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  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, Roland
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Individual and Society (IS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Sederblad, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Teams, continuous improvement, the unions and conditional trust in the company Scania2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, it will be discussed if there is a “team dimension” connected to legitimacy/trust in manufacturing companies. The “improvement teams” in the truck producing company Scania, that also are the basic organisational unit in production, can be described as “open micro systems”, with external relations and links between the teams and the organisation as a whole (Sederblad, 2011b). Our interpretation is that the result of continuous improvement activities in the improvement teams is dependent on blue collar workers believe that they will, at least indirectly and in a long time perspective, benefit from involvement in developing the production system. We will introduce the concept “conditional trust” to analyse the relations in production (Sederblad, 2011a; see also page 5 in this paper). This concept will also be used to understand the negotiation system on the company level and we will especially focus on the role of the unions. In the final section of the paper we will analyse how the production system and negotiation system are linked to each other. We will discuss and analyse the following questions: 1. How is the “improvement teams” organised in the company Scania and how do they work with “continuous improvement”? 2. How is conditional trust established in production and in improvement activities (among supervisors, team-leaders and workers)? 3. How is conditional trust established in the negotiations in the company (management, unions and workers)? 4. How is trust in production linked to trust in the negotiation system, and how functions the system at the workplace as a whole?

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  • 2.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Hakanen, Jari
    Kristensen, Tage Søndergård
    Lönnblad, Anneli
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Westerlund, Hugo
    A Qualitative Study on the Content Validity of the Social Capital Scales in the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ II)2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 2002-2867, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ II) includes scales for measuring workplace social capital. The overall aim of this article is to evaluate the content validity of the following scales: horizontal trust, vertical trust and justice based on data from cognitive interviews using a think-aloud procedure. Informants were selected to achieve variation in gender, age, region of residence, and occupation. A predetermined coding scheme was used to identify: 1) Perspective (reflection on behalf of oneself only or abstraction to a broader perspective), 2) Use of response options, 3) Contexts challenging the process of answering, and 4) Overall reflections included in the retrieval and judgement processes leading to an answer for each item. The results showed that 1) the intended shift from individual to a broader perspective worked for eight out of eleven items. 2) The response option balancing in the middle covered different meanings. Retrieval of information needed to answer constituted a problem in four out of eleven items. 3) Three contextually challenging situations were identified. 4) For most items the reflections corresponded well with the intention of the scales, though the items asking about withheld information caused more problems in answering and lower content validity compared to the other items of the scales. In general, the findings supported the content validity of the COPSOQ II measurement of workplace social capital as a group construct. The study opens for new insight into how concepts and questions are understood and answered among people coming from different occupations and organizational settings.

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  • 3.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Psykosocialt säkerhetsklimat: ett sätt att mäta organisatoriskt och socialt säkerhetsklimat. Stressforskningsrapport nr 3272017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish context, the provisions about Organisational and Social Work Environment (AFS 2015: 4) have contributed to more attention being paid to the role of organisational conditions for a healthy work environment. From this perspective, a relevant theoretical term is Psychosocial Safety Climate (PSC). PSC can be defined as the employees’ shared perceptions of the organizations’ guidelines, practices and procedures to protect the employees’ psychosocial health and safety. The PSC measures how employees perceive that the senior management 1) engages, 2) prioritizes, 3) communicates and 4) involves employees in psychosocial workplace safety issues. Several studies show that PSC predicts work environment factors such as emotional and quantitative job demands, bullying, influence and development opportunities, which in turn affect, for example, employee involvement, stress, fatigue and depression symptoms. The purpose of this report is to present the initial steps in the adaptation and validation process leading to the establishment of an official Swedish version of the international PSC scale. Initially, a translation of the original English version of PSC into Swedish was conducted including suggestions for alternative terms of key concepts such as senior management. An expert panel including researchers in the field evaluated the translated version. They identified potential problem areas and commented on which translations they considered as most relevant. This phase led to a revised version of the questionnaire that was tested and further developed based on ten cognitive interviews and evaluated psychometrically in a survey. Finally, the Swedish version of the survey was back-translated into English and the conceptual congruency with the original version was verified in collaboration with Professor Maureen Dollard, with whom we have been in continuous dialogue during the whole process. Results of the interview study revealed that while the central concept of psychological health was unproblematic, the term senior management did not result in consistent interpretations among the informants. Most often, the informants referred to their immediate manager rather than senior management. The informants perceived it as difficult to respond to the statements that concerned the whole workgroup rather than themselves as individuals. They also commented that responding to statements was more difficult than responding to questions. Informants who had trouble responding were inclined to choose the middle response option. In general, informants expressed that it was positive and relevant to study climate related to the psychosocial working environment, while some expressed doubt about the relevance of certain statements. In addition, a number of informants found some statements to be redundant regarding the 12-item version (PSC-12). The results of the psychometric analyses of the 4 item version (PSC-4) showed a low internal non-response percentage and a frequent use of the middle response option. A confirmatory factor analysis supported combining the four statements into a scale (PSC-4). The correlations between the PSC-4 and a selection of theoretically relevant concepts corroborated our expectations about the relationships between the variables. In sum, content and construct validity as well as reliability of the Swedish adapted translation of PSC-4 was supported by the findings of the initial part of the validation process described in this report.

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  • 4.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Vad händer med arbetsmiljön när man inför aktivitetsbaserade kontor inom akademin?2017In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, E-ISSN 2002-343X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 9-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Aktivitetsbaserade kontor är fortfarande ovanliga för forskare och lärare inom akademin, men nu verkar flera lärosäten vara igång att införa den här typen av arbetsplatser. Det finns begränsat med kunskap om vad som händer vid flyttprocesser från egna rum till aktivitetsbaserade kontor i akademin och hur personalen upplever arbetsmiljön i denna typ av kontorsmiljöer. I den här artikeln redovisas resultat från en enkätundersökning före och efter flytt till aktivitetsbaserade kontor på en svensk högskola.

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  • 5.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hakanen, Jari
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ II) - concurrent validity assessed by a theoretical model2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no Issue S1, p. 640-640Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To validate the concurrent validity of COPSOQ II (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire), a work environment questionnaire translated into >25 languages. Methods. Electronic questionnaire sent to all public dentistry staff in four Swedish regions (response rate of 75%; n = 1345). Twenty‐two scales from COPSOQ II, complemented by the Utrecht Work Engagement scale, were mapped onto a hypothesized double mediated model based on the Job‐Demand‐Resources (JD‐R) Model with workability as outcome. The model was tested using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM). Results. The theoretical model fit the data well (RMSEA 0.060; CFI 0.925, TLI 0.913, χ2 1543.81; df 281; p < 0.001). The effect of leadership resources on workability was mediated through other kind of job resources and demands, and from these through strain symptoms and positive work‐related outcomes. Conclusion. The concurrent validity of the scales was corroborated and the results support the use of COPSOQ II for research and workplace risk assessment.

  • 6.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Westerlund, Hugo
    The Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hakanen, Jari J
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kristensen, Tage S
    Task-Consult, Gilleleje, Denmark.
    It is not just about occupation, but also about where you work2017In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 372-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Dentistry is characterized by a meaningful but also stressful psychosocial working environment. Job satisfaction varies among staff working under different organizational forms. The aim of this study was to identify (i) to what extent crucial psychosocial work environment characteristics differ among occupations in general public dental clinics in Sweden, and (ii) how much of the variation within each occupation is attributable to the organizational level. Methods: All staff (N=1782) employed in four public dental organizations received an email with personal log-in to an electronic questionnaire based on the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. After two reminders, a response rate of 75% was obtained. Responses from 880 nonmanagerial dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses working in general practices were included in our analyses. Results: First, we compared the three dental occupations. We found that job demands, task resources (eg influence, possibilities for development and role clarity), strain symptoms and attitudes to work differed among occupations, dentists having the least favourable situation. Next, we compared the four organizations for each occupational group, separately. For dentists, a significant and relevant amount of variance (P<.05 and ICC >.05) was explained by the organizational level for 15 of 26 subscales, least pronounced for task resources. By contrast, for dental nurses and hygienists, the corresponding number was 2 subscales of 26. The psychosocial working environment of people working at the organization with the highest levels of strain indicators and the least positive work-related attitudes differed systematically from the organization with the most favourable profile, in particular regarding job demands and leadership aspects. Conclusion: In conclusion, the psychosocial working environment depended to a large degree on occupation and, for dentists in particular, also on their organizational affiliation. The findings suggest a potential for designing interventions at organizational level for improvements of the psychosocial working environment for dentists.

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  • 7.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Søndergård Kristensen, Tage
    COPSOQ II: en uppdatering och språklig validering av den svenska versionen av en enkät för kartläggning av den psykosociala arbetsmiljön på arbetsplatser2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire version II (COPSOQ II) was developed by the Danish National Research Centre for the Working Environment (www.arbejdsmiljoforskning.dk) to be a valid instrument for the assessment of the psychosocial work environment and for facilitating communication between workplaces, work environment professionals, and researchers. It is a comprehensive, generic instrument including numerous dimensions based on an eclectic set of theories on psychosocial factors at work as well as on empirical research, rather than being linked to one particular theory. The existing Swedish version of COPSOQ II was translated from the Danish version of the questionnaire by a Danish-Swedish team of researchers, but has so far not been back-translated or subjected to psychometric analysis. The aim of this report is to present the overall results from the first steps of the validation process, including a revised Swedish version of the instrument. An international group of practitioners and researchers using COPSOQ meet regularly for exchange of experiences, discussions and decisions on the instrument’s continued development. This international group has agreed that new translations of COPSOQ should be based on the English version of the instrument. The ongoing validation of the Swedish version of COPSOQ therefore includes a back-translation from Swedish to English, followed by cognitive interviews for questionnaire development and a cross-sectional study combined with register data. Results from the back-translation procedure including a systematic evaluation process revealed challenges in relations to conceptual equivalence as well as a need for adjustments to improve clarity and the use of ordinary contemporary language. Cognitive interviews were conducted to identify potential problems in the questionnaire, to clarify how different concepts and questions were interpreted by the respondents, and thus to revise the Swedish version of COPSOQ. Informants were selected to achieve variation in age, gender, occupation, and region of residence. Individual interviews were performed with 26 informants using a think aloud approach combined with flexible concurrent probing based on an interview guide. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. The interviews were conducted in rounds followed by an initial analysis before adjustments of the questionnaire items were made. The initial analyses provided insight in questions which were difficult to understand or were understood in another way than expected, in addition to an understanding of how response options were used by informants. Based on the findings from the back-translation and the interviews, the Swedish version of the Swedish was revised and tested on new rounds of informants until it was functioning well. Results from the back-translation procedure indicate problems with lacking conceptual equivalence for a number of items in the Danish and English versions of COPSOQ. As a starting point the questions were adjusted for equivalence to the English version, but in a number of items equivalence to the original Danish version was preferred to be retained. Results from the interviews implicated that some formulations were adjusted in such a way that comprehensibility and relevance were given preference over equivalence. The present report presents all the decisions we have made about adjustments of the formulations and the consequences for conceptual equivalence. This is relevant to take into consideration, when results from Swedish and international studies are compared. The results of the project are also relevant in relation to the other language versions of COPSOQ, which are developed, based on the Danish version, as well as for decisions concerning the future international development of the instrument. The project will continue with complementary studies and analyses in relation to other aspects of validity. The study has been approved by the Regional Ethics Board in Southern Sweden and is funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (Forte).

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  • 8. Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Emotional work-family boundaries in the context of family business2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a family firm, individual family members’ emotions are important for the cohesion and the emotional climate of the family which may in the end affect the family firm performance. Therefore we argue that the role of emotions is important for family business- However, work and family have long been considered to be the main life spheres of individuals and it has been normative to keep work and family apart. As a consequence, these two life domains are often characterized by different emotion rules. The central point of such rules is that “being emotional” i.e. showing emotions is “appropriate” and “natural” in the private sphere whereas it is depicted as “inappropriate” or even “irrational” in the public in our case the business sphere. People are expected to behave emotionally different at home and at work by creating, developing and maintaining emotion boundaries between the firm and the family spheres However, in the context of a family business, work and family are spatially & temporally often impossible to separate. Additionally, the line between family relationships and business relationships is also thin. As a whole, in such in the context of a family business where work and family are de facto interwoven, emotion boundaries may be blurred. This creates challenges for family members such as: How do family members’ emotions interact in the two spheres? How are they managed? Why are emotions managed in specific ways and not others? And what are the implications for individuals, the family and the family business of such emotion management? To addressed these questions we introduce the concept of boundaries and how family members draw emotion boundaries in the context of family businesses in relation to time, space and genuine relationships. Depending on how emotions are managed by the individual family member, this can lead to emotional harmony or disharmony at the individual and/or group level. The purpose of this paper is to explain how family members create, develop and maintain emotion boundaries in the context of their family business where family and work are spatially and temporally intertwined and where genuine relations are at play. Further, we intend to explore consequences for family members, the family and the family business. This paper is based on a narrative from different members of a family business and how do they construct emotional boundaries and why do they do so. This paper concludes with a model about the role or emotional boundaries in the context of family business.

  • 9. Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Family members' display of emotions: Emotion rules and emotion boundary management in relation to time, space and genuine relations2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions have been pointed out as central for family capital and success of family businesses, but research about how family members manage emotions is lacking. This paper focuses on family members' display of emotions and their emotion boundary management. An analysis of the narratives of five family members illustrate that individuals have diverse views on emotions boundary management. Based on the emotions literature and boundary management, this reveals that time, space and genuine relationships are clues to the individual in how he or she manages emotions between work and family in a situation where both spheres are intertwined. It reveals that family members' creation and maintenance of emotion boundaries are related to their individual emotional harmony and/or dissonance where emotional dissonance may be displayed in order to respect the "family" emotion rule at the sacrifice of one’s own honest emotion. Emotion rules and emotion boundaries are thus developed and enacted differently and individually by each family business member in a three dimensional way – through time, space and genuine relations. This paper finally suggests that family members’ individual emotional harmony and/or dissonance in the long run leads to family emotion harmony and/or disharmony.

  • 10. Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Should I laugh or should I cry? An emotion perspective on work-family boundaries in family firms2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Work and family have for long been considered to be the main life spheres of individuals (Zedeck, 1992). Whereas it has been normative to keep work and family spheres apart (Ashforth, Kreiner & Fugate, 2000; Zerubavel, 1991), nowadays, the boundaries between the two are considered fluid indicating that elements navigate from one sphere to the other. This has been referred to the blurring of work and family domains and to the permeability of boundaries, leading to work-to-family and to family-to-work permeability (Frone, Russell & Copper, 1992; de Man, de Bruijn, & Groeneveld, 2008). In the context of a family business, work and family are de facto spatially and temporally hard, or even impossible, to separate where the boundaries between family and business are highly permeable. Permeability as well as its positive and negative consequences have been largely discussed in regards to “stress” and “energy” spilling over into the other sphere and/or crossing over to someone else’s sphere (see Westman, 2006). Permeability can relate to any elements that may navigate between the spheres, above all emotions (Languilaire, 2009). Emotions are central for the family business and due their permeability of domains may be affected by family emotions and vice-versa (see: Sharma, 2008; Björnberg & Nicholson, 2008; Brundin, Florin-Samuelsson & Melin, 2008). Studies have illustrated that emotions navigate between work and family and research on work-life conflicts is full of illustrations of the positive and negative spillover of emotions and their consequences in one or the other sphere. For example, happiness emerging from the workday may get transported to the dining table, anxiety about the family may affect one’s attitudes at work and frustration emerging from a Friday work meeting may affect one’s mood during the weekend. Haag and Sund’s (2015) research on divorce indicates the positive and negative spillover of emotions and their consequences in one or the other sphere of the family business. Likewise, Brundin and Sharma (2011) explain how the strong link between the family and the business spheres can lead to emotional messiness with a mix of positive and negative emotions at the same time related to the same issue, such as both loving and hating one’s sibling who is also the CEO. To manage such emotional messiness and to get a sense of balance between work and family, boundary management strategies can be developed (see Bulger, Matthews, & Hoffman, 2007; Kossek, Lautsch, & Eaton, 2005, Languilaire, 2009). Based on Ashforth et al., (2000) some family members may develop an integrating boundary management strategy based on a higher level of permeability to facilitate the integration of and the transition between work and family. By contrast, others may develop segmenting boundary management based on a lower level of permeability to avoid elements to transit between the spheres. In this context, family members may differently experience the permeability between family and work spheres in regards to their emotions between the two spheres: work and family. In that regard, work and family are characterized by different emotion rules (Hochschild, 1983) leading to the emergence of emotion boundaries (Languilaire, 2009). The central point of such rules is that “being emotional” and to show emotions is socially “appropriate” and “natural” in the private sphere whereas it is depicted as socially “inappropriate” or even “irrational” in the public sphere (see Hochschild, 1983; White & Brown, 1991). People are expected to behave emotionally different at home and at work by creating, developing and maintaining emotion rules and emotion boundaries in the work and the family spheres (Languilaire, 2009). As a whole, whereas any individual may be affected by emotion rules, the context of family businesses is particular and studies on such permeability is largely neglected, especially in relation to emotion aspects. As work and family are de facto so interwoven in family business, emotion boundaries may be blurred. The purpose of this paper is to explore family members’ creation and management of emotion rules and boundaries in the context of a family business and their implications. Our results have implications for the cohesion and the emotional climate of the family, which may in the end affect the family firm performance.

  • 11.
    Burger, Marybeth
    Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Bättre eller annorlunda?: Fem studier av förbättringsarbete inom Region Skåne2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport handlar om förbättringsarbete inom Region Skåne och är ett resultat av ett samarbete mellan Malmö högskola och Utvecklingscentrum, Region Skåne. Rapporten bygger på fem magisteruppsatser från Malmö högskolas socionomutbildning med inriktning mot verksamhetsutveckling. Uppsatserna examinerades våren 2010 och har i denna utgåva skrivits om till populärvetenskapliga kapitel, av uppsatsförfattarna själva, i syfte att på ett lättare sätt tillgängliggöra resultaten av studierna. Ambitionen är att på ett enkelt och kortfattat sätt presentera fem gedigna arbeten och deras resultat samt vad de olika studierna gemensamt kan lära oss om förbättringsarbetet i Region Skåne.Författarna och deras kapitel: Mary Beth Burger & Jasmina Dizdarevic – ”Vi var som isolerade öar” Carina Johansson & Lii Ljunggren – Resursers betydelse för förbättringsarbete Marie Andersson – Verka för att samverka Johanna Hansen & Sara Larsson – Följs rutiner för en god patientsäkerhet? Maria Toft & Martin Jönsson – Hinder eller hjälp? Som redaktör för skriften står Mats Fred (fd. Andersson), projektledare på Centrum för tillämpad arbetslivsforskning, som under projektets gång också verkat som samordnare av uppsatserna. Förordet till rapporten är författat av Bertil Lindström, direktör på Utvecklingscentrum, Region Skåne.

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  • 12. Eskebaek, Svetlana
    et al.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Creating Sustainable Culture for Sustainability2013In: Conference Proceedings: 22d Nordic Academy of Management Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapidly changing environment in which organizations operate demands adequate and fast organizational response. Organizations answer such demand with new forms of organizing among those projects. Project management can be seen as a process tool to react on fast changing environment and to be efficient and competitive. But beyond what could be seen as the structure of the organizations, the major distinguishing feature of successful companies as well as one of the most powerful factors for their success is their organizational culture. Even if in research, there is still no unique definition of organizational culture, there is no disagreement about the importance of organizational culture and its roles for attaining organization coherence and performance. Culture can be seen as the strategic key of a competitive advantage. Beyond such consensus, research is still at its infancy when it comes to understand how to develop a sustainable organizational culture. The question becomes whether project management as a form of organization and a set of tools to implement change could in fact become a tool to develop a sustainable culture. This paper aims at exploring to what extent a sustainable organizational culture for sustainability could be a sustainable outcome of a sustainable project. This paper is largely based on a literature review where few examples are used to illustrate how Agile or Extreme Project Management approaches have been discussed and used as a relevant way to use project tools and techniques to create sustainable organizational culture. The paper also shows the centrality of project as an organizational pattern to develop sustainable culture of adaption and flexibility.

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  • 13.
    Forssell, Rebecka
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Exploring cyberbullying and face-to-face bullying in working life Prevalence, targets and expressions2016In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 58, p. 454-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While cyberbullying among children and adolescents is a well-investigated phenomenon, few studies have centred on adults' exposure to cyberbullying in working life. Drawing on a large sample of 3371 respondents, this study investigates the prevalence of cyberbullying and face-to-face bullying in Swedish working life and its relation to gender and organisational position. Using a cyberbullying behaviour questionnaire (CBQ), the result shows that 9.7% of the respondents can be labelled as cyberbullied in accordance with Leymann's cut-off criterion. Fewer respondents, .7%, labelled themselves as cyberbullied and 3.5% labelled themselves as bullied face-to-face. While no significant relationships with gender or organisational position was found for individuals exposed to face-to-face bullying, this study showed that men to a higher degree than women were exposed to cyberbullying. Moreover, individuals with a supervisory position were more exposed to cyberbullying than individuals with no managerial responsibility. (C) 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 14. Hedenus, Anna
    et al.
    Ulfsdotter Eriksson, Ylva
    Wikstrand, Frida
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Individual and Society (IS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Backman, Christel
    Yrkesbeskrivningar för vägledning: en fråga om individens fria val eller arbetskraftens selektering?2015Report (Other academic)
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  • 15.
    Herz, Marcus
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Utvärdering av Oden. Delrapport 3: Samverkan2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Malmö högskolas uppdrag var att undersöka vilka ungdomar som tar del av insatsen, om insatsen når sina mål samt analysera hur de olika samverkansparterna upplever samverkan med Oden. Verksamhetsstatistiken visar att Oden når en mycket hög grad av måluppfyllelse. Även i jämförelse med andra projekt framstår Oden som ett lyckat projekt, även om det är svårt att jämföra projekt då de alla har olika förutsättningar. Dock pekar även verksamhetsstatistiken på en annan sak, som även har uppmärksammats tidigare, nämligen att en mycket stor andel av deltagarna är män. Vi är medvetna om att handläggarna uppmärksammat detta och att ett nytt initiativ startats (Freja) och det ska bli intressant att se vilken betydelse detta får. Dock har vårt uppdrag här inte varit att följa Freja och vi kan därför inte heller uttala oss om Frejas resultat. Varför har Oden så hög måluppfyllnad? I en tidigare uppföljning uppmärksammades att Oden inte har någon ”bortre parantes”. Deltagarna är alltså i Oden tills de av någon anledning flyttar till en annan kommun eller av annan anledning slutar. Det betyder att många deltagare har varit länge i Oden. Den genomsnittliga tiden som deltagare befinner sig i Oden har ökat, då vi jämför med den tidigare utvärderingen. Det finns även en ökad spridning, jämfört med tidigare. Detta visar det i den senare perioden finns fler som befinner sig längre period i Oden, men även fler som är där kortare. Trots sina goda resultat finns det, som i alla projekt, en del utmaningar att tänka på inför framtida arbete i Odens eller någon annans regi. Projektformen har visserligen fördelar, som att det kan innebära en ökad flexibilitet och en möjlighet att pröva nya arbetssätt. Men, projektifieringen av denna typ av arbete är i sig en utmaning; att bedriva tidsbegränsade projekt för ett långsiktigt socialt förändringsarbete innebär per definition en motsättning. Projektifieringen medför en kortsiktighet och många gånger en otydlighet. Det hänger delvis ihop med att det ofta finns flera projekt, både kommunala, kommunövergripande och frivilliga, som riktar sig till samma eller en liknande målgrupp. Detta brukar betyda en otydlighet både för den personal (dvs. samverkansparter) som ska använda sig av projektet och de deltagare projektet riktar sig till. Det är detta som samverkansparterna i denna rapport ger uttryck för. Ibland kan det också innebära olika villkor för olika deltagare, det har dock inte framkommit bland samverkansparterna i denna rapport. En annan viktig utmaning, som hänger ihop med projektifieringen, är den personbundenhet som blir tydlig när samverkansparterna i utvärderingen talar om Oden. För några av dem tycks personalen i Oden vara viktigare än projektet Oden. I sig är det inget problem, inte heller är det särskilt konstigt. En av få saker som går att peka på som fungerande i socialt förändringsarbete är relationsbyggande arbete, därför blir naturligtvis också personalen så viktig både för de som ska remittera någon till Oden och för deltagarna. Å ena sidan går det att hävda att Oden ger sin personal möjligheten att arbeta nära och långsiktigt med de personer som remitteras dit och med de olika myndigheternas personal, å andra sidan innebär personbundenheten som uppstår av det arbetet också en sårbarhet. Det kan innebära att det kan vara svårt att upprätthålla samma goda resultat om människor slutar eller om Odenliknande verksamheter skulle spridas och implementeras på andra platser. Det finns också anledning att tro att det inte är säkert att samma arbete kan utföras om projektet skulle permanentas eftersom det ofta innebär mindre flexibilitet och ibland också ökade krav på ”effektivitet” eller anpassning till en specifik styrmodell som ”evidensbasering” eller New Public Management. Samverkan mellan myndigheterna och de olika kontaktpersonerna tycks fungera relativt väl. De flesta känner till Oden och vet vart de kan vända sig. Samtidigt är frågan om samverkan följer samma mönster avseende personbundenheten. Det är i första hand samverkan mellan personer inom kommunen eller mellan kommuner som fungerar väl, däremot tycks det inte vara lika fast förankrat på respektive arbetsplats. Slutligen finns det en fråga all form av socialt, socialpedagogiskt eller socialt förändringsarbete bör fråga sig. Hur kommer det sig att det krävs projekt för att arbeta med denna typ av arbete? Hur kommer det sig exempelvis att en handläggare på försörjningsstöd inte har utrymme i sin tjänst för att arbeta med socialt förändringsarbete utan att det arbetet behöver läggas över på ett projekt? I Odens fall finns det vissa svar på de frågorna. När små kommuner kan ha svårt att själva bära alla olika former av verksamheter som krävs finns det ett behov av samordning. Men, trots detta, finns det anledning att ställa frågan i vilken grad detta bör ingå i ordinarie verksamheter eller ligga utanför dem, och i så fall vilka vinster eller förluster de olika organisationsformerna innebär.

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  • 16.
    Holmgren, Johan
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Ramstedt, Linda
    Sweco Society AB, Gjörwellsgatan 22, Stockholm, SE-100 26, Sweden.
    An extended TAPAS-Z model and a case study of the transport of forest products2017In: Procedia Computer Science, E-ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 109, p. 343-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We contribute an extension of the agent-based freight transport analysis model TAPAS-Z, whose aim is to simulate decision- making and other activities in transport chains. TAPAS-Z is a further development of the TAPAS model, and it enables stochastic variation, based on statistical distributions, of the locations of senders and receivers of freight, hence providing improved support for simulation of transport between larger regions. The model extension presented in this paper enables stochastic sampling of sender and receiver locations from historically known data, which we argue is beneficial in those situations where such data exist. We also contribute a case study where we used our extended TAPAS-Z model to simulate transport of timber from forest felling places to a Swedish paper mill. The case study illustrates how we recommend conducting a case study using the extended TAPAS-Z model. The aim of the study was to assess the possible implications of a structural change from a time-based to a distance-based Eurovignette system for heavy freight trucks in Sweden, which will lead to increased costs for most road users. As a mitigation action for the increased costs, we studied the possibility to use heavier trucks than the currently allowed 60 tonne trucks. The simulation results suggest that an introduction of a distance-based Eurovignette is expected to cause a small modal shift from road to rail for the studied type of transport. Furthermore, an introduction of larger freight trucks is expected to lead to a complete shift to road transport.

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  • 17.
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    "Finnas för alla medborgare…”: utvärderingsrapport om det mångkulturella perspektivet inom utbildningen Skydd mot olyckor (SMO)2016Report (Other academic)
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  • 18.
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marginalized Masculinities and Exclusion in the New Low-Skill Service Sector in Sweden2017In: Marginalized Masculinities: Contexts, Continuities and Change / [ed] Chris Haywood, Thomas Johansson, Routledge, 2017, p. 67-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses low-skill service jobs in Sweden from a gender perspective. It then examines marginalization of masculinity by studying how the transformation from an industrial economy to a service- and knowledge-based economy has changed the labour market. Masculine work has been socially constructed as being dangerous, hard, dirty and sweaty, all of which has created a strong working identity. Low-skill service jobs include lower wages and more insecure employment contracts than the manual, industrial work that was available previously; however, it is often the only employment available for both men and for women. Dual labour market theory describes the labour market as dual and segmented. To analyse the gendered labour market from this theoretical perspective gives valuable contribution to understanding the polarized service sector. The data from Statistics Sweden show that male participation in high-touch jobs has actually increased in the country, both in absolute terms and in relation to the increase with its female counterpart. 

  • 19.
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Unga som varken arbetar eller studerar - ett kommunalt perspektiv2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I artikeln analyseras unga (16–24 år) utanför jobb och studier utifrån en mindre kommuns perspektiv. De tre kommuner som används i studien är Höör, Hörby och Eslöv. En viktig upptäckt är att av de 16–19-åringar som inte arbetade eller studerade under ett helt kalenderår (år 2010), var det ca 75 procent som befann sig i samma situation året därpå. För gruppen 20–24-åringar var denna andel lägre, drygt 50 procent, men även denna andel bör ses som hög. Det betyder att risken att hamna i en, mer eller mindre, permanent situation av inaktivitet är hög för dem som tidigt hamnar utanför studier och arbete. Inte minst av denna anledning är det viktigt att åtgärder sätts in tidigt. Två teman är genomgående i respondenternas berättelser. Det första är att det behövs mer samarbete mellan olika instanser så att individen slipper ”bollas runt” mellan olika handläggare. Det andra temat handlar om behovet av stöd från en ”klok vuxen” som kan guida och stödja individen. När det gäller det kommunala informationsansvaret (KIA) har alla tre kommuner ett strukturerat arbetssätt med utsedda ansvariga. De uppfyller därigenom lagens krav att löpande informera sig om de ungdomar som inte befinner sig i gymnasieskolan och som inte fullgjort gymnasiet. Problemet är dock att respondenterna inte anser sig ha några åtgärder att erbjuda de ungdomar som upptäcks genom KIA. Någon form av praktik eller motsvarande hade varit en lämplig åtgärd för den här gruppen, som i stor utsträckning har tröttnat på skolan. Vidare saknas en tydlig målsättning för KIA-arbetet.

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  • 20.
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Utvärdering av Oden. Delrapport 2: Deltagare, aktiviteter, metoder2016Report (Other academic)
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  • 21.
    Håkansson, Peter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Tovatt, Caroline
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Networks and labor market entry: a historical perspective2017In: Labor history, ISSN 0023-656X, E-ISSN 1469-9702, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 67-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how recruitment practices have changed over time. Networks and contacts are more important today for labor market entry than was the case in the latter half of the twentieth century. There may be two explanations for this: the short-run explanation and the long-run explanation. The short-run explanation derives from fluctuations in unemployment. When unemployment is high, competition for every vacancy is tougher and networks become more important for the job seeker. This has been the case in Sweden since 1991, when unemployment increased to new levels not experienced since the 1930s. In the long run, there has been a change in recruitment practices due to institutional change. A clear pattern is that the importance of social networks has increased, while the significance of public institutions (i.e. the Public Employment Service) has decreased.

  • 22.
    Jönsson, Sandra
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Psychosocial work environment and prediction of job satisfaction among Swedish registered nurses and physicians: a follow-up study2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the health care sector was subject to considerable changes during the 1990s: decreased costs, related staff redundancies and high rates of sick leave. The situation has now changed, and the sector is not facing the same all-embracing and turbulent changes. In addition, there is a shortage of nurses and physicians and a difficulty in retaining qualified staff. Regarding the psychosocial work environment, there is a lack of studies where both physicians and nurses are in focus. It is from a managerial perspective important to take a holistic approach towards questions regarding the work environment in general and the psychosocial work environment in particular. The aims of this study were to analyse similarities and differences in Registered Nurses and physicians’ experience of quantitative and qualitative demands, control, role conflicts, role clarity, social support and job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009 and to analyse the stability in the prediction of job satisfaction over time. Questionnaires regarding psychosocial work environment aspects were distributed in 2002 and 2009, and a total of 860 nurses and 866 physicians answered the questionnaire. Independent t tests and linear stepwise regression analyses were conducted. The results indicate that the work environment has improved between 2002 and 2009 and that nurses experience their psychosocial working environment as more satisfactory than physicians. Social support, control, role conflicts, role clarity and qualitative demands were the best predictors of job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009. Quantitative demands did not contribute to predicting job satisfaction. Variables predicting job satisfaction are quite stable over time and are quite comparable for both nurses and physicians.

  • 23.
    Jönsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Cowen Forssell, Rebecka
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Bäckström, Martin
    Assessing exposure to bullying through digital devices in working life: two versions of a cyberbullying questionnaire (CBQ)2017In: Psychology, ISSN 2152-7180, E-ISSN 2152-7199, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 477-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is two folded: 1) to analyze the reliability and validity of a cyberbullying behaviour questionnaire (CBQ) in working life and 2) to analyze the reliability and validity of a short version of a cyberbullying behaviour questionnaire (CBQ-S) in working life. A total of 3371 working adults (MAge = 49.85 years) in Sweden, and 238 (MAge = 35.61 years) in the USA participated in the study. The results of the Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling (ESEM) showed that the one-factor model had an excellent fit to data, and Cronbach’s alpha indicates that both scales are reliable. In addition, the criterion validity of the scales was demonstrated by significant correlations with the following theoretically relevant concepts: wellbeing, work engagement and intention to quit. The results of the study support the use of the CBQ and CBQ-S as reliable and valid measures of cyberbullying behaviour in working life.

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  • 24.
    Jönsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Denti, Leif
    Chen, Kahn
    Social climate and job control as mediators between leadership and learning from a cross-cultural perspective2015In: International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, ISSN 1470-5958, E-ISSN 1741-2838, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 135-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to examine the direct effects of empowering leadership on learning and the indirect or mediating role of social climate and job control from a cross-cultural perspective. Questionnaires were distributed to two furniture retail stores in Sweden and two stores in China belonging to the same company. The final sample consisted of 483 participants from the Chinese and 254 participants from the Swedish stores. The results of the structural equation modeling showed that there was a direct relationship between empowering leadership and learning (both in the Chinese and the Swedish sample). The study also showed that social climate had a mediating effect of empowering leadership and learning (both in the Chinese and the Swedish sample). In addition, the result indicated that job control had a mediating effect (Swedish sample). The model explained 38% of the variance in learning among the Chinese sample and 62% in the Swedish. This indicates that the tested factors are highly relevant in the context of learning. Despite some methodological limitations such as the cross-sectional design and problems with acquiescence in responses, the results indicate the complexity of the role of culture in organizational behavior. Managers working in increasingly globalized contexts need to take into consideration that some organizational behaviors gradually become more universal, whereas others remain culturally contingent. This article illustrates the complex relationship between leadership behavior, social climate, job control, and learning in the same corporate culture but in different cultural settings.

  • 25.
    Jönsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Schölin, Tobias
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Sten K Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Process of change: competence development as a restructuring strategy2016In: Journal of Management Development, ISSN 0262-1711, E-ISSN 1758-7492, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze and contextualize the outcomes of competence development as a restructuring strategy in a company that was significantly affected by the economic recession in 2008. Design/methodology/approach - In the context of restructuring, increased globalization has expanded international competition that in turn has put additional pressure on organizational transformation, restructuring, reorganization and rationalization Findings - The result indicates that the experience of learning, commitment and job satisfaction have decreased between T1 and T2 (no difference regarding self-efficacy Originality value - From this study, the authors can conclude that the outcomes of competence development programs are not easily interpreted. Depending on the purpose of the intervention, the results can be interpreted in different ways. It is important to approach the issue of competence development with a wise degree of skepticism

  • 26.
    Kroon, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Andreasson, Eskil
    Olsson, Pär
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Assessment of fracture energy of polyethylene2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semi-crystalline polymers, such as polyethylene, nylon, and PET, are widely used in engineering applications, and the fracture mechanics properties of these materials are therefore of great interest. One big challenge of these materials is that they are strongly rate-dependent, which makes it difficult to identify a rate-independent surface energy which can be considered as a material property. Instead dissipation processes at the advancing crack tip have to be lumped into an effective (and rate-dependent) work of fracture. In the present paper we assess a possible experimental strategy for determining the effective work of fracture for soft polymers.

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  • 27.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Integrating AND segmenting: An essential combination to reach work/non-work balance2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows that integrating and segmenting are complementary processes in individual’s work/non-work experiences. This paper is based on individuals’ self-narratives of 6 French middle-managers. This paper analyse qualitatively integrating and segmenting as work/non-work preferences and as work/non-work activities. It reveals that segmenting and integrating are experienced as two parallel strategies. Reaching long-term integration between one’s life domains is a long-term process essential to one’s work/non-work balance. However, such long-term objectives require in our contemporary and integrative society to daily segment some central work/non-work activities by drawing some of our boundaries more clearly on daily and short term. Their complementarities renders complexity to the segmentation-integration continuum leading to consider five archetypes of individuals in regard to their work/non-work experiences.

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  • 28.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    The role of work/non-work-friendly cities in reaching sustainable work/non-work equilibrium from a boundary perspective: An explorative study of four cities2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Attaining work-life balance is one of most important needs or the 21st century global population. The work-life issues have been mostly treated from a sociologic perspective (see for exemple Nordenmark, 2004), a work psychological perspective (see for exemple, Sonnentag and Kruel, 2006; Jones, Burke, & Westman, 2006) and from a business perspective (see for example Kossek & Lambert, 2005). Whereas in the first one the roles of societal values and social structures have been related with individuals' work-life balance, in the second one the roles individuals is in the centre and in the third, the roles of the employing organisations in enabling individuals to reach a balance have been discussed. Even if not that visible on the research agenda, work-life issues also belong to "urban studies". This paper intent to connect lifestyle migration to work/non-work process discussing what could be named as "work/non-work lifestyle migration". Based on the accepted proactive view of the work/non-work process, this paper deems work/non-work lifestyle migration as a "rational" or "cognitive" choices where individuals knowing their work/non-work preferences, will search for a context enabling such preferences to be enacted in a better way for a better outcome. By "finding" the right urban context, individuals, couples and families may have an opportunity to experience a sustainable work/non-work process where the urban context is enabling them reach a sustainable work/non-work equilibrium. Following the reasoning above, cities may use the "work/non-work" argument to attract people while convincing them that their cities, in comparison to others, will represent the "ideal" or "idyllic" context for enacting their work/non-work preferences and reaching sustainable work/non-work equilibrium. By enabling individual's work/non-work process and enabling individuals to reach work/non-work equilibrium, cities may, as organisations, become sustainable economically, environmentally and socially. Such cities could be referred as "sustainable work/non-work friendly cities". However, to what extent are in fact cities aware of their role in enabling people to reach work/non-work equilibrium? To what extent do cities think, "work/non-work" and integrate "work/non-work" while planning and developing the urban context? If cities do so, they may use "work/non-work" arguments in their information to potential migrants. One evidence is the discourse on transport management in urban context that points out how cities aim at reducing commuting time which is an essential component of work-life balance via "time based strain" and participate to the definition of "temporal boundaries". But are their other arguments? The purpose of the paper is to explore the information presented to potential migrants in cities to identify if and to what extent cities include a "work/non-work perspective" into their approach to urban development enabling individuals to reach sustainable work/non-work equilibrium.

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  • 29.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    The Work/Non-Work Experience: What About A Gay Experience? Setting a temptative research agenda2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing work and non-work is central for individuals’ well-being however to different extents and to different manners for diverse individuals. For organisations, managing work and non-work becomes central to the development of healthy organisations especially one considering individuals in the centre. To truly be a healthy but above all a sustainable and healthy organisation, it is essential to listen to every employees. It is thus central to understand individuals as unique "human resource" and therefor to understand human resources in their diversity. Diversity can be discussed in diverse terms among those cultural or biological. The diversity in focus in this paper is sexual orientation in terms of "homosexuality" especially "gay homosexuality". The aim of this paper is to problematise and potentially hypothesise gay work/non-work experiences to set a research agenda. This dicussion is based on the accumulation of knowledge in the work/non-work life and the observation that the gay perspective in work-life tended to be forgotten whereas the society seems to give a place to these issues as the legalisation of the gay marriage is on the political agenda in serveral countries including the US, France and the UK recently. This discussion explores the extent to which the work/non-work experiences could be different just due to one’s sexual preferences of beeing gay.

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  • 30.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    The Work/Non-Work Experience: What About Gay Homosexuals? An Explorative Study of Gay Men in Sweden2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration is one of the strong arguments for enabling individuals to manage work/non-work relationships. Beside its noble intentions, integration may not solve individuals work/non-work conflict. Work-family scholars conclude that work-life programmes are seen as ”employer friendly” because they are good for business and the organisation’s ethical and social image rather than ”employee friendly”. In fact, work-life programmes that shall support all individuals to manage their work/non-work relationships often focus on certain individuals and share a unique view of work/non-work management. Recognizing the richness of the current knowledge in the work-life research, it becomes legitimate to discuss its relevancy for every individual. In that regards, it is observable that most of the research in the work-life field is based on a knowledge accumulated for heterosexual individuals in couple with children that represent the “accepted lifestyle” in most societies. Diversity in terms of alternative lifestyles among those single by choice, no children by choice, bohemian lifestyle as well as gay-lesbian-bi-trans lifestyle (LGBT) are largely less represented. I argue that practitioners but also researchers shall pay attention to every individual including ”alternative lifestyles”. This paper aims at problematizing and hypothesising work/non-work experiences in the context of alternative lifestyles from a boundary management perspective. This paper is foremost theoretical with illustrations from gay alternative lifestyle. Based on the view that boundary management is seen as a multi-level contextual process, this paper shows that when the “so call alternative lifestyle” is accepted at a given level, the work/non-work decisions/experiences are similar to the ones from an “accepted lifestyle” but when the “alternative lifestyle” is not accepted the work/non-work decisions become individuals’ burden so that one must develop his/her own work/non-work strategy. The multi- level contextual creates tensions for “alternative lifestyles” people and may lead to negative outcomes in their overall work/non-work experiences.

  • 31.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Work/non-work experiences in organisation: a narrative perspective and approach2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Attaining work-life balance is one of most important needs expressed by the 21st century global population in the western world. Such balance relies on boundary work and boundary management processes that when combine lead to individuals' work/non-work experiences. As experiences, this paper aims underlining and understanding how narratives participate to the work/non-work experiences. This paper reveals that six narratives are in fact present in individual's work/non-work experiences. It reveals that each of them is purposive. Together, narrative participate to diverse elements of the work/non-work experiences especially to boundary work, boundary management but also to the development of work/non-work self-identity or even to the development of the actual organisational formal and informal context. This paper thus suggests that further and deeper adopting a narrative perspective is needed to understand work/non-work experiences especially when combined with a "narrative approach" to access work/non-work experiences.

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  • 32.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Work/Non-Work Friendly Cities: Adopting a Human Perspective on Urban Sustainability2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Attaining work-life balance is one of most important needs for the 21st century global population. Traditionally, the work-life issues have been mostly treated from a sociologic perspective and from a business/HR perspective. Whereas in the first one the roles of societal values and social structures have been related with individuals' work-life balance, in the second one the roles of the employing organisations in enabling individuals to reach a balance have been discussed. Even if not visible on the research agenda, work-life issues also belong to "urban studies". This research bridges work-life studies with urban studies. The 2012 edition of Demographia World Urban Areas (http://www.demographia.com/db-worldua.pdf) identifies around 1500 urban areas in the world sheltering about 1.9 billion people, or 52% of the world's urban population. The report indicates that 850 urban areas in the world with a population of 500,000 or more represent 48% of the world's urban population (http://www.demographia.com/db-worldua.pdf). From a work-life perspective, urbanisation indicates that cities shall represent one context in which individuals may fulfil their "needs" or "wants" to meaningfully develop and management life domains. The purpose of this paper is to describe the urban elements affecting work/non-work experiences and their roles for individuals' boundary development and management

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  • 33.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Work/non-work oriented cities from a boundary management perspective2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Attaining work-life balance is one of most important needs for the 21st century global population. Traditionally, the work-life issues have been mostly treated from a sociologic perspective and from a business/HR perspective. Whereas in the first one the roles of societal values and social structures have been related with individuals' work-life balance, in the second one the roles of the employing organisations in enabling individuals to reach a balance have been discussed. Even if not visible on the research agenda, work-life issues also belong to "urban studies". This research bridges work-life studies with urban studies because individuals connects cities to their work/non-work equilibrium.

  • 34.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Work/Non-Work Process and Outcome for Alternative Lifestyles2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim Recognizing the richness of the current knowledge in the work-life research, it becomes legitimate to discuss its relevancy for every individual. Indeed, it is observable that most of this research in the worklife field is based on a knowledge accumulated for heterosexual individuals in couple with children that represent the “accepted lifestyle” in most societies. Diversity in terms of alternative lifestyles among those single-life by choice, no children by choice, bohemian lifestyle as well as gay-lesbian-bi-trans lifestyle (GLBT) are largely less represented. I argue that practitioners but also researchers shall pay attention to every individual including ”alternative lifestyles” including LGBT lifestyle. The aim of this paper is to problematize and potentially hypothesise work/non-work experiences alternative lifestyles from a boundary management perspective.

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  • 35.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Caulier-Gustavsson, Carole
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Entrepreneurs’ Tactics for Segmentation and Integration of Work, Family, Social Life and Private life.2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Caulier-Gustavsson, Carole
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Entrepreneurs’ tactics for segmentation and integration of work, family, social life and private life2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relations between work and personal life have long been on the public, business, and research agenda (see Hall & Richter, 1988; Kossek, et al., 2005). Such relations have been conceptualised in different ways going from “work-family relations (see Friedman & Greenhaus, 2000) to “work/non-work relations” (Languilaire, 2009) passing by “work-personal life relations”. In this paper, we refer to “work/non-work relations” where non-work is defined as there major life domains namely: the family, the social and the private (Languilaire, 2009). The accumulation of knowledge in the work/non-work relation is not to be undermined so that the work-life field has reached considerable development in understanding work/non-work challenges. Additionally, research on work/non-work relations points out that developing work/non-work strategies is essential to individual’s well-being (see Frone, Yardley, & Markel, 1997; Geurts & Demerouti, 2003; Poelmans, O'Driscoll, & Beham, 2005). As matter of fact, Kossek et al. (2005, p. 351) in the context of work and family relation, touched upon in 2005 upon what could be seen as individual strategies indicating that ”everyone has a preferred, even if implicit, approach for meshing work and family roles that reflects his or her values and the realities of his or her lives for organising and separating role demands and expectations in the realms of home and work”. (Kossek, et al., 2005, p. 351). Based on social cognitive theory and especially on Zerubavel's social mindscapes (see Zerubavel, 1991; Zerubavel, 1997), Nippert-Eng (1996) popularised in 1996 two major strategies to combine life domains, namely integration and segmentation. One the one hand, people wishing segmentation define strict lines because they do not accept a mixture betwen their life domains and want to avoid such mixtrure. On the other hand, people wishing integration define no lines and do not distinguish any life domains. Whereas several pieces of research have measured the degree of integration and segmentation (see Bulger, et al., 2007), what is actually done by individuals while segmenting and integrating is under-researched. Additionally, whereas most research focus on ”employees”, less empirical research is based in ”self-employed/entrepreneurs”. This research focuses on these two research gaps. To address these gaps, this research has its origins in the boundary perspective that “address the construction of work-family boundaries as a complex interplay between employees' strategies and preferences, the social contexts in which they are embedded, and both the idiosyncratic and cultural meanings attached to work and family” (Desrochers & Sargent, 2003, p. 5). Within the boundary perspective, individuals develop diverse types of boundaries enabling them to organise their life domains (work, family, social and private) so that they can enact their strategies for integration or segmentation. Several boundary types have been discussed in research among those the spatial, temporal and psychological boundaries (see Clark, 2000; Ahrenten, 1990). In an in-depth narrative analysis of individual’s work/non-work experiences, Languilaire (2009) indicates that seven boundaries are developped and managed by individuals. Each boundary is concerned with one specific aspect of one’s life namely: time, space, behaviours, people, thoughts, emotions and psychosomatic elements such as stress or energy. For each type of boundaries, individuals develop tactics enabling them as a whole to reach their ”wished” strategy towards segmention or integration. In line with Kossek, Noe, and DeMarr (1999) work/non-work tactics can be understood as the visible and practical activities enabling an individual to concretely place and transcend (i.e. cross) boundaries or, in turn, to render boundaries more or less permeable and/or flexible. For example, an integrator may develop tactics to segment time. One of theses tactics could be “by pre-deciding of time slots in his/her agenda” so that he/she ”reserves time” for each domain with no possible overlap. Based on empirical data, Languilaire (2009) develop an extensive (not exhaustive) list of tactics used by employed middle-managers. This list will be the base for the analysis of this research. Based on Languilaire (2009), this research deductively describes which tactics entrepreneurs/self-employed people are using to manage the relations between their life domains in a satisfying way, i.e. in line with their strategy. This research is based on qualitative interviews of entrepreneurs/self-employed and qualitative analysis in a form of content analysis. At this date (submission date) data is being processed.

  • 37.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Lundsten, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Missing voices on meaningful relationships in time and space2017In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Languilaire, Jean-Charles Emile
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Muhonen, TuijaMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).Berthelsen, HanneMalmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).Witmer, HopeMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).Lundsten, JonasMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    COMMUNITY, WORK AND FAMILY: What are we talking about after 10 years?2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 39.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Exploring gender harassment among university teachers and researchers2016In: Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, ISSN 2050-7003, E-ISSN 1758-1184, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 131-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of gender harassment and how it is related to different organisational factors, ill-health and job satisfaction among women and men working as university teachers and researchers. Design/methodology/approach – A web questionnaire was conducted in a university college in South Sweden. The final sample consisted of 322 participants, 186 women and 136 men. Findings – The results showed that gender harassment was more prevalent among women than men, and among senior lecturers and professors than lecturers. Gender harassment was associated with high job demands, less fair leadership style of the immediate manager and job dissatisfaction for both women and men. For women, there was also an association between gender harassment, ill-health and gender of the immediate manager. For men, poorer social organisational climate was related to gender harassment, but contrary to women, gender harassment was not related to the gender of the immediate manager. Research limitations/implications – Even though the research was conducted only in one university, the results imply that gender harassment can have negative consequences for teachers and researchers. As the immediate manager’s leadership style seems to be associated with the occurrence of gender harassment, universities should take this into consideration in their leadership programs. Originality/value – The paper highlights gender harassment, a subtle form of sexual harassment, among university teachers and researchers.

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  • 40.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Gender harassment among university teachers and researchers: an explorative study2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no Issue S1, p. 614-614Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examined the prevalence of gender harassment and it's associations to different organisational factors, ill‐health and job satisfaction among university teachers and researchers in Southern Sweden. Altogether 322 participants, 186 women and 136 men, responded to a web questionnaire. The results showed that gender harassment was more prevalent among women than men, and among senior lecturers and professors than lecturers. Gender harassment was associated with high job demands, less fair leadership style of the immediate manager, and job dissatisfaction for both women and men. For women, there was also an association between gender harassment, ill‐health and gender of the immediate manager. For men, poorer social organisational climate was related to gender harassment, but not the gender of the immediate manager. As the immediate manager's leadership style seems to be associated with the occurrence of gender harassment, universities should take this into consideration in their leadership programs.

  • 41.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Ökad rörlighet på arbetsmarknaden - Utvärdering av Medarbetarcentrum Sjuhärad2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På uppdrag av Sjuhärads kommunalförbund har en utvärdering av Medarbetarcentrum Sjuhärad genomförts. Sjuhärads kommunalförbund bedriver Medarbetarcentrum inom ramen för projektet Ökad hälsa bland kommunanställda i Sjuhärad under 2006 – 2008. Målsättning med Medarbetarcentrums verksamhet är att med hjälp av karriärvägledning, jobbförmedling och cirkulationsringar öka frivillig rörlighet och undvika s.k. inlåsning, dvs. upplevelsen av att inte vara i det arbete och/eller på den arbetsplatsen man önskar sig samtidigt som man anser sig ha begränsade möjligheter att byta arbete. En ökad frivillig rörlighet på arbetsmarknaden kan förebygga negativa effekter av inlåsningsfenomenet på de anställdas hälsa och gynna såväl individer, organisationer som samhället i stort. Utvärderingen har haft två övergripande syften, dels att ge underlag för förändringar och/eller förbättringar, dels att ge underlag för beslut om projektets framtid. Författaren arbetar vid IMER samt Centrum för tillämpad arbetslivsforskning på Malmö högskola och rapporten ingår i rapportserien Malmö högskolas utvärderingsrapporter som ges ut av Enheten för kompetensutveckling och utvärdering.

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  • 42.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Alm, Fayme
    "Det var inte för att jag är kvinna": Kvinnors förnekande av könsdiskriminering2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kvinnor i Sverige har fortfarande inte tillgång till maktpositioner i samma utsträckning som män. Dock finns det en tendens att kvinnor över lag förnekar att de personligen blir utsatta för diskriminering. Hur resonerar kvinnor som haft chefspositioner kring utsattheten för könsdiskriminering? Denna artikel bygger på en studie där kvinnliga chefer och specialister intervjuats om sin karriärutveckling och hur de reflekterar över eventuella upplevelser av könsdiskriminering. Analysen visar att förnekelse är den allmänna reaktionen bland de intervjuade kvinnorna, åtminstone initialt i intervjuerna. Flera av de intervjuade kvinnorna framhöll att om eller när diskriminering skett var det inte riktat mot dem som individer. Detta är i linje med tidigare studier, som visat att kvinnor erkänner att det finns könsdiskriminering på samhällsnivå, men förnekar att de själva blivit utsatta för negativ särbehandling på grund av kön. Bakomliggande orsaker till detta något paradoxala fenomen diskuteras i artikeln. Eftersom kvinnor i maktposition har möjlighet att påverka, är det angeläget att lyfta fram hur även de gör kön och därmed bidrar till reproducering av den manliga normen i samhället. Studien vill inte skuldbelägga utan bidra till förändring genom att öka medvetandet hos kvinnor i chefspositioner om förekomsten av könsdiskriminerade mönster.

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  • 43.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Jönsson, Sandra
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Bäckström, Martin
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Consequences of cyberbullying behaviour in working life2017In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 376-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore health- and work-related outcomes of cyberbullying behaviour and the potential mediating role of social organisational climate, social support from colleagues and social support from superiors. Design/methodology/approach – Altogether 3,371 respondents participated in a questionnaire study. Findings – The results of this study indicate that social organisational climate can have a mediating role in the relationship between cyberbullying behaviour and health, well-being, work engagement and intention to quit. Contrary to earlier face-to-face bullying research, the current study showed that cyberbullying behaviour had stronger indirect than direct relationships to health, well-being, work engagement and intention to quit. Practical implications – Communication through digital devices in work life is becoming more prevalent, which in turn increases the risk for cyberbullying behaviour. Organisations need therefore to develop occupational health and safety policies concerning the use of digital communication and social media in order to prevent cyberbullying behaviour and its negative consequences. Originality/value – Cyberbullying behaviour among working adults is a relatively unexplored phenomenon and therefore this study makes valuable contribution to the research field.

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  • 44.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Jönsson, Sandra
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Bäckström, Martin
    Lund Univ, Dept Psychol, Lund, Sweden.
    Forssell, Rebecka
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Assessing Exposure to Cyberbullying Behaviour in Working Life2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no Issue S1, p. 22-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse the reliability and validity of a cyberbullying behaviour questionnaire (CBQ) in working life. Further aim was to analyse the reliability and validity of a short version of a cyberbullying behaviour questionnaire (CBQ‐S) in working life. Altogether 3 371 working adults in Sweden, and 238 in the USA participated in the study. The results of the confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) showed that the one‐factor CFA model had an excellent fit to data, and Cronbach's alpha indicates that both scales are reliable. In addition, the convergent validity of the scales was demonstrated by significant correlations with the following theoretically relevant concepts: wellbeing, work engagement and intention to quit. The results of the study support the use of the CBQ and CBQ‐S as reliable and valid measures of cyberbullying behaviour in working life.

  • 45.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Skolledarskap och resiliens2016In: Upplyftande ledarskap / [ed] Bim Riddersporre, Magnus Erlandsson, Natur & Kultur , 2016, p. 104-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Nyqvist, Eva
    et al.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Belastningssymptomer og nedsat arbejdsevne: en udfordring for dagens og morgendagens tandpleje. (Sekundär publication)2017In: Tandlægebladet, ISSN 0039-9353, Vol. 121, no 8, p. 690-697Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Strain symptoms and work ability – a challenge for the public dental health service. The Public Dental Health Service (PDHS) in Sweden is challenged by increasing sickness rates, difficulties in recruitment and an expected high staff turnover due to upcoming retirements. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-rated health and strain symptoms for different work areas and occupational groups among dental care staff and to analyse associations between strain symptoms, effective commitment to the workplace and self-rated work ability. An online questionnaire based mainly on scales and items from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was sent to all PDHS staff in four regions of Sweden resulting in a response rate of 76% (n = 1,345). ANOVA and exploratory cluster analyses were used in addition to descriptive and correlational analyses. The current study confirms the overall picture from previous research with respect to employees of the Swedish PDHS. In particular, dentists from general practice, have a stressful work environment. The study contributes with new knowledge on how work-related stress, burnout symptoms and sleeping trouble (strain symptoms) differ according to work area and occupation. Also, strain symptoms were related to self-rated work ability and affective commitment to the workplace. This knowledge is important for the sector in order to consider the opportunity of integrating work environment, health, and wellbeing of staff into the planning of a sustainable future dental organization.

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  • 47. Nyqvist, Eva
    et al.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Belastningssymtom och sviktande arbetsförmåga: en utmaning för tandvården2016In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, no 14, p. 54-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Public Dental Health Service (PDHS) in Sweden has been challenged by increasing sickness rates among staff and difficulties in recruitment of staff , as well as a high staff turnover due to expected retirements. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-rated health and strain symptoms for different work areas and occupational groups amongst dental care staff , and to analyse associations between strain symptoms, affective commitment to the workplace and self-rated work ability. An online questionnaire was sent to all PDHS staff in four regions of Sweden. Questions were mainly based on scales from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. A resulting response rate of 76 percent (n = 1345) was obtained. ANOVA and exploratory cluster analyses were used, in addition to descriptive and correlational analyses. The current study supported the view of previously reported research in Sweden with respect to employees of PDHS. In particular, non-managerial dentists in general practice from general practice have a stressful work environment. However, the study does contribute with new knowledge on how work-related stress, burnout symptoms and sleeping trouble (strain symptoms) differed according to work area and occupation. Furthermore, strain symptoms were linked to self-rated work ability and affective commitment to the workplace. The processes by which the work environment, health, and well-being of staff can be integrated is important knowledge for the dental field to consider when planning a future sustainable dental organization.

  • 48.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Sandell, Niklas
    Arbetsrehabilitering och myndighetssamverkan: Utvärdering av Samordningsförbundet i Svedala2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett i den politiska debatten centralt område är arbetsrehabilitering. Inom detta område går det att se en ökad politisk aktivitet som många gånger mynnar ut i begreppet ”samverkan”. Ropet på samverkan beror möjligen på att det blir allt svårare för enskilda myndigheter att såväl överblicka som hantera sitt verksamhetsfält i takt med att omvärlden ter sig allt mer komplex. Föreliggande rapport bygger på en utvärdering av Samordningsförbundet i Svedala utförd av Mikael Ottosson och Niklas Sandell. Mikael Ottosson är historiker och verksam på Centrum för tillämpad arbetslivsforskning (CTA) vid Malmö högskola och Niklas Sandell är företagsekonom och verksam på Rådet för KommunalEkonomisk Forskning och Utbildning (KEFU) vid Lunds universitet. Utvärderingens primära syfte är att belysa Samordningsförbundet i Svedala som det såg ut vid slutet av 2009. Utvärderingen fokuserar fyra områden: syfte och mål, organisation, innehåll och effektivitet.

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  • 49.
    Peter, Håkansson
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Nilsson, Anders
    Yrkesutbildningens formering i Sverige 1940-19752013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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  • 50.
    Scholten, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö högskola, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    The opaque gendered lens: barriers to recruitment and career development2017In: Gender in Management, ISSN 1754-2413, E-ISSN 1754-2421, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 47-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose – This paper aims to reveal gendered leadership constructs that hinder a competency-based view of leadership in Swedish-based global companies and the implications for leadership recruitment and development to top management positions. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on qualitative semi-structured interviews, which have been analyzed using a gender analytic framework to identify how senior management, Human resource management and leadership trainees are discussing leadership and career development. Findings – Three themes were identified as clouding the issue of gender-equal leadership practices thereby creating an opaque gendered lens of who is defined as eligible for leadership positions. The three themes were: symbols as gendered images, counting heads – preserving the existing system and illusive gender inclusion. Research limitations/implications – Recruitment practices were identified as contributors to homosocial practices that perpetuate male-dominated leadership representation. However, specific recruitment practices were not fully explored. Practical implications – The potential use of gender equality as a sustainable management practice for competitive organizations to recruit and develop talented people. Social implications – To create resilient and gender-equal recruitment and leadership development practices. Originality/value – This research offers an original perspective on gender representation at the senior management level in global companies by revealing gendered leadership constructs in the leadership recruitment and development process as antecedents to unequal gender representation in senior management positions.

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