses how student-teachers’ bodying with children, mathematics and diversity in classroom activity as ‘fearful feeling’ can become co-composed as choreographic thinking. In this, student-teachers ‘sad affects’ are reconsidered by returning to body through the notion of bodying inspired by the work of Erin Manning and Brian Massumi and discusses the affirmative potential of their body’s capacity to act with early year mathematics in classroom diversity. The study unfolds the bodying of mathematics and children first, as classroom activity and, then, as choreographic proposition where the thinking of body co-composes body-movement with mathematics. It argues that working with student-teachers’ affects through bodying can be a minor gesture of an affirmative politics that opens up mathematical thinking in movement with the other. The paper is organized along six sections. Following the introduction, the second section considers research on embodiment in mathematics education, cultural approaches of the body, as well as, the notion of body as affective bodying. The third section describes the study setting, whilst the fourth and fifth analyze bodying as the mathematics of ‘area’ in classroom activity and in choreographic proposition. The paper argues how an affective bodying of mathematical concepts in a body-world relation affords an affirmative politics in early childhood mathematics teacher education as a minor gesture that troubles the prevailing distribution of sensible ‘norms’ of mathematical activity

  • 5.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Mathematics Education as a Matter of Identity2016In: Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory / [ed] Martin Peters, Springer, 2016, p. 532-537Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mathematics education as a matter of identity’ is an emergent field where selfhood and the mathematical subject are being theorized as the effect of lived experiences in institutions such as family, school, media or youth cultures. Identity and its associated term subjectivity are embryonic in varied theoretical and activist arenas ranging from sociocultural psychology, psychoanalysis, cultural-studies, post-structuralism, post-colonialism, new-materialisms or arts-based-research. Emphasis on the ‘question of the subject’ facilitates the problematizing of a ‘knowing self’ as the effect of politics of difference, diversity, language, discourse, body, power, authority, agency, justice and emancipation, or as the product of affective politics connected to consumption habits and entertainment desires. Up until today, ‘identity’ persists the status of a ubiquitous concept in social sciences, resists clear-cut definitions and subjects itself to critique. Despite being unsettled as a robust concept, mathematics education researchers embrace identity and/or subjectivity towards analyzing, discussing or interrogating how selfhood becomes inscribed through mathematical practices, how certain subject positions are constructed as normative, deficient or marginal and how a reconfiguration of mathematical subjectivity is potentially possible as part of cultural, discursive, material, corporeal, or affective renewals. Moreover, ‘mathematics education as a matter of identity’ is key towards understanding the reciprocal relation amongst a bourgeoning free-market economy, neoliberal governing, increased socioeconomic crisis, vulnerable environmental sustainability, loss of security and safety, forced migration and a risky process of fabricating (by means of mathematics) the rational, reasonable and yet fragile, fragmented or indebted subject.

  • 6.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Mathematics out in the wild: anthropological engagements with mathematics education2018In: Research in Mathematics Education, ISSN 1479-4802, E-ISSN 1754-0178, Vol. 20, p. 94-99Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Book Review of Multimathemacy : anthropology and mathematics education, by Rik Pinxten, ISBN: 978-3-31926-253-6

  • 7.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Proceedings of the Ninth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference: Mathematics Education and Life at Times of Crisis, vol. 12017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 8.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Proceedings of the Ninth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference: Mathematics Education and Life at Times of Crisis, vol. 22017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 9.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). University of Thessaly, Greece.
    The Unbearable Lightness of Dislappearing Mathematics: Or, life and reason for the citizen at times of crisis2018In: The Mathematics Enthusiast, E-ISSN 1551-3440, Vol. 15, no 1-2, p. 8-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the early 1960s, Ursula Le Guin wrote 'The Masters', a short novel that offers a sharp contrast to the 'maths for all' discourse of contemporary mathematics education reforms. Le Guin writes of a world - Edun - where 'mathematical prohibition' is law. Mathematical reason is banned for all people by the Priests of Edun, and failure to obey is punishable by death. Despite the threat of this totalitarian anti-math regime, some citizens create a collective heterotopia in which they practice mathematics in secret. Le Guin's story is an opportunity to conduct a thought experiment: 'what if maths became forbidden?' This 'what if' experiment (Haraway 2016) allows us to consider how statements such as 'maths for all' or 'no to maths' are grounded in rationalisations that construe mathematical subjectivity as a determined actor for citizen agency in contemporary societies. The paper suggests that we need to move beyond a 'maths for all' or 'no to maths' dichotomy by interrogating how they both operate as 'states of exception' around politics of fear producing in/exclusions.

