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  • 1.
    Afonso, Damien
    et al.
    Laboratory of Photochemistry, Department of Drug Sciences, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125, Catania, Italy.
    Valetti, Sabrina
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Nanologica AB, Södertälje, SE-151 36, Sweden.
    Fraix, Aurore
    Laboratory of Photochemistry, Department of Drug Sciences, Viale Andrea Doria 6, Catania, 95125, Italy.
    Bascetta, Claudia
    Laboratory of Photochemistry, Department of Drug Sciences, Viale Andrea Doria 6, Catania, 95125, Italy.
    Petralia, Salvatore
    STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, Catania, I-95121, Italy.
    Conoci, Sabrina
    STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, Catania, I-95121, Italy.
    Feiler, Adam
    Nanologica AB, Södertälje, 151 36, Sweden; Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SE-100 44, Sweden.
    Sortino, Salvatore
    Laboratory of Photochemistry, Department of Drug Sciences, Viale Andrea Doria 6, Catania, 95125, Italy.
    Multivalent mesoporous silica nanoparticles photodelivering nitric oxide with carbon dots as fluorescent reporters2017Inngår i: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 9Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Amino-terminated mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedding carbon dots (MSCD) formed by calcination were functionalized with a nitric oxide (NO) photodonor (1) to give a robust MSCD-1 conjugate. The intense fluorescence of MSCDs was strongly quenched in MSCD-1 by effective energy transfer. Visible light excitation of MSCD-1 liberates NO, suppresses the energy transfer mechanism and leads to concomitant fluorescence restoration of the MSCD scaffold, which acts as an optical reporter for the released NO. The MSCD-1 hybrid is also able to encapsulate the highly hydrophobic photosensitizer temoporfin, preserving the fluorescence reporting function.

  • 2.
    Albèr, Cathrine
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Engblom, Johan
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Hydration of Hyaluronan: Effects on Structural and Thermodynamic Properties2015Inngår i: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 119, nr 11, s. 4211-4219Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a frequently occurring biopolymer with a large variety of functions in nature. During the past 60 years, there have been numerous reports on structural and dynamic behavior of HA in water. Nevertheless, studies covering a wider concentration range are still lacking. In this work, we use isothermal scanning sorption calorimetry for the first time to investigate hydration-induced transitions in HA (sodium hyaluronate, 17 kDa). From this method, we obtain the sorption isotherm and the enthalpy and the entropy of hydration. Thermotropic events are evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and structure analysis is performed with X-ray scattering (SWAXS) and light and scanning electron microscopy. During isothermal hydration, HA exhibits a glass transition, followed by crystallization and subsequent dissolution of HA crystals and formation of a one-phase solution. Structural analysis reveals that the crystal may be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with space group P212121. Crystallization of HA was found to occur either through endothermic or exothermic processes, depending on the temperature and water content. We propose a mechanism of crystallization that explains this phenomenon based on the interplay between the hydrophobic effect and strengthening of hydrogen bonds during formation of crystals. The combined results were used to construct a binary phase diagram for the HA–water system.

  • 3.
    Alenezi, Ali
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Naito, Yoshihito
    Oral Implant Center, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan.
    Terukina, Takayuki
    Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Musashino University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Prananingrum, Widyasri
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Prosthodontics and Oral Implantology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan.
    Jinno, Yohei
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tagami, Tatsuaki
    Drug Delivery and Nano Pharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Aichi, Japan.
    Ozeki, Tetsuya
    Drug Delivery and Nano Pharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Aichi, Japan.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Controlled release of Clarithromycin from PLGA microspheres enhances bone regeneration in rabbit calvaria defects2017Inngår i: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 106, nr 1, s. 201-208Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the controlled release effect of Clarithromycin loaded in PLGA microspheres in a rabbit calvaria defect model. Methods: Clarithromycin-loaded PLGA microspheres (MSPs) were formulated by modified O/W single emulsion/solvent evaporation method. After characterization, in vivo animal experiment was conducted. Four critical size bone defects were created in the calvaria of New Zealand White rabbits (n=21, n=7/time point). The bone defects were randomly designated to 4 groups: Group 1: No augmentation (sham), Group 2: beta-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), Group 3: beta-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with 0.12 µg clarithromycin, and Group 4: beta-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with 6.12 µg PLGA microspheres (loaded with 0.12 µg clarithromycin). After 2, 4 and 12 weeks of healing, the levels of bone regeneration were evaluated using micro- computed tomography and histology. Results: The average size of the PLGA microspheres was 26.38 μm that showed 94% encapsulation efficacy with clarithromycin. Clarithromycin release from PLGA microspheres revealed sustained release for around 4 weeks with approximately 50% release of clarithromycin during the first week. In the histological analysis, new bone formation was evident at 2 and 4 weeks of healing in all groups and bone formation increased as a function of healing time in vivo. At 12 weeks, Group 4 showed significantly higher amount of newly formed bone compared to Group 1 (p=0,002). Moreover, during the micro CT exam, Group 4 expressed significantly higher bone formation compared to Group 1 at all time points tested (p=0.00, 0.014, and 0.002 in 2, 4, and 12 weeks, respectively). Conclusions: PLGA microspheres demonstrated initial burst release of clarithromycin followed by a sustained release profile. The in vivo findings showed that β-TCP with clarithromycin-loaded microspheres can enhance bone formation in bone defects.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Alsaoub, Sabine
    et al.
    Analytical Chemistry-Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätstrasse 150, 44780, Bochum, Germany.
    Ruff, Adrian
    Analytical Chemistry-Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätstrasse 150, 44780, Bochum, Germany.
    Conzuelo, Felipe
    Analytical Chemistry-Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätstrasse 150, 44780, Bochum, Germany.
    Ventosa, Edgar
    Analytical Chemistry-Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätstrasse 150, 44780, Bochum, Germany.
    Ludwig, Roland
    Department of Food Sciences and Technology, Vienna Institute of Biotechnology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 11/1/56, 1190, Vienna, Austria.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Kurchatov's Complex of NBICS-technologies, National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute", Akademika Kurchatova Sq. 1, 123 182, Moscow, Russia.
    Schuhmann, Wolfgang
    Analytical Chemistry-Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätstrasse 150, 44780, Bochum, Germany.
    An Intrinsic Self-Charging Biosupercapacitor Comprised of a High-Potential Bioanode and a Low-Potential Biocathode2017Inngår i: ChemPlusChem, E-ISSN 2192-6506, Vol. 82, nr 4, s. 576-583Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An intrinsic self-charging biosupercapacitor built on a unique concept for the fabrication of biodevices based on redox polymers is presented. The biosupercapacitor consists of a high-potential redox polymer based bioanode and a low-potential redox polymer based biocathode in which the potentials of the electrodes in the discharged state show an apparent potential mismatch E-anode > E-cathode and prevent the use of the device as a conventional biofuel cell. Upon charging, the potentials of the electrodes are shifted to more positive (cathode) and more negative (anode) values because of a change in the a(ox-)to-a(red) ratio within the redox polymer matrix. Hence, a potential inversion occurs in the charged state (E-anode < E-cathode) and an open circuit voltage of >0.4 V is achieved and the bio-device acts as a true biosupercapacitor. The bioanode consists of a novel specifically designed high-potential Os complex modified polymer for the efficient immobilization and electrical wiring of glucose converting enzymes, such as glucose oxidase and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase. The cathodic side is constructed from a low-potential Os complex modified polymer integrating the O-2 reducing enzyme, bilirubin oxidase. The large potential differences between the redox polymers and the prosthetic groups of the biocatalysts ensure fast and efficient charging of the biodevice.

