Publikationer från Malmö universitet
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 7 of 7
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Carlsson, Alexandra Dimitrijevic
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Linkoping Univ, Ctr Oral Rehabil Linkoping, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Scandinavian Ctr Orofacial Neurosci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wahlund, Kerstin
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Kindgren, Erik
    Vasterv Hosp, Dept Pediat, Vastervik, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linkoping, Sweden.;Skaraborg Hosp, Dept Pediat, Skovde, Sweden..
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Johansson, Carin Starkhammar
    Linkoping Univ, Ctr Oral Rehabil Linkoping, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Scandinavian Ctr Orofacial Neurosci, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Specialized Pain Rehabil, Lund, Sweden.;Malmo Univ, Orofacial Pain Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Orofacial pain in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is associated with stress as well as psychosocial and functional limitations2019Inngår i: Pediatric Rheumatology, E-ISSN 1546-0096, Vol. 17, nr 1, artikkel-id 83Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate relations between psychosocial factors, signs and symptoms of orofacial pain and jaw dysfunction in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Forty-five patients with JIA (median age 12 years) and 16 healthy matched controls (median age 13 years) were examined according to the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD). The subjects answered the DC/TMD questionnaires regarding psychosocial factors (pain intensity, pain-related disability, depression, stress, catastrophizing, pain locations and jaw function). Results JIA patients with orofacial pain had higher degree of stress, depression, catastrophizing and jaw dysfunction compared to subjects without. In turn, these factors were associated with orofacial pain intensity. Also, patients with orofacial pain had higher systemic inflammatory activity. Conclusions Orofacial pain in patients with JIA is associated with stress, psychological distress, jaw dysfunction and loss of daily living activities. Pain intensity seems to be the major pain aspect related to these factors. In addition, systemic inflammatory activity appears to be an important factor contributing to orofacial pain in JIA.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Dimitrijevic Carlsson, Alexandra
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    The Temporomandibular Joint in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Psychosocial, clinical, imaging and parotid saliva biomarkers2024Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. The disease can affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cause orofacial growth disturbances, pain, and jaw dysfunction. TMJ arthritis is often asymptomatic and therefore a challenging joint to diagnose. Clinical assessment of the TMJ is hampered by the low sensitivity and specificity of joint pain and the absence of physical findings early in the disease process. More specific methods are therefore needed for diagnosing TMJ arthritis. Saliva and blood are promising as diagnostic fluids for various diseases. Also, adolescents with chronic pain report high rates of psychosocial stress. Psychosocial stress may also be involved in JIA as a trigger and maintaining factor of the disease. Aim: The main aim of this thesis research was to investigate the relation between clinical variables, psychosocial factors, MRI findings, and inflammatory biomarkers in saliva and blood in relation to TMJ involvement in JIA. The secondary aim was to investigate the relation between stress and change in stress over time in comparison with orofacial pain, psychosocial factors, and jaw function in JIA patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional case-control study and a longitudinal cohort study. Forty-five patients (6-16 years old) with JIA and 16 healthy age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were examined according to the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD). The study subjects completed questionnaires regarding psychosocial factors and underwent bilateral MRI of their TMJs. Unstimulated parotid saliva and venous blood samples were collected. Biochemical analyses were performed using a multiplex platform electrochemiluminescence assay from Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) for measuring cytokine concentrations in saliva and blood. A two-year prospective follow-up study was performed in 40 JIA patients from our original baseline study. The JIA patients underwent the same clinical examination and completed the same questionnaires regarding psychosocial factors as in the baseline studies. Results: The JIA patients with orofacial pain had higher degrees of stress, depression, catastrophizing, and jaw dysfunction than did those JIA patients without such pain. These factors were also associated with orofacial pain intensity. Additionally, patients with orofacial pain had higher systemic inflammatory activity. In the two-year follow-up study, we observed that change in stress was associated with changes in catastrophizing, psychological distress, as well as limitations in both general and jaw functions. Regarding TMJ MRI findings, there were no significant differences between JIA patients and healthy individuals in either the inflammatory or damage domain. Moderate/severe TMJ changes in the inflammatory and damage domains were, however, only found in the JIA patients. Among JIA patients, orofacial pain intensity was correlated to TMJ bone marrow edema, and pain in jaw muscles during jaw function was related to both TMJ bone marrow edema and erosion. JIA patients had lower concentrations of interleukin receptor 6 (IL-6R) and glycoprotein 130 (gp130) in parotid saliva than in plasma. Higher concentrations of IL-6 were found in parotid saliva than in plasma. The members of the interleukin-6 family (i.e., IL-6, IL-6R, and gp130) in parotid saliva were found to be explanatory factors for the presence of bone marrow edema and effusion in the JIA patients. Conclusions: Orofacial pain in patients with JIA is associated with stress, psychological distress, jaw dysfunction, and loss of daily living activities. Pain intensity seems to be the major aspect related to these factors. Increased disease activity with more joint involvement seems to be an important factor contributing to orofacial pain in JIA. Myalgia, in addition to arthritis, seems to be an important source of orofacial pain in these patients. Maintaining a low stress level in JIA patients seems to be crucial, as an increase in stress level over a two-year period appears to negatively impact both jaw function as well as psychosocial distress and catastrophizing. There was an overlap of TMJ MRI findings regarding signs of inflammatory and bone tissue changes between JIA patients and healthy individuals. Among, JIA patients, the presence of inflammatory MRI signs, and bone marrow edema seems to worsen orofacial pain intensity. The IL-6 family in parotid saliva is associated with TMJ bone marrow edema and effusion in patients with JIA, suggesting that IL-6 has promising properties as a parotid saliva biomarker of TMJ inflammatory activity. In addition there seems to be local production of the IL-6 family in the parotid gland in JIA patients and healthy individuals. However, parotid saliva does not seem to reflect the plasma content in terms of the investigated biomarkers in JIA.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 3.
    Dimitrijevic Carlsson, Alexandra
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Center For Oral Rehabilitation, Torkelbergsgatan 11, 581 85 Linköping, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Science, Linköping University; postal code 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, and Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.
    Starkhammar Johansson, Carin
    Center For Oral Rehabilitation, Torkelbergsgatan 11, 581 85 Linköping, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Science, Linköping University; postal code 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Institute of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Alfred Nobels allé 8, 141 52 Huddinge, Sweden; Specialized Pain Rehabilitation, Skåne University Hospital, Lasarettsgatan 13, 222 41 Lund, Sweden.
    Unstimulated Parotid Saliva Sampling in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Healthy Controls: A Proof-of-Concept Study on Biomarkers2020Inngår i: Diagnostics (Basel), ISSN 2075-4418, Vol. 10, nr 4, artikkel-id 251Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this proof-of-concept study were to develop a collecting method for unstimulated parotid saliva in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and healthy children and to investigate if inflammatory biomarkers could be detected in these samples. Forty-five children with JIA (median age of 12 years and 25th-75th percentile of 10-15 years; 33 girls and 12 boys) and 16 healthy children as controls (median age of 13 years and 25-75th percentile of 10-13 years; 11 girls and 5 boys) were enrolled in this study. Unstimulated parotid saliva was collected with a modified Carlson-Crittenden collector. The salivary flow rate and salivary concentrations of total protein and inflammatory mediators were assessed. The Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence immunoassay was used for analyzing protein concentrations and the inflammatory biomarkers. Sufficient parotid saliva volumes to be analyzed could be collected with the collection device. JIA patients had a lower sampling saliva volume (p = 0.008) and saliva flow rate (p = 0.039) than controls. The total protein concentrations and inflammatory biomarkers were measured in the last six healthy subjects. The median protein concentration was 1312 mu g/mL (25th percentile: 844 mu g/mL and 75th percentile: 2062 mu g/mL; n = 6) and quantifiable concentrations of 39 inflammatory proteins could be assessed in these samples. In conclusion, this study indicates that the saliva sampling method, as used in the present study, is able to collect sufficient sample volumes in children, and that it is possible to analyze various inflammatory biomarkers in the collected saliva.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Dimitrijevic Carlsson, Alexandra
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). 2 Center for Oral Rehabilitation, in Linköping, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, ; Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö.
    Wahlund, K
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Klintström, E
    Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV) and Department of Radiology in Linköping and Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University.
    Salé, H
    Department of Neuroradiology, Center of Medical imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund.
    Kindgren, E
    Department of Pediatrics, Västervik Hospital, Västervik; Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping; Department of Pediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde.
    Starkhammar Johansson, C
    Center for Oral Rehabilitation, in Linköping, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping,.
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö; Skåne University Hospital, Specialized Pain Rehabilitation, .
    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint: a case-control study of magnetic resonance imaging findings in relation to clinical and psychosocial factors.2023Inngår i: European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1591-996X, E-ISSN 2035-648X, Vol. 24, nr 1, s. 69-76Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a particularly challenging joint to assess both clinically and with imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate TMJ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in relation to clinical and psychosocial factors in patients with JIA and healthy individuals related to TMJ arthritis in JIA.