  • 10.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Unfolding Global/local Policies, Practices and/or Hybrids in Mathematics Education Worldwide: Utopias, Pleasures, Pressures and Conflicts2019In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE TENTH INTERNATIONALMATHEMATICS EDUCATION AND SOCIETY CONFERENCE, MES 10 , 2019, p. 171-175Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The utopian dream of a global world is not new. It can be traced back in the 15th century navigators and 19th century colonial times and post world war peace pleas but also even earlier in ancient myths and religion narratives on the morals of living on earth. In our times, processes of globalisation are hastened by increased techno-culture, free-capitalist economy, migration, environmental calamity and war. During the last decades a global world imagery has taken momentum in how the lives of children, youth, families and educators could be reconfigured through the launching of ‘global citizenship education’ as strategic areas for curricular organisation by institutional bodies such as UNESCO or OECD. Explicit goals for an increased globalised, internationalised, cosmopolitan and urban worldview across nation-states, provinces and indigenous communities can be substantiated (for some) in the context of mathematics education practices. Based on the (false) epistemological assumption that mathematics remains a neutral and universal language, mathematics education becomes easily figured as the space for crafting a citizenship subjectivity for globality. In this context, one needs to problematize what is at stake when mathematics education curricula become (or not) framed within discourses of global citizenship education? How the ‘future’ of mathematics education can be reconfigured when the rhetoric of global citizenship education meets diverse localities? And moreover, what are the effects of such political imageries in diverse localities for children, teachers and materials, as well as for markets, economy and policies? The purpose of the symposium is twofold. It is, first, to discuss how such utopian dreams of global, transnational and cosmopolitan citizenship become entangled or disentangled with/in discourses of mathematics education in diverse localities and diverse cultures, nations, languages and bodies including a variety of practices and communities. Presenters and participants will bring forward projects that unfold certain historiographies that map the effects of discourses of global citizenship in mathematics education by attempting to reinstate its colonial, de-colonial and post-colonial politics. This might imply an encounter of ideological critique of such curricular endeavours, of problematizing processes of globalisation in specific localities, or discussing its potential affirmative politics for reclaiming what mathematics education might regenerate out of this conflictual discursive materiality. And, second, the symposium will try to create and perform an offhand presentation that can engage the conference participants based on visual materials and narratives brought by presenters and participants in either digital or physical forms. These can be fragments of varied media, artefacts, or, even art-based performances that will denote or interrogate the hybrid presence of ‘global’ citizenship education discourses in ‘local’ (and vice versa) mathematics education practices such as curriculum activities, exam-, guidelines but also contemporary artefacts, as well as cultural representations in well known movies, literature, poetry, games etc. The aim of such an endeavour will be to problematise the meanings and effects of discourses on ‘global’ or ‘local’ mathematics education policies, practices or hybrids and explore their effects not only for the formal -the written norms- but also for the hidden school curriculum -the unwritten norms- or even the informal leisure practices beyond the walls of schooling.

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  • 11.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Bourdakis, Vassilios
    Moving with/out the Body with/in Virtual Space Abstractions: Im/pure Geometries in/between affects, codes and interface2018In: Affects Interfaces Events, Aarhus University , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of designing and navigating virtual space abstractions cannot be perceived as a neutral process for re-imagining or re-presenting what is indented by the mind’s eye or the body’s hand as phenomenology might suggest. Instead of assuming the virtual space as a substrate construed as intentional or as aiming to prefix subject-object relations, the abstract virtual space according to Brian Massumi has an active (and unpredictable) life of its own. It is rather populated by virtual forces of deformation that avoid imprisonment of signification and tend to reconnect with bodily materiality at the ontological ground of lived experience. Moreover, the user is impelled to encounter moving with/out the body to identify presence and interaction in the virtual space. Taking into account Deleuze’s reading of Spinoza’s well known say: ‘we do not know what a body can do’, one may argue for the virtual space’s autonomous agency exemplified as its fluid, transitional or changeable nature. Based on a preliminary analysis of more than 200 offhand student projects on virtual space in a course on interactive spatial design taught by the first author, the present paper aims to consider the relation between virtual space abstractions and movement with and without the body as an event of impure geometries. Impure in the sense that the encounter of codes (sensors, controllers, actuators), affects and interfaces produces an ongoing transformation of surfaces and depths that cannot be regulated. This can be thought as an inverted experience of a pure virtual reality coding process with our minds, hands or bodies that does no longer rely merely with us as designers and/or navigators, but unfolds back on itself as impure geometry and continues, alongside us, to create unexpected topological experiences of separations, intersections, cuts, stoppages, doublings or folds. Seen through a pedagogy of concepts perspective, events of moving with/out the body with/in virtual space abstractions serve to disrupt discourses of im/pure geometry.

  • 12.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Kollosche, David
    Refusing Mathematics: A discourse theory approach on the politics of identity work2019In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 457-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many scholars in the field of mathematics education are aware that identity discourses are highly political, research in the field usually lacks a framework theoretically and methodologically to address the political dimension of identity research. Based on Laclau and Mouffe’s discourse theory and the case of a female secondary school student at a German public school, the present paper analyses identity as a socio-political process of identity work articulated around the discourse of ‘refusing school mathematics’ in our contemporary times. Her refusal of mathematics is constituted around issues related to a series of noted classroom practices such as collective work, being together and having fun, relevance of mathematics in society and life, respect of one’s own dignity instead of becoming humiliated, and bodily activity instead of seated work. We illustrate how discourse theory allows us to see the identity work of refusing mathematics as a contingent process in a discursive field of socio-political struggle. In this process the subject moves beyond an essentialist ‘refusal’ of mathemat- ics learning towards articulating her refusal of a particular mathematics education socio-materiality that needs to become subverted and reworked into more affirmative terms.

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  • 13.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Lazaridou, Irene
    University of Thessaly.
    Mathematics Education Out in the Rural Scape: Experimenting With Radical Democracy for Commons2019In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE TENTH INTERNATIONALMATHEMATICS EDUCATION AND SOCIETY CONFERENCE: MES 10 / [ed] Subramanian, Jayasree, Hyderabad, India: Mathematics Education and Society , 2019, p. 212-216Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a pedagogic experimentation in the rural scape at a Greek village that tends to challenge the neoliberal and capitalist politics of economic austerity in the area. A group of young educated people in their 30s instead of migrating to the ‘West’ for a secure job have opted to return at their place of origin for a way of living around the values of a common ownership economy. They experiment with a vision of radical democratic pedagogy as vital for life. It unfolds in their relations, first with children as part of an after-school workshop and second with the adults in varied interactions as part of sharing knowledge for manual work in the land and with hand-made constructions. As such mathematical ideas, skills and competences are being entangled in diverse opportunities of life reorganisation around what they perceive as their commons.

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  • 14.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Mountzouri, Georgia
    Zaharaki, Maria
    Planas, Nuria
    Number words in ‘her’ language, dialogism and identity-work: the case of little Mariah2016In: Intercultural Education, ISSN 1467-5986, E-ISSN 1469-8439, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 352-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an ethnographic study, we explore the potential of experimenting with multiple languages for number words as part of young children's mathematical activity. Data from a preschool classroom activity on number words in 'other' languages exemplify a complex process of discursive identity-work and dialogism amongst children, parents, teachers and researchers. The focus is on the case of little Mariah, a Pakistani immigrant girl in greece, who experiences participation by sharing number knowledge in her mother tongue Urdu, and highlights how gendered, racial or language-related discourses weave her learner identity in a multilingual preschool classroom.

  • 15.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Papasarantou, Chrysa
    Lazaridou, Eirini
    Mannioti, Efi
    Koumbarelou, Magda
    Giannikis, Georgios
    AnthropoGeometries in the UrbanScape: Interrogating the echo of geometry2017In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference: Mathematics Education and Life at Times of Crisis, vol 1, University of Thessaly Press , 2017, p. 305-311Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What else could geometry may mean besides a detailed and systematic metric encounter with earth (i.e. γεωμετρία = μέτρηση γης), as the etymology of the word suggests? Could notions of ‘geometry’ become supportive towards opening up how, today, we may reconfigure our relation with space and place at a time of crisis? And for whom? Could geometry enable us to reconfigure this relation as entailing a variety of topologies, figurations and meanings? Could we, with our student-teachers, children and locals endure a confrontation with the ‘echo’ of geometry in the urban scape as a continuum amongst the dis/appearance of its particularities, features, values, valorisations or, even, violations? A confrontation that involves a subtle interrogation of geometry’s echo today.

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  • 16.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Planas, Nuria
    Language diversity in mathematics education research: a move from language as representation to politics of representation2018In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1101-1111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss language diversity in mathematics education research by considering the move from a view of language as representation that strives to correlate concepts, ideas, codes and signs towards addressing the representation politics of language. Language as representation of mathematics has framed the discursive construction of language diversity over the years in published research in our field. We argue that the representation politics of language as grounded in cultural and postcolonial studies enables us to see the meanings attributed to language diversity as resulting from a complex circuit of culture' in the realm of global and local identity politics. Three questions help us in this endeavour: (1) What are assumed as commonly shared meanings about language diversity? (2) How do they become present in prevailing discourses about the languages of mathematics, teachers and learners? (3) How may a view of language diversity as part of the circuit of culture' disturb the normative presence of such assumptions?

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  • 17.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Planas, Núria
    Autonomous University, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Svensson Källberg, Petra
    Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching. Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Onto/Epistemic Violence and Dialogicality in Translanguaging Practices Across Multilingual Mathematics Classrooms2022In: Teachers College record (1970), ISSN 0161-4681, E-ISSN 1467-9620, Vol. 124, no 5, p. 108-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The focus on translanguaging practices in multilingual classrooms canbe seen, by and large, as responding to risks of violence entailed in diverse contextsof language use, including the teaching and learning of mathematics. However, thepractice of translanguaging alone cannot counteract the hegemonic authority ofmonolingual and monologic curricula being present through interactions amongteachers, students, and researchers, as well as material resources.Purpose: Drawing on Bakhtin’s philosophy of language, we discuss dialogicalityas a critical and democratic organizing principle for the pervasive polyphony thatcharacterizes every utterance constituting heteroglossia. Dialogicality reconstitutesour relation to language through the “other” and the need to see any utterance as anonteleological process among subjects and objects. As such, the aim is to explorehow acts of dialogicality may address the potential risks of onto/epistemic violence intranslanguaging practices. Focusing on either emergent or orchestrated translanguagingin three European states: Greece, Catalonia and Sweden, we discuss how dialogicalityallows for alternative accounts of language use in complex classroom events.Method: Methodologically, we start by encountering the sociopolitical contextof monolingual and monologic curricula in Europe, where the three cases wetheorize take place, along with our considerations for dialogicality in the realm oftranslanguaging. Our theorizing-in-practice unfolds a double effort in reading. First,what can we read today as risks of onto/epistemic violence in each of these cases?1Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden2Autonomous University, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain3Malmö University, Malmö, SwedenCorresponding Author:Anna Chronaki, Malmö University, Skåne County, Malmö 205 06, Sweden.Email: anna.chronaki@mau.se1104040TCZXXX10.1177/01614681221104040Teachers College RecordChronaki et al.research-article2022  Chronaki et al. 109And second, what is the potential of dialogic translanguaging across the cases andwithin the boundaries of state monolingual policy and monologic discursive cultureof school mathematics?Findings: The present article contributes by discussing dialogicality as a relationalonto/epistemology toward addressing translanguaging practices. Concerning thefirst question, our theorizing-in-practice shares evidence of the inevitable presenceof onto/epistemic violence in every utterance. The limited scope of a crudemathematisation process through language appears continuously in mathematicsclassrooms, serving to place either the object or the subject into fixed narratives.Regarding the second question, our dialogical reading of translanguaging denotes theimportance of the importance of minor responding(s) to such moments of violentrisk. We understand them as “cracks” in the authoritative status of monolingual andmonologic mathematics curricula; we argue that such minor, yet crucial, cracks areof great significance for creating acts of dialogicality from “below,” disrupting thehegemonic authority of an assumed neutral mathematical language.Conclusions/Recommendations: The risk of onto/epistemic violence is inevitablein any discursive and embodied encounter in multilingual mathematics classrooms,including the translanguaging practices. The study suggests that acts of dialogicalitybecome minor responses to violence in ways that both counteract oppressivemonologic discourse and open toward a relational onto/epistemology withmathematics, children, teachers, material resources, and researchers. Rememberinghow Bakhtin insisted that “language is never unitary” and “dialogue” is not a panacea,we emphasize the need for a continuous focus on creating acts of dialogicality withlanguage and discourse.

