Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Dieden, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Learning echocardiography- what are the challenges and what may favour learning? A qualitative study.2019In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Echocardiography is a frequently used imaging modality requiring extensive training to master. In order to develop curriculums and teaching material fully favouring students learning within echocardiography, this study aims to investigate students’ experiences of learning echocardiography, focusing on that which is perceived as the main challenges as well as what might aid learning within the area. The findings could serve as a foundation in the development of new teaching material or curriculums. Methods: A qualitative study was performed with data gathered through two audio-recorded focus group interviews with four third year students from the biomedical laboratory programme at Malmö University in each group. Data was analysed by manifest content analysis. Results: Findings were clustered into two categories reflecting the main findings in the text – practical skills and bridging the theory-practice-gap. Students expressed that main challenges when initially learning echocardiography were the projections and handling the probe as well as connecting ultrasound physics and measurements to practical application. Things that aided their learning were immediate feedback, “playing” with the ultrasound machine, video lectures, the possibility to swiftly alternate between practice and theory as well as the learning by their mistakes in a risk-free environment. Conclusions: This study shows the main challenges when initially learning echocardiography and what might be helpful during the learning process. These findings may be useful when developing curriculums or new teaching material within echocardiography. One suggestion might be to develop digital resources such as virtual laboratories (vLABs).

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  • 2.
    Gummesson, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Alm, Stina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Futurum - the Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Umeå University, Paediatrics, Umeå, Sweden.
    Cederborg, Anna
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, 581 83, Sweden.
    Hellman, Jarl
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hjelmqvist, Hans
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jood, Katarina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Neurology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leanderson, Charlotte
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Möller, Riitta
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Björn
    Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Själander, Anders
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter J
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Särnblad, Stefan
    Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tejera, Alexander
    Division of Translational Cancer Research, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for undergraduate medical education - development and exploration of social validity2023In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The development of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) as a framework for work-based training and assessment in undergraduate medical education has become popular. EPAs are defined as units of a professional activity requiring adequate knowledge, skills, and attitudes, with a recognized output of professional labor, independently executable within a time frame, observable and measurable in its process and outcome, and reflecting one or more competencies. Before a new framework is implemented in a specific context, it is valuable to explore social validity, that is, the acceptability by relevant stakeholders.

    AIM: The aim of our work was to define Core EPAs for undergraduate medical education and further explore the social validity of the constructs.

    METHOD AND MATERIAL: In a nationwide collaboration, EPAs were developed using a modified Delphi procedure and validated according to EQual by a group consisting of teachers nominated from each of the seven Swedish medical schools, two student representatives, and an educational developer (n = 16). In the next step, social validity was explored in a nationwide survey. The survey introduced the suggested EPAs. For each EPA, the importance of the EPA was rated, as was the rater's perception of the present graduates' required level of supervision when performing the activity. Free-text comments were also included and analyzed.

    RESULTS: Ten Core EPAs were defined and validated. The validation scores for EQual ranged from 4.1 to 4.9. The nationwide survey had 473 responders. All activities were rated as "important" by most responders, ranging from 54 to 96%. When asked how independent current graduates were in performing the ten activities, 6 to 35% reported "independent". The three themes of the free text comments were: 'relevant target areas and content'; 'definition of the activities'; and 'clinical practice and learning'.

    CONCLUSION: Ten Core EPAs were defined and assessed as relevant for Swedish undergraduate medical education. There was a consistent gap between the perceived importance and the certainty that the students could perform these professional activities independently at the time of graduation. These results indicate that the ten EPAs may have a role in undergraduate education by creating clarity for all stakeholders.

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  • 3.
    Kumlien, Christine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bish, Melanie
    Chan, Engle A
    Rew, Lynn
    Chan, P S
    Leung, Doris
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Psychometric properties of a modified cultural awareness scale for use in higher education within the health and social care fields2020In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cultural awareness and cultural competence have become important skills in higher education as populations continue to grow in diversity around the world. However, currently, there are few instruments designed to assess student awareness of the aspects of culture, and the existing instruments need further development and testing for use with different target populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of a modified version of the Cultural Awareness Scale (CAS) for use in higher education within the health and social care fields.

    METHODS: A modified version of the CAS was developed, which was tested psychometrically using cross-sectional data. In total, 191 undergraduate students from different health and social care undergraduate programs in Sweden and Hong Kong responded to a call to test the modified instrument.

    RESULTS: The results showed that the modified CAS is a four-factor measure of cultural awareness and possesses satisfactory internal consistency. Results also support the use of the modified CAS as a generic tool to measure cultural awareness among students in higher education within the health and social care fields.

    CONCLUSION: The modified CAS showed satisfactory psychometric properties and can be recommended as a generic tool to measure cultural awareness among students in higher education within the health and social care fields. However, further psychometric testing on the effectiveness of the modified CAS as a tool to evaluate the efficacy of cultural awareness interventions is required.

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    fulltext
  • 4.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gustafsson, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Edgren, Gudrun
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Ctr Teaching & Learning, Lund, Sweden..
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lindqvist, Magnus
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services.
    Eriksson, Tommy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Core competencies for a biomedical laboratory scientist - a Delphi study2022In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background After completing university education, biomedical laboratory scientists work in clinical laboratories, in biomedical research laboratories, in biotech, and in pharmaceutical companies. Laboratory diagnostics have undergone rapid development over the recent years, with the pace showing no signs of abatement. This rapid development challenges the competence of the staff and will most certainly influence the education of future staff. This study aimed to examine what was considered the necessary competencies needed to pursue a career as a biomedical laboratory scientist. Methods A modified Delphi technique was used, with the panel of experts expressing their views in a series of three questionnaire. Consensus was defined as the point which 75 % or more of the panel participants agreed that a particular competency was necessary. Results The study highlights the perceived importance of mostly generic competencies that relate to quality, quality assurance, and accuracy, as well as different aspects of safety, respect, trustworthiness (towards patients/clients and colleagues), and communication skills. The results also stress the significance of self-awareness and professionality. Conclusions We identified important competencies for biomedical laboratory scientists. Together with complementary information from other sources, i.e., guidelines, laws, and scientific publications, the competencies identified can be used as learning outcomes in a competency-based education to provide students with all the competencies needed to work as professional biomedical laboratory scientists.

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    fulltext
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