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  • 1.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Automation as an empty signifier: Interrogating automated work futures and their non-technologies2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the role of anticipated futures of automation in public administration. Engaging with ethnographic research with stakeholders from roughly ten municipalities in Sweden, this paper examines the tension between different ways of imagining automated work futures and the extent to which they are associated with (or not) technologies. Automating data-driven processes is believed to alleviate administrative drudgery and support a goal-driven, efficient public sector. Various stakeholders participate in the implementation of automation systems, including corporate actors, managers, politicians, and civil servants. This group of stakeholders has diverse perspectives and expectations regarding the future of work automation and its role in the organisation of public services. Some see automated work processes as a way to boost efficiency, productivity, and precision through algorithmic data processing; others, however, see them as ways to allow professionals to spend less time on repetitive, rule-based, and seemingly tedious tasks, so that they can focus on their core professional practice. Challenging established narratives about work automation, this paper suggests how automation can be used to visualise, think about, and communicate organisational change without involving any technology per se, but rather as an empty signifier to which future-making practices can be affixed and legitimised. By emphasising social expectations and experiences, the paper interrogates emerging automated work futures in ways that move beyond techno-optimism and economic-political goals of efficiency and optimisation, not the least by showing that automation is situated, social and contingent.

  • 2.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Deltagande netnografi2019In: Handbok i kvalitativa metoder / [ed] Göran Ahrne; Peter Svensson, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, 2Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Deltagande netnografi2022In: Handbok i kvalitativa metoder / [ed] Göran Ahrne & Peter Svensson, Stockholm: Liber, 2022, 3Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Digital Technography: A Methodological Framework for Interrogating Emerging Technologies2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging digital technologies are becoming increasingly prevalent in contemporary society. As future- oriented, promissory, and sometimes yet to be realised, such technologies pose particular methodological challenges for digital social research since they partake in creating the future they aim at transforming. This paper proposes a methodological framework to study the construction of emerging digital technologies as meaningful phenomena. Corporate actors within this growing field adopt similar marketing strategies that involve sharing multimodal promotional materials on digital platforms where technical specifications blend with evocative stories. These stories employ a future- oriented vocabulary in which words such as change, re-imagination, reinvention, and transformation play an essential role. Building on recent ethnographic research, this paper demonstrates how emerging digital technologies are promoted by creating a symbolic and imaginary context in which such technologies make perfect sense. These studies focus on wearable devices, digital food technologies, and systems for work automation. The empirical examples demonstrate how the promotional materials involve discursive practices that produce a particular kind of situated and transformative knowledge that allows emerging digital technologies to appear meaningful. These empirical examples serve as a basis for the formulation of ’digital technography’ as a methodological framework that allows for an interrogation of how emerging digital technologies are imagined across different sites of knowledge production.

  • 5.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Digital teknografi: Att studera hur framväxande digitala teknologier försöker lära känna oss2023In: Tekniska mediestudier: En introduktion till metoder och teknologier / [ed] Martin Berg; Maria Engberg; Sara Leckner, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023, p. 55-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi anpassar oss ständigt till de medieteknologier vi lever våra liv med, men hur kan vi få kunskap om hur de får oss människor att agera på olika sätt? I det här kapitlet får du bekanta dig med digital teknografi, en metod för att studera och analysera framväxande digitala teknologier som sätter teknologierna och deras förväntningar i centrum. Kapitlet utgår från självövervakningsteknologier, företrädesvis ”smarta” smycken, men fungerar lika bra för tjänster som TikTok och Instagram. Du får veta mer om nyckelbegrepp för att analysera marknadsföringsmaterial av framväxande digitala teknologier. Genom detta lär du dig hur till synes oskyldiga mobilappar kan bli föremål för vetenskapliga studier, kritik och teoretiserande.

  • 6.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Frozen Margaritas, Free Nibbles and the Future of Work: A Small Ethnography of Digital Professionals at SXSW2023Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the growing interest in how digital technologies affect work life, there is still a need for in-depth research and policy work that scrutinize where, by whom, and how the anticipated work futures are shaped and appropriated. Who sets the agenda for the future of work, and how are these images about the future of work with digital technologies created and negotiated? More importantly, where does this occur? There are key moments at a handful of globally influential 'first places' where the ideas and inventions for the digital future of work are shown and explored. These nascent ideas quickly set expectations as industries, communities, organizations, and individuals adopt and further disseminate what they have learned at those pivotal sites. This paper reports from an ethnographic pilot study of a global conference that has grown into an unmissable taste-making event that sets trends and shapes the future of work through and with digital technologies: South By SouthWest (SXSW) in Austin, TX, USA. Drawing on observations and interviews with ten participants representing the digital and creative industries in Sweden, this paper shows how digital work futures are constituted through anticipatory and appropriation practices, and how a sense of belonging - based mainly on pleasures - runs through the processes and practices by which technologies, experiences, and anticipations become entangled in everyday professional environments.