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  • 18.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Swanson, Dalene
    De/mathematising the political: bringing feminist de/post-coloniality to mathematics education2017In: Quaderni di Ricerca in Didattica" QRDM (Mathematics), ISSN 1592-5137, E-ISSN 1592-4424, Vol. 27, no Supplemento n.2, p. 67-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we attempt to move beyond current understandings of what it means to mathematise in relation to varied social thematic contexts in mathematics education. By way of theoretical intervention, we offer the beginnings of a feminist de/postcolonial commentary in response to such social, cultural and political programmes of work, recognising nevertheless the important contributions they have made to advancing complex political approaches to mathematics education as praxis in relation to society, and the way in which they have promoted alternative ways of envisioning mathematical activity. Our critique is as much a celebration of these programmes of work that have offered diverse conversations about what it means to de/mathematise, as it is a way of moving these conversations forward in newer, alternative politico-epistemological directions. We argue that feminist de/postcoloniality offers opportunities to centralise ethical, democratic and (geo)political considerations in de/mathematisation activities and events, while bringing concerns about social and economic development, culture, gender, and global (in)justices to bear on mathematics education arguments. We suggest that feminist de/postcoloniality provides theoretical concepts by which we can speak of ontological and epistemic considerations politically in mathematics education.

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  • 19.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Swanson, Dalene
    De/mathematising the Political in Mathematics Education: a De/postcolonial Critique2019In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE TENTH INTERNATIONALMATHEMATICS EDUCATION AND SOCIETY CONFERENCE, MES10 , 2019, p. 333-342Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various interpretations have been given to the double gesture of de/mathematising in relation to a variety of social thematic contexts demarcating ‘the political’ in mathematics education. By way of theoretical intervention, we offer the beginnings of a de/postcolonial critique in response to such programmes of work, while recognising the important contributions they have made to advancing complex political approaches to mathematics education as a pedagogic praxis. Social thematic approaches of de/mathematising have promoted ways of envisioning mathematical activity and agency. Our critique is both celebration of these diverse initiatives, as well as, a way of moving these conversations forward in newer, alternative, politico- epistemological directions. In a dialogue amongst us, based on our previous works, we reconsider ‘the political’ in mathematics education through a de/postcolonial critique

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  • 20.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Univ Thessaly, Volos, Greece..
    Yolcu, Ayse
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Mathematics for "citizenship" and its "other" in a "global" world: critical issues on mathematics education, globalisation and local communities2021In: Research in Mathematics Education, ISSN 1479-4802, E-ISSN 1754-0178, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 21. Dafermos, Manolis
    et al.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Kontopodis, Michalis
    Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Travels to Greece: Actors, Contexts and Politics of Reception and Interpretation2020In: Cultural-Historical Psychology, ISSN 1816-5435, E-ISSN 2224-8935, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how socio-cultural, cultural-historical and activity theory approaches to education and psychology have traveled to Greece over the last three decades. It explores the history of introducing these approaches in the Greek context while identifying key dimensions of the process, such as: diverse interpretation of original works, key actors in academic teaching and research and linkages with educational policy and activism beyond the university spaces. Greece with its specific history of military dictatorship, constitutional change, varied struggles for democracy within the university, European integration, and current crisis and neoliberal reforms is seen as a sample case; taking this case as a point of departure, the authors develop a meta-theoretical frame on how to discuss the various ways in which socio-cultural-historical approaches have traveled across socio-cultural, historical, institutional, political, regional, and also, increasingly globalized contexts of education.

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  • 22.
    Delacour, Laurence
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    The Fabrication of Early Childhood Mathematics and the desired child in Sweden2020In: Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal, ISSN 1465-2978, no 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish early years mathematics education is currently under discussion, as it is experiencing transformation on several levels. A few years ago PISA results showed that Sweden ranks below certain highly developed countries. The importance of mathematics has consequently become a prevailing discourse, with the aim of safeguarding a top ranking for Sweden. At the same time, increased population mobility towards Sweden over past decades has resulted in the contemporary school setting being characterised by cultural and linguistic diversity. Based on a series of interviews and observations, this paper analyses how preschool teachers tend to fabricate mathematics education and the desired child in a context where conflicting discourses of school mathematics and early childhood education circulate. This study also explores whether certain children run the risk of being excluded as “other”.

