Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Ek, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Holmström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Elmerstig, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Unmet Need for Sexual Rehabilitation after Acquired Brain Injury (ABI): A Cross-Sectional Study Concerning Sexual Activity, Sexual Relationships, and Sexual Rehabilitation after ABI2023In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 387-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In relation to brain injury rehabilitation, research has stressed the importance of including sexuality issues due to increased risk for sexual dysfunctions after Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). This study aims to explore experiences after non-stroke ABI concerning individual and relational aspects of sexuality, received information about sexuality at rehabilitation, and gender differences. A postal nationwide survey was conducted in Sweden, 2018-2019. The sample included individuals who had participated in brain injury rehabilitation 2014-2016, response rate 40% (250/624). Among all participants 78% had resumed sexual activity, and there was a significant difference between males (84%, 118/140) and females (69%, 76/110, p = 0.004). Among all participants, 95% reported physical intimacy as important, 80% considered sex as important on an individual level, and 91% stated sexuality as important for the relationship (no gender differences). Significantly more females (52%) than males (22%) reported that they had tried sexual aids (p = 0.000), and more males (29%) than females (16%) reported that professionals addressed sexuality issues during brain injury rehabilitation (p = 0.024). However, only a few participants were offered specific sexual counseling during brain injury rehabilitation, such as individual counseling (3%), couples counseling (2%), and group counseling (3%). To conclude, the vast majority valued both individual and relational aspects of sex and sexuality highly, and more males than females had resumed sexual activity. Few had received information about sexuality after ABI, and even fewer females compared to males reported that the issue was raised during rehabilitation. Clinical implications are discussed in relation to sexual rehabilitation.

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  • 2.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    “Hip to be Crip?”: about crip theory, sexuality and people with intellectual disabilities2013In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 413-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the value of using Crip Theory by investigating what is considered normal sex life for people with intellectual disabilities in Sweden. By combining Crip Theory with Gagnon and Simon’s sexual scripting theory, it concludes that Crip Theory can be of use for researchers and activists, and also suitable for educating staff members, in that it questions sexual norms that are most often taken for granted. However, due to the fact that research or activism inspired by Crip Theory seldom includes intellectual disabilities, its usefulness is limited, and more work is needed to solve problems surrounding agency, stigma and visibility.

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  • 3.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    "I want to do it right!": a pilot study of Swedish sex education and young people with intellectual disabilities2012In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 209-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden sex education has been compulsory since 1955. However, access to sex education seems to be insufficient in schools with special education programs. Concerns about unwanted pregnancies, sexual abuse and sexual risk situations make personnel insecure about how to best deal with the subject. A largely heteronormative perspective of sex education renders young gay people with ID an invisible group. Stereotyped gender norms where girls are supposed to be oriented towards love and relationships and boys towards sexuality make it more difficult for young people with ID to find a more subtle way to act. The aim of this study is to strengthen sexual health among young people with ID, and to develop a knowledge base culled from their own experiences that can help teachers in special schools to supply sufficient sex education. What are the experiences of sex education in young people with ID aged 16–21? In what way, and by whom, should sex education be supplied? What themes do the young people with ID consider important? Qualitative research interviews with 16 young females (9) and males (7) with ID aged 16–21 years have been conducted. Guiding the analyses is an interactionist perspective on sexuality. Results show that a restrictive script is geared toward informants with ID, focusing on sexual risks instead of challenging a discourse of pleasure, desire and intimacy. The study also shows that using critical pedagogy can help personnel develop a professional and adequate teaching model for sex education at schools for adolescents with ID.

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  • 4.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    May I? About Sexuality and Love in the New Generation with intellectual disabilities2004In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 197-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to identify, describe and understand the opportunities and hindrances for young people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in forming relationships and expressing sexuality and love. The methods are participant observations at dances geared towards youths with ID and qualitative interviews with youngsters, staff members and parents. The results show a big variation of sexual conduct, where intercourse seems to be quite unusual. The study also shows that staff and parents feel responsibility for the youngsters sexuality and often act disciplinary as new institutional walls, while the youngsters develop different social strategies to cope with the surroundings. It seems clear that staffs need more guidance and education about sexuality and disability in their social interaction with a new generation of people with ID.

  • 5.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    The Invisibility of Young Homosexual Women and Men with Intellectual Disabilities2009In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to identify, describe and understand the opportunities and hindrances for young people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in expressing a variety of sexual expressions, such as homo- and bisexuality. The method is qualitative interviews with people with ID in the age of 16-27, staff members and parents. The study show that young gay people with ID are an invisible group, and that the possibilities to show a variety of sexual expressions are depending on the surroundings attitudes and behaviours toward the youngsters. Therefore it is important to teach about different sexualities in the sex education at special schools and also to do more research concerning homo- and bisexuality and intellectual disability, without having the heterosexual norm as a starting point.

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  • 6.
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Sorbring, Emma
    Molin, Martin
    "T@ngled Up in Blue!": Views of Parents and Professionals on Internet Use for Sexual Purposes Among Young People with Intellectual Disabilities2015In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 533-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aim to examine parents' and professionals' views on the usage of Internet for love and sexual purposes among young people with intellectual disabilities (18-20 yrs.) in Sweden. Five semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with professionals (n=8) working on special programmes in upper secondary schools and with parents (n=5). The interviews were analysed with thematic analysis and the theory of sexual scripts were guiding the process. The results show that the Internet is seen as a social arena with complex challenges; for love and sexuality, for sexual conduct, and for sexual risk and opportunities. Young people with intellectual disabilities are looked upon as more vulnerable than other youth. However, the result also show that parents view the risk of their adolescent of being lonely as greater than the risk of being abused or mislead. A Net-script consisting of rules is geared towards the young people with intellectual disability. Nevertheless, a change to a more flexible and nuanced Net-script is shown while the group of young persons with intellectual disabilities are seen as more heterogeneous than earlier. In-depth knowledge about parents' and professionals' perspectives on the Internet and sexuality is important since the young people live in a dependency situation towards their surroundings. In addition, the surroundings' attitudes and behaviour are essential for the young peoples' access of support and opportunities to develop their own capacity and to experience love and sexuality.

  • 7. Rasmusson, Else-Marie
    et al.
    Thomé, Bibbi
    Women's Wishes and Need for Knowledge Concerning Sexuality and Relationships in Connection with Gynecological Cancer Disease2008In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 207-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate women's wishes and need for knowledge concerning sexuality and relationships in connection with gynecological cancer. A total of 11 women were interviewed following the completion of their treatment for gynecological cancer. The data was analyzed using latent content analysis. Two main categories were identified: "The absence of knowledge about the body" and "Conversation with sexual relevance." The women wished with their partners present, to be given more in-depth knowledge about their situation given by competent staff who are sensitive to what knowledge is required. Thus, it is important that nurses, who care for women with gynecological cancer, meet each woman's individual needs for knowledge about the effects on her sexuality due to her disease and treatment.

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