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  • 1.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    School of Design and Crafts, Faculty of Fine Arts, Gothenburg University, Box 131, Göteborg, 405 30, Sweden.
    Høg Hansen, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Amendments and Frames: The Women Making History Movement and Malmö Migration History2018In: Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture, ISSN 2040-4344, E-ISSN 2040-4352, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 265-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores existing and emerging frames of writing history involving a push for new modes of telling and writing history/histories. This, from the point of view of a recent movement, in short named Women Making History, launched in Malmö, Sweden in 2013 aiming to cover a 100-year period, from when immigration began until the present day. The movement - engaged in activism and archival work and research around the lives and work of women immigrants in the city - took off in 2013 with support from authors engaged in a Living Archives research project, and formally ended, though some activity continues, with a book publication in 2016. With the initiator of the movement Feminist Dialogue Malmö University researchers (mainly the two authors and students) have been documenting activities and workshops over hree years, revealing the voicing of ambivalent identities that wish to maintain a plurality and openness of identifications and directions. These voices do not want to be framed as ‘outsiders’, ‘homogenized others’ or ‘victimised strangers’, and struggle with a feeling of being amended to a more homogenous national history – an ambiguous predicament which is investigated in this article through diverse ways of trying to understand how belonging is developed in the notions of multidirectionality, multilogues, amendments and re/framing.

  • 2.
    Boothby, Hugo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Listening with Elephant Ears: Contesting Exclusion at the Intersection of Virtuosity and Ableism2023In: Resonance: Journal of Sound and Culture, E-ISSN 2688-867X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 88-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses Listening with Elephant Ears, a contemporary music composition and performance created by the author together with the Elefantöra (Elephant Ear) ensemble. Elefantöra is a norm-critical music ensemble that includes both disabled and non-disabled musicians. When musicians are defined as disabled, normative assumptions regarding the correct use of musical instruments and expert definitions of good sound generate rehabilitative approaches to music that perpetuate exclusions of ableism. This article examines the intersections that exist between exclusions of ableism and exclusions based on musical virtuosity. It focuses on the ways in which Elefantöra contests both exclusions of ableism and virtuosity in their creative reappropriations of sound technology. Composed in the fall of 2020 as a collaborative artistic research engagement, Listening with Elephant Ears was first performed at the Lund Contemporary Music Festival in Sweden, October 2021. The article draws on ethnographic and sound material generated from my artistic research engagement with Elefantöra. Created during the COVID-19 pandemic, Listening with Elephant Ears actively reappropriates the Zoom video conference software as a music technology. The piece embraces Zoom’s limitations and emphasizes the aesthetic value of the audio distortions and digital interference that Zoom introduces into musical performance. Critiquing regimes of regulation that situate disabled musicians differently to non-disabled musicians, Listening with Elephant Ears applies care as a theoretical perspective from which to reflect critically on rehabilitative approaches to music and the associated exclusions of ableism and musical virtuosity.

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  • 3.
    Cory, Erin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Echoes of the Club: Affective Materiality & Vinyl Records as Boundary Objects2023In: Riffs: A Popular Music Journal, ISSN 2513-8537, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 4.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Kozel, Susan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Larsen, Henrik Svarrer
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Visual Materiality: crafting a new viscosity2018In: Proceedings of the Design Research Society: Catalyst, Design Research Society, 2018, Vol. 4, p. 1762-1774Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A re-materialisation of the visual in terms of viscosity is provided by this article. The argument is grounded in practical design processes from on-going research in the integration of archival material into AR/MR environments (Augmented Reality and Mixed Reality). This is an approach to emergent materiality not because new materials are invented but because existing visual, digital and traditional craft materials are re-configured. The archival material we use for this project is visual rather than textual, and it portrays moving bodies. The re-materialisation happens through experimentation with materials, affect and perception. Visual materialities, in this case viscosity, rely on a phenomenological approach to vision whereby design materials cannot be separated from the active perception of the designers, the participants and even the materials themselves. This article outlines the final iteration of the AffeXity project where glass was used as a design material to enhance viscous materiality. Viscosity is experienced as depth, layers, stickiness, reflections, motion, and an affective quality of dreaminess or the passage of time.

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  • 5.
    Hedenborg, Susanna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Svensk barndomshistoria2018In: Barndomshistoria, Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 277-365Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the chapters an account of the Swedish history of childhood is presented. In addition, the book includes a commented bibliography on research in the field.

  • 6.
    Henriksen, Line
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Kjær, Katrine Meldgaard
    IT University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.
    Blønd, Marie
    Independent Researcher Copenhagen Denmark.
    Cohn, Marisa
    IT University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.
    Cakici, Baki
    IT University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.
    Douglas‐Jones, Rachel
    IT University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    IT University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.
    Feshak, Viktoriya
    Technical University of Munich Munchen Germany.
    Gahoonia, Simy Kaur
    IT University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.
    Sandbukt, Sunniva
    IT University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.
    Writing bodies and bodies of text: Thinking vulnerability through monsters2022In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 561-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we suggest approaching writing as a vulnerable practice marked by an unstable boundary between bodies: bodies of text and bodies of writers. We present an exercise-method that we refer to as Monster Writing, which we have developed in order to engage with these instabilities as well as in order to address experiences of difficulty, anxiety and uncertainty in relation with the text and writing process. Though the writing process can at times be exciting and thrilling, and at other times perhaps a little tedious and mundane, for some it also presents (more than) occasional encounters with one's own insecurities, shame and doubt. We argue that this potentially more painful relationship between writer and text should be awarded more attention in scholarship on writing, and that a way of doing so is through the framework of feminist theory on vulnerability, embodiment, and the monstrous. 

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  • 7.
    Henriksen, Line
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Meldgaard Kjær, Katrine
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Ojala, Mace
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Objektivitet2021In: Aktørnetværksteori : i praksis / [ed] Irina Papazu; Britt Ross Winthereik, Djøf Forlag , 2021, p. 179-194Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Henriksen, Line
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Romic, Bojana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lively Media Technologies: Ethics, Monsters and New Imaginaries for the Future2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With this paper, we suggest a new ethical and conceptual framework for how to enter into companionships with digital technologies and digital creations in an increasingly media dominated society. We argue that such a framework is needed, as recent developments within digital technologies have sparked cultural anxieties concerning the agency and liveliness of such technologies to the extent of creating popular imaginaries of “technologies-as-monsters” (Suchman 2018). Examples of such imaginaries of monstrous technologies can be found within contemporary popular culture, but the ties between the monster and technological developments have a much longer history and have been explored within literature and art for centuries, the most notable example being Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein: Or the Modern Prometheus (1818/2003). Using discourse and textual analysis, as well as Monster Studies and Feminist Posthumanism, we investigate the legacy of the cultural and scientific imaginary of technologies-as-monsters, and the role played by media in transporting these imaginaries (Jasanoff, 2015). We offer an analysis of contemporary science fiction narratives across media – such as TV, film and novels – and discuss how they influence imaginaries of the technologies of the future. We also propose new methods based on creative writing for rethinking and retelling stories of future co-existence and companionship with techno-monsters. 

    References

    Jasanoff, Sheila (2015) “Future imperfect: Science, Technology, and the Imaginations of Modernity”, pp. 1-34 in Sheila Jasanoff and Sang-Hyun Kim (eds.) Dreamscapes of Modernity. Sociotechnical Imaginaries and the Fabrication of Power. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Shelley, Mary (1818/2003) Frankenstein: Or the Modern Prometheus. London: Penguin.

    Suchman, Lucy (2018) “Frankenstein’s Problem”, pp. 13-18 in Ulrike Schultze, Margunn Aanestad, Magnus Mähring, Carsten Østerlund and Kai Riemer (eds.) Living with Monsters? Social Implications of Algorithmic Phenomena, Hybrid Agency, and the Performativity of Technology. Cham: Springer.

  • 9.
    Høg Hansen, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Women Making History2018In: History Workshop Online, no 180514Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In 2013, Parvin Ardalan, a former journalist and civil-rights activist from Iran, launched a project in Malmö, Sweden called 100 Years of Immigrant Women’s Life and Work – or, Women Making History for short. Ardalan was Malmö’s first ‘safe-haven writer in residence’ from 2010 to 2012. In 2007, she was awarded the Olof Palme Prize for her work campaigning for the equal rights of men and women in Iran. At the time of the project launch, we, the authors, were involved in the Living Archives research project at Malmö University, which was rethinking the archive as a social resource. We were invited by Parvin and fellow activists to be partners in the work of documentating activity for Women Making History, alongside a few other Malmö-based organisations. This article recounts the movement’s engagement in rewriting Malmö’s history – a rewriting that focused on the lives and work of immigrant women over the last 100 years from a feminist and activist perspective.

  • 10.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    The End of Media Logics? On Algorithms and Agency2018In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 4653-4670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that algorithms are an outcome rather than a replacement of media logics, and ultimately, we advance this argument by connecting human agency to media logics. This theoretical contribution builds on the notion that technology, particularly algorithms are non-neutral, arguing for a stronger focus on the agency that goes into designing and programming them. We reflect on the limits of algorithmic agency and lay out the role of algorithms and agency for the dimensions and elements of network media logic. The article concludes with addressing questions of power, discussing algorithmic agency from both meso and macro perspectives.

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  • 11.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Institute for Media and Communication Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    What Media Logics Can Tell Us About the Internet?2018In: Second International Handbook of Internet Research / [ed] Jeremy Hunsinger, Lisbeth Klastrup, Mathew M Allen, Springer, 2018, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter departs from the dichotomy between techno-optimism and normalization and asks the questions how participation online has been – and can be – studied beyond this. The chapter focuses on the theory of media logics, how it has been and can be used when studying online participation. The chapter will end with a discussion of media logics locating it within the field of media and communication – increasingly a popular strand of mediatization.

  • 12.
    Kozel, Susan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Gibson, Ruth
    Gibson/Martelli, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Martelli, Bruno
    Gibson/Martelli, London, United Kingdom.
    The Bronze Key: Performing Data Encryption2018In: Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI '18), ACM Digital Library, 2018, p. 549-554Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bronze Key art installation is the result of performative re-materializations of bodily data. This collaborative experiment in data encryption expands research into practices of archiving and critical discourses around open data. It integrates bodily movement, motion capture and Virtual Reality (VR) with a critical awareness of data trails and data protection. A symmetric cryptosystem was enacted producing a post-digital cipher system, along with archival artefacts of the encryption process. Material components for inclusion in the TEI Arts Track include: an audio file of text to speech of the raw motion capture data from the original movement sequence on cassette tape (The Plaintext), a 3D printed bronze shape produced from a motion captured gesture (The Encryption Key), and a printed book containing the scrambled motion capture data (The Ciphertext).

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  • 13.
    Kozel, Susan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Gibson, Ruth
    Martelli, Bruno
    The Weird Giggle: Attending to Affect in Virtual Reality2018In: Transformations, E-ISSN 1444-3775, no 31, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual Reality (VR) is once again causing a stir, with conflicting assertions over its potential to usher in a glorious posthuman phase of freedom or to immerse bodies wearing headsets in pure and meaningless violence. This paper integrates philosophies of affect and affective experiences in VR by means of a practical application of phenomenological reflection. The combination of phenomenology and affect is valuable for articulating the lived experience of something unprecedented or disorienting, and for expanding the language of critique. The practical affective experiences of VR are from one particular VR artwork: MAN A VR by Gibson / Martelli, which uses captured data from dancers performing the dance improvisation form Skinner Releasing Technique (SRT) to animate the figures the VR world. SRT is also the movement practice facilitating philosophical reflections on the experience of being in the VR world. In this paper, passages directly describing moments of experience in MAN A VR extracted directly from research journals act as affective counterpoints to the theoretical discussion. The result is an expansion of the somatic register of VR, at the same time as a grounding of concepts from affect theory within contemporary digital culture.

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  • 14.
    Meldgaard Kjær, Katrine
    et al.
    Technologies in Practice, ETHOS Lab, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Ojala, Mace
    Technologies in Practice, ETHOS Lab, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Henriksen, Line
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Absent Data: Engagements with Absence in a Twitter Collection Process2021In: Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience, E-ISSN 2380-3312, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers the ways in which silences and absences are a central part of research that relieson automated data collection from social media or the internet. In recent years, automated data collection driven or supported research methods have gained popularity within the social sciencesand humanities. With thisincrease in popularity, it becomes ever more pertinent to consider how toengage with digital data, and how both engagementand data are situated, messy,and contingent. Based on experiences with “missing”data, thispaper mobilizes the framework of hauntology to make sense of what relationships may be builtwith missing dataand how silences haunt research practices. Ultimately, we argue that it is possible to reimagine absent data not as a limitation but as an invitation to reflect on and establish new methods for working with automated data collections.

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  • 15.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Arbetarpoesin och offentligheterna: exemplet Stig Sjödin2020In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish poet Stig Sjödin (1917–1993) is generally recognized as an important figure in both Swedish literary history and the history of Swedish working-class literature. This status rests almost exclusively on poetrycollections published in the 1940s, 1950s and 1970s. In addition to this, however, Sjödin was also active as a poet within the labour movement. By including his activities there, and discussing their relationship to his poetry collections, this article aims at broadening the understanding of Sjödin’s oeuvre. It also argues that research on modern Swedish working-class literature must transcend the traditional realm of literature.

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  • 16.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Vem är arbetarförfattaren i Föreningen Arbetarskrivare?2020In: Arbetarförfattaren: Litteratur och liv / [ed] Margaretha Fahlgren, Per-Olof Mattsson och Anna Williams, Gidlunds förlag, 2020, p. 42-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En analys av hur man sett på identiteten arbetarförfattare inom Föreningen Arbetarskrivare.

  • 17.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Bogdanska, Daria
    Comics and Politics2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Medea Vox, an academic podcast. Episode 24: Comics have been around for more than a hundred years. For a long time, comics were mainly viewed as light entertainment for kids, but today they can also be seen as an aesthetically ambitious art form. But are comics also a politically significant medium? In this Medea Vox episode, comics artist Daria Bogdanska and professor Magnus Nilsson talk about comics and politics. Can comics be used to criticize and think about society in new ways? Can comics articulate new voices, or reach out to those who are not taking part in political life? And which are the potentials and limitations of comics as a political art form?

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  • 18.
    Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Rice University, Houston, TX, United States.
    Balsamo, Ann
    School of Art, Technology, and Emerging Communication, University of Texas at Dallas, United States.
    Farman, Jason
    Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.
    Losh, Elizabeth
    College of William and Mary, United States.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    University of South Carolina, United States.
    Hoyt, Eric
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States.
    McPherson, Tara
    Sidney Harman Academy of Polymathic Studies, USC, United States.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Unintended Consequences2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 181-191Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses the complex, sometimes unintended—but also potentially very rewarding—consequences of intervening into practices that are more commonly studied from a distance, and the political and ethical implications of this work. The case studies for this chapter explore what happens when media scholars become actively involved in the reshaping of media experiences and infrastructures, and in some sense become part of the very processes they seek to critique. Contributors were asked, has your applied media studies work ever produced truly unexpected results that raised unintended ethical or legal issues you had to address? How have you managed issues relating to Intellectual Property regulations with open, collaborative work online? Have you discovered any novel ethical challenges or responsibilities from putting work online—including objects created by people, living and deceased, from cultures that are different than your own? Have you ever been unexpectedly drawn into an applied media studies project as a participant in ways that redefined your understanding of your role as scholar, or expert, or lead investigator? How did you respond, and has this changed the way you work now?

  • 19.
    Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Rice University, Houston, TX, United States.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    University of South Carolina, United States.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Balsamo, Anne
    School of Art, Technology, and Emerging Communication, University of Texas at Dallas, United States.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Losh, Elizabeth
    College of William and Mary, United States.
    Hoyt, Eric
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States.
    McPherson, Tara
    Sidney Harman Academy of Polymathic Studies, USC, United States.
    Farman, Jason
    Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.
    Foundations of Applied Media Studies2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 31-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each of the collaboratively authored chapters of Applied Media Studies was produced through a series of interview-style questions that I, as editor, developed and circulated to the contributors. Through a dialogic process that took place in a deliberately conversational tone, I asked each contributor to answer questions related to a set of themes in the book as a whole, ranging from logistical concerns to methodological and theoretical problems. In this foundational chapter, I asked, “What does applied media studies mean to you? How and why did you start doing applied media studies? In your view, what is the theoretical, historical, and/or political rationale for reimagining humanistic media studies as an applied practice?” In addition to their written responses, contributors created short videos for a web-based companion to the book, hosted on the open-access Scalar platform (http://scalar.usc.edu/works/applied-media-studies/index).

  • 20.
    Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Rice University, Houston, TX, United States.
    Farman, Jason
    Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.
    Balsamo, Anne
    School of Art, Technology, and Emerging Communication, University of Texas at Dallas, United States.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Losh, Elizabeth
    College of William and Mary, United States.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    University of South Carolina, United States.
    McPherson, Tara
    Sidney Harman Academy of Polymathic Studies, USC, United States.
    Hoyt, Eric
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States.
    Conceptual Models and Helpful Thinkers2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 253-262Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter serves as a conclusion by way of annotated compilation, gathering the contributors’ favorite resources for helping them, their colleagues, and their students do applied media studies work. I asked participants what conceptual models they have found helpful for extending and applying media theory as they move between making, writing, and teaching. Additional questions included, what articles, books, blogs, and Twitter streams would you urge readers to look into? And finally, what are the gaps in this field where you feel future research should be focused?

  • 21.
    Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Rice University, Houston, TX, United States.
    Hoyt, Eric
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States.
    McPherson, Tara
    Sidney Harman Academy of Polymathic Studies, USC, United States.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Parks, Lisa
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States.
    Farman, Jason
    Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.
    Losh, Elizabeth
    College of William and Mary, United States.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    University of South Carolina, United States.
    Transdisciplinary Collaboration and Translational Media-Making2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 129-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, contributors address the core challenges of collaborating across academic divisions such as humanities and science, bridging academic and community practices, and translating between the diverse stakeholders involved in these projects. Much of the recent research on problem-based collaboration and innovation has noted the value of bringing together teams of people with radically different forms of expertise to solve complex challenges (Johnson 2010; Davidson 2011; Ness 2012). Contributors address a common question asked by academics interested in applied media studies, who don’t know where to begin: how do you find good collaborators in different, perhaps unfamiliar disciplines? Further, once those collaborators are found, how do you overcome the typical siloes of universities structured by departments within divisions like “humanities” and “sciences” to build effective working relationships with your collaborators? How do you translate between fields with radically different training, terminology, and theories of knowledge? What does it take to develop a shared vocabulary?

  • 22.
    Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Rice University, Houston, TX, United States.
    McPherson, Tara
    Sidney Harman Academy of Polymathic Studies, USC, United States.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    University of South Carolina, United States.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Parks, Lisa
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States.
    Farman, Jason
    Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.
    Losh, Elizabeth
    College of William and Mary, United States.
    Hoyt, Eric
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States.
    Balsamo, Anne
    School of Art, Technology, and Emerging Communication, University of Texas at Dallas, United States.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Architectures of Sustainability2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 219-237Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While doing applied media studies generally requires far fewer financial resources than doing applied science, issues of funding and sustainability nonetheless play a significant role in these projects. The multidisciplinary teams assembled to create applied media projects need space, technology, supplies, and human capital to succeed, and the pipelines for securing those resources are particularly limited in the humanities. This chapter asks contributors how they have managed to attain the needed resources for their projects, and what kinds of institutional homes they have found to house them. Further, to cultivate the necessary team members as participants come and go, we discuss what kind of background, training, and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students, as well as faculty members, is needed to do this kind of work.

  • 23.
    Ostherr, Kirsten
    et al.
    Rice University, Houston, TX, United States.
    Parks, Lisa
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Losh, Elizabeth
    College of William and Mary, United States.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    McPherson, Tara
    Sidney Harman Academy of Polymathic Studies, USC, United States.
    Farman, Jason
    Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.
    Cooley, Heidi Rae
    University of South Carolina, United States.
    Hoyt, Eric
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States.
    Pleasures and Perils of Hands-On, Collaborative Work2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 81-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this collaboratively authored chapter, contributors discuss why they do applied media studies, addressing both the great rewards and the significant challenges to shifting away from traditional models of humanistic research and teaching.

  • 24.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    Henriksen, Line
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Developing democratic data practices for heritage organisations2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When new data practices are being deployed at cultural heritage organisations, a new set of apprehensions and insecurities emerge. We invite participants to the interactive session where we employ monsters to explore what is happening with data practices in cultural heritage organisations. The participants will confront/get to know their data monsters through interactive exercises: depicting the monster, naming the monster and addressing the monster.

    As contemporary research conceptualizes the agency of technology and data through the figure of the monster, our workshop aims to explore the monstrous aspects of data practices so that we might learn to live (differently) with our monsters. In the three-part exercises, the participants will explore the mutuality of agency in relation to data practices as monsters.

    The workshop is intended for people who are working with data in the cultural heritage organisations – through collections’, management’, visitors’ or other kinds of data. In this workshop, we will experiment with monster making as a collaborative inquiry into data practices. Data and activities around it are often very elusive, and we hope that after the workshop, participants will be better aware of their own ideas about data practices or will be equipped to conduct a similar workshop at their home institution with concerned and wary colleagues to discuss data monsters and their care.

  • 25.
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Transforming the Urban Envrironment: Media Interventions, Accountability and Agonism2018In: Applied Media Studies: theory and practice / [ed] Kirsten Ostherr, Routledge, 2018, p. 203-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The media landscape has changed tremendously. New companies—Apple, Google, Facebook, and so on—have entered the landscape, reshaping it from the ground, and disrupting the business models of the traditional media companies. Media as such are increasingly being designed, produced and consumed collaboratively. And as evidenced in the Internet of Things discourse, more and more objects become media.

  • 26.
    Romic, Bojana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Negotiating anthropomorphism in the Ai-Da robot2022In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 14, p. 2083-2093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central interest of this paper is the anthropomorphic social robot Ai-Da (Aidan Meller Gallery/Oxford University), perceived as an actor in the interplay of cultural and representational gestures. These gestures determine how this robot is presented—that is, how its activities are articulated, interpreted and promoted. This paper criticises the use of a transhistorical discourse in the presentational strategies around this robot, since this discourse reinforces the so-called “myth of a machine”. The discussion focuses on the individuation and embodiment of this drawing robot. It is argued that the choice to provide Ai-Da with an evocative silicone face, coupled with an anthropomorphic body, is a socio-political decision that shapes public imaginaries about social robots in general.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Romic-AI-Da-robot
  • 27.
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    En infrastruktur för utökad delaktighet i hållbar stadsutveckling: Ett förslag till ett ramverk och möjliga organisatoriska upplägg för att främja gemensamt lärande och mångfald i delaktighetsprocesser i hållbar stadsutveckling.2019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den föreliggande rapporten beskriver ett förslag som främjar en förståelse, ett organiserande och drivandet av utökade delaktighetsprocesser i hållbar stadsutveckling. Den förser tjänstepersoner som är verksamma inom stadsutveckling med en uppfattning av och vägledning om hur man kan organisera och driva utökade delaktighetsprocesser.

    Förslaget har som mål att inspirera och ge konkret vägledning till tjänstepersoner och stadsförvaltningar som är intresserade av att förbättra deras arbetssätt inom delaktighet för att utveckla mer hållbara och demokratiska städer.

    Mot denna bakgrund fokuserar förslaget på fördelarna med att utöka den nuvarande delaktighetspraxis i stadsutveckling. Framförallt förstärker utökad delaktighet synergierna mellan olika kunskapsformer och perspektiv och detta är nödvändigt om man vill uppnå hållbarhet. Dessutom förstorar utökad delaktighet möjligheterna för en bredare och mera mångfaldig delaktighet, och därmed främjar en mer demokratisk och inkluderande stadsutveckling.

    Rapporten presenterar de underliggande skälen som motiverar verkställandet av delaktighet under planeringen, utvecklingen och förvaltningen av den byggda miljön och för att gå över från konsultativa till mer samarbetsbaserade tillvägagångssätt. Den lyfter vikten i att fokusera på mångfald i delaktighet, vilket innebär att man ser närmare på frågan om och hur olika grupper, kunskapsformer och perspektiv tas upp (eller ej) inom den hållbara stadsutvecklingen.

    Den konkreta vägledningen presenterar ett övergripande ramverk och möjliga organisatoriska upplägg för utökad delaktighet. Ramverket syftar till att förse vägledning i förberedningen, drivandet och utvärderingen av utökade delaktighetsprocesser där olika metoder kan tillämpas. De organisatoriska uppläggen utgör exempel för hur man organiserar utökade delaktighetsprocesser inom förvaltningars ordinarie aktiviteter.

    Vägledningen i detta dokument bygger på lärdomar från olika tidsbegränsade projekt, förvaltningars ordinarie aktiviteter och kommunala utredningar i Malmö samt samtida teoretiska perspektiv på delaktighet. Förhoppningen är att den utgör en grundlig bas för praktisk tillämpning och vidare diskussioner och forskning i framtiden.

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    fulltext
  • 28.
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Infrastructuring urban commons over time: learnings from two cases2018In: Proceedings of the 15th Participatory Design Conference: Full Papers - vol 1, ACM Digital Library, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the understanding of urban commons and how they might be (co)-designed. Insights from two cases are used to articulate how urban commons develop over time and to discuss how the approach of infrastructuring can enable urban commoning on a long-term basis. First, an overview of commons and urban commons is provided with a special focus on communing, as in, the understanding of commons as an ongoing process rather than a stable arrangement. Thereafter, the paper gives an overview of the participatory design community's findings about co-designing commons, with infrastructuring proposed as a possible approach. By looking at the development of two urban commons over time, the paper tentatively presents an understanding of urban commoning. This emerges as a process that entails the exploration, reification, and reworking of collaborative arrangements over time. It is a process that requires transparency and accountability, and its transformative potential in relation to urban governance should be carefully considered. From these findings, the paper suggests that prolonged infrastructuring efforts for urban commons need to: (1) foster the understanding of the temporal and fallible nature of arrangements; (2) support accountability and transparency over time; (3) recognize and address the installed base; and (4) articulate democratic and governance aspects in commoning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 29.
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Reflektioner kring den sammanbindande dimension av kunskapsalliansen: mötet mellan olika yrkesgrupper och representanter för stadens kommunala förvaltningar2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Amiralsstadens Kunskapsallians (KA) kring Barnets rättigheter i stadsutveckling [KA #6] har under hösten 2018 undersökt inkluderingen av barnrättsperspektivet in i stadsplaneringen. En av de två frågeställningar som drev arbetet var hur man främjar en givande dialog mellan Stadsbyggnadskontoret och Förskoleförvaltningen. KA #6 är därmed ett initiativ för att skapa nya kontaktytor och fostra lärande, inte bara längs med den överbryggande (vertikala) dimensionen, utan även längs den sammanbindande (horisontella). Denna reflektion fokuserar främst på den sammanbindande dimensionen, nämligen mötet mellan representanter från olika grupper av yrkesverksamma (s.k. professional communities, eller yrkesgrupper) och från olika kommunala förvaltningar. Reflektionen lyfter fram möjligheter och utmaningar som uppstod i processen. Den lägger även fram förslag om hur dessa identifierade utmaningar kan hanteras framöver. Utmaningarna berör: (1) svårigheter som uppstår när olika yrkesgrupper träffas p.g.a. av deras olika arbetssätt och värderingar; (2) vikten att ta hänsyn i både sätt att jobba och organisatoriska strukturer när det gäller att integrera barnrättsperspektivet in i stadsutveckling.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 30.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ernits, Heiti
    Upadhyaya, Savita
    Innovationslabb för avfallsminimering2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report sums up the results of the project ILA , an innovation lab for waste minimization. The project aimed at developing a lab, i.e. a process and an organizational model, to support the development of new waste services aiming towards waste prevention. In order to do so representatives and managers of the three units of VA SYD’s waste department have been involved. Their input has been integrated with learnings from the city of Borås (who has been addressing similar challenges) and research about innovation in the public sector. The project has been firstly identified and articulated current challenges in relation to the development of new services. Starting from these challenges a proposal for an innovation lab has been formulated. The proposal consists of a process and an organizational model. The process is characterized by an iterative and learning nature that allows to deal with the complexity that developing new services might entail. The process is composed by four phase (listening, initiation, experimenting and implementation), which are strongly interwoven to each other. Learning is seen as key throughout the process and it is understood as matter of supporting ongoing evaluation and reflection in order to support adjustments along the way. Support in terms of resources, contact with different functions and mandate are also key throughout the process. The organizational model proposes to have a group responsible for the overall lab and the establishment of specific groups for each development project.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT02
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT03
  • 31.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Selloni, Daniela
    Corubolo, Marta
    Sharing and collaborating in service design2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the track on co-created and/or co-produced collaborative services within different types of organisations, from the public realm, to the private and third sector. We navigate this wide field in the wake of three main interpretations of what collaboration may entail: collaboration as an approach to conceive services, ie co-design, collaboration as way in which services are implemented and delivered, ie co-production, and collaboration as a way to raise awareness about issues of public interest, ie participation and democracy. The various papers submitted to this track are clustered according to these three domains: the part on co-design explores the development of tools and the inclusion of stakeholders, the issue of co-production mainly refers to the empowerment of individuals within professional networks and local communities, while questions of democracy and power relationships highlight the importance to address in future how service design practice for sharing and collaboration intersects and contributes to a larger societal development.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 32.
    Smedberg, Alicia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Kinna, Ruth
    Lang, Miriam
    Degrowth is not utopian, it is happening2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Medea Vox, an academic podcast. Episode 23: In this Medea Vox episode, we discuss degrowth. How can we build societies where economic growth is no longer important? This year, the first of August was the date when we had used more from nature than our planet can renew in the entire year. Are we about to eradicate our own habitats? This conversation between scholars Miriam Lang, Ruth Kinna and Alicia Smedberg explores what needs to be done to avoid it.

    Download full text (mp3)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    Behind the Algorithm2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 34.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    Empowerment as development: An outline of an analytical concept for the study of ICTs in the Global South2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 35.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    Empowerment instead of Development: An outline of an analytical concept for the study of ICTs in the global South2018In: Handbook of Communication for Devlopment and Social Change / [ed] Jan Servaes, Springer, 2018, p. 1-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter turns to the concept of “empowerment” as a result of disenchantment with the concept of “development” in the study of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and social change in the global South. It is a certainty that the proliferation of ICTs (mobile phones in particular) has opened up a range of possibilities and new avenues for individuals, aid agencies, and NGOs. However, overviews of communication supposedly for development reveal a field based on economic understandings of development biased toward techno-determinism. Moreover, these understandings lack sufficient critique and do not take larger contextual factors into account. Therefore, it is argued that empowerment is a better concept to draw upon in the critical study of ICTs and social change. However, empowerment is not an easy concept to define, and no analytical outline of the concept has been found in the existing body of literature. Addressing this lack, this chapter will trace the roots of empowerment in community psychology and in feminist and black power movements as well as explore different understandings of the concept from various disciplines. From this overview, the chapter suggests that empowerment should be studied on a) an intersectional level, b) a contextual level, c) an agency level, and d) a technological level. It further argues that these four levels intersect and must be studied in tandem to understand whether processes of empowerment are taking place, and if so, in what ways? The chapter ends by shortly applying these levels to a study involving market women’s use of mobile phones in Kampala.