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  • 23.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

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  • 24.
    Rubel, Laurie H.
    et al.
    Univ Haifa, Dept Math Educ, Haifa, Israel..
    Nicol, Cynthia
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Curriculum & Pedag, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Univ Thessaly, Volos, Greece..
    A critical mathematics perspective on reading data visualizations: reimagining through reformatting, reframing, and renarrating2021In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 108, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data visualizations have proliferated throughout the COVID-19 pandemic to communicate information about the crisis and influence policy development and individual decision-making. In invoking exponential growth, mathematical modelling, statistical analysis, and the like, these data visualizations invite opportunities for mathematics teaching and learning. Yet data visualizations are social texts, authored from specific points of view, that narrate particular, and often consequential, stories. Their fundamental reliance on quantification and mathematics cements their social positioning as supposedly objective, reliable, and neutral. The reading of any data visualization demands unpacking the role of mathematics, including how data and variables have been formatted and how relationships are framed to narrate stories from particular points of view. We present an approach to a critical reading of data visualizations for the context of mathematics education that draws on three interrelated concepts: mathematical formatting (what gets quantified, measured, and how), framing (how variables are related and through what kind of data visualization), and narrating (which stories the data visualization tells, its potential impacts and limits). This approach to reading data visualisations includes a process of reimagining through reformatting, reframing and renarrating. We illustrate this approach and these three concepts using data visualizations published in the New York Times in 2020 about COVID-19. We offer a set of possible questions to guide a critical reading of data visualizations, beyond this set of examples.

  • 25.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Andersson, Annica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    “Mathematics is bad for society”: Reasoning about mathematics as part of society in a language diverse middle school classroom2021In: Applying Critical Mathematics Education / [ed] Annica Andersson; Richard Barwell, Brill Academic Publishers, 2021, p. 144-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we report on a small-scale critical mathematics education project in a Swedish classroom with students of varied language backgrounds. The project departed from the student Arvid’s statement “Mathematics is bad for society.” Our research interest was twofold. On the one hand, we wanted to explore what knowledge is being (re)produced by students as they try to connect and reason with a statement like “Mathematics is bad for society.” And on the other hand, we were also interested in how the students in this classroom, in which they do not have shared mother tongues, can express and (dis)acknowledge knowledge when reasoning about mathematics in society. We found that when the students (and their teacher) grappled with unpacking critical aspects such as “mathematics in society,” their reciprocal assessment of claims was based on their individual ways of knowing and talking, and tended to shape both their actions and the outcome of their efforts. We show that the discussion around critical aspects of mathematics in society that came to the fore was intertwined with both students’ and the teacher’s (lack of) meta-understanding of language diversity.

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  • 26.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    A joke on precision? Revisiting “precision” in the school mathematics discourse2020In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 104, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the place of precision in mathematics education by exploring its role in curricular guidelines and in classroom life. By means of a joke on precision delivered by a school student in South Sweden, our study focuses on student participation in mathematical tasks that require precision in processes of measuring and reasoning. The paper uses theories on humour and inferentialism to revisit the normative place of “precision” in mathematics classroom discourse.

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  • 27.
    Segerby, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Primary students’ participation in mathematical reasoning: Coordinating reciprocal teaching and systemic functional linguistics to support reasoning in the Swedish context2018In: Educational Design Research : An International Journal for Design-Based Research in Education, ISSN 2511-0667, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of reasoning has been regarded as core element for developing mathematical arguments. However, curricula reforms have only recently focused on reasoning as an essen- tial part of mathematics education. In Sweden, the emphasis on systematically developing reasoning competences began in 1994 and became even more explicitly focused in the 2011 mathematics curricula reform documents. However, many stu- dies, including our own, show that students and teachers face difficulties in conceiving what reasoning might mean and also how its growth can be supported in the everyday mathematics classroom setting. Through a collaborative intervention study, the present paper explores how the coordination amongst the basic tenets of Reciprocal Teaching and Systemic Functional Lin- guistics perspectives could potentially create a pedagogic design for Grade 4 students’ reasoning in specific mathematical tasks.