  • 7.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Hate it? Automate it!: Thinking and Doing Robotic Process Automation and Beyond2022In: Everyday Automation: Experiencing and Anticipating Emerging Technologies / [ed] Sarah Pink, Martin Berg, Deborah Lupton, Minna Ruckenstein, London & New York: Routledge, 2022, 1, p. 157-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    chapter
  • 8.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Om digitala forskningsmetoder: entusiastiska betraktelser från utkanten2022In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 2022-02-17Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    The State of Work Automation: Interrogating Anticipated Futures and Metaphors of Organisational Change2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Nordic countries, which are known for their expansive welfare systems, public administration is increasingly being viewed as a potential automation site. Data-driven process automation is believed to alleviate administrative drudgery and support a goal-driven, efficient public sector. In the implementation of automation systems, a variety of stakeholders participate, including corporate actors, managers, consultants, politicians and civil servants. As stakeholders, these groups have diverse perspectives and expectations regarding the anticipated future of automation and its role in the organization of public services. The idea of automated work processes is accepted by some as a way to boost efficiency, productivity, and precision through algorithmic data processing; others, however, see such systems as ways to let professionals spend less time on repetitive, rule-based, and seemingly tedious tasks so that they can focus on their core professional practice. This paper engages with the tensions between the different ways of imagining automatized futures by reporting from ethnographic research with stakeholders from roughly ten municipalities in Sweden, as well as digital technographic studies of two world- leading work automation platforms. Using the sociology of expectations as a theoretical framework to illuminate these tensions, this paper explores the role of anticipated automation when organizations imagine change. The paper shows that automation can be used to help envision, think about, and communicate organizational change without involving any technology, but rather as a metaphor to which future-making practices can be attached and legitimized. Work automation is understood in the paper as fundamentally social and structured as well as affected by expectations regarding future benefits and potential risks. By explicitly paying attention to expectations and experiences, the paper allows for an interrogation of emerging automated work futures that goes beyond techno- optimism and economic-political goals of efficiency and optimisation, not the least by illustrating work automation’s situated and contingent nature.

  • 10.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Beräkningsmedier2021In: Introduktion till medieteknik / [ed] Pernilla Falkenberg Josefsson; Mikael Wiberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, p. 261-269Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad kan falska nyheter, VR-glasögon och aktivitetsarmband lära oss om medieteknik som forskningsämne? Med utgångspunkt i tre forskningsbaserade exempel introducerar vi beräkningsmedier som ett nyckelbegrepp för framtida medieteknisk forskning. Begreppet bidrar till att ta fram digitala teknologiers datafierande karaktär och deras inflytande på relationen mellan människor och deras kroppar, mellan medier och vad som uppfattas vara verkligt i en medialiserad värld. Detta hjälper oss att bedriva vetenskaplig forskning inom ämnet medieteknik på sätt som både skapar förståelse för och bidrar till utvecklingen av digitala medier med hänsyn till deras tekniska, sociala, kulturella och ekonomiska förutsättningar.

  • 11.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Leckner, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Inledning: Varför tekniska mediestudier?2023In: Tekniska mediestudier: En introduktion till metoder och teknologier / [ed] Martin Berg, Maria Engberg & Sara Leckner, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023, 1, p. 11-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Engberg, MariaMalmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.Leckner, SaraMalmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Tekniska mediestudier: En introduktion till metoder och teknologier2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I en tid då medielandskapet är i ständig förändring och traditionell medieforskning konstant utmanas ökar behovet av att förena teknik, humaniora och samhällsvetenskap. Medie- och teknikforskning kräver innovativa angreppssätt för att navigera bland komplexa relationer mellan kultur, samhälle, ekonomi och teknologi.

    I den här boken bjuder ledande forskare in till samtal om teknologins utmaningar och möjligheter. Här presenteras redskap för att utforska, beskriva, begreppsliggöra och förstå nya relationer mellan medieteknologier och deras omvärld – en kunskap som förbereder läsaren att på egen hand kombinera samhällsvetenskapernas kritiska analyser med teknikvetenskapernas tradition att utveckla tillförlitliga och effektiva system.

    Tekniska mediestudier riktar sig till studenter inom ämnen som medieteknik, medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap, kulturvetenskap, data- och systemvetenskap, interaktionsdesign och informatik.

  • 13.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Fors, VaikeWillim, Robert
    Samverkansformer: nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Samverkan har blivit en nyckelterm för att förstå akademins förväntade roll i samhället. Genom samverkansprojekt ska nya värden, lösningar och framgångar skördas. Men hur går detta till i praktiken? Samverkan handlar om relationer, och relationer förändras över tid. Just föränderligheten och brokigheten när det gäller samverkan är viktig att förstå. Vilka är utmaningarna och möjligheterna? Samverkan kan leda till praktiska, etiska och även känslomässiga utmaningar, samtidigt som den också kan ge upphov till helt nya värden. I den här boken visar författarna på möjliga vägar för samverkansprojekt och hur forskning inom humaniora och samhällsvetenskap har en viktig plats även utanför akademin.

  • 14.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Lidegran, Ida
    Uppsala universitet.
    Schmauch, Ulrika
    Umeå universitet.
    Sjöstrand, Glenn
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Kravchenko, Zhanna
    Digital sociologi: Att undervisa i sociologi under en pandemi2021In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, no 4, p. 467-482Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Sociologisk Forskning har undervisning och lärande tidigare diskuterats på flera sätt. Ämnet har bland annat behandlats i forskningsartiklar som undersökt skolbarns välbefinnande och utbildningsresultat (Aytar & Mella 2012), hinder för tillgång till högre utbildning (Ismail 2011), professionsutmaningar inom gymnasieutbildningen (Bruno 2012) och strukturella bestämningsfaktorer för akademiska karriärer (Behtoui 2017). Den sociologiska forskningspraktikens nära koppling till ämnets pedagogiska praktik har också medfört att personliga undervisningserfarenheter behandlats i olika texter (se specialnumret ”Sociologi i tiden”: Hansen, Johansson, Kollind m.fl. 1997).

    Tidskriftens redaktion skulle framöver gärna se fler artiklar som behandlar frågor om undervisning och lärande inom sociologiämnet. Vi välkomnar därför sociologikollegor att inkomma med förslag till sådana artiklar eller färdiga manus. Det skulle kunna vara texter om hur vår praktik som sociologer påverkar vårt sätt att undervisa, hur sociologisk forskning omsätts i undervisning, hur olika pedagogiska metoder och material kan användas i sociologiundervisningen eller hur samhälleliga processer och strukturer påverkar vad som händer i klassrummet. Vi tror att sådana reflektioner med fördel skulle kunna ta sin utgångspunkt i utbildningssociologi och den svenska sociologins reflekterande tradition.

    Som ett första steg mot att ge utrymme åt denna typ av artiklar publicerar vi i detta nummer ett samtal om hur undervisningen i sociologi har påverkats av övergången till digital undervisning under covid-19-pandemin. Vi bad fyra sociologikollegor, verksamma vid olika svenska lärosäten, att svara på några frågor utifrån sina erfarenheter som lärare, utbildningssamordnare och forskare. De medverkande är Martin Berg, professor i medieteknik och docent i sociologi vid Malmö universitet, som forskar om digital sociologi med särskilt fokus på kritiska studier av algoritmer och automatiseringsprocesser; Ida Lidegran, docent i utbildningssociologi vid Uppsala universitet, som ingår i Forskningsgruppen för utbildnings- och kultursociologi (SEC) och forskar om elitutbildningar och familjers utbildningsstrategier, migranters möte med det svenska utbildningssystemet samt utbildning och covid-19; Ulrika Schmauch, lektor i sociologi vid Umeå universitet, vars forskning handlar om social ojämlikhet i allmänhet och om ras, plats och kön i synnerhet; samt Glenn Sjöstrand, prefekt för Institutionen för samhällsstudier vid Linnéuniversitetet i Växjö, vars forskning i huvudsak är inriktad mot professionsstudier och särskilt ingenjörers professionella utveckling, men som även forskar om digital transformation, miljö och välfärdsfrågor.

  • 15.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Ruckenstein, Minna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Lund University.
    Lomborg, Stine
    Copenhagen University, Denmark.
    Automated Welfare Futures: Interrogating Automated Decision-Making in the Nordics2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we, as social scientists, make sense of the promises and implications of automated and data-driven systems that are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and essential for the Nordic welfare states? What are the theoretical and methodological tensions and possibilities that these systems pose to research when they assemble and disassemble existing structures, organisational logics and dependencies?

    Over the last few years, critical social science research has established that data harvesting and digital tracking, in particular, pose a general societal challenge that risks undermining Nordic values of autonomy and equity and the overall welfare of people. At the same time, the welfare state and welfare provision are increasingly characterised by processes of datafication, promoting uses of data analytics and automated decision-making (ADM). Researchers have flagged datafication as a specific concern for the public sector in relation to questions of ADM systems, and other forms of data-driven optimization. Despite the burgeoning literature on various concerns and the ethical guidelines and regulatory initiatives that try to respond to them, however, we have engaged so far with a limited range of theoretical and methodological approaches to explore the social dynamics at play in concrete contexts of ADM.

    This roundtable brings together key scholars that engage critically with the social aims and implications of datafication to address how ADM is imagined, practised and experienced in different empirical contexts and across various organisational levels in the Nordics. The roundtable will open with short ’provocations’ through which the speakers present and contextualise concepts they have used or would like to promote in the study of emerging automated and data-driven systems. The provocations are followed by a joint discussion about how these concepts can support sociological research that studies the promises and implications of automated and data-driven systems as part of the myths and realities of the Nordic welfare states, now and in the future.

  • 16.
    Bolter, Jay David
    et al.
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    MacIntyre, Blair
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Reality Media: Augmented and Virtual Reality2021 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How augmented reality and virtual reality are taking their places in contemporary media culture alongside film and television.

    This book positions augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) firmly in contemporary media culture. The authors view AR and VR not as the latest hyped technologies but as media—the latest in a series of what they term “reality media,” taking their place alongside film and television. Reality media inserts a layer of media between us and our perception of the world; AR and VR do not replace reality but refashion a reality for us. Each reality medium mediates and remediates; each offers a new representation that we implicitly compare to our experience of the world in itself but also through other media.

    The authors show that as forms of reality media emerge, they not only chart a future path for media culture, but also redefine media past. With AR and VR in mind, then, we can recognize their precursors in eighteenth-century panoramas and the Broadway lights of the 1930s. A digital version of Reality Media, available through the book's website, invites readers to visit a series of virtual rooms featuring interactivity, 3-D models, videos, images, and texts that explore the themes of the book.

  • 17.
    Boztepe, Suzan
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Redesigning the curriculum: A participatory design approach2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Boztepe, Suzan
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Rethinking the Public Sector: Design storytelling as a catalyst for organizational transformation2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Boztepe, Suzan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Connected Eating: Servitising the Human Body through Digital Food Technologies2020In: Digital Food Cultures / [ed] Deborah Lupton and Zeena Feldman, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2020, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Brink, Henning
    et al.
    Osnabrück University, Germany.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Analyzing Barriers to Digital Transformation in the German Engineering Industry: A Comparison of Digitalized and Non-Digitalized Enterprises2022In: Proeccedings of the 55th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences / [ed] Bui, Tung X., 2022, p. 4849-4858Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The German engineering sector is one of the most prominent industries in Germany in terms of revenues, the number of employees, and reputation for the “Made in Germany” brand. In this industry, digital transformation (DT) has become a significant trend. DT is more than optimizing internal processes by digital means. It entails the offer of digital services and products and the enhancement of customer experience. Complex barriers need to be overcome to drive this transformation forward. Therefore, our study analysis the organizational barriers to DT within the German engineering industry. We follow a quantitative approach to gain insight on organizational barriers by a comparison of digitalized and less digitalized enterprises and their DTs. Our research demonstrates that digitalized enterprises perceive lower degrees of certain barriers in leadership, culture, employees, and skills, which are essential parts in a socio-technical view. However, there are still barriers that digitalized enterprises are struggling with.

  • 21.
    Brink, Henning
    et al.
    Osnabrück University, Germany.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Paul, Fynn-Hendrik
    Osnabrück University, Germany.
    Extending a Socio-Technical Model of the Barriers to Digital Transformation Through Data Triangulation2022In: 8th International Conference on Information Management (ICIM), 2022, p. 68-74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital Transformation is one of the megatrends to re-shape industries, non-profit sectors, higher education, and even societies. Digital technologies merge with physical production processes provoking changes in value creation processes. These changes may lead to positive effects such as more effectiveness, revised business models, and closer customer contact. However, there are also negative effects hindering the digital transformation journey. As many firms still struggle, it is essential to understand the barriers which slow down or even stop a digital transformation. Based on qualitative data from 525 respondents working in different sectors, we reevaluate and extend an existing model by using a triangulation approach. The result is a holistic socio-technical model of the barriers to digital transformation consisting of seven distinct dimensions. The model can serve as input for future research instruments. Firms can use it to reflect barriers in their digital transformation.

  • 22. Brink, Henning
    et al.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Vogelsang, Kristin
    Developing and Applying an Instrument to Measure Barriers to Digital Transformation: A Mixed- Method Study2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of digital technologies, digital transformation (DT) has become an issue in nearly all industries. In enterprises, DT means to digitalize internal processes, offer digital services as well as products, and enhance the customer experience. As the transformation is complex, barriers hinder the successful transformation. However, an instrument for the measurement of barriers and their effects on the DT of an organization is missing. Our research questions are therefore: What are the barriers to DT in industry and industry-related areas? How can they be described and measured?

  • 23.
    Brink, Henning
    et al.
    Osnabrück University.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Vogelsang, Kristin
    Osnabrück University.
    The digitalization of universities from a students’ perspective2020In: 6th International Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd'20) / [ed] Josep Domenech ; Paloma Merello ; Elena de la Poza ; Raúl Peña-Ortiz, Universitat Politècnica de València , 2020, p. 967-974Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitalization of higher education institutions is progressing significantly. Though the use of digital assets enhances the students’ learning experience and offers new opportunities for administration, there are no uniform standards for the use of digital media in teaching and student services. As educational service providers, universities are dependent on students being able to cope with the structures offered. Thus it is essential to ascertain students’ attitudes of the technologies used. We asked students from three blended learning courses about their perceptions. We further asked the students what should be done and by whom. Our results show that students see structural changes occurring not only in themselves but also at the level of the university management. Our research contributes to the actual discussion about the digitalization of higher education by offeringsuggestions for development from a students’ view. The results are valuable for lecturers and faculty managers who want to advance the digitalization of services and learning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Stigmar, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Falk, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Enskär, Karin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Students´ Experiences of Participation in a Research Team: Evaluation of a Research-based Teaching Activity in HigherEducation2022In: International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning, E-ISSN 1931-4744, Vol. 16, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractIn Sweden as well as internationally the teaching and research nexus has been described as the defining charac-teristics of higher education promoting generic skills such as information analysis and critical reflection. Vertically Integrated Projects has been proposed as one educational strategy where research and teaching are linked by in-viting students to take active part in actual research projects. The strategy is well aligned to Scholarship of teaching and learning enabling the transition from a teacher-centred accepted knowledge to a student-centred perspective where students are invited as producers of knowledge. The aim of the current study was to explore students’ experiences of participation in a research-based learning activity with academia and industrial partners, designed as a qualitative explorative study using focus group interviews. Findings describe not only factors students find motivating for learning, but also their experience of being part of professional life with its benefits and challenges.

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  • 25.
    Draxler-Weber, Nicole
    et al.
    Department of Organization and Information Systems, Osnabrück University, Germany.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Brink, Henning
    Department of Organization and Information Systems, Osnabrück University, Germany.
    Barriers to Digital Higher Education Teaching and How to Overcome Them: Lessons Learned during the COVID-19 Pandemic2022In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 1-15, article id 870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic forced a transition to digital teaching in higher education institutions (HEIs) as it was the only safe method for higher education (HE) teaching during the pandemic. However, this crisis emphasized the barriers students face worldwide. For digital HE teaching to survive in the future, these barriers should be overcome. The present paper aimed to systematically identify these barriers and present recommendations to overcome them. For this purpose, a quantitative survey (n = 369) was conducted with students in three countries, and qualitative student statements were analyzed. Possible countermeasures for corresponding barriers are described, and related stakeholders are identified. Thus, the study provided an overview of recommendations for stakeholders to overcome the barriers. The recommendations to resolve most barriers entail offering hybrid formats, adjusting lecture design, and ensuring proper communication.

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  • 26.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Augmented Reality for urban cultural heritage experiences: Lessons of a partly failed application2021In: RISE IMET 2021:: Emerging Technologies andthe Digital Transformation ofMuseums and Heritage Sites / [ed] Theopisti Stylianou-Lambert,Maria Shehade, Nicosia, Cyprus, 2021, p. 61-61Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years design with augmented reality applications for cultural heritage purposes have increased and their usefulness for informal learning and tourist experiences is improving (Haugstvedt and Krogstie, 2012; Liestøl 2014). However, there are still significant challenges with using Augmented Reality technology for cultural heritage applications in open urban environments using GPS location. Even if the potential for rich experiences is great, the continued lack of precision of available GPS location and direction in smart phones create particular challenges for the interaction and experience design. This paper presents the experiences from a project that underwent several iterations in 2017 and 2018, using mobile Augmented Reality and 360 panoramic photography in a mobile application that foregrounded historical narratives in urban heritage environments. Specifically, the narratives were about the colonial past in the Danish capital Copenhagen, a past whose traces are still present in the architecture and history of noted places such as the famous Tivoli in the city as well as in archives and museums. This contested and fragmented colonial past live in digital archives that require design and exhibition practices in order to find their way to a larger audience. 

     

    Our project Finding Alberta was one such intervention. The extended reality (XR) web-based application, using a now depreciated platform called Argon (Speiginer et al 2015) but which was created using web programming and therefore is transferable, was part of a larger set of experiences, workshops and installations that brought to life black persons who were once taken to Denmark from the Virgin Islands, then under Danish rule. The point of the urban AR experience was to let the visitor follow in the footsteps of two children - Victor and Alberta - in order to better comprehend their lives and ultimately their fate in Denmark, from the human exhibition to early death of Alberta in 1917. However, the difficulty of properly leading visitors to GPS points and understand fully in what directions they are facing once they reach those points proved a design challenge that we were only partially able to successfully work around. This paper presents some of the design choices we made in order to still create a compelling experience while working around the limits of the affordances of mobile AR.

  • 27.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Reading and Materiality: Conditions of Digital Reading2022In: The Digital Reading Condition / [ed] Maria Engberg; Iben Have; Birgitte Stougaard Pedersen, Routledge, 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conditions of reading are shaped by materialities of that which is read. In the wake of digital publishing, reading activities have been impacted by the affordances of digital technologies, and the chapter “Reading and materiality: conditions of digital reading” charts some of the influential ideas on the material nature of digital reading, and arguing that print-centric notions of what constitutes “good” reading have at times overshadowed an in-depth reckoning of the role that digital technologies play today. The perceived dichotomy between so-called digitally born and digitized materials does not delineate a border between “digital” and “print” reading, even though many of the assumptions about the latter still permeate perceptions of what is more valuable to read. The digital reading condition that the chapter introduces does not exclude any forms. Rather, the current media moment includes print, audiobooks, printed books in all forms, as well as a multitude of digital forms in a complex, interlocking media economy.

  • 28.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Bolter, Jay David
    Georgia Inst Technol, TSRB 317, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.
    The Aesthetics of Reality Media2020In: Journal of Visual Culture, ISSN 1470-4129, E-ISSN 1741-2994, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 81-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the authors examine the aesthetics of immersion in two emerging media forms: 360° video and 3D VR. Their goal is to move beyond addressing technical affordances, to consider the techniques and choices that producers of 360° video and 3D VR are making to exploit these affordances, and what resulting effects those viewing experiences have. They discuss the tension between transparency and reflectivity in two contrasting examples, in particular: the Danish company Makropol’s Anthropia (2017) and Arora and Unseld’s The Day the World Changed (2018). The authors argue that technical affordances are part of a complex process of mediation that includes both experimentation with the technology at hand and a reliance on earlier media forms. It is critical, they argue, to understand the creative tension between established forms and new ones that underscore new aesthetic and narrative experiences in VR and 360° formats.

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  • 29.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Bolter, Jay David
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Freeman, Colin
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Liestøl, Gunnar
    University of Oslo.
    MacIntyre, Blair
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    The Acropolis on the Immersive Web2021In: The Journal of Media Innovations, ISSN 1894-5562, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report here on an application of reality media(virtual and augmented reality) to digital culturalheritage. The particular challenge we address is:how to combine VR and AR to bridge the gap betweenthe center (the museum housing cultural artifacts)and periphery (the heritage site where theartifacts were found) while at the same time attendingto, even enhancing, the aura of both artifacts andsites? Our proposed solution is to implement thecultural heritage technique known as situated simulation(sitsim) in combination with a social virtual environmentcalled Hubs. Our case study is a sitsim ofthe Acropolis in Athens, which can function on locationand remotely and offers real-time conferencingcapabilities for its participants.

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  • 30.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Have, IbenAarhus University, Denmark.Pedersen, Birgitte StougaardAarhus University, Denmark.
    The Digital Reading Condition2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume offers a critical overview of digital reading practices and scholarly efforts to analyze and understand reading in the mediatized landscape. Building on research about digital reading, born-digital literature, and digital audiobooks, The Digital Reading Condition explores reading as part of a broader cultural shift encompassing many forms of media and genres.

    Bringing together research from media and literary studies, digital humanities, scholarship on reading and learning, as well as sensory studies and research on multimodal and multisensory media reception, the authors address and challenge print-biased conceptions of reading that are still prevalent in research, whether the reading medium is print or digital. They argue that the act of reading itself is changing, and rather than rejecting digital media as unsuitable for sustained or focused reading practices, they argue that the complex media landscape challenges us to rethink how to define reading as a mediated practice.

    Presenting a truly interdisciplinary perspective on digital reading practices, this volume will appeal to scholars and graduate students in communication, media studies, new media and technology, literature, digital humanities, literacy studies, composition, and rhetoric.

  • 31.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Stougaard Pedersen, Birgitte
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Reading across Media, Technologies, and Senses2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital media conditions shape new forms of reading. We read on a daily basis on various digital platforms: we read books, we search for information while reading on screens, we use apps on our smartphones, and we read audiobooks. A number of these practices challenge the former print-biased definitions of reading to which we are accustomed, and foreground intermedial practices of aesthetic works. They also challenge how we understand the sensory input that is activated while we read such works and in what contexts such reading takes place. The aim of this paper is to present our analysis of  these extended practises of reading in a digital landscape by proposing reading as a travelling concept (Bal 2002) that moves across different media contexts and moves inbetween disciplinary concerns. Central to our analysis is the material and intermedial interplay between medium and material affordances which in turn shapes the reading experience (Hayles 2005). 

    By bringing selected research fields and contributions regarding reading into dialogue with each other, we will exemplify what we see are common scholarly issues when analyzing digital reading today, specifically the multisensory address inherent in many digital texts: we are invited to touch, listen, watch, possibly take part in movement and interaction, look at images and text, listen to the timbre of voices of an audiobook reading and so forth. These elements must, we argue, play a larger role when analyzing these distinctly digital reading conditions (reimagining Jerome McGann’s 1991 analyses of the textual condition). In this paper, through analyses of digital reading situations in Tender Claws Pry (2014) and Sally Rooney’s Beautiful World, Where Are You (2021) read by Aoife MaMahon that challenge the print bias that is still the foundation of the reading concept, we explore the assumptions and value judgments that imbue the concept of reading. 

  • 32. Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Pink, Sarah
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Imagining Personal Data: Experiences of Self-Tracking2020Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As technology has become more advanced, self-tracking devices and data have become normal elements of everyday life. Imagining Personal Data examines the implications of the rise of body monitoring and digital self-tracking for how we inhabit, experience and imagine our everyday worlds. Through a focus on how it feels to live in environments where data is emergent, present, and characterised by a sense of uncertainty, the authors argue for a new approach to understanding the implications of self-tracking, and questions what this means for the status of big data. With contributions ranging across the social sciences, the book brings together the concerns of scholars working in design, social sciences, philosophy, and human-computer interaction. It problematizes the body and senses in relation to data and tracking devices, and presents an accessible analytical account of the sensory and affective experiences of self-tracking.

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  • 33. Grantorp, Christina
    et al.
    Lee, Francis
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Samhällsanalys i algoritmernas tidevarv: Introduktion till avsnittets texter2020In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 64-65, p. 22-34Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Harvard Maare, Åsa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Addo, Giuseppina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Taher, Hassan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Å utvide Tingenes metode2023In: Tingenes metode: museenes kunnskapstopografi / [ed] Henrik Treimo, Lars Risan, Ketil Gjølme Andersen, Marianne Løken, Torhild Skåtun, Trondheim: Museumsforlaget AS, 2023Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Hausberg, Johann Piet
    et al.
    Osnabrück University, Rolandstraße 8, Osnabrück, 49078, Germany.
    Liere-Netheler, Kirsten
    Osnabrück University, Rolandstraße 8, Osnabrück, 49078, Germany.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society. Bahçeşehir University, Çırağan Caddesi 4-6, Beşiktaş/Istanbul, 34353, Turkey.
    Pakura, Stefanie
    Hamburg University, Von-Melle-Park 9, Hamburg, 20146, Germany.
    Vogelsang, Kristin
    Osnabrück University, Rolandstraße 8, Osnabrück, 49078, Germany.
    Research streams on digital transformation from a holistic business perspective: a systematic literature review and citation network analysis2019In: Journal of Business Economics, ISSN 1861-8928, Vol. 89, no 8-9, p. 931-963Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital transformation (DT) has become a buzzword, triggering different disciplines in research and influencing practice, which leads to independent research streams. Scholars investigate the antecedents, contingencies, and consequences of these disruptive technologies by examining the use of single technologies or of digitization, in general. Approaches are often very specialized and restricted to their domains. Thus, the immense breadth of technologies and their possible applications conditions a fragmentation of research, impeding a holistic view. With this systematic literature review, we aim to fill this gap in providing an overview of the different disciplines of DT research from a holistic business perspective. We identified the major research streams and clustered them with co-citation network analysis in nine main areas. Our research shows the main fields of interest in digital transformation research, overlaps of the research areas and fields that are still underrepresented. Within the business research areas, we identified three dominant areas in literature: finance, marketing, and innovation management. However, research streams also arise in terms of single branches like manufacturing or tourism. This study highlights these diverse research streams with the aim of deepening the understanding of digital transformation in research. Yet, research on DT still lacks in the areas of accounting, human resource management, and sustainability. The findings were distilled into a framework of the nine main areas for assisting the implications on potential research gaps on DT from a business perspective.

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  • 36.
    Himma-Kadakas, Marju
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    Ivask, Signe
    Masaryk University, Czech Republic.
    Visualizing COVID-19:: an analytical model to understand and compose continuously evolving data visualization projects2022In: Medialni studia / Media studies, ISSN 2464-4846, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 65-91, article id 04Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased demand for information during the Covid-19 pandemic inspired projects todescribe the pandemic’s progress via data visualization. Critically analyzing the publisheddata visualization projects (DVPs) contributes to establishing a framework that supportsboth understanding and composing DVPs that evolve over time. Drawing upon constructedgrounded theory, we develop an analytical model for creating DVPs in a journalistic or public communication context. For our analysis, we selected Covid-19 public service media DVPsin the United Kingdom, Norway, Sweden and Estonia as well as DVPs created by global andlocal data activists. The analysis of these examples provides an understanding of (1) theimplied agency standing of the authors of the visualizations, (2) the kinds of editorial layer(data, visual representation, annotation or interactivity) that inform the creation processand (3) what newsrooms and data visualizers can learn from this practice to create understandable, meaningful and engaging DVPs of (critical) events that evolve over an extendedperiod. Our model supports data visualization practitioners in making informed choiceswhen creating data stories. 

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  • 37.
    Jang, So-Youn
    et al.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    Park, Jisu
    Georgia Inst Technol, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    MacIntyre, Blair
    Georgia Inst Technol, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    Bolter, Jay D.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    RealityMedia: immersive technology and narrative space2023In: Frontiers in virtual reality, ISSN 2673-4192, Vol. 4, article id 1155700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we treat VR as a new writing space in the long tradition of inscription. Constructing Virtual Reality (VR) narratives can then be understood as a process of inscribing text in space, and consuming them as a process of "reading" the space. Our research objective is to explore the meaning-making process afforded by spatial narratives-to test whether VR facilitates traditional ways of weaving complex, multiple narrative strands and provides new opportunities for leveraging space. We argue that, as opposed to the linear space of a printed book, a VR narrative space is similar to the physical space of a museum and can be analyzed on three distinct levels: (1) the architecture of the space itself, (2) the collection, and (3) the individual artifacts. To provide a deeper context for designing VR narratives, we designed and implemented a testbed called RealityMedia to explore digital remediations of traditional narrative devices and the spatial, immersive, and interactive affordances of VR. We conducted task-based user study using a VR headset and follow-up qualitative interviews with 20 participants. Our results highlight how the three semantic levels (space, collection, and artifacts) can work together to constitute meaningful narrative experiences in VR.

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  • 38.
    Kannabiran, Gopinaath
    et al.
    Computer Science Department, IT Univserity of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Reddy, Anuradha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Exploring Kolam As An Ecofeminist Computational Art Practice2022In: Creativity and Cognition (C&C '22), New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, p. 336-349Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this pictorial, we present Kolam, a visual artform originating in Tamilnadu, South India, as an ecofeminist computational art practice. We provide a visual documentation of Kolam's Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) through eight characteristics based on existing research and authors’ personal experiences as Kolam practitioners. We begin by framing Kolam as an ecofeminist practice, highlighting cultural and ecological characteristics of Kolam as a Tamil tradition. We then illustrate evolving hybrid multimedia and contemporary technological practices that characterize Kolam as computational art. Our aim is to present a cohesive and compelling visual narrative using the artwork of authors and four contemporary Kolam practitioners to inspire creativity and highlight challenges for relational knowledge production in design and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research.

  • 39.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    The End of Media Logics? On Algorithms and Agency2018In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 4653-4670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that algorithms are an outcome rather than a replacement of media logics, and ultimately, we advance this argument by connecting human agency to media logics. This theoretical contribution builds on the notion that technology, particularly algorithms are non-neutral, arguing for a stronger focus on the agency that goes into designing and programming them. We reflect on the limits of algorithmic agency and lay out the role of algorithms and agency for the dimensions and elements of network media logic. The article concludes with addressing questions of power, discussing algorithmic agency from both meso and macro perspectives.

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  • 40.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    European University Viadrina, Frankfurt (Oder), Germany.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Data Society.
    The power of code: women and the making of the digital world2021In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 24, no 14, p. 2075-2090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research on gender and digital communication centers on how women use digital media, how they participate online, or how they are treated in online forums and social media. This article, in contrast, approaches gender from a behind the screen perspective. How algorithms and platforms are created, designed, and maintained, the affordances they provide for users and how they govern the ways users communicate with each other, has a major impact on digital communication. However, it is mostly men who create these technologies. Our study approaches technologies as socio-cultural, departing from the concept of network media logic. Empirically, it is based on (1) the review of a diverse body of literature from the history of programming, professional sociology, and computer science and documents such as the diversity reports from tech giants, as well as on (2) 64 semi-structured expert interviews conducted with male and female programmers in seven countries over a time-period of four years. Results show that the gender gap continues to run deep. We report results in four dimensions: professional culture, pervasive stereotypes, lack of role models and typical career paths.

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  • 41. Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    The Power of Code: Women and the making of the digital world2023In: Women in the Digital World, Routledge, 2023Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Institute for Media and Communication Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö University, Data Society.
    What Media Logics Can Tell Us About the Internet?2018In: Second International Handbook of Internet Research / [ed] Jeremy Hunsinger, Lisbeth Klastrup, Mathew M Allen, Springer, 2018, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter departs from the dichotomy between techno-optimism and normalization and asks the questions how participation online has been – and can be – studied beyond this. The chapter focuses on the theory of media logics, how it has been and can be used when studying online participation. The chapter will end with a discussion of media logics locating it within the field of media and communication – increasingly a popular strand of mediatization.

  • 43.
    Lagergren, Ebba
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Enhancing the Digital Transformation of Sports Arenas2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments within digital technology are redefining how spectators will experience sport in the future. Combined with current crises, it creates new demands on how sports arenas can generate visitors to their events. An alternative can be virtual arenas. Therefore, this study aimed to understand the visitor’s expectations of a virtual arena and identify key factors that affected potential spectators’ intentions to visit a virtual arena. This qualitative study collected empirical data through focus groups. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology 2 (UTAUT 2) was used as a theoretical foundation for the analysis. This study results in an enhanced hypothetical model arguing for additional elements affecting a spectator’s intention to visit a virtual arena. Our research contributes to helping shape future research on and practical implementation of virtual arenas.

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  • 44. Lepik, Krista
    et al.
    Mägi, Reet
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kuidas mõtestavad ekspositsioonikoostajad auditooriumidekaasamist?: Kujuteldavadauditooriumid ja kaasamisviisidTartu Ülikooli loodusmuuseumiuue püsiekspositsiooni loomisel2020In: Eesti Rahva Muuseumi aastaraamat, ISSN 1406-0388, Vol. 62, p. 21-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims to enhance the understanding of audience engagement and ways of its shaping in relation to permanent expositions by using the example of Tartu University Natural History Museum. We focus on the role of exhibition curators as content creators in the shaping of audience engagement. The study is informed by constructivist grounded theory and draws upon eleven semi-structured interviews with the curators of the new permanent exhibition of Tartu University Natural History Museum. In order to understand better the curators’ perspectives our analysis relies on the concept of imagined audiences and seeks to answer questions about what kind of engagement modes can be identified from the curators’ comments and what processes the latter were influenced by. The theme of museum audiences and engagement modes should already be familiar to the reader from previous Yearbooks of the Estonian National Museum (Runnel ja Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt 2012; Runnel, Lepik, Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt 2014; Lotina 2014; Rattus 2016). Earlier discussions, however, placed more emphasis to the existence of audiences and engagement modes, and were less concerned with how curatorial considerations can impact the formation of audience engagement and how this formative process may be directed. Furthermore, the earlier in-depth identification of engagement modes and examination of the interrelationships between their various aspects was underpinned by a holistic view on museum activities (Lotina 2016), while the present treatment focuses on the specific context of museum expositions. The concept of imagined audiences (Litt 2012) draws on the study of social media, but for this article we have applied its principles to a museum exposition, which is a far more static communicative environment. 40 The study answered the questions about the kind of audiences the curators who put together the permanent exhibition of Tartu University Museum of Natural History were envisioning and what factors influenced the construction of audiences as well as what engagement modes were designed for the exposition. Individuals and institutions were distinguished among the audiences, both of which were in turn comprised of more detailed groups. Building on Gidden’s theory of structuration (1984) and Litt’s notion of an imagined audience (Litt 2012) the factors influencing the curators were grouped as either structural or agential. The following modes of engagement with the permanent display emerged: teaching, attracting interest, co-operation and provisions for stakeholders. Teaching was closely interlinked with the main objective of renewing the permanent display: the intent is to create a learning environment for non-formal environmental education, and in this respect it resembled the informing mode of audience engagement identified by Lotina (2016). Attracting interest was a mode of engagement which bore similarities to the marketing engagement mode previously described by Lotina (2016). Co-operation where visitors contribute towards the fulfillment of the museum’s objectives offered limited possibilities within the context of the permanent exhibition, but it holds considerable potential in the planning of future developments of the exposition. Providing for stakeholders was reflected in the museum’s consideration of the stakeholders’ needs, and it allows the museum to develop various services. All in all, both museums and their permanent displays offer valuable material for analysing the way in which audiences and their engagement modes are shaped. A better understanding of these processes will help us expand the possibilities of engaging actual audiences. Identifying messages, audiences and activities is a natural part of the planning of any permanent exhibition; however, the content creators’ visions of the upcoming exhibition also merit a detailed examination, and thereby particular factors that favour or constrain curatorial creativity will become clearer.