  • 5.
    Basic, Amina
    et al.
    Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Dahlen, Gunnar
    Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    The proteins of Fusobacterium spp. involved in hydrogen sulfide production from L-cysteine2017Inngår i: BMC Microbiology, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 17, nr 61Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a toxic foul-smelling gas produced by subgingival biofilms in patients with periodontal disease and is suggested to be part of the pathogenesis of the disease. We studied the H2S-producing protein expression of bacterial strains associated with periodontal disease. Further, we examined the effect of a cysteine-rich growth environment on the synthesis of intracellular enzymes in F. nucleatum polymorphum ATCC 10953. The proteins were subjected to one-dimensional (1DE) and two-dimensional (2DE) gel electrophoresis An in-gel activity assay was used to detect the H2S-producing enzymes; Sulfide from H2S, produced by the enzymes in the gel, reacted with bismuth forming bismuth sulfide, illustrated as brown bands (1D) or spots (2D) in the gel. The discovered proteins were identified with liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results: Cysteine synthase and proteins involved in the production of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'phosphate (that catalyzes the production of H2S) were frequently found among the discovered enzymes. Interestingly, a higher expression of H2S-producing enzymes was detected from bacteria incubated without cysteine prior to the experiment. Conclusions: Numerous enzymes, identified as cysteine synthase, were involved in the production of H2S from cysteine and the expression varied among Fusobacterium spp. and strains. No enzymes were detected with the in-gel activity assay among the other periodontitis-associated bacteria tested. The expression of the H2S-producing enzymes was dependent on environmental conditions such as cysteine concentration and pH but less dependent on the presence of serum and hemin.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 6. Bertram, Nicolas
    et al.
    Barker, Robert
    Bavishi, Krutika
    Lindberg Møller, Birger
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Nanodisc films for membrane protein studies by neutron reflection: Effect of the protein scaffold choice2015Inngår i: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 31, nr 30, s. 8386-8391Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanodisc films are a promising approach to study the equilibrium conformation of membrane bound proteins in native-like environment. Here we compare nanodisc formation for NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) using two different scaffold proteins, MSP1D1 and MSP1E3D1. Despite the increased stability of POR loaded MSP1E3D1 based nanodiscs in comparison to MSP1D1 based nanodiscs, neutron reflection at the silicon–solution interface showed that POR loaded MSP1E3D1 based nanodisc films had poor surface coverage. This was the case, even when incubation was carried out under conditions that typically gave high coverage for empty nanodiscs. The low surface coverage affects the embedded POR coverage in the nanodisc film and limits the structural information that can be extracted from membrane bound proteins within them. Thus, nanodisc reconstitution on the smaller scaffold proteins is necessary for structural studies of membrane bound proteins in nanodisc films.

  • 7.
    Björklund, Sebastian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Alcohols react with MCM-41 at room temperature and chemically modify mesoporous silica2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 9960Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous silica has received much attention due to its well-defined structural order, high surface area, and tunable pore diameter. To successfully employ mesoporous silica for nanotechnology applications it is important to consider how it is influenced by solvent molecules due to the fact that most preparation procedures involve treatment in various solvents. In the present work we contribute to this important topic with new results on how MCM-41 is affected by a simple treatment in alcohol at room temperature. The effects of alcohol treatment are characterized by TGA, FTIR, and sorption calorimetry. The results are clear and show that treatment of MCM-41 in methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, pentanol, or octanol at room temperature introduces alkoxy groups that are covalently bound to the silica surface. It is shown that alcohol treated MCM-41 becomes more hydrophobic and that this effect is sequentially more prominent going from methanol to octanol. Chemical formation of alkoxy groups onto MCM-41 occurs both for calcined and hydroxylated MCM-41 and the alkoxy groups are hydrolytically unstable and can be replaced by silanol groups after exposure to water. The results are highly relevant for mesoporous silica applications that involve contact or treatment in protic solvents, which is very common.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 8.
    Björklund, Sebastian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Humidity scanning quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring setup for determination of sorption-desorption isotherms and rheological changes2015Inngår i: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 86, nr 5, artikkel-id 055105Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method to determine water sorption-desorption isotherms with high resolution in the complete range of water activities (relative humidities) is presented. The method is based on quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The QCM-D is equipped with a humidity module in which the sample film is kept in air with controlled humidity. The experimental setup allows for continuous scanning of the relative humidity from either dry to humid conditions or vice versa. The amount of water sorbed or desorbed from the sample is determined from the resonance frequencies of the coated quartz sensor, via analysis of the overtone dependence. In addition, the method allows for characterization of hydration induced changes of the rheological properties from the dissipation data, which is closely connected to the viscoelasticity of the film. The accuracy of the humidity scanning setup is confirmed in control experiments. Sorption-desorption isotherms of pig gastric mucin and lysozyme, obtained by the new method, show good agreement with previous results. Finally, we show that the deposition technique used to coat the quartz sensor influences the QCM-D data and how this issue can be used to obtain further information on the effect of hydration. In particular, we demonstrate that spin-coating represents an attractive alternative to obtain sorption-desorption isotherms, while drop-coating provides additional information on changes of the rheological properties during hydration.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 9.
    Björklund, Sebastian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Hydration-Induced Phase Transitions in Surfactant and Lipid Films2016Inngår i: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, nr 21, s. 5223-5232Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For several surfactant and lipid systems, it is crucial to understand how hydration influences the physical and chemical properties. When humidity changes, it affects the degree of hydration by adding or removing water molecules. In many cases, this process induces transitions between liquid crystalline phases. This phenomenon is of general interest for numerous applications simply because of the fact that humidity variations are ubiquitous. Of particular interest are hydration-induced phase transitions in amphiphilic films, which in many cases appear as the frontier toward a vapor phase with changing humidity. Considering this, it is important to characterize the film thickness needed for the formation of 3D liquid crystalline phases and the lyotropic phase behavior of this kind of film. In this work, we study this issue by employing a recently developed method based on the humidity scanning quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (HS QCM-D), which enables continuous scanning of the film hydration. We investigate five surfactants films (DDAO, DTAC, CTAC, SDS, and n-octyl beta-D-glucoside) and one lipid film (monoolein) and show that HS QCM-D enables the fast characterization of hydration-induced phase transitions with small samples. Film thicknesses range from tens to hundreds of nanometers, and clear phase transitions are observed in all cases. It is shown that phase transitions in films occur at the same water activities as for corresponding bulk samples. This allows us to conclude that surfactant and lipid films, with a thickness of as low as 50 nm, are in fact assembled as 3D-structured liquid crystalline phases. Furthermore, liquid crystalline phases of surfactant films show liquidlike behavior, which decreases the accuracy of the absorbed water mass measurement. On the other hand, the monoolein lipid forms more rigid liquid crystalline films, allowing for an accurate determination of the water sorption isotherm, which is also true for the sorption isotherms corresponding to the solid surfactant phases.

  • 10.
    Björklund, Sebastian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Quoc Dat, Pham
    Physical Chemistry, The Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Bastholm Jensen, Louise
    LEO Pharma A/S, Industriparken 55, DK-2750 Ballerup, Denmark.
    Østergaard Knudsen, Nina
    LEO Pharma A/S, Industriparken 55, DK-2750 Ballerup, Denmark.
    Dencker Nielsen, Lars
    LEO Pharma A/S, Industriparken 55, DK-2750 Ballerup, Denmark.
    Ekelund, Katarina
    LEO Pharma A/S, Industriparken 55, DK-2750 Ballerup, Denmark.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Engblom, Johan
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sparr, Emma
    Physical Chemistry, The Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    The effects of polar excipients transcutol and dexpanthenol on molecular mobility, permeability, and electrical impedance of the skin barrier2016Inngår i: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 479, s. 207-220Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the development of transdermal and topical products it is important to understand how formulation ingredients interact with the molecular components of the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), and thereby influence its macroscopic barrier properties. The aim here was to investigate the effect of two commonly used excipients, transcutol and dexpanthenol, on the molecular as well as the macroscopic properties of the skin membrane. Polarization transfer solid-state NMR methods were combined with steady-state flux and impedance spectroscopy measurements to investigate how these common excipients influence the molecular components of SC and its barrier function at strictly controlled hydration conditions in vitro with excised porcine skin. The NMR results provide completely new molecular insight into how transcutol and dexpanthenol affect specific molecular segments of both SC lipids and proteins. The presence of transcutol or dexpanthenol in the formulation at fixed water activity results in increased effective skin permeability of the model drug metronidazole. Finally, impedance spectroscopy data show clear changes of the effective skin capacitance after treatment with transcutol or dexpanthenol. Based on the complementary data, we are able to draw direct links between effects on the molecular properties and on the macroscopic barrier function of the skin barrier under treatment with formulations containing transcutol or dexpanthenol.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 11.
    Bllaci, Loreta
    et al.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences, University of Southern Denmark , DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.
    Torsetnes, Silje
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences, University of Southern Denmark , DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.
    Wierzbicka, Celina
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences, University of Southern Denmark , DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.
    Jensen, Ole N.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences, University of Southern Denmark , DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.
    Phosphotyrosine biased enrichment of tryptic peptides from cancer cells by combining pY-MIP and TiO2 affinity resins2017Inngår i: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 89, nr 21, s. 11332-11340Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein phosphorylation at distinct tyrosine residues (pY) is essential for fast, specific, and accurate signal transduction in cells. Enrichment of pY-containing peptides derived from phosphoproteins is commonly facilitated by use of immobilized anti-pY antibodies prior to phosphoproteomics analysis by mass spectrometry. We here report on an alternative approach for pY-peptide enrichment using inexpensive pY-imprinted polymer (pY-MIP). We assessed by mass spectrometry the performance of pY-MIP for enrichment and sequencing of phosphopeptides obtained by tryptic digestion of protein extracts from HeLa cells. The combination of pY-MIP- and TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment provided more than 90% selectivity for phosphopeptides. Mass spectrometry signal intensities were enhanced for most pY-phosphopeptides (approximately 70%) when using the pY-MIP-TiO2 combination as compared to TiO2 alone. pY constituted up to 8% of the pY-MIP-TiO2-enriched phosphopeptide fractions. The pY-MIP-TiO2 and the TiO2 protocols yielded comparable numbers of distinct phosphopeptides, 1693 and 1842, respectively, from microgram levels of peptide samples. Detailed analysis of physicochemical properties of pY-MIP-TiO2-enriched phosphopeptides demonstrated that this protocol retrieved phosphopeptides that tend to be smaller (<24 residues), less acidic, and almost exclusively monophosphorylated, as compared to TiO2 alone. These unique properties render the pY-MIP-based phosphopeptide enrichment technique an attractive alternative for applications in phosphoproteomics research.

  • 12. Brennich, Martha
    et al.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Castillo-Michel, Hiram
    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Cotte, Marine
    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Forsyth, V. Trevor
    Institit Laue Langevin, Life Sciences Group, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble, France; Keele University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG UK.
    Haertlein, Michael
    Institit Laue Langevin, Life Sciences Group, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble, France.
    Kimber, Simon A. J.
    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Le Duc, Geraldine
    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Mitchel, Edward P.
    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France; Keele University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG UK.
    Round, Adam
    Keele University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG UK; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Salome, Murielle
    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Sztucki, Michael
    European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Nanoparticle Characterization Methods: Applications of Synchrotron and Neutron Radiation2016Inngår i: Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology: Innovation and Production / [ed] Jean Cornier Dr.; Prof. Andrew Owen; Prof. Arno Kwade Dr.; Prof. Marcel Van de Voorde, John Wiley & Sons, 2016, s. 157-174Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The characterization of materials at the atomic-, nano-, and microscales is of crucial importance in understanding and then tailoring their macroscale properties and function for end-use applications and for effective modern cradle-to-reuse materials cycling. Synchrotron light, as well as the complementary neutron beams, offer exquisite microscopy probes to look into the heart of materials. This chapter presents some examples of pharma-oriented nanoparticle characterization highlighting the possibilities of synchrotron light and neutron beams. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well-established technique to probe nanoscale structures. SAXS can also deliver valuable information on the structure of self-assembled nanovectors, such as liposomes, which are recognized as efficient platforms for drug delivery. Future developments for neutron characterization will be driven in parallel with instrumental developments at existing sources and future facilities such as the European Spallation Source (ESS) being built in Sweden.  

  • 13.
    Browning, Kathryn
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharm, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Tania
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Maric, Selma
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Malekkhaiat-Haffner, Sara
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharm, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rochester, Sweden.
    Malmsten, Martin
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Pharm, Copenhagen, Denmark; Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharm, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Human lipoproteins at model cell membranes: Role of the lipoprotein class on lipid dynamics2017Inngår i: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 14.
    Browning, T. K.
    et al.
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Tania Kjellerup
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Maric, Selma
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Malekkhaiat-Häffner, S.
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, G. N.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, E.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmsten, M.
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Pharmacy, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Human lipoproteins at model cell membranes: Role of the lipoprotein class on lipid dynamics2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 7478Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    High and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) are thought to play vital roles in the onset and development of atherosclerosis; the biggest killer in the western world. Key issues of initial lipoprotein (LP) interactions at cellular membranes need to be addressed including LP deposition and lipid exchange. Here we present a protocol for monitoring the in situ kinetics of lipoprotein deposition and lipid exchange/removal at model cellular membranes using the non-invasive, surface sensitive methods of neutron reflection and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. For neutron reflection, lipid exchange and lipid removal can be distinguished thanks to the combined use of hydrogenated and tail-deuterated lipids. Both HDL and LDL remove lipids from the bilayer and deposit hydrogenated material into the lipid bilayer, however, the extent of removal and exchange depends on LP type. These results support the notion of HDL acting as the ‘good’ cholesterol, removing lipid material from lipid-loaded cells, whereas LDL acts as the ‘bad’ cholesterol, depositing lipid material into the vascular wall.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Carlstedt, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wojtasz, Joanna
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Fyhr, Peter
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Understanding Starch Gelatinization: the Phase Diagram Approach2015Inngår i: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 129, s. 62-69Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    By constructing a detailed phase diagram for the potato starch–water system based on data from optical microscopy, synchrotron X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry, we show that gelatinization can be interpreted in analogy with a eutectic transition. The phase rule explains why the temperature of the gelatinization transition (G) is independent on water content. Furthermore, the melting (M1) endotherm observed in DSC represents a liquidus line; the temperature for this event increases with increasing starch concentration. Both the lamellar spacing and the inter-helix distance were observed to decrease with increasing starch content for starch concentrations between approximately 65 wt% and 75 wt%, while the inter-helix distance continued decreasing upon further dehydration. Understanding starch gelatinization has been a longstanding challenge. The novel approach presented here shows interpretation of this phenomenon from a phase equilibria perspective.

  • 16.
    Cecchinato, Francesca
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Karlsson, Johan
    Ferroni, Letizia
    Gardin, Chiara
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Zavan, Barbara
    Andersson, Martin
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stromal cells on 3-dimensional mesoporous TiO2 coating with magnesium impregnation2015Inngår i: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 52, s. 225-234Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic response of human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADScs) to mesoporous titania (TiO2) coatings produced with evaporation-induced self-assembly method (EISA) and loaded with magnesium. Our emphasis with the magnesium release functionality was to modulate progenitor cell osteogenic differentiation under standard culture conditions. Osteogenic properties of the coatings were assessed for stromal cells by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, colorimetric mitochondrial viability assay (MTT), colorimetric alkaline phosphates activity (ALP) assay and real time RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) it was shown that the surface expansion area (Sdr) was strongly enhanced by the presence of magnesium. From MTT results it was shown that ADSc viability was significantly increased on mesoporous surfaces compared to the non-porous one at a longer cell culture time. However, no differences were observed between the magnesium impregnated and non-impregnated surfaces. The alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed that ADSc started to differentiate into the osteogenic phenotype after 2weeks of culturing. The gene expression profile at 2weeks of cell growth showed that such coatings were capable to incorporate specific osteogenic markers inside their interconnected nano-pores and, at 3weeks, ADSc differentiated into osteoblasts. Interestingly, magnesium significantly promoted the osteopontin gene expression, which is an essential gene for the early biomaterial-cell osteogenic interaction.

  • 17. Chang, Debby P.
    et al.
    Barauskas, Justas
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.
    Wadsäter, Maria
    Tiberg, Fredrik
    Nylander, Tommy
    Non-lamellar lipid liquid crystalline structures at interfaces2015Inngår i: Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0001-8686, E-ISSN 1873-3727, Vol. 222, s. 135-147Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The self-assembly of lipids leads to the formation of a rich variety of nano-structures, not only restricted to lipid bilayers, but also encompassing non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures, such as cubic, hexagonal, and sponge phases. These non-lamellar phases have been increasingly recognized as important for living systems, both in terms of providing compartmentalization and as regulators of biological activity. Consequently, they are of great interest for their potential as delivery systems in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. The compartmentalizing nature of these phases features mono- or bicontinuous networks of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. To utilize these non-lamellar liquid crystalline structures in biomedical devices for analyses and drug delivery, it is crucial to understand how they interact with and respond to different types of interfaces. Such non-lamellar interfacial layers can be used to entrap functional biomolecules that respond to lipid curvature as well as the confinement. It is also important to understand the structural changes of deposited lipid in relation to the corresponding bulk dispersions. They can be controlled by changing the lipid composition or by introducing components that can alter the curvature or by deposition on nano-structured surface, e.g. vertical nano-wire arrays. Progress in the area of liquid crystalline lipid based nanoparticles opens up new possibilities for the preparation of well-defined surface films with well-defined nano-structures. This review will focus on recent progress in the formation of non-lamellar dispersions and their interfacial properties at the solid/liquid and biologically relevant interfaces.

  • 18. Charyeva, Olga
    et al.
    Neilands, Jessica
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Resorbing Magnesium Implants2015Inngår i: Open Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 2165-3372, Vol. 5, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implant-associated infections are a result of bacterial adhesion to an implant surface and subsequent biofilm formation at the implantation site. This study compares different magnesium materials based on their ability to resist bacterial adhesion as well as further biofilm formation. Material and Methods: The surfaces of four magnesium-based materials (Mg2Ag, Mg10Gd, WE43 and 99.99% pure Mg) were characterized using atomic force microscope. In addition, the samples were tested for their ability to resist biofilm formation. Planktonic bacteria of either S. epidermidis or E. faecalis were allowed to adhere to the magnesium surfaces for two hour followed by rinsing and, for S. epidermidis, further incubation of 24, 72 and 168 h was carried out. Results: E. faecalis had a significantly stronger adhesion to all magnesium surfaces compared to S. epidermidis (p = 0.001). Biofilm growth of S. epidermidis was different on various magnesium materials: the amount of bacteria increased up to 72 h but interestingly a significant decrease was seen at 168 h on Mg2Ag and WE43 surfaces. For pure Mg and Mg10Gd the biofilm formation reached plateau at 72 h. Surface characteristics of resorbable magnesium materials were changing over time, and the surface was generally less rough at 168 h compared to earlier time points. No correlation was found between the surface topology and the amount of adherent bacteria. Conclusion: In early stages of biofilm adhesion, no differences between magnesium materials were observed. However, after 72 h Mg2Ag and WE43 had the best ability to suppress S. epidermidis’ biofilm formation. Also, bacterial adhesion to magnesium materials was not dependent on samples’ surface topology.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Chen, Zhiliang
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shen, Xiantao
    Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
    Synergistic Catalysis by “Polymeric Microzymes and Inorganic Nanozymes”: The 1+1>2 Effect for Intramolecular Cyclization of Peptides2017Inngår i: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 5, artikkel-id 60Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we developed an efficient “molecularly imprinted polymer microzymes and inorganic magnetic nanozymes” synergistic catalysis strategy for the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides. The polymeric microzymes showed excellent selectivity toward the template peptide as well as the main reactant (linear peptide), and the Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) nanozymes inhibited the intermolecular reaction during the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides. As a result, the integration of the two different artificial enzymes in one process facilitates the intramolecular cyclization in high product yields (59.3%) with excellent selectivity. Mechanism study indicates the synergistic effect was occurred by using a “reversed solid phase synthesis” strategy with an enhanced shift of reaction balance to product generation. We believe the synergistic catalysis by “polymeric microzymes and inorganic nanozymes” presented in the present work may open new opportunities in creation of multifunctional enzyme mimics for sensing, imaging, and drug delivery.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 20.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Department of Biomaterials, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Bone Quality and Quantity and Dental Implant Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis2017Inngår i: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 30, nr 3, s. 219-237Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in implant failure rates, marginal bone loss, and postoperative infection for implants inserted in bone with different qualities and quantities according to the classification of Lekholm and Zarb. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was undertaken in January 2015 for randomized and nonrandomized human clinical studies. Results: A total of 94 publications were included. When bone sites of different qualities were considered, the results suggested the following comparative implant failure rates: 1 > 2, 1 > 3, 3 > 2, 4 > 1, 4 > 2, and 4 > 3. Sensitivity analyses suggested that when implants inserted in bone qualities 1 and 2 and 1 and 3 were compared, oxidized and sandblasted/acid-etched surfaces showed a decrease in significant difference in failures compared with turned implants. The same is not true for failure of implants inserted in bone quality 4 compared to failure of implants in all other bone qualities. When bone sites of different quantities were considered, the following comparative implant failure rates were observed: A > B, A > C, A < D, B < C, B < D, C < D, E > A, E > B, E > C, E > D. Due to insufficient information, meta-analyses for the outcomes postoperative infection and marginal bone loss were not performed. Conclusion: Sites with poorer bone quality and lack of bone volume may statistically affect implant failure rates. Implant surfaces may play a role in failure of implants in different bone qualities.

  • 21.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Biomaterials, Göteborg University, Göteborg.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Survival and complications of zygomatic implants: an updated systematic review2016Inngår i: Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery (Print), ISSN 0278-2391, E-ISSN 1531-5053, Vol. 74, nr 10, s. 1949-1964Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To assess the survival rate of zygomatic implants (ZIs) and the prevalence of complications based on previously published studies. Methods. An electronic search was performed in December/2015 in three databases and was supplemented by hand-searching. Clinical series of ZIs were included. Interval survival rate (ISR) and cumulative survival rate (CSR) were calculated. The untransformed proportion of complications (sinusitis, soft tissue infection, paresthesia, oroantral fistulas) was calculated, considering the prevalence reported in the studies. Results. Sixty-eight studies were included, comprising 4556 ZIs in 2161 patients, with 103 failures. The 12-year CSR was 95.21%. Most failures were detected within the six-month postsurgical period. Studies (n=26) that exclusively evaluated immediate loading showed a statistically lower ZI failure rate than studies (n=34) evaluating delayed loading protocols (P=0.003). Studies (n=5) evaluating ZIs for the rehabilitation of patients after maxillary resections presented lower survival rates. The probability of presenting postoperative complications with ZIs was as follows: sinusitis 2.4% (95%CI 1.8-3.0), soft tissue infection 2.0% (95%CI 1.2-2.8), paresthesia 1.0% (95%CI 0.5-1.4), oroantral fistulas 0.4% (95%CI 0.1-0.6). However, these numbers may be underestimated, as many studies failed to mention the prevalence of these complications. Conclusion. ZIs present a high 12-year CSR, with most failures occurring at the early stages postoperatively. The main observed complication related to ZIs was sinusitis, which may appear several years after ZI installation surgery.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 22.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Biomaterials, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Turned versus anodised dental implants: a meta-analysis2016Inngår i: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, nr 9, s. 716-728Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL)and post-operative infection for patients being rehabilitated by turned versus anodised-surface implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in November 2015. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. Thirty-eight publications were included. The results suggest a risk ratio of 2·82 (95% CI 1·95–4·06, P < 0·00001) for failure of turned implants, when compared to anodised-surface implants. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results when only the studies inserting implants in maxillae or mandibles were pooled. There were no statistically significant effects of turned implants on the MBL (mean difference-MD 0·02, 95%CI −0·16–0·20; P = 0·82) in comparison to anodised implants. The results of a meta-regression considering the follow-up period as a covariate suggested an increase of the MD with the increase in the follow-up time (MD increase 0·012 mm year−1), however, without a statistical significance (P = 0·813). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome ‘post-operative infection’ was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kisch, Jenö
    Clinic for Prosthodontics, Centre of Dental Specialist Care, Malmö, Sweden.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Biomaterials, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Analysis of risk factors for cluster behavior of dental implant failures2017Inngår i: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 19, nr 4, s. 632-642Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Some studies indicated that implant failures are commonly concentrated in few patients. Purpose: To identify and analyze cluster behavior of dental implant failures among subjects of a retrospective study. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included patients receiving at least three implants only. Patients presenting at least three implant failures were classified as presenting a cluster behavior. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models and generalized estimating equations analysis evaluated the effect of explanatory variables on the cluster behavior. Results: There were 1406 patients with three or more implants (8337 implants, 592 failures). Sixty-seven (4.77%) patients presented cluster behavior, with 56.8% of all implant failures. The intake of antidepressants and bruxism were identified as potential negative factors exerting a statistically significant influence on a cluster behavior at the patient-level. The negative factors at the implant-level were turned implants, short implants, poor bone quality, age of the patient, the intake of medicaments to reduce the acid gastric production, smoking, and bruxism. Conclusions: A cluster pattern among patients with implant failure is highly probable. Factors of interest as predictors for implant failures could be a number of systemic and local factors, although a direct causal relationship cannot be ascertained.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 24.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kisch, Jenö
    Clinic for Prosthodontics, Centre of Dental Specialist Care, Malmö, Sweden.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Biomaterials, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Is the intake of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure?2017Inngår i: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 46, nr 6, s. 782-788Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the association between the intake of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the risk of dental implant failure. Patients were included if they were taking SSRIs only and no other medication, did not present any other systemic condition or compromising habits (bruxism, smoking, snuff), and complied with the use of prophylactic antibiotics for implant surgery. The multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) method and multilevel mixed-effects parametric survival analysis were used to test the association between SSRI exposure (predictor variable) and the risk of implant failure (outcome variable), adjusting for several potential confounders (other variables). The total number of implants with information available and meeting the necessary eligibility criteria was 931 (35 failures). These were placed in 300 patients. The implant failure rate was 12.5% for SSRI users and 3.3% for non-users (P = 0.007). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed a statistically significant difference in the cumulative survival rate (P < 0.001). The multivariate GEE model did not show a statistically significant association between SSRI intake and implant failure (P = 0.530), nor did the multilevel model (P = 0.125). It is suggested that the intake of SSRIs may not be associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure.

  • 25.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Svagan, Anna J.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Cellulose Nanofibers for Biomedical Applications2016Inngår i: Biopolymers for Medical Applications / [ed] Juan M. Ruso, Paula V. Messina, CRC Press, 2016, s. 213-232Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The creation of materials exploiting molecules from renewable resources and green processing routes in order to minimize contamination of the environment with toxic solvents and starting components, is an important step towards a sustainable society, and sustainable development is critical in all technological fields including biomedical engineering. In this context, the polysaccharides are an important family of molecules, as they can be derived from numerous natural sources including plants, bacteria, insects, animals, and also from by-products/waste-materials obtained from agricultural or fishery activities. Also, polysaccharides are biodegradable and can be broken down by common microorganisms found on land or in water. In nature, polysaccharides can be composed of one type of repeating unit (homopolysaccharides; starch and cellulose) or two or more types of repeating monomer (heteropolysaccharides; pectin, alginate). But despite using only a few basic building blocks, many unique and complex molecular structures with specific features and functions are assembled giving rise to a plethora of diverse carbohydrates. Some of the polysaccharides are classified as polyelectrolytes, and these are either negatively or positively charged. The intrinsic properties of such ionic polysaccharides are used in material science to produce stimuli-responsive materials where external stimuli (pH, ionic strength, and temperature) trigger, for example, a mechanical response in the material or a swelling mechanism that can be exploited in drug delivery. In addition to conventional polysaccharides, advanced genetic engineering also opens up the possibility for new, innovative, and structurally designed macromolecules with specific chemical and physical properties, allowing for better material structure-property control. Natural polysaccharides are typically biocompatible, possibly bioadhesive, and generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and, in conclusion, they are attractive materials to use in biomedical applications.

  • 26.
    Dagys, Marius
    et al.
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Laurynenas, Audrius
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania; Faculty of Fundamental Sciences, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Sauletekio al. 11, Vilnius, LT-10223, Lithuania.
    Ratautas, Dalius
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania; Faculty of Fundamental Sciences, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Sauletekio al. 11, Vilnius, LT-10223, Lithuania.
    Kulys, Juozas
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Vidziunaite, Regina
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Talaikis, Martynas
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Niaura, Gediminas
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Marcinkeviciene, Liucija
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Meskys, Rolandas
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 7, Vilnius, LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Kurchatov NBICS Centre, National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Akademika Kurchatova pl. 1, Moscow, 123 182, Russian Federation.
    Oxygen electroreduction catalysed by laccase wired to gold nanoparticles via the trinuclear copper cluster2017Inngår i: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, E-ISSN 1754-5706, Vol. 10, nr 2, s. 498-502Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Specific wiring of biocatalysts par excellence, viz. redox enzymes, to an electrode can be exploited in the fabrication of high-performance bioelectronic devices. Here we report oxygen electroreduction catalysed by Didymocrea sp. J6 laccase wired to gold nanoparticles via the trinuclear copper cluster. Bypassing the intramolecular electron transfer, which under certain conditions is the rate-limiting step of oxygen bioelectroreduction, has resulted in the fabrication of a high current density biocathode based on high-redox-potential laccase, which is able to operate in electrolytes with a broad pH range in the presence of high fluoride concentrations.

  • 27.
    Delfani, Payam
    et al.
    Department of Immunotechnology, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    ZAP70 (zeta-chain (TCR) associated protein kinase 70kDa)2015Inngår i: Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology, E-ISSN 1768-3262Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Review on ZAP70, with data on DNA, on the protein encoded, and where the gene is implicated.

  • 28.
    Delvar, Alice
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Lindh, Liselott
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Interaction of polyelectrolytes with salivary pellicles on hydroxyapatite surfaces under erosive acidic conditions2015Inngår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 38, nr 7, s. 21610-21618Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The modification of acidic beverage formulations with food-approved, nonhazardous substances with antierosive properties has been identified as a key strategy for counteracting the prevalence of dental erosion, i.e., the acid-induced dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HA, the main mineral component of tooth surfaces). While many of such substances have been reported, very little is known on how they interact with teeth and inhibit their acid-induced dissolution. With the aim of filling this gap in knowledge, we have studied under acidic conditions the interaction between two polyelectrolytes of differing ionic character, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and chitosan, and saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, i.e., a model for the outer surface of teeth. These studies were performed by means of ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and atomic force microscopy. We also studied, by means of pH variations, how dissolution of saliva-coated HA is affected by including these polyelectrolytes in the erosive solutions. Our results confirm that salivary films protect HA from acid-induced dissolution, but only for a limited time. If the acid is modified with CMC, this polyelectrolyte incorporates into the salivary films prolonging in time their protective function. Eventually, the CMC-modified salivary films are removed from the HA surfaces. From this moment, HA is continuously coated with CMC, but this offers only a weak protection against erosion. When the acid is modified with the cationic chitosan, the polyelectrolyte adsorbs on top of the salivary films. Chitosan-modified salivary films are also eventually replaced by bare chitosan films. In this case both coatings offer a similar protection against HA dissolution, which is nevertheless notably higher than that offered by CMC.

  • 29.
    Di Bari, Chiara
    et al.
    Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, c/Marie Curie 2, L10, 28049, Madrid, Spain.
    Mano, Nicolas
    Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, Université de Bordeaux, UPR 8641, CNRS, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600, Pessac, France.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Pita, Marcos
    Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, c/Marie Curie 2, L10, 28049, Madrid, Spain.
    De Lacey, Antonio
    Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, c/Marie Curie 2, L10, 28049, Madrid, Spain.
    Halides inhibition of multicopper oxidases studied by FTIR spectroelectrochemistry using azide as an active infrared probe2017Inngår i: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 22, nr 8, s. 1179-1186Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An IR spectroelectrochem. study of Trametes hirsuta laccase and Magnaporthe oryzae bilirubin oxidase has been performed using azide, an inhibitor of multicopper oxidases, as an active IR probe incorporated into the T2​/T3 copper cluster of the enzymes. The redox potential-​controlled measurements indicate that N3-​ stretching IR bands of azide ion bound to the T2​/T3 cluster are only detected for the oxidized enzymes, confirming that azide only binds to Cu2+. Moreover, the process of binding​/dissocn. of azide ion is shown to be reversible. The interaction of halide anions, which also inhibit multicopper oxidases, with the active site of the enzymes was studied by measuring the changes in the azide FTIR bands. Enzymes inhibited by azide respond differently upon addn. of fluoride or chloride ions to the sample soln. inhibited by azide. Fluoride ions compete with azide for binding at one of the T2​/T3 Cu ions, whereas competition from chloride ions is much less evident.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Abdullah, Mohammad
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Dizeyi, Nishtman
    Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rosén, Anders
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Different expression levels of glycans on leukemic cells-a novel screening method with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) targeting sialic acid2016Inngår i: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 10, nr 37, s. 13763-13768Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sialic acid (SA) is normally expressed on the cell membranes and is located at the terminal position of the sugar chains. SA plays an important role for regulation of the innate immunity, function as markers of the cells and can be recognized by a variety of receptors. Interestingly, the level of SA expression is increased on metastatic cancer cells. The availability of specific antibodies against SA is limited and, therefore, biomarker tools for detection of SA are lacking. We have recently presented a novel method for specific fluorescence labeling of SA molecular imprinted polymers (MIP). Here, we have performed an extended screening of SA expression by using SA-MIP and included four different chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell lines, conveniently analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. SA expression was detected in four cell lines at different levels, and the SA expression were verified with lectin-FITC. These results show that SA-MIP can be used as a plastic antibody for detection of SA using both flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. We suggest that SA-MIP can be used for screening of different tumor cells of various stages, including CLL cells.

  • 31.
    Falco, Cigdem Yucel
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Falkman, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Risbo, Jens
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Medronho, Bruno
    University of Algarve, Faculty of Sciences and Technology (MeditBio), Campus de Gambelas, Ed. 8, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal.
    Chitosan-Dextran Sulfate Hydrogels as a Potential Carrier for Probiotics2017Inngår i: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 172, s. 175-183Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical and chemical (crosslinked with genipin) hydrogels based on chitosan and dextran sulfate were developed and characterized as novel bio-materials suitable for probiotic encapsulation. The swelling of the hydrogels was dependent on the composition and weakly influenced by the pH of the media. The morphology analysis supports the swelling data showing distinct changes in microstructure depending on the composition. The viability and culturability tests showed approx. 3.6 log CFU/mL decrease of cells (L. acidophilus as model) incorporated into chemical hydrogels when compared to the number of viable native cells. However, the live/dead viability assay evidenced that a considerable amount of viable cells were still entrapped in the hydrogel network and therefore the viability is most likely underestimated. Overall, the developed systems are robust and their structure, rheology and swelling properties can be tuned by changing the blend ratio, thus constituting appealing bio-matrices for cell encapsulation.

  • 32.
    Falco, Cigdem Yucel
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, Copenhagen, DK-1958, Denmark.
    Geng, Xiaolu
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, Copenhagen, DK-1958, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Risbo, Jens
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, Copenhagen, DK-1958, Denmark.
    Edible Foam Based on Pickering Effect of Probiotic Bacteria and Milk Proteins2017Inngår i: Food Hydrocolloids, ISSN 0268-005X, E-ISSN 1873-7137, Vol. 70, s. 211-218Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the preparation and characterization of aqueous Pickering foams using bio-particles constituted by lactic acid bacteria surface modified by oppositely charged milk proteins. Cell surface modification was shown by zeta potential measurements. Foams stabilized by bacterial Pickering bio-particles showed improved stability compared to purely milk protein stabilized foams. The stability of foams increased with the bacterial concentration whereas the foam volume (foamability) decreased. On the other hand, protein concentration was correlated with foamability but not with the foam stability. Optical and fluorescence microscopy revealed organized cell structures around and in between the air bubbles providing for an internal network that effectively stabilizes the foam. Therefore, entirely food grade stable foams can be produced by using modified health promoting bacterial cells and surface active milk proteins. Such Pickering systems can potentially be utilized in bottom up construction of more complex hierarchical food structures and further improve properties such as foam stability.

  • 33.
    Falco, Cigdem Yucel
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Rascon, Ana
    Lund University, Food for Health Science Centre, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Risbo, Jens
    University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Design of a potentially prebiotic and responsive encapsulation material for probiotic bacteria based on chitosan and sulfated beta-glucan2017Inngår i: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 487, s. 97-106Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothesis: Chitosan and sulfated oat beta-glucan are materials suitable to create a prebiotic coating for targeted delivery to gastrointestinal system, using the layer by layer technology. Experiment: Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to assess the multilayer formation capacity and characterize the resulting coatings in terms of morphology and material properties such as structure and rigidity. The coating of colloidal materials was proven, specifically on L acidophilus bacteria as measured by changes in the bacterial suspension zeta potential. Viability of coated cells was shown using plate counting method. The coatings on solid surfaces were examined after exposure to mimics of gastrointestinal fluids and a commercially available beta-glucanase. Findings: Successful build-up of multilayers was confirmed with QCM-D and SE. Zeta potential values proved the coating of cells. There was 2 log CFU/mL decrease after coating cells with four alternating layers of chitosan and sulfated p-glucan when compared to viability of uncoated cells. The coatings were partially degraded after exposure to simulated intestinal fluid and restructured as a result of beta-glucanase treatment, mimicking enzymes present in the microflora of the human gut, but seemed to resist acidic gastric conditions. Therefore, coatings of chitosan and sulfated beta-glucan can potentially be exploited as carriers for probiotics and delicate nutraceuticals. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Gonzalez, Juan Fransisco
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Somoza, AM
    Universidad de Murcia, Departamento de Física-CIOyN, Murcia, E-30100, Spain.
    Palacios-Lidon, E
    Universidad de Murcia, Departamento de Física-CIOyN, Murcia, E-30100, Spain.
    Charge distribution from SKPM images2017Inngår i: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 19, nr 40, s. 27299-27304Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Inferring the surface charge distribution from experimental Kelvin probe microscopy measurements is usually a hard task. Although several approximations have been proposed in order to estimate the effect of these charges, the real inverse problem has not been addressed so far. In this paper, we propose a fast and intuitive method based on Fast Fourier Transform algorithms that allows the surface charge distribution to be obtained directly from the experimental Kelvin voltage measurements. With this method, quantitative physical information such as the total charge and charge position is accessible even in complex charge distributions such as highly insulating polymer surfaces. Moreover, one of the strongest points is that sub-tip resolution is achieved, and therefore the usually unknown charge size can be estimated.

  • 35.
    Gonzalez-Arribas, Elena
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Bobrowski, Tim
    Analytical Chemistry - Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Di Bari, Chiara
    Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, C/Marie Curie 2, L10, 28049 Madrid, Spain.
    Sliozberg, Kirill
    Analytical Chemistry - Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Ludwig, Roland
    Department of Food Science and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria.
    Toscano, Miguel D.
    Novozymes A/S, Krogshoejvej 36, 2880 Bagsværd, Denmark.
    De Lacey, Antonio L.
    Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, C/Marie Curie 2, L10, 28049 Madrid, Spain.
    Pita, Marcos
    Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, C/Marie Curie 2, L10, 28049 Madrid, Spain.
    Schuhmann, Wolfgang
    Analytical Chemistry - Center for Electrochemical Sciences (CES), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, 119071 Moscow, Russia; Kurchatov NBIC Centre, National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute", 123182 Moscow, Russia.
    Transparent, mediator- and membrane-free enzymatic fuel cell based on nanostructured chemically modified indium tin oxide electrodes2017Inngår i: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 97, s. 46-52Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We detail a mediator- and membrane-free enzymatic glucose/oxygen biofuel cell based on transparent and nanostructured conducting supports. Chemically modified indium tin oxide nanoparticle modified electrodes were used to substantially increase the active surface area without significantly compromising transparency. Two different procedures for surface nanostructuring were employed, viz. spray-coating and drop-coating. The spray-coated biodevice showed superior characteristics as compared to the drop-coated enzymatic fuel cell, as a result of the higher nanostructured surface area as confirmed by electrochemical characterisation, as well as scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Subsequent chemical modification with silanes, followed by the immobilisation of either cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophiles or bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria, were performed to obtain the bioanodes and biocathodes, respectively. The optimised biodevice exhibited an OCV of 0.67 V and power output of up to 1.4 mu W/cm(2) at an operating voltage of 0.35 V. This is considered a significant step forward in the field of glucose/oxygen membrane- and mediator-free, transparent enzymatic fuel cells.

  • 36. Gutierrez-Sanchez, Cristina
    et al.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    De Lacey, Antonio L.
    Pita, Marcos
    Third-generation oxygen amperometric biosensor based on Trametes hirsuta laccase covalently bound to graphite electrode2015Inngår i: Chemické zvesti, ISSN 0366-6352, E-ISSN 1336-9075, Vol. 69, nr 1, s. 237-240Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of low-density graphite electrodes hosting Trametes hirsuta laccase in a direct electron transfer regime is presented for real-time analysis of O2 concentrations. The use of contrasting immobilisation methods developed for biocathodes affords good reproducibility and reliability of the amperometric biosensor, which shows a limit of detection below 1 µM and a sensitivity slightly higher than 60 nA cm−2 M.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 37.
    Hedegaard, Sofie
    et al.
    Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen , Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Barker, Robert
    Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Jorgensen, Lene
    Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Van de Weert, Marco
    Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Lipidation Effect on Surface Adsorption and Associated Fibrillation of the Model Protein Insulin2016Inngår i: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, nr 28, s. 7241-7249Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipidation of proteins is used in the pharma- ceutical field to increase the therapeutic efficacy of proteins. In this study, we investigate the effect of a 14-carbon fatty acid modification on the adsorption behavior of human insulin to a hydrophobic solid surface and the subsequent fibrillation development under highly acidic conditions and elevated temperature by comparing to the fibrillation of human insulin. At these stressed conditions, the lipid modification accelerates the rate of fibrillation in bulk solution. With the use of several complementary surface-sensitive techniques, including quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and neutron reflectivity (NR), we show that there are two levels of structurally different protein organization at a hydrophobic surface for both human insulin and the lipidated analogue: a dense protein layer formed within minutes on the surface and a diffuse outer layer of fibrillar structures which took hours to form. The two layers may only be weakly connected, and proteins from both layers are able to desorb from the surface. The lipid modification increases the protein surface coverage and the thickness of both layer organizations. Upon lipidation not only the fibrillation extent but also the morphology of the fibrillar structures changes from fibril clusters on the surface to a more homogeneous network of fibrils covering the entire hydrophobic surface.

  • 38. Hering, Kathrin
    et al.
    Björklund, Sebastian
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Klein, Stephan
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Inkjet printing of surfactants, proteins and enzymes for biomedical applications2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Ink solutions relevant for biomedical applications have been printed using a commercial inkjet printer. Specifically, water-based inks containing surfactant, protein and enzyme have been evaluated. Printability of surfactant ink was theoretically estimated from practically determined surface tension and viscosity of the solution. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to estimate the mass of inkjet printed surfactant. The effect of printing patterns and hydration on the QCM-D data was evaluated. Finally, horseradish peroxidase ink was printed on skin and an enzymatic reaction on skin was observed. Taken together, the results from this study provide a promising starting point from which inkjet printing of protein-enzyme mixtures on skin can be evaluated.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 39.
    Incel, Anil
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Izmir Inst Technol, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, TR-35430 Izmir, Turkey;.
    Varlikli, Canan
    Izmir Inst Technol, Dept Photon, TR-35430 Izmir, Turkey;.
    McMillen, Colin D.
    Clemson Univ, Dept Chem, 219 Hunter Labs, Clemson, SC 29634 USA.
    Demir, Mustafa M.
    Izmir Inst Technol, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, TR-35430 Izmir, Turkey;.
    Triboluminescent Electrospun Mats with Blue-Green Emission under Mechanical Force2017Inngår i: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 121, nr 21, s. 11709-11716Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibrous mechanosensing elements can provide information about the direction of crack propagation and the mechanism of material failure when they are homogeneously dispersed into the bulk volume of materials. A fabrication strategy of fibrous systems showing triboluminescent (TL) responses is in high demand for such applications. In this work, micrometer-sized Cu(NCS) (py)(2)(PPh3) crystals were synthesized, and polymeric fibrous mats containing the TL crystals were obtained via electrospinning as a stress probe for the determination of mechanical impact. Four different polymeric systems have been employed (PMMA, PS, PU, and PVDF), and the mechano-optical sensing performance of electrospun mats of the polymer-crystal composites was measured. Photophysical properties (quantum yield, band gap, and broadness of the emission) of the TL crystal/electrospun mat composites were also studied. TL and PL emission maxima of the PU-based composite mat show identical behavior due to the chemical affinity between the two structures and the smallest fiber diameter. Moreover, the PU fiber mats exhibit long-lived bluish-green emission persisting over a large number of drops.

  • 40.
    Isaksson, Simon
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology , SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Watkins, Erik B.
    Materials Physics and Application Division, MPA-11, Los Alamos National Laboratory , Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, United States.
    Browning, Kathryn L.
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University , SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Tania Kjellerup
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Hedfalk, Kristina
    Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg , SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Höök, Fredrik
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology , SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Martin
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology , SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Protein containing lipid bilayers intercalated with size-matched mesoporous silica thin films2017Inngår i: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 476-485Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteins are key components in a multitude of biological processes, of which the functions carried out by transmembrane (membrane-spanning) proteins are especially demanding for investigations. This is because this class of protein needs to be incorporated into a lipid bilayer representing its native environment, and in addition, many experimental conditions also require a solid support for stabilization and analytical purposes. The solid support substrate may, however, limit the protein functionality due to protein–material interactions and a lack of physical space. We have in this work tailored the pore size and pore ordering of a mesoporous silica thin film to match the native cell-membrane arrangement of the transmembrane protein human aquaporin 4 (hAQP4). Using neutron reflectivity (NR), we provide evidence of how substrate pores host the bulky water-soluble domain of hAQP4, which is shown to extend 7.2 nm into the pores of the substrate. Complementary surface analytical tools, including quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and fluorescence microscopy, revealed successful protein-containing supported lipid bilayer (pSLB) formation on mesoporous silica substrates, whereas pSLB formation was hampered on nonporous silica. Additionally, electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), light scattering (DLS and stopped-flow), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were employed to provide a comprehensive characterization of this novel hybrid organic–inorganic interface, the tailoring of which is likely to be generally applicable to improve the function and stability of a broad range of membrane proteins containing water-soluble domains.

  • 41. Jagalski, Vivien
    et al.
    Barker, Robert
    Thygesen, Mikkel B.
    Gotfryd, Kamil
    Krüger, Mie B.
    Shi, Lei
    Bovet, Nicolas
    Moulin, Martine
    Haertlein, Michael
    Günther Pomorski, Thomas
    Loland, Claus J
    Maric, Selma
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Grafted Biomembranes Containing Membrane Proteins: The Case for the Leucine Transporter2015Inngår i: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 11, nr 39, s. 7707-7711Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we bind the sodium dependent amino acid transporter on nitrilotriacetic acid/polyethylene glycol functionalized gold sensors in detergents and perform a detergent–lipid exchange with phosphatidylcholine. We characterize the LeuT structure in the adsorbed film by magnetic contrast neutron reflection using the predicted model from molecular dynamic simulations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 42.
    Jagalski, Vivien
    et al.
    Nano Science Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Barker, Robert
    Institute Laue Langevin, 71 avenue de Matyrs, CS, 20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, France.
    Topgaard, Daniel
    Division of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Sweden.
    Gunther-Pomorski, Thomas
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hamberger, Björn
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Nano Science Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Biophysical study of resin acid effects on phospholipid membrane structure and properties2016Inngår i: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes, ISSN 0005-2736, E-ISSN 1879-2642, Vol. 1858, nr 11, s. 2827-2838Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophobic resin acids (RAs) are synthesized by conifer trees as part of their defense mechanisms. One of the functions of RAs in plant defense is suggested to be the perturbation of the cellular membrane. However, there is a vast diversity of chemical structures within this class of molecules, and there are no clear correlations to the molecular mechanisms behind the RA's toxicity. In this study we unravel the molecular interactions of the three closely related RAs dehydroabietic acid, neoabietic acid, and the synthetic analogue dichlorodehydroabietic acid with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) model membranes and the polar lipid extract of soybeans. The complementarity of the biophysical techniques used (NMR, DLS, NR, DSC, Cryo-TEM) allowed correlating changes at the vesicle level with changes at the molecular level and the co-localization of RAs within DPPC monolayer. Effects on DPPC membranes are correlated with the physical chemical properties of the RA and their toxicity.

  • 43.
    Jagdadeesan, Kishore
    et al.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rossetti, Cecilia
    Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Qader, Abed Abdel
    Department of Environmental Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Institute for Environmental Research (INFU), Technical University of Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Reubsaet, Leon
    Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Laurell, Thomas
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ekström, Simon
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Filter Plate–Based Screening of MIP SPE Materials for Capture of the Biomarker Pro-Gastrin-Releasing Peptide2017Inngår i: SLAS Discovery, ISSN 2472-5560, E-ISSN 2472-5552, Vol. 22, nr 10, s. 1253-1261Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Affinity-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) is an attractive low-cost sample preparation strategy for biomarker analysis. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as affinity sorbents offer unique opportunities for affinity SPE, due to their low manufacturing cost and high robustness. A limitation is the prediction of their affinity; therefore, screening of analyte recovery and specificity within a large range of SPE conditions is important in order to ensure high-sensitivity detection and assay reproducibility. Here, a µ-SPE method for screening of the MIP-SPE materials using a commercial 384-well filter plate is presented. The method allows for rapid and automated screening using 10?30 µL of packed SPE sorbent per well and sample volumes in the range of 10?70 µL. This enables screening of many different SPE sorbents while simultaneously identifying optimal SPE conditions. In addition, the 384-well format also facilitates detection with a multitude of analytical platforms. Performance of the µ-MIP-SP

  • 44.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Naito, Yoshihito
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Berner, Simone
    Dard, Michel
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Biomechanical and histomorphometrical evaluation of TiZr alloy implants: an in vivo study in the rabbit2015Inngår i: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, nr suppl 2, s. e670-e678Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinically, there is a demand for mechanically stronger alloyed implants; however, not much evidence exists with regard to these materials. PURPOSE: To test the osseointegration property of TiZr1317 implants in a rabbit model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hydrophilic titanium-zirconium alloy (TiZr1317) implants with sand-blasted and acid-etched surface (test) and hydrophilic cpTi implants with the same treatment (control) were placed pairwise in the hind limbs (two in each tibia and one in each femur) of 36 Swedish lop-eared rabbits. After 2, 4, and 12 weeks (n = 12/time point), the bone samples were subjected to removal torque (RTQ, proximal tibia and femur) and histologic/histomorphometric (distal tibia) testings. RESULTS: The control presented significantly higher RTQ than the test at 2 weeks (55 vs 36 Ncm). No differences were observed for other time points. The test presented higher mean BIC than the control (19.25 vs 13.89 %) at 4 weeks; however, there were no statistical differences for the following time point tested in vivo.The new bone area was significantly higher for the test at 4 weeks in the marrow areas. CONCLUSION: The TiZr1317 implants presented comparable biologic outcomes to that of the cpTi implants through a 12-week evaluation period.

  • 45.
    Joon, Narender Kumar
    et al.
    Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    He, Ning
    Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Wagner, Michal
    Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet 207, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Bobacka, Johan
    Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Lisak, Grzegorz
    Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Åbo-Turku, Finland; College of Engineering, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore; Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Residues and Resource Reclamation Center, 1 Cleantech Loop, CleanTech, Singapore 637141, Singapore.
    Influence of phosphate buffer and proteins on the potentiometric response of a polymeric membrane-based solid-contact Pb(II) ion-selective electrode2017Inngår i: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 252, s. 490-497Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the influence of phosphate buffer and proteins on the potentiometric response of a polymeric membrane-based solid-contact Pb2+-selective electrode (Pb2+-ISE) was studied. The effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption at the surface of the ion-selective membrane combined with electrode conditioning in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution was elucidated by potentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The adsorbed BSA at the surface of the Pb2+-ISE slightly lowered the detection limit but did not influence the selectivity of the Pb2+-ISE towards the interfering ions studied (Cu2+, Cd2+). Conditioning of the Pb2+-ISE in 0.01 mol dm–3 PBS resulted in a super-Nernstian response which was related to fixation/extraction of Pb2+ in the ion-selective membrane via precipitation of Pb3(PO4)2 by PO43– anions present in PBS. By conditioning of the Pb2+-ISE in 0.01 mol dm–3 PBS + 1 mg/ml BSA it was possible to extend the linear response range of the Pb2+-ISE towards lower analyte concentrations. The utilization of this conditioning procedure was validated by determination of Pb2+ concentrations down to ca 20 ppb in aqueous samples by Pb2+-ISEs and by comparing the results with those obtained by ICP-MS.

  • 46.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid crystalline phases of dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride2015Inngår i: Journal of Molecular Liquids, ISSN 0167-7322, E-ISSN 1873-3166, Vol. 210, nr Part A, s. 74-81Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular dynamics simulations of four different phases of a cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) are presented. It is shown that when the topology of the initial configuration matches that of the equilibrium structure, the required equilibration times of MD simulations are only few nanoseconds. The methods of building initial configurations for simulations of the hexagonal and Ia3d bicontinuous cubic phases are described. The simulation results show that locally, the hydrophilic part of the hexagonal phase has a flat bilayer structure. Analysis of radial distribution functions shows that the properties of the hydrophilic layers of the phases are dominated by ion–ion and ion–water interactions. The dynamic properties of the system are dependent on the curvature of the aggregates, and calculated diffusion coefficients are in agreement with experimental NMR data.

  • 47.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    The nature of nonfreezing water in carbohydrate polymers2016Inngår i: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 150, s. 353-358Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In an aqueous environment, carbohydrate polymers are surrounded by hydration shells consisting of water molecules that are sometimes called “bound”. When polymer solutions are subjected to low temperatures, a part of water turns into ice, another part remains in the biopolymer phase and is called “nonfreezing water”. Thermodynamic analysis of water freezing shows that the amount of non-freezing water does not reflect the amount of bound water, neither can it be used as a measure of strength of polymer-water interactions. Upon deep cooling, crystallization of water should desiccate polymers more than is observed in experiment. The reason for existence of non-freezing water is an interplay between the crystallization of water and the glass transition in biopolymers that prevents dehydration.

  • 48.
    Kocherbitov, Vitaly
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Söderman, Olle
    Physical Chemistry, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University , P.O. Box 124, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Effect of Oligomerization of Counterions on Water Activity in Aqueous Cationic Surfactant Systems2016Inngår i: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 120, nr 28, s. 6961-6968Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A sorption calorimetry study of cationic cetyltrimethyl ammonium surfactants with four different counterions was performed. The counterions were acetate, succinate, citrate, and butyl tetracarboxylate with formal charges ranging from 1 to 4, respectively. The counterions with 2–4 charges can be considered as oligomers. In all the cases, hydration experiments started with dry solid phases that upon water uptake went through solid-state phase transitions and hexagonal to micellar cubic phase transitions. It was found that in liquid-crystalline phases the activity of water increased with the degree of oligomerization or, equivalently, the formal charge of the counterions. The results are discussed in terms of the forces acting between the colloidal aggregates. It is argued that under the conditions investigated, the so-called strong-coupling theory can be used to describe the electrostatic forces between the charged colloidal objects. Therefore, we suggest that the observed dependence of water activity on the degree of polymerization is due to the entropy of mixing of the counterions in the water volume, which we describe using Flory–Huggins theory.

  • 49.
    Lind, Tania K
    et al.
    Nano-Science Center and Department of Chemistry, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Malmö, 20506, Denmark.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Nano-Science Center and Department of Chemistry, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Malmö, 20506, Denmark.
    Understanding the formation of supported lipid bilayers via vesicle fusion: a case that exemplifies the need for the complementary method approach2016Inngår i: Biointerphases, ISSN 1934-8630, E-ISSN 1559-4106, Vol. 11, artikkel-id 020801Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review, the authors discuss the challenges of studying supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) deposited by vesicle fusion in terms of (1) evaluating SLB formation and quality using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and (2) analyzing the composition and asymmetry of SLBs composed by lipid mixtures using complementary surface sensitive techniques. An overview of the literature is presented and the inconsistencies on this topic are discussed with the objective to expand beyond simple lipid compositions and set the basis for forming and analyzing SLBs of complex natural lipid extracts formed via the vesicle fusion method. The authors conclude by providing some guidelines to successfully form SLBs of complex lipid mixtures including natural extracts.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 50. Lind, Tania K
    et al.
    Polcyn, Piotr
    Zielinska, Paulina
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Urbanczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia
    On the Antimicrobial Activity of Various Peptide-Based Dendrimers of Similar Architecture2015Inngår i: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 738-753Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial drug resistance is a major human health threat. Among the many attempts to tackle this problem, the synthesis of antimicrobial compounds that mimic natural antimicrobial peptides appears as a promising approach. Peptide-based dendrimers can be designed to have higher potency than natural antimicrobial peptides and at the same time they can evade the bacterial defense system. Novel dendrimers with similar chemical structure but varying potency in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration were designed. The dependency between dendrimer structure and antibacterial activity as well as their capacity to attack model cell membranes was studied. The data suggests that supramolecular structure in terms of charge distribution and amphiphilicity, rather than net charge, is the main driver for disruption of cellular membranes and this correlates well with dendrimer hemolytic activity.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
123 1 - 50 of 106
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