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  • 28. Valoyes-Chavez, Luz
    et al.
    Martin, Danny
    Spencer, Joi
    Valero, Paola
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Race, Racism and Mathematics Education: Local and Global Perspectives2017In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference: Mathematics Education and Life at Times of Crisis, vol 1, University of Thessaly Press , 2017, p. 174-179Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this symposium we are interested in analyzing the ways wherein particular racial formations across societies manifest in the social space of mathematics education practices. It is aimed at facilitating discussion with colleagues to explore the current state of research directed to analyze and uncover the mechanisms and practices responsible for the reproduction and maintenance of racial domination within mathematics education as well as how mathematics education contributes to various forms of domination in local and global contexts.

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  • 29. Walshaw, Margaret
    et al.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Leyva, Luis
    Stinson, David
    Nolan, Kathy
    Mendick, Heather
    Beyond the Box: Rethinking Gender in Mathematics Education Research2017In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference: Mathematics Education and Life at Times of Crisis, vol 1, University of Thessaly Press , 2017, p. 184-189Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Τhe present symposium is an attempt to rethink gender in mathematics education research beyond the box, and specifically the box of binaries. We consider the importance in contemporary neoliberal times of doing research in mathematics education with and through the perspective of gender and, equally, we advocate ways in which gender could be key towards discerning relations amongst mathematics, science and life. To that end the symposium will address specific questions and issues surrounding gender presently confronting researchers, as well as educators, and policy makers. Organized around presentations in dialogue with reactions, discussion and debate, the symposium is intended not only to enhance understanding but also to stimulate fresh thinking and to initiate ongoing critique about research on and with gender in reconfiguring the subject in mathematics education, reimagining classroom learning, or, reconsidering mathematics education research.

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  • 30.
    Ödmo, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Boistrup, Lisa Björklund
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    A teacher education statistics course encounters climate change and critical mathematics education: Thinking about controversies2023In: Proceedings of the 12th international conference of mathematics education and society: Sixth sketch, proofreading version / [ed] Renato Marcone; Patricia Linardi; Raquel Milani; João Pedro A. de Paulo; Amanda Moura Queiroz; Michela Tuchapesk da Silva, 2023, p. 1307-1321Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we discuss the complexity faced by a teacher when Critical Mathematics Education (CME) and climate change are being brought into a specific teaching setting that is part of a teacher education program a large university in Sweden. The teacher in the course encountered climate change as a timely thematic context to discuss statistics in the social. Driven by core ideas of CME, mathematics has been conceived as a formatting power for articulating issues of climate change (Coles et al. 2013). Mathematics can, potentially, change how climate change is perceived and formatted as solvable, predictable, and so forth. In the case of teaching statistics, the teacher must make certain choices concerning what data to look at since the particular examples of data might suggest certain narratives at the expense of others, but soon, confronts the complexity of opening mathematics to the social. It is with these thoughts in mind that the course teacher set up the course. Latour (2005) discards an abstract definition of the social and in his well-known book “Reassembling the Social” focuses on its material understanding as relationships between actants. The notion of ‘actant’ is grounded in Active Network Theory and signifies both human and non-human participants in a complex network as being capable of producing a particular effect and, thus, having agency (Smelser & Baltes, 2001). The relationship that we as a collective iterate over time, is a way of thinking of how things are done and, thus, a way to map the ‘social’ as a highly controversial terrain. Taking this theory into account along with the teacher’s dilemmas, we here perform an inquiry that aims to map potential actants and their relationships, as they are core in a teacher’s experience to plan and enact a statistics course that engages the theme of climate change through CME. For this inquiry, the teacher’s log (or course diary notes) is analyzed. The analysis locates instances where the teacher connects to different actants such as the climate change phenomenon, the curricula, the course plan, and student-teachers. In some instances, these actants suggest ways of doing that contradict each other. These all become evident as signs of hesitation by the teacher at specific moments of planning or enactment. The actants, moreover, reserve to create different narratives about what mathematics should be utilized and demands reflexive choices by the teacher over which narrative to follow. Such hesitations might also be traced back to how the arguments for choosing one narrative over the other are being constructed. In short, the analysis shows that since diverse arguments can be narrated, one might be left with the feeling of missing something in just following one. It is a rather vulnerable situation the teacher is in; risking being hold accountable for not dealing with the mathematical content that has good arguments for it to be dealt with, but, yet, knowing that taking this risk allows mathematics to enter the social.

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  • 31.
    Ödmo, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Bjorklund Boistrup, Lisa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Bringing Critical Mathematics Education and Actor–Network Theory to a Statistics Course in Mathematics Teacher Education: Actants for Articulating Complexity in Student Teachers’ Foregrounds2023In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 1201-1201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss how critical mathematics education (CME) and actor–networktheory (ANT) come together in a mathematics teacher education course that focuses on the thematiccontext of climate change to study statistics. Acknowledging the complexity that student teachersencounter when asked to move from a mainly instrumental treatment of statistics toward a criticalforeground of data in society, we turn to explore the actant networks, as theorized by ANT, utilized bystudent teachers when asked to imagine teaching from a CME perspective. For this, our study is basedon a series of interviews with student teachers who participated in a statistics course where pollutiondata graphs were discussed, inquiring about their role as future critical mathematics teachers. Thetranscribed interviews, analyzed through ANT, inform us as to how student teachers’ foregrounds arebeing shaped by actants such as the curriculum, social justice, democracy, and source critique, amongothers. Based on the above, we recommend that teacher education should invite active discussion ofthe complexity created when a CME perspective is required. This move would allow for a criticalapproach to critical mathematics education itself that could prepare student teachers to navigate,instead of ignoring or opposing, such complexity.

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  • 32.
    Ödmo, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Boistrup, Lisa Björklund
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    A teacher education course on climate change and critical mathematics education2023In: Mathematics Education and the Socio-EcologicalICMI Symposium 20th March 2023, ICMI , 2023, p. 74-76Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we discuss the possible controversies faced by both a teacher and student-teachers when Critical Mathematics Education (CME) and climate change are being brought into a specific teaching setting, part of a teacher education program at a large university in Sweden. Driven by core ideas of CME, mathematics has been conceived as a formatting power for articulating issues of climate change (Coles et al. 2013). Mathematics can, potentially, change how such socio-ecological problems are perceived and formatted as solvable, predictable and so forth. In the particular case of teaching statistics, the teacher has to make certain choices concerning what data to look at since the particular data might suggest certain description or, solutions at the expense of others. In parallel, the teacher wonders how all these might influence the student-teachers who come into the statistics course with diverse needs and expectations. It is with these thoughts in mind (i.e., dilemmas that can lead to irresolvable problems) that the course teacher (and the first writer of this paper) enters this study (i.e., course plan and its enactment). Latour (2005) discards an abstract definition of the social and in his well-known book “Reassembling the Social” focuses on its material understanding as relationships between actants. The notion of ‘actant’ is grounded in Active Network Theory and signifies both human and non-human participants in a complex network as being capable of producing a particular effect and, thus, having agency (Smelser & Baltes, 2001). The relationship that we as a collective iterate over time, in assemblages, is a way of thinking of how things are done and, thus, a way to map the ‘social’ as a highly controversial terrain. Taking this theory into account along with the teacher’s dilemmas (as described above), we here perform an inquiry that aims to map potential actants and their relationships, as they are core in a teacher’s experience to plan and enact a statistics course that engages the theme of climate change through CME. For this inquiry, both the teacher’s logbook (or course diary notes) and student-teachers’ interviews are analyzed. The analysis so far, locates instances where the teacher connects to different actants such as the climate change phenomenon, the curricula, the course plan, and student-teachers. In some instances, these actants suggest ways of doing, decisions to make or choices that contradict each other and hint toward controversial issues. These all become evident in signs of hesitation by the teacher at moments of planning or enactment. They, moreover, reserve to create different narratives about what mathematics should be utilized and demands reflexive choices by the teacher over which narrative to follow. Such hesitations might also be traced back to how the arguments for choosing one narrative over the other are being constructed. In short, the analysis shows that since diverse arguments can be narrated, one might be left with the feeling of missing something in just following one. It is a rather vulnerable situation the teacher is in; risking being hold accountable for not dealing with the mathematical content that has good arguments for it to be dealt with.

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