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  • 45.
    Mathieu, David
    et al.
    Roskilde university.
    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander
    Roskilde university.
    Kleut, Jelena
    University of Novi Sad.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Questioning the business–humanities divide in media studies: A reformulation of the administrative–critical distinction in stakeholder collaboration2022In: Business Meets the Humanities: The Human Perspective in University-Industry Collaboration / [ed] Mahnke, Martina; Nielsen, Mikka; Petersen, Matilde;Tjørring, Lise, New York: Routledge, 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 46.
    Mathieu, David
    et al.
    Roskilde University.
    Schrøder, Kim Christian
    Roskilde University.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University.
    Runnel, Pille
    Estonian National Museum.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    Nanì, Alessandro
    Tallinn University.
    Theodoropoulou, Vivi
    Independent Researcher.
    Stakeholder Collaboration in Audience Research: from Why to How2020In: Baltic Screen Media Review, ISSN 2346-5492, Vol. 8, p. 112-125Article in journal (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 47.
    Mies, Yannick A. A.
    et al.
    Osnabrueck Univ, Technol & Innovat Management, Osnabruck, Germany..
    Hausberg, J. Piet
    Osnabrueck Univ, Technol & Innovat Management, Osnabruck, Germany..
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Digitising Miles and Snow: using cluster analysis to empirically derive digital business strategy types2023In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitisation is among the macro-trends that significantly influence the business world in the twenty-first century. Firms striving to succeed in this environment must develop new strategic approaches. The accelerating development of information technology (IT) drives digitisation. Therefore, IT and business strategies must be integrated. In this context, the information systems literature promotes the concept of digital business strategies (DBSs), reflecting a fusion between IT and business strategies. However, knowledge of the types and characteristics of such DBSs is currently scarce. Therefore, we developed a conceptually and empirically grounded typology of DBS based on the well-known business strategy classification by Miles and Snow (1978). Using a dataset comprising 192 firms worldwide, we conducted a cluster analysis, identified basic types of DBS, and evaluated their effects on firm performance. Moreover, we identified four types of DBS: non-digital reactor, analyser, digital opportunist, and digital producer. The study contributes to a better understanding of new business strategy concepts in the digitisation context.

  • 48.
    Mies, Yannick
    et al.
    University of Osnabruck, Germany.
    Hausberg, Piet
    University of Osnabruck, Germany.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Digital Business Strategy: Towards an empirically derived topology2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitization is among the macro-trends that significantly determine the business world of the 21st century. Firms striving to succeed in this environment have to develop new strategic approaches. The accelerating development of information technology drives digitization. Thus, IT strategy and business strategy need to be integrated. In this context, information systems literature promotes the concept of digital business strategy, reflecting a fusion between IT strategy and business strategy. However, currently, we do not know much about the characteristics and different types of such digital business strategies. To this end, we develop a conceptually and empirically grounded typology of digital business strategies. Based on a dataset of 281 firms worldwide, we carry out a cluster analysis, identify basic types of digital business strategies and evaluate their effects on firm performance. The paper contributes to a better understanding of new business strategy concepts. It thus enriches the extant insights from innovation management, strategic management, and information systems literature in the context of digitization.

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    Conference Program
  • 49.
    Mosconi, Elaine
    et al.
    Université de Sherbrooke.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Santa-Eulalia, Luis Antonio
    Université de Sherbrooke.
    Making Digital Transformation Real2019In: Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences / [ed] Bui, TX, 2019, p. 4924-4926Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital Transformation (DT) is based on superior connectivity and in an explosion of available data, changing the way enterprises do business. This frequently implies the development of new strategies, new business models and new capabilities. By proposing the mini-track Making Digital Transformation Real, the objective is to put forward new ideas about how companies, managers, and individuals are dealing with the complexity around this phenomenon. Papers selected highlight challenges and opportunities for large, small, and medium companies from different sectors. In this editorial, after presenting a short introduction to the topic, different contributions are briefly presented to offer a snapshot of this mini-track.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 50.
    Packmohr, Sven
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    A call for more sociomateriality and its usage in research on digital transformation2021In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference Information Systems / [ed] Miguel Baptista Nunes, Pedro Isaías and Philip Powell, 2021, p. 285-289Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociotechnical and sociomaterial perspectives are tools for research on Information System. As Digital Transformation is a research area related to IS, this paper takes these two perspectives into account for a literature review. The explicit use of both perspectives is rather limited. Still, sociotechnical is the broader perspective. A call for more sociomateriality in research on Digital Transformation is the aim of this reflection paper.

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