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  • 1.
    Baeten, Guy
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    The Europeanization of Brussels and the Urbanization of ‘Europe’: Hybridizing the City. Empowerment and Disempowerment in the EU District2001In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regeneration practices in the EU district in Brussels clearly reveal how a mismatch has grown between Brussels’ economic and cultural globalization and its political-institutional parochialization. Brussels’ global mission is being inserted into well-tested local formats of urban governance that have existed throughout the postwar period. Local powerbrokers continue to form remarkable economic growth coalitions that are successfully manoeuvring through obstacles that would prevent them from cashing in on Brussels’ internationalized economy through property development. Any government strategy that would deal with the rapid internationalization of Brussels and the EU district - socially, economically, culturally or politically - is simply absent. Important segments of Brussels’ social fabric are excluded from participation in public political and cultural life. Meanwhile, the success of extreme right-wing parties - which are fiercely contesting the multiculturalization of Brussels - has risen to alarming levels, while different cultural groups in Brussels are de facto generating hybridized cultural expressions which might form the base of a new modus vivendi of community, citizenship, economy and politics.

  • 2.
    Markova, Eugenia
    et al.
    University of Brighton, UK.
    King, Russell
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). University of Brighton, UK.
    Leave or remain?: The post-Brexit (im)mobility intentions of Bulgarians in the United Kingdom2021In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 58-61, article id 0969776420977603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this conceptual article is to explore how Bernstein’s concepts can further our understanding of the internal structure of knowledge informing physical education (PE) and the transmission of knowledge from its site of production into the school subject. In the process of constructing a school subject, knowledge is chosen and decontextualised from where it is produced and then recontextualised into the pedagogic context. This process involves a subjective selection of what is valued as important knowledge. That which is stipulated in the curriculum is regarded as legitimate knowledge worth transmitting to the younger generation. This article offers a deepened understanding of the organising principles of knowledge and the transformation of knowledge into the recontextualised field of PE. Background: The subject of PE has been legitimised in various ways over time, yet in many parts of the world PE as a school subject remains under discussion. Competing ideas have appeared over the years about what constitutes PE, and these have been compared and contrasted with each other. Researchers in the field are concerned with a range of different yet related issues regarding the aim of the subject, the relevance of the content knowledge, and the legitimacy of PE as a school subject. Key concepts: Bernstein’s concepts of pedagogic device and knowledge structures will be applied as explanatory frameworks. The current PE syllabus and support documents in Sweden serve as examples to illustrate how the use of these two overarching concepts can help deepen the understanding of the internal structure of knowledge informing PE and the transmission of knowledge from its site of production into the school subject. Conclusion: This article demonstrates how applying Bernstein’s concepts as an explanatory framework helps identify the characteristics of the knowledge that informs PE and the origin and site of this knowledge. PE appears to be informed by a wide range of different knowledge domains, with each one possessing its own knowledge structure with different characteristics and ways of constructing knowledge. The article suggests that an understanding of the complexity of knowledge informing PE must be taken into consideration in the debate about the subject.

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  • 3.
    Valli, Chiara
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Hammami, Feras
    University of Gothenburg.
    Introducing Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) in Sweden: A social justice appraisal2021In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 155-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a context of growing socio-spatial polarization and of restructuring state–market relations in urban governance, a new phenomenon is emerging in Swedish cities, that is, partnerships for urban regeneration inspired by the Business Improvement District (BID) model. Through an empirical case study research on one of the most long-standing BID partnerships in Sweden – that is, BID Gamlestaden in Gothenburg – the article critically assesses whether the BID model as it has been applied in Sweden represents a socially and politically sustainable tool for urban regeneration. Namely, the study analyses the complex constellation of power entrenched in the BID, with a focus on the relations with urban governance actors ‘above’ (city planning department, public housing, real estate companies, media, politicians) and ‘below’ (residents and local businesses). Despite general claims around BIDs as successful tools for uplifting distressed neighbourhoods, BID Gamlestaden presents shortcomings regarding issues of urban social justice in terms of democratic participation and representation (democracy), disciplining and sanitizing strategies (diversity) and gentrification risks (equality). In fact, while BID partners notice improved attractiveness and sense of security and higher estate values, this improvement is based upon the removal of the most socio-economically vulnerable residents and the disciplining of residents’ and businesses’ behaviours and aesthetics. This study warns about the risk that BIDs as they are currently implemented in Sweden are used as a ‘neoliberal fix’ to move social problems elsewhere rather than solving them, which might lead to new landscapes of exclusion and gentrification.

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