    MATERIALS: In total, 45 patients (6-16 years) with JIA and 16 healthy age- and sex-matched controls were examined according to the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD). The subjects answered questionnaires about psychosocial factors (pain intensity, pain-related disability, depression, stress, catastrophising, pain locations, and jaw function) and underwent bilateral MRI of the TMJ.

    RESULTS: There were no significant differences between JIA patients and healthy individuals in any of the TMJ MRI findings. Moderate/severe changes among JIA patients were found only for effusion, synovial thickening, condylar flattening, and erosion, with no moderate/severe changes in healthy individuals. In JIA patients, orofacial pain intensity was related to TMJ bone marrow oedema, and pain in jaw muscles during jaw function was related to TMJ bone marrow oedema and erosion. There were no significant correlations between psychosocial aspects and MRI findings.

    CONCLUSION: This study indicates a substantial overlap of TMJ MRI findings in both the inflammatory domain and the damage domain between JIA patients and healthy individuals. In JIA patients, the inflammatory MRI sign of bone marrow oedema seems to influence orofacial pain intensity.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Dimitrijevic Carlsson, Alexandra
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Wahlund, Kerstin
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Kindgren, Erik
    Frodlund, Martina
    Salé, Hanna
    Klintström, Eva
    Starkhammar Johansson, Carin
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Parotid saliva and blood biomarkers in juvenile idiopathic arthritis inrelation to temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance imaging findingsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6.
    Dimitrijevic Carlsson, Alexandra
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Centre for Oral Rehabilitation, Linköping, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wahlund, Kerstin
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Kindgren, Erik
    Department of Pediatrics, Västervik Hospital, Västervik, Sweden; Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Frodlund, Martina
    Rheumatology/Division of Inflammation and Infection, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences; Skåne University Hospital, Specialized Pain Rehabilitation, Lund, Sweden.
    Increase in stress contributes to impaired jaw function in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a two-year prospective study2024Inngår i: Pediatric Rheumatology, E-ISSN 1546-0096, Vol. 22, nr 1, artikkel-id 30Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundStress in patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) has been found to be associated with orofacial pain, psychological distress, jaw dysfunction and loss of daily activities in a cross-sectional study. The aim of this study was to investigate the relations between stress and change of stress over time versus changes in orofacial pain, psychosocial factors and jaw function over a two-year period in patients with JIA.MethodsThis is a two-year prospective follow-up study involving 40 JIA patients. At baseline (2015) the median age was 12 years and at two-year follow up (2018) 14 years. The JIA patients were examined clinically and with questionnaires at baseline and follow-up with the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD) and completed the same set of DC/TMD questionnaires regarding orofacial pain symptoms and psychosocial factors.ResultsChange in stress was associated with change in catastrophizing, psychological distress as well as limitation in general function and jaw function.ConclusionsThis study emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low stress level in patients with JIA since an increase in stress level over a two-year period seems to impair jaw function as well as psychological distress and catastrophizing.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Starkhammar Johansson, C
    et al.
    Center for Oral Rehabilitation, Linköping, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dimitrijevic Carlsson, Alexandra
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Center for Oral Rehabilitation, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping.
    Wahlund, K
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Skåne University Hospital, Specialized Pain Rehabilitation, Lund, Sweden.
    Periodontal Health in Children with Juvenile idiopathic arthritis2024Inngår i: European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1591-996X, E-ISSN 2035-648X, Vol. 25, artikkel-id 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate gingival inflammation and prevalence of four specific periodontal associated pathogens in Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in relation to orofacial pain, jaw function and systemic inflammatory activity in JIA.

    METHODS: Forty-five children with JIA and 16 healthy children as controls, were enrolled. Subjects were examined and classified according to the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD). Pain, pain-related disability and jaw function were also assessed. A clinical periodontal examination was performed. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and analyzed for semiquantitative levels of the following periodontal pathogens; Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomintans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola.

    RESULTS: No significant difference between JIA and healthy individuals was observed regarding the clinical periodontal variables plaque, gingivitis, probing pocket depth or the investigated periodontal pathogens. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were detected in both groups. In the group with JIA, no significant correlation was found between orofacial pain, jaw function, systemic inflammatory activity and periodontal disease, including levels of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. 

    CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the periodontal disease-associated bacteria P. gingivalis and T. forsythia do not contribute to neither periodontal disease, systemic inflammatory activity nor orofacial pain and jaw dysfunction, including TMJ arthritis, in JIA patients in Sweden.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 7 of 7
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf