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  • 1. Agger Eriksen, Mette
    et al.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Foregrounding Learning in Infrastructuring: to Change Worldviews and Practices in the Public Sector2020Inngår i: Proceedings of the Participatory Design Conference, ACM Digital Library, 2020, Vol. 1, s. 182-192Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutual learning and infrastructuring are two core concepts in Participatory Design (PD), but the relation between them has yet to be explored. In this article, we foreground learning in infrastructuring processes aimed at change in the public sector. Star and Ruhleder’s (1996) framework for first, second, and third level issues is applied as a fruitful way to stage and analyze learning in such processes. The argument is developed through the insights that arose from a 4-year-long infrastructuring process about future library practices. Framed as Co-Labs this process was organized by researchers and officers from the local regional office. This led to adjusted roles for both PD researchers and civil servants working with materials at the operational and strategic levels. The case shows how learning led to profound changes in the regional public sector in the form of less bureaucratic and more participatory experimental and learning-focused worldviews and practices.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 2. Avram, Gabriela
    et al.
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    De Paoli, Stefano
    Light, Ann
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Lyle, Peter
    Teli, Maurizio
    Repositioning CoDesign in the age of platform capitalism: from sharing to caring2019Inngår i: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 185-191Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 3.
    Baroncelli Torretta, Nicholas
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Reitsma, Lizette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Nair van Ryneveld, Tara
    Lund Universitet.
    Hansen, Anne-Marie
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Castillo Muñoz, Yénika
    Independent Researcher.
    Pluriversal Spaces for Decolonizing Design: Exploring Decolonial Directions for Participatory Design2022Inngår i: Design, Oppression, and Liberation, Vol. 22, nr 2, s. 3-18, artikkel-id 8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Decolonization is a situated effort as it relates to the relations of privilege, power, politics, and access (3P-A, in Albarrán González’s terms) between the people involved in design in relation to wider societies. This complexity creates certain challenges for how we can understand, learn about, and nurture decolonization in design towards pluriversality, since such decolonizing effort is based on the relationship between specific individuals and the collective. In this paper, we present and discuss the ‘River project’, a participatory space for decolonizing design, created for designers and practitioners to reflect on their own 3P-A as a way to create awareness of their own oppressive potential in design work. These joint reflections challenged ideas of participation and shaped learning processes between the participants, bringing to the foreground the importance of seeing and allowing for a plurality of life and work worlds to be brought together. We build on the learnings from this project to propose the notions of pluriversal participation, pluriversal presence, and pluriversal directionality, which can help nurture decolonizing designs towards pluriversality. We conclude by arguing that, for nurturing pluriversality through Participatory Design, participation, presence, and direction must be equally pluriversal.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Bjärstorp, Sara
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Live Action Role Playing and Engagement with Literature2023Inngår i: The Routledge Companion to Literary Media / [ed] Astrid Ensslin; Julia Round; Bronwen Thomas, Routledge, 2023, 1, s. 502-512Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital age has seen an unprecedented proliferation of literary content across different media, involving different audiences. As a consequence of this, scholars are directing their attention to how literature lives on beyond the book. While much of this research focuses on forms of intermediality, less attention has been given to embodied, participatory and interactive practices where literature is used in a variety of ways. In this chapter, we will discuss what happens to literature when it is used in physical, collaborative gameplay, focusing on live action role playing (larp), specifically larps in the Nordic tradition.

    Since larp is located at the intersection of a number of different cultural expressions, we draw on scholarly work on gaming, performance, adaptation and participatory culture to discuss how literary material is used in three different larps, at which we have carried out fieldwork. Fortune and Felicity (2017) engaged with all of Jane Austen’s work, taking place over five days in period costume and setting. Located at the actual Elsinore Castle, Inside Hamlet (2017) adapted Shakespeare’s play to a revolutionary, decadent context. Using Thomas Vinterberg’s film The Celebration as the frame story, A Nice Evening With the Family (2018) thematised bourgeois family trauma through the use of a number of nineteenth-century Scandinavian plays, like Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House.

    Although thematically diverse, these larps raise common questions: What happens when a literary storyworld is materialised in embodied practices such as live action role playing? How can the unfolding story be understood collectively and individually and what storytelling mechanisms are used? What does it feel like to embody characters and actions from a work of fiction? By addressing these questions, this chapter highlights the intricate relation between literature and its collective embodiment in larp.

  • 5.
    Bjärstorp, Sara
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Live-action role-playing and the affordances of social media2023Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 66-87Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Live-action role-playing (larp) is characterized by participants’ physical and mental immersion in a storyworld, played out in a specific location during a fixed period of time. Most of the immersion is realized during the live event itself, where a collective story is acted out in physical space in real time. However, contemporary larping also usually entails significant interaction and communication between players, and between players and organisers, before and after the event itself, through digital media. In this article, we explore the social media afterlife of one of the most significant Nordic larp events in recent years, Fortune and Felicity (2017). Using an affordance framework, we discuss what happens to the “liveness” of the larp when it is extended into social media. Through the affordances of persistence, visibility, editability and associability, we analyse material from the Facebook group connected to Fortune and Felicity, used by players and organisers to prepare for the larp and, afterwards, to continue the gameplay and to de-brief. In social media, the continuum of time and space, which is characteristic of the larp event itself, is changed into asynchronous and physically separate player action. Thus, the affordances of social media, we argue, enable player interaction and collaborative storytelling in ways that change the narrative, interactive and immersive dynamics of the larp.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Planas, Núria
    Autonomous University, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Svensson Källberg, Petra
    Malmö universitet, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching. Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Onto/Epistemic Violence and Dialogicality in Translanguaging Practices Across Multilingual Mathematics Classrooms2022Inngår i: Teachers College record (1970), ISSN 0161-4681, E-ISSN 1467-9620, Vol. 124, nr 5, s. 108-126Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The focus on translanguaging practices in multilingual classrooms canbe seen, by and large, as responding to risks of violence entailed in diverse contextsof language use, including the teaching and learning of mathematics. However, thepractice of translanguaging alone cannot counteract the hegemonic authority ofmonolingual and monologic curricula being present through interactions amongteachers, students, and researchers, as well as material resources.Purpose: Drawing on Bakhtin’s philosophy of language, we discuss dialogicalityas a critical and democratic organizing principle for the pervasive polyphony thatcharacterizes every utterance constituting heteroglossia. Dialogicality reconstitutesour relation to language through the “other” and the need to see any utterance as anonteleological process among subjects and objects. As such, the aim is to explorehow acts of dialogicality may address the potential risks of onto/epistemic violence intranslanguaging practices. Focusing on either emergent or orchestrated translanguagingin three European states: Greece, Catalonia and Sweden, we discuss how dialogicalityallows for alternative accounts of language use in complex classroom events.Method: Methodologically, we start by encountering the sociopolitical contextof monolingual and monologic curricula in Europe, where the three cases wetheorize take place, along with our considerations for dialogicality in the realm oftranslanguaging. Our theorizing-in-practice unfolds a double effort in reading. First,what can we read today as risks of onto/epistemic violence in each of these cases?1Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden2Autonomous University, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain3Malmö University, Malmö, SwedenCorresponding Author:Anna Chronaki, Malmö University, Skåne County, Malmö 205 06, Sweden.Email: anna.chronaki@mau.se1104040TCZXXX10.1177/01614681221104040Teachers College RecordChronaki et al.research-article2022  Chronaki et al. 109And second, what is the potential of dialogic translanguaging across the cases andwithin the boundaries of state monolingual policy and monologic discursive cultureof school mathematics?Findings: The present article contributes by discussing dialogicality as a relationalonto/epistemology toward addressing translanguaging practices. Concerning thefirst question, our theorizing-in-practice shares evidence of the inevitable presenceof onto/epistemic violence in every utterance. The limited scope of a crudemathematisation process through language appears continuously in mathematicsclassrooms, serving to place either the object or the subject into fixed narratives.Regarding the second question, our dialogical reading of translanguaging denotes theimportance of the importance of minor responding(s) to such moments of violentrisk. We understand them as “cracks” in the authoritative status of monolingual andmonologic mathematics curricula; we argue that such minor, yet crucial, cracks areof great significance for creating acts of dialogicality from “below,” disrupting thehegemonic authority of an assumed neutral mathematical language.Conclusions/Recommendations: The risk of onto/epistemic violence is inevitablein any discursive and embodied encounter in multilingual mathematics classrooms,including the translanguaging practices. The study suggests that acts of dialogicalitybecome minor responses to violence in ways that both counteract oppressivemonologic discourse and open toward a relational onto/epistemology withmathematics, children, teachers, material resources, and researchers. Rememberinghow Bakhtin insisted that “language is never unitary” and “dialogue” is not a panacea,we emphasize the need for a continuous focus on creating acts of dialogicality withlanguage and discourse.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Marxism and Human Rights against Capitalism2022Inngår i: Encyclopaedia of Marxism and Education / [ed] Maisuria, Alpesh, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2022, s. 435-452Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses Marxism and its relationship to human rights in a contemporary context. Our main argument is that universal human rights, as formulated, e.g., in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), cannot be fully realised under capitalism, but that a politics defending and promoting such rights has the potential to contribute to the advancement of internationalist, working class politics furthering political emancipation within the current order, and even to contribute to a socialist critique of the capitalist mode of production aiming for human emancipation.

  • 8.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    University of Sussex, UK.
    Future public policy and its knowledge base: Shaping worldviews through counterfactual world-making2020Inngår i: Policy Design and Practice, E-ISSN 2574-1292, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 109-122Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in diverse areas such as climate change, happiness and wellbeing emphasizes the need for transformative change, stressing the importance of rethinking established values, goals and paradigms prevailing among civil servants, policy- and decision makers. In this paper, we discuss a role that design can play in this, especially how processes of counterfactual world-making can help facilitate reflection on worldviews and the shape of future forms of governance. By exploring different presents, rather than conditions in the future, this approach allows civil servants to consider, create and resist playful alternatives to business-as-usual. In this way, we demonstrate how design can stimulate imagination both as to futures and people’s role in shaping these futures.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Annet (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Holmberg, Lars
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Mapping Knowledge Representations to Concepts: A Review and New Perspectives2022Inngår i: Explainable Agency in Artificial Intelligence Workshop Proceedings, 2022, s. 61-70Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of neural networks builds to a large extent on their ability to create internal knowledge representations from real-world high-dimensional data, such as images, sound, or text. Approaches to extract and present these representations, in order to explain the neural network's decisions, is an active and multifaceted research field. To gain a deeper understanding of a central aspect of this field, we have performed a targeted review focusing on research that aims to associate internal representations with human understandable concepts. In doing this, we added a perspective on the existing research by using primarily deductive nomological explanations as a proposed taxonomy. We find this taxonomy and theories of causality, useful for understanding what can be expected, and not expected, from neural network explanations. The analysis additionally uncovers an ambiguity in the reviewed literature related to the goal of model explainability; is it understanding the ML model or, is it actionable explanations useful in the deployment domain? 

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Jönsson, Li
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Narrating ecological grief and hope through reproduction and translations2022Inngår i: DRS2022: Bilbao, 25thJune - 1st July, Bilbao, Spain, Design Research Society / [ed] Lockton, D. ; Lenzi, S. ; Hekkert, P. ; Oak, A.; Sádaba, J.; Lloyd, P., Bilbao: Design Research Society, 2022, s. 68-68Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government has decided that Sweden will become carbon neutral by 2045. What are the implications for us as citizens in such a transition? What formats allow us to favour careful transformation over progress through radical innovation? In this paper, we attempt to understand grief and hope in the context of this transition. We describe a designerly format of re-production and translation aimed at collectively working through potential future changes, uncertainties and loss. Influenced by plaster moulding techniques used at a closed-down pottery, we invite participants to reproduce and translate original animal and plant motifs into present circumstances. These practical hands-on engagements allow us to notice and articulate change in relation to the past and orient ourselves towards uncertain futures. Hope can be found in the ruins of industries, in locally produced alternative energies and in small-scale attempts to undo biodiversity loss.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Jönsson, Li
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Lindkvist, Christina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US).
    Larsen, Jonas
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Grief and Hope in Transition: An orienteering guide2023Bok (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    In the project Grief and Hope in Transition, our approach to transition has been one of reorientation, a departure from the belief in new technologies as the solution to all kinds of problems, an attempt at deviation from modernity’s familiar territories and road maps. Together with people living in different rural areas in Sweden’s southern most landscape Scania, we formed a study group in future orienteering.

    This book is an outcome of the collaborative work done to explore how to transition into becoming fossil-free and how to let go of optimism that places agency elsewhere (such as in others' roadmaps and tech-fixes). It describes how we through designerly ways have addressed the challenge of how to restore a sense of attachments and commitment to the unfolding of the future.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Jönsson, Li
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linneaus University.
    The thickening of futures2021Inngår i: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 134, artikkel-id 102850Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with biodiversity loss. In particular, it focuses on observations and scientific facts: the decline of pollinators and what that entails for the co-living of humans and more-than-humans. This kind of work often reaches the publics as thin stories of limited futures.

    The article explores how to situate the issue of out-of-sync plant–pollinator relationships into thick, ongoing presents rather than as a distant future that is out of one’s own hands. This is done through a collaborative design project that experiments with various formats for staging more material, embodied and experiential ways to sensitise and invite humans to experience the issue of pollination. We therefore explore and give an account of how we have situated the issues in a thick, ongoing present as an anticipatory practice. We thus suggest a practice that becomes both sticky and sweaty; in addition, the practice moves some pollination facts into not only matters of concern but also matters of care.

    In doing so, we forward the role that design researchers can play in environmental and collaborative anticipation by engaging with emerging approaches to both biodiversity loss and collaborative future-making that are simultaneously conflicting and harsh as well as hopeful.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14. Lagerkvist, Amanda
    Bothering the binaries: unruly AI futures of hauntings and hope at the limit2023Inngår i: Handbook of Critical Studies of Artificial Intelligence / [ed] Lindgren, Simon, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, s. 199-208Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AI is not only a technology but also a powerful story about the latent future present. This narrative assemblage is visible across domains of industry, policy, academia, and debate. Characteristically, it bifurcates into binaries of possibility versus risk, augmentation versus replacement, and so on. This calls for a renewed critique. In this chapter, we argue for the importance of bothering these binaries by re-thinking AI as anticipatory existential media that allows for the unexpected, the impredicative, and the uncanny. Three voices from the continental tradition of philosophy offer possibilities for pluralizing the AI imaginary. Jaspers’ existentiality brings the reality of the vulnerabilities of the present digital limit situation to the fore, requiring response; Derrida’s hauntings allow the past to return as friendly and wise ghosts; and Bloch’s hopefulness challenges the inevitability of the processes at hand. Together, they allow us to reimagine more unruly AI futures in fruitful and urgent ways.

  • 15.
    Latva-Somppi, Riikka
    et al.
    Aalto University.
    Mäkelä, Maarit
    Aalto University.
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University.
    Entangled Materialities: Caring for soil communities at glass industry sites2021Inngår i: FORMakademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, E-ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 1-14Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses craft and design practices through their impact on the environment. We consider how to act concerning the consequences of the craft and design industry. Also, we reflect on the agency of our field of practice in changing how we perceive the environment. We present three case studies of the European glass industry sites in Sweden, Italy and Finland, where we study contamination of the soil with participatory, speculative and craft methods. Through these cases, we reflect on our role in soil communities and ask how we may act in them with responsibility, hope and care. We conclude by proposing to act locally, to share our practices and make them visible, expanding our situated, personal skills and knowledge towards the political.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Light, Ann
    et al.
    University of Sussex, UK .
    Gray, Collin M
    Purdue University, USA .
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Forlano, Laura
    Illinois Institute of Technology, USA .
    Lockton, Dan
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Speed, Chris
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Designing transformative futures2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    What makes the design of futures sufficiently transformative? Worldwide, people are aware of the need to change and keep changing to address eco-social challenges and their fall-out in an age of crises and transitions in climate, biodiversity, and health. Calls for climate justice and the development of eco-social sensibilities speak to the need for dynamic and provisional engagements. Such concerns raise age-old issues of inequality and colonialist destruction. Our designs carry the imprint of this current politics, wittingly or unwittingly, into worlds to come. This conversa- tion asked how might we respond fluidly to coming uncertainties, questioning our own practices to sow the seeds of more radical transformation, while recognizing the structural forces that can limit or temper opportunities for design activism. It was or- ganized in three quadrant exercises, which we also reflect upon.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS). Malmö universitet, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Collaboration: Collaborative future-making2021Inngår i: Routledge Handbook of Social Futures / [ed] Carlos Lépes Galviz and Emily Spiers, London and New York: Routledge , 2021, s. 104-116Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter will outline what we label ‘collaborative future-making’ (CFM), which can be understood as an interplay between critical imagination and collaborative engagements in future-making processes. Using critical imagination to break out of (imagined) political and scholarly deadlocks is an important theme within collaborative future-making. Imagining should not be confused, however, with an abstract practice. Instead, critical imagination links directly to forms of participation and engagement. Collaborative engagement concerns how we can work together. At the centre is an ethos of democratizing processes of change, that is, to acknowledge people’s skills and rights to influence their everyday environments. This approach should be understood as a shift from engaging with the future through forecasting to a concern with how critical imagination can challenge basic assumptions, norms and structures to widen the perspectives on what constitutes socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable futures, engaging not only professionals and policymakers, but also citizens and civil society. This chapter presents opportunities in what we call ‘collaborative future-making’, as well as highlighting the potential problems and challenges in collaborating. This critical perspective is illustrated through a series of empirical examples that combines critical perspectives with constructive and collaborative aspects.

  • 18.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Sketching hope and grief in transition: Situating anticipation in lived futures2021Inngår i: Artifact: Journal of Design Practice, E-ISSN 1749-3471, Vol. 8, nr 1-2, s. 17.1-17.22Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of current environmental challenges, it often seems that optimism is a required emotional state for addressing our future. This can be seen in how different technological fixes are assumed to sort our futures out at the same time as requiring minimal change in our daily lives. Moving beyond our existing high-carbon and material lives requires not only that we deal with the optimistic end of the spectrum but also that we envision fragile and uncertain futures. In response, this article proposes a designerly format for supporting public anticipation that attends to and cares for tensions between hope and grief, with the aim of nurturing grounds for living with uncertain futures. In contrast to abstract and decontextualized visions and images of the future that can be hard to relate to, the format situates anticipation in lived futures, that are ongoing, emerging and situated in specific locations, environments and experiences. By tending to anticipated losses related to the transition to a post-carbon future, the workshop format created space for confronting shared difficulties and vulnerabilities. Despite the lack of easy solution, the format also opened up for articulating alternatives and less tech-oriented hopeful engagements and practices.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Lindkvist, Christina
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US).
    Larsen, Jonas
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Sorg och Hopp i Omställning: En Orienteringsguide2023Bok (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 20.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University.
    Caring Design Experiments in the Aftermath2019Inngår i: Proceedings of the 8th Bi-Annual Nordic Design Research Society Conference: Who Cares?, 2019, s. 1-9Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We live in the aftermath of industrial design, which primarily has been guided by a focus on making the new. Through the project Un/Making Soil Communities, carried out where glass production has left pollution in the soil, the authors propose caring design experiments which aim to foster maintenance and repair for livable worlds. In this articulation, the authors draw on democratic design experiments (Binder et al 2015), but propose a shift from gathering around matters-of-concern (Latour 2005) to matters-of-care (Puig de la Bellacasa 2017). Furthermore, caring design experiments also entail engaging with big enough stories (Haraway 2016) through going visiting and continuously crafting invitations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University.
    Living With2020Inngår i: Transmissions: Critical Tactics for Making and Communicating Research / [ed] Kat Jungnickel, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2020, s. 131-151Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 22.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University.
    Un/Making in the Aftermath of Design2020Inngår i: Proceedings of the 16th Participatory Design Conference 2020: Participation(s) Otherwise, ACM Digital Library, 2020, Vol. 1, s. 12-21Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes as its starting point the fact that we live in the aftermath of previous making and design. For participatory design to adequately answer to this aftermath, we suggest building on a combination of participatory and speculative design approaches in everyday life settings and exploring the practice of un/making matters. The paper draws on two cases where participants have been invited to engage with recent scientific findings and practices - one where they explore the practice of un/making plastic waste through composting, and one on un/making polluted soil through plants that can accumulate metals. By not primarily aiming at feeding into new iterations of a design process, there is an openness for speculating beyond the given systems, and to bring into question imaginaries of constant progress, which have been part of generating these lingering matters.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Design, Växjö, Sweden..
    Un/Making the Plastic Straw: Designerly Inquiries into Disposability2023Inngår i: Design and Culture, ISSN 1754-7075, E-ISSN 1754-7083, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 393-415Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes un/making as a designerly response to urgent environmental issues. By focusing on the simultaneous constructive and destructive aspects of design, this effort attempts to challenge design's dominant focus on making new things. The implications and potentialities of un/making are explored through a designerly inquiry into ongoing and emerging attempts to ban the plastic straw. Based on this inquiry, the article proposes an approach to un/making that is driven by speculative, what if questions, informed by the history of the plastic straw: from coming into being to becoming preferable and now emerging as a matter of concern. Through a series of speculative design artifacts, the authors articulate matters at stake in the un/making of the plastic straw. They also show how these matters are a stake in the un/making of disposability as part of a preferable future. Rather than proposing one preferable future, the article highlights the frictions that emerge in un/making.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Institute for Urban Research (IUR).
    Från statarnas ombudsman till turist i prekariatet?: Om arbetarlitterära representationsmodeller2023Inngår i: Samlaren: tidskrift för svensk litteraturvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-6133, E-ISSN 2002-3871, Vol. 144, s. 58-80Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to problematize working-class literature’s biographical representation model, that is, the widespread thought model according to which the political potential of working-class literature is dependent on the authors having a strong biographical connection to the working-class collectives they portray. This problematization, which takes its point of departure in an analysis of the reception of two literary works about the so-called precariat — Anders Teglund’s Cykelbudet [The Bicycle Courier] (2021) and Kristian Lundberg’s Yarden [The Yard] (2009) — is both theoretical and historical. Drawing on the Marxist distinction between class in itself and class for itself, the article argues that the so-called precariat has not developed any common way of life or class conciousness that the authors could share. This is thematized in several contemporary literary depictions of precarious working conditions, which can therefore be read as an implicit criticism of working-class literature’s biographical representation model. The article also demonstrates that this model rests on a false picture of the tradition of working-class literature. Older working-class writers have not always had such a strong biographical anchorage in working-class life worlds as critics and literary researchers usually assume (and as the writers themselves have sometimes claimed). On the other hand, they have often, through their participation in the labor movement and its literary life, had an ideological/political connection to this class. Many of the contemporary authors who depict the so-called precariat also have political connections to the collectives they write about, in the form of involvement in organizations that fight against precarious working conditions. Therefore, the article argues that it can be fruitful to focus more on the ideological partisanship of writers portraying workers than on their biographical anchoring in the life worlds of these collectives.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Från statarnas ombudsman till turist i prekariatet? Om arbetarlitterära representationsmodeller
  • 25.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Marxism Across Media: Characterization and Montage in Variety Artwork's Capital in Manga2019Inngår i: International Journal of Comic Art, ISSN 1531-6793, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 423-438Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I analyze how Marxist thought travels across media boundaries, focusing on characterization and montage, with the point of departure in a manga version of Capital (volume I). These changes can be viewed in terms of corruption, but also in terms of resources. Among other things, the artform of comics makes it possible to reach new audiences, and to connect ideas to new contexts.

  • 26.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Nya sorters arbetarlitteratur2019Inngår i: Klass, ISSN 2002-0546, Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 26-28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Populärvetenskaplig essä om hur en mer inkluderande syn på arbetarlitteraturen kan synliggöra fler erfarenheter av och idéer om klassamhället och fler sätt att gestalta dem konstnärligt.

  • 27.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM).
    Precarity and Class Consciousness in Contemporary Swedish Working-Class Literature2023Inngår i: Humanities, E-ISSN 2076-0787, Vol. 12, nr 2, artikkel-id 28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses aesthetical-political strategies for the promotion of class consciousness among workers in a few examples of contemporary Swedish working-class literature from different genres that describe and criticize precarious working conditions. Special attention is given to how these texts engage in dialogue with the notion of the precariat and to the authors' use of decidedly literary forms. One important result is that Swedish working-class writers highlight the heterogeneity among those working under precarious conditions while also arguing that they share certain economic conditions, both amongst each other and with members of other groups (especially the traditional working class). Furthermore, it is argued that the use of literary forms (as opposed to, e.g., reportage or documentary) reflects the absence in the precariat of class consciousness, and the authors' belief that literature can contribute to the creation of such a consciousness.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS). Malmö universitet, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    A joke on precision? Revisiting “precision” in the school mathematics discourse2020Inngår i: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 104, s. 369-384Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the place of precision in mathematics education by exploring its role in curricular guidelines and in classroom life. By means of a joke on precision delivered by a school student in South Sweden, our study focuses on student participation in mathematical tasks that require precision in processes of measuring and reasoning. The paper uses theories on humour and inferentialism to revisit the normative place of “precision” in mathematics classroom discourse.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Sandelin, Erik
    et al.
    Konstfack, University of Arts, Craft and Design.
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    After the Revolution: Prototyping Post-Speciesist Futures2019Inngår i: Rethinking revolution: Nonhuman animals, antispeciesism, and power, 2019, s. 92-92Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    What could a post-speciesist world be like?

    Critical Animal Studies activists and scholars have developed convincing counter-arguments to speciesism and animal oppression. These arguments are continuously developed and reshaped through contributions from fields like gender studies, postcolonialism, environmental humanities, and philosophy. This broad range of approaches makes for an diverse and growing body of knowledge on the systematic discrimination, exploitation, and oppression of nonhuman animals, not least regarding the treatment of animals today and in the past. We argue, however, that this knowledge production is significantly more sporadic when it comes to constructive proposals of less speciesist futures. Where are the snapshots from potential futures, and alternative presents, where human-animal relations are radically reconfigured?

    We suggest that in working towards an anti-speciesist revolution we need to also be able to imagine what living in a post-speciesist society could be like; and explore creative tactics for bringing these material propositions into being.

    These kinds of speculations and constructions of scenarios involve future-oriented contributions from fields such as the arts, design, literature, architecture, and speculative philosophy. In other words, domains that are engaged with envisioning, prototyping, and rehearsing potential futures and alternative presents. In this paper, we discuss a number of works that in different ways materialise reconfigured relations between humans and other species. Examples include utopian artworks by Hartmut Kievert, Ursula Le Guin’s ecofeminist stories, as well as our own design projects on sketching already existing post-speciesist animal-human encounters and redesigning recreational fishing practices. We discuss what tactics are employed by the creators and how their designerly approaches might help in generating new ideas about possible futures. We also introduce and reflect on tools and practices from the design disciplines, such as sketching, prototyping, and design fiction that can be of use for CAS scholar-activists.

    Importantly, an affirmative approach of imagining post-speciesist futures does not come without risk. It can be argued that constructive, at times hopeful, projects distract from militating against the currently dim situation that billions of animals face daily. It can also be argued that we are nowhere near attaining a world that can be considered hopeful for most animals on our planet. Shouldn’t we focus on bringing about the revolution before speculating on its aftermath?

    We argue that research and activism against speciesism ought to be complemented by constructive scenarios for post-speciesist futures. We seek to contribute to the field of Critical Animal Studies by calling for and articulating a stronger speculative and imaginative strand of CAS, without blunting the urgency and critical edge of the field.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Medea.
    En infrastruktur för utökad delaktighet i hållbar stadsutveckling: Ett förslag till ett ramverk och möjliga organisatoriska upplägg för att främja gemensamt lärande och mångfald i delaktighetsprocesser i hållbar stadsutveckling.2019Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den föreliggande rapporten beskriver ett förslag som främjar en förståelse, ett organiserande och drivandet av utökade delaktighetsprocesser i hållbar stadsutveckling. Den förser tjänstepersoner som är verksamma inom stadsutveckling med en uppfattning av och vägledning om hur man kan organisera och driva utökade delaktighetsprocesser.

    Förslaget har som mål att inspirera och ge konkret vägledning till tjänstepersoner och stadsförvaltningar som är intresserade av att förbättra deras arbetssätt inom delaktighet för att utveckla mer hållbara och demokratiska städer.

    Mot denna bakgrund fokuserar förslaget på fördelarna med att utöka den nuvarande delaktighetspraxis i stadsutveckling. Framförallt förstärker utökad delaktighet synergierna mellan olika kunskapsformer och perspektiv och detta är nödvändigt om man vill uppnå hållbarhet. Dessutom förstorar utökad delaktighet möjligheterna för en bredare och mera mångfaldig delaktighet, och därmed främjar en mer demokratisk och inkluderande stadsutveckling.

    Rapporten presenterar de underliggande skälen som motiverar verkställandet av delaktighet under planeringen, utvecklingen och förvaltningen av den byggda miljön och för att gå över från konsultativa till mer samarbetsbaserade tillvägagångssätt. Den lyfter vikten i att fokusera på mångfald i delaktighet, vilket innebär att man ser närmare på frågan om och hur olika grupper, kunskapsformer och perspektiv tas upp (eller ej) inom den hållbara stadsutvecklingen.

    Den konkreta vägledningen presenterar ett övergripande ramverk och möjliga organisatoriska upplägg för utökad delaktighet. Ramverket syftar till att förse vägledning i förberedningen, drivandet och utvärderingen av utökade delaktighetsprocesser där olika metoder kan tillämpas. De organisatoriska uppläggen utgör exempel för hur man organiserar utökade delaktighetsprocesser inom förvaltningars ordinarie aktiviteter.

    Vägledningen i detta dokument bygger på lärdomar från olika tidsbegränsade projekt, förvaltningars ordinarie aktiviteter och kommunala utredningar i Malmö samt samtida teoretiska perspektiv på delaktighet. Förhoppningen är att den utgör en grundlig bas för praktisk tillämpning och vidare diskussioner och forskning i framtiden.

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  • 31.
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Medea.
    Reflektioner kring den sammanbindande dimension av kunskapsalliansen: mötet mellan olika yrkesgrupper och representanter för stadens kommunala förvaltningar2019Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Amiralsstadens Kunskapsallians (KA) kring Barnets rättigheter i stadsutveckling [KA #6] har under hösten 2018 undersökt inkluderingen av barnrättsperspektivet in i stadsplaneringen. En av de två frågeställningar som drev arbetet var hur man främjar en givande dialog mellan Stadsbyggnadskontoret och Förskoleförvaltningen. KA #6 är därmed ett initiativ för att skapa nya kontaktytor och fostra lärande, inte bara längs med den överbryggande (vertikala) dimensionen, utan även längs den sammanbindande (horisontella). Denna reflektion fokuserar främst på den sammanbindande dimensionen, nämligen mötet mellan representanter från olika grupper av yrkesverksamma (s.k. professional communities, eller yrkesgrupper) och från olika kommunala förvaltningar. Reflektionen lyfter fram möjligheter och utmaningar som uppstod i processen. Den lägger även fram förslag om hur dessa identifierade utmaningar kan hanteras framöver. Utmaningarna berör: (1) svårigheter som uppstår när olika yrkesgrupper träffas p.g.a. av deras olika arbetssätt och värderingar; (2) vikten att ta hänsyn i både sätt att jobba och organisatoriska strukturer när det gäller att integrera barnrättsperspektivet in i stadsutveckling.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 32.
    Seravalli, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US). Malmö universitet, Centrum för tillämpad arbetslivsforskning och utvärdering (CTA).
    (Service) Design and organizational change: balancing with translation objects2021Inngår i: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 73-86Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the further understanding of how (service) design can engage with organisational change. It does so by applying translation theory and building on the insights from a 7-year-long collaboration with a public agency, during which three attempts at introducing new ways of working were carried out. Translation theory understands organisational change as an intentional and contingent process through which ideas are materialised in possible translation objects that intervene in organisational practices, structures, and assumptions. The longitudinal study highlights how to bring about change, translation processes, and the objects needed to balance the reproduction and challenging of existing practices, structures, and assumptions within organisations. Moreover, translation processes interact with existing power dynamics, which cause reactions to change interventions by, among other things, influencing the legitimacy and mandate of the processes. Therefore, in addition to the mobilisation of internal organisational knowledge, (service) design that engages with organisational change needs to be aware of both power dynamics and to develop approaches and sensibilities to be able to listen and respond to the consequences that interventions in these dynamics might create. 

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    fulltext
  • 33.
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Imagining Multispecies Worlds2020Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    It can be considered the most systemic, deadly, and all-encompassing form of institutional violence that currently exists: speciesism, the oppression and exploitation of other animals. For most people on our planet, speciesism is something completely normalized, justified, and encouraged through many facets of dominant cultures. The field of critical/political animal studies, and other fields that challenge anthropocentrism, have already thoroughly problematized, questioned, and analyzed speciesist practices, but one topic receives little academic attention: what can a counter-concept to speciesism contain, without saying what it is not?

    This thesis is concerned with imagining ‘multispecies worldings’, with the goal to construct positive rather than negative aspects of a counter-concept to speciesism. Instead of offering a single answer, this work illustrates how additive knowledges regarding the possible meanings of ‘multispecies worlding’ make worlds richer. These knowledges emerge through a repertoire of world-making practices with other animals in which we recognize and engage with the ability to respond to each other.

    Thereby, this thesis answers to – and builds on – various scholarly and activist discourses, including posthumanism, welfarism, animal liberationism, and is theoretically grounded in feminist epistemologies. With a focus on negotiating possibilities, this dissertation is also a work of interaction design. The design practice involves tracing and negotiating multispecies responses with other animals and expressing those narratives as a design research program. These responses are presented as a Multispecies Bestiary, in which ten protagonist animals guide the reader through a collection of big-enough multispecies stories. The thesis thereby illustrates how humans can – together with other animals – find possible meanings of ‘multispecies worlding’ not as a single (broken) solution, but as ever-expanding directions that can permanently unsettle and unmake the established speciesist order.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Thesis Michelle Westerlaken 2020
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  • 34.
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Telling multispecies worlds: Traces of a counter-concept to speciesism2020Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans are far from the only species who make worlds, and thus make futures; ‘Worlding’ entails an active ontological process that is enacted and embodied by all living beings. It is only when we fully recognise these practices as influential to ecological vulnerability and biodiversity that we can take a less anthropocentric approach to future-making.

    The notion of “multispecies worlding” is coined by Donna Haraway as a practice of articulating the partial connections between all kinds of living entities; who relate, know, and tell stories with and through each other. Rather than telling multispecies worlds at all-encompassing scales, this paper argues (following Haraway) that multispecies futures are inscribed in more situated every-day ways in which living beings already negotiate futures with each other. The notion of ‘multispecies’ here is approached as a counter-concept to ‘speciesism’ and seeks to find traces of worlds that abandon animal oppression and explores the meaning of care in relation to living with other species.

    This paper offers a collection of these traces through presenting annotated illustrations created by the author during a three-year project. These illustrations present a kind of technique for knowing that does not come from standing at a distance and representing something, but rather providing initial different entries into what multispecies worlds can entail. In this practice, we must recognise that other species have been speaking to us all along and that we learn about them in worlding practices that are partly told by them.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Centrum för tillämpad arbetslivsforskning och utvärdering (CTA).
    Entrapment Between Narratives: The Millennial Voice and Degendering Organi-zational Resilience2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 1, s. 1-14, artikkel-id 620903Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Covid-19 pandemic pushes organizations to innovate, adapt, and be responsive to new conditions. These demands are exacerbated as organizations respond to the triple sustainability challenge of social and environmental issues alongside economic recovery. These combined factors highlight the need for an inclusive definition of organizational resilience, the increased agility to adapt, learn, and transform to rapidlyshifting external and internal conditions. This paper explores a gendered perspective of organizational resilience and the implications for degendering the concept to incorporate masculine and feminine constructs equally valuable to the theory and practices oforganizational resilience during times of crisis. Viewing the organizational demands of crisis and the expectations of the millennial workforce through the degendering lens elucidates conceptualizations of gender constructions and power that limit inclusivepractices and processes of organizational resilience. Data was used from focus groups of men and women between the ages of 21–35 (millennials) who have experience in the workplace and a shared knowledge of sustainability including social aspects of gender equity and inclusion. The Degendering Organizational Resilience model (DOR) was used for analysis to reveal barriers to inclusive, resilient organizational practices.The data was organized according to the three aspects of the DOR, power structures, gendering practices, and language. A unique contribution of this study is that it explores a cross-cultural gender perspective of organizational resilience focused on a specific cohortgroup, the millennials. Based on the findings three organizational recommendations for practice were identified. These include recommendations for policies and practices that deconstruct inequitable practices and co-create more agile structures, practices, and narratives for sustainable and resilient organizations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Yoo, Daisy
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Bekker, Tilde
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Dalsgaard, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Aaarhus University, Denmark.
    Fougt Skov, Simon
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Frauenberger, Christopher
    University of Salzburg, Austria.
    Friedman, Batya
    University of Washington, USA.
    Giaccardi, Elisa
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Hansen, Anne-Marie
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3). University of Sussex.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Wakkary, Ron
    Simon Fraser University, Canada; Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University; Chalmers University of Technology.
    More-Than-Human Perspectives and Values in Human-Computer Interaction2023Inngår i: CHI EA '23: Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] Albrecht Schmidt; Kaisa Väänänen; Tesh Goyal; Per Ola Kristensson; Anicia Peters, ACM Digital Library, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, s. 1-3, artikkel-id 516Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this special interest group (SIG) we invite researchers, practitioners, and educators to share their perspectives and experiences on the expansion of human-centred perspective to more-than-human design orientation in human-computer interaction (HCI). This design for and with more-than-human perspectives and values cover a range of fields and topics, and comes with unique design opportunities and challenges. In this SIG, we propose a forum for exchange of concrete experiences and a range of perspectives, and to facilitate reflective discussions and the identification of possible future paths.

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    fulltext
  • 37.
    Ödmo, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    Boistrup, Lisa Björklund
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för naturvetenskap, matematik och samhälle (NMS).
    A teacher education course on climate change and critical mathematics education2023Inngår i: Mathematics Education and the Socio-EcologicalICMI Symposium 20th March 2023, ICMI , 2023, s. 74-76Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we discuss the possible controversies faced by both a teacher and student-teachers when Critical Mathematics Education (CME) and climate change are being brought into a specific teaching setting, part of a teacher education program at a large university in Sweden. Driven by core ideas of CME, mathematics has been conceived as a formatting power for articulating issues of climate change (Coles et al. 2013). Mathematics can, potentially, change how such socio-ecological problems are perceived and formatted as solvable, predictable and so forth. In the particular case of teaching statistics, the teacher has to make certain choices concerning what data to look at since the particular data might suggest certain description or, solutions at the expense of others. In parallel, the teacher wonders how all these might influence the student-teachers who come into the statistics course with diverse needs and expectations. It is with these thoughts in mind (i.e., dilemmas that can lead to irresolvable problems) that the course teacher (and the first writer of this paper) enters this study (i.e., course plan and its enactment). Latour (2005) discards an abstract definition of the social and in his well-known book “Reassembling the Social” focuses on its material understanding as relationships between actants. The notion of ‘actant’ is grounded in Active Network Theory and signifies both human and non-human participants in a complex network as being capable of producing a particular effect and, thus, having agency (Smelser & Baltes, 2001). The relationship that we as a collective iterate over time, in assemblages, is a way of thinking of how things are done and, thus, a way to map the ‘social’ as a highly controversial terrain. Taking this theory into account along with the teacher’s dilemmas (as described above), we here perform an inquiry that aims to map potential actants and their relationships, as they are core in a teacher’s experience to plan and enact a statistics course that engages the theme of climate change through CME. For this inquiry, both the teacher’s logbook (or course diary notes) and student-teachers’ interviews are analyzed. The analysis so far, locates instances where the teacher connects to different actants such as the climate change phenomenon, the curricula, the course plan, and student-teachers. In some instances, these actants suggest ways of doing, decisions to make or choices that contradict each other and hint toward controversial issues. These all become evident in signs of hesitation by the teacher at moments of planning or enactment. They, moreover, reserve to create different narratives about what mathematics should be utilized and demands reflexive choices by the teacher over which narrative to follow. Such hesitations might also be traced back to how the arguments for choosing one narrative over the other are being constructed. In short, the analysis shows that since diverse arguments can be narrated, one might be left with the feeling of missing something in just following one. It is a rather vulnerable situation the teacher is in; risking being hold accountable for not dealing with the mathematical content that has good arguments for it to be dealt with.

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