  • 36.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    Strand, Cecilia
    Accessing sexual minorities in Uganda: an exploration of methodological challenges and ethical considerations2018Conference paper (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 37.
    Romic, Bojana (Researcher, Project director)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Reimer, Bo (Editor)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Rosenqvist, Karolina (Contributor)
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services.
    Topgaard, Richard (Editor)
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Artificial Creativity2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Artificial Creativity virtual conference aimed to stir a discussion about the cultural, societal and ethical aspects of artworks featuring artificial intelligence or robots engaged in creative production. The conference dates were 19–20 November 2020 and it was hosted by the research lab Medea, the School of Arts and Communication, and the Data Society research programme – all at Malmö University, Sweden. The conference received generous support from Riksbankens Jubileumsfond.

    Videos of keynotes and some participant presentations are available through Malmö University's video repository, MaU Play: https://play.mau.se/playlist/details/0_dvsr6i1f

    Keynote speakers:

    • Dr. habil. Andreas Broeckmann (Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany). "Robots versus Machines".
    • Professor Mark Amerika (University of Colorado, US). "Fatal Error: Artificial Creative Intelligence (ACI)".
    • Professor Joanna Zylinska (Goldsmiths University, UK). "Beyond Machine Vision: How to Build a Non-Trivial Perception Machine".

    Participants:

    • Arandas, Luís, Mick Grierson, and Miguel Carvalhais. "Continuous Contributions of Artificial Agents in Performance Regarding Static Artefacts".
    • Ashton, Daniel. "Assembling Creative Work Futures: Automation and Portfolio Working in the Creative Economy".
    • Axhamn, Johan. "EU Copyright Law and AI".
    • Balfour, Lindsay. "Beauty is in the Eye of the Algorithm: Artificially Intelligent Creativity and its Ethical Implications".
    • Carvalhais, Miguel and Rosemary Lee. "Spectral and Procedural: A Perspective on Artificial Creativity Through Computational Art".
    • Chia, Aleena. "Agency and Automation in Digital Game Production".
    • Chow, Pei-Sze. "Ghost in the (Hollywood) machine: emergent applications of artificial intelligence in the film industry".
    • Coelho, Inês Rebanda. "Authorship of fictional texts generated by AI".
    • Feher, Katalin. "Narrow AI results in narrow creativity: Concepts of creative process in a decade’s perspective from media to art".
    • Gallagher, Brad. "Do GPT-2s Dream of Electric Poetry?"
    • Goddard, Valentine. "Art can shape how AI is governed".
    • Ivanova, Nevena. "Computational Creativity: A Philosophical Study".
    • Kadish, David. "Designing Endemic Robots: An Experiment in Sound".
    • Koh, Immanuel. "AI-Urban-Sketching in the Age of COVID-19".
    • Leach, Neil. "AI and The Limits of Human Creativity".
    • Maraffi, Christopher. "Sherlock Frankenstein: Transmedia Character Design with AI Breeding Tools".
    • McGarrigle, Conor. "Art Washing Machine Learning".
    • Muia, Julian. "Downstream: New Developments in Algorithmic Composition and Music Streaming".
    • Olszewska, Anna. "Reflections on machine situationism".
    • Stephensen, Jan Løhmann. "Artificial Creativity, Anthropocentrism and Post-Creativity – The Political Stakes".
    • Trillo, Roberto Alonso, Peter Nelson, Daniel Shanken, François Mouillot, Mathis Antony, Ryan Au, and Maya Duan. "Collaborative Artistic Production Using Generative Adversarial Networks".
    • Wagman, Kelly B. "Ambii: An Ambient & Non-Anthropomorphic Digital Assistant".
    • Wasielewski, Amanda. "What role can AI play in the creation and study of art?"
    • Wellner, Galit. "Layers of Imagination".
    • Willcox, Stacey. "Artificial Synaesthesia: An exploration of machine learning image synthesis for soundscape audio visualisation".

    The conference also featured a virtual exhibition in Mozilla's Hubs with the following presentations:

    • Emard, Justine. "Supraorganism"
    • Partadiredja, Reza Arkan, Davor Ljubenkov, and Carlos Alejandro Entrena Serrano. "AI or Human?"
    • Goddard, Valentine. "Introducing the 'AI on a Social Mission' conference".

    The virtual exhibition was produced by Maria Engberg and Jay David Bolter within the research project "Virtual conferencing to promote research and scholarly exchange during the current pandemic and possible future disruptions".

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