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  • 1.
    Alftberg, Åsa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Providing support for family carers: social workers describing their professional role2023In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family carers have a growing significance, and they are increasingly regarded as clients in need of support. In Sweden, the municipal support for family carers is often provided by family care advisors. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding this relatively new area of social work practice. This article aims to explore how family care advisors describe their work and construct their professional role in relation to family carers. The empiric material derives from a research circle, a form of focus group interview, with family care advisors. The theoretical framework is based on the concept categorical pair, where the description of the family care advisors’ work includes constructing themselves as professionals and the family carers as clients. Four themes have emerged in their stories: being neutral, being allies, being a container, and being an educator. The findings show how the family care advisors’ relationship with the family carers is described as being simultaneously personal and professional: a form of professional friendship with a delicate balancing act. The family care advisors also view their neutral role, with no power to exercise authority, as important and required. Family carers that are perceived as difficult are described from a paternalistic perspective, thus needing to be educated by the family care advisors. Accordingly, when the family care advisors construct their professional role, they also construct family carers, which includes implicit moral notions of a ‘good carer’.

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  • 2.
    Björkhagen Turesson, Annelie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Staaf, Annika
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    How are children’s rights to housing, safety and protection implemented in practice in Malmö?2023In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 280-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to examine how the rights of homeless children to housing and protection in accordance with articles 27 and 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child are upheld in Malmö. The two research questions that are of particular interest in relation to this objective are firstly whether the Swedish parliament’s decision to incorporate the Convention on children’s rights into Swedish law has had a concrete effect on the implementation of children’s rights to housing and protection, and secondly how new guidelines that were introduced in Malmö in 2019 have had an impact on the same. The study is qualitative and employs an ethnographic approach based on conversations with 14 girls and 6 boys, which proceeded from photographs the children had taken of their housing situation and daily lives. The results show that homeless children and their needs and rights remain largely unseen in the work of the social services. The situation of this already vulnerable group has also worsened since our conversations with the children, since a majority no longer are part of the social services’ target group according to Malmö’s guidelines regarding homeless persons. It may be argued that such a result provides an indication both of society’s approach to children located on the extreme margins of society and of the way in which welfare provision has developed in Sweden. 

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  • 3.
    Denvall, Verner
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Johansson, Kerstin
    Linköping University.
    Metagoverning social work knowledge structures2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 808-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing fragmentation and the rising number of organizations in society create major challenges when implementing knowledge structures. In this article, we propose that the concept of metagovernance is useful when addressing these challenges. The enhancement of knowledge structures in the Swedish social services is our study object. Networks at national, regional and local levels have been organized and facilitated by national resources and agreements since 2003. The shifting of participants, switching assignments and ambiguity about the networks’ purposes created difficult conditions for successful implementation. In this paper, we argue that fragile top-down government and shifting local network organization provide limited opportunities to ensure that new knowledge structures will have an impact on social work practice. Research is based upon monitoring a national program that started in 2003, affecting five universities and their surrounding regions and municipalities. The article is also based upon observations and interviews among national and regional actors. Results show that national agencies are hands-off, but still in control by setting up legal and discursive frameworks for those networks. It is argued that this creates new challenges for participating organizations and professionals in social work.

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  • 4.
    Grander, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Roelofs, Kim
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Salonen, Tapio
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Area-based development initiatives: a means to an end or an end in itself? – a literature overview on the case of Sweden2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 243-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries during the last four decades, area-based programmes and initiatives have emerged, directed to the residents in so-called disadvantaged areas of cities. The initiatives are commonly initiated by local public authorities and are gathering social workers, housing companies and NGOs in collaboration, occasionally under the label of community work. With the aim to understand the role of ABIs in the development of marginalized areas, but also to understand ABIs as a phenomenon in a broader societal context, this literature overview compiles recent literature on such initiatives in Sweden. The review finds that the initiatives are often launched as responses to inequality and segregation, which is manifested in low employment rates, but also in social unrest, criminality and associated stigmatization. Thus, the initiatives are often set up with aims of increasing employment or reducing crime rates, but with the overarching goals of reducing segregation. However, segregation has prevailed, which has led to the initiatives being questioned. This literature review finds that the initiatives should be evaluated with regard to results on individual level, as they often are of substantial value for the residents, while at the same time the initiatives should be questioned as means to achieve greater equality.

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  • 5.
    Guidi, Paolo
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Meeuwisse, Anna
    Scaramuzzino, Roberto
    Italian and Nordic social workers’ assessments of families with children at risk2016In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 4-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of how social workers view child welfare problems and what are seen as appropriate interventions has been subject of debate and research the last decades. The aim of the study is to investigate how different child welfare models influence social workers’ assessment of cases involving children at risk. This is done by identifying differences and similarities between Nordic and Italian social workers’ assessments regarding the levels of intervention, their line of reasoning and the types of intervention proposed. A recent comparative study of social workers’ assessment in four Nordic countries reveals a tendency to apply a common model in social work with children and families. The data for this study, collected through a qualitative vignette study involving 18 Italian social workers, are compared with the results of the Nordic study. The analysis displays certain differences between Italian and Nordic social workers’ assessments, in particular with adolescents, but also indicates similar approaches with babies and children. The similarities in the assessment of Nordic and Italian social workers, especially in the line of reasoning, indicate a common professional base of values and knowledge among social workers working with families. The study also shows that child welfare models, as institutional factors, actually influence social workers’ assessment of cases involving children at risk, when it comes to level of intervention and intervention proposed. Such influence seems to be mediated by meso-level organisational factors related to how social work with children at risk is organised.

  • 6.
    Herz, Marcus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Transforming social work: Social constructionist reflections on contemporary and eduring issues2018In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 201-203Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Herz, Marcus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Lalander, Philip
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    An abstract and nameless, but powerful, bystander: ‘unaccompanied children’ talking about their social workers in Sweden2019In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 18-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how ‘unaccompanied children’ in Sweden experience one part of the reception system – the social workers – in the context of their everyday life. The aim is to describe and analyse how these young people view and experience social workers and their relation to them, as well as their perceptions regarding the social worker’s nature. The article is drawn from a research project where 20 ‘unaccompanied children’ participated for over two years. During this period, the researchers have met with the young people continuously doing interviews, observations and informal conversations once a month. The results indicate that the social worker tends to become something of a bystander, a representative of the authorities who has played no active role in the young people’s everyday life, except for when they ‘pop up’ to make a decision affecting their everyday life. The social worker becomes a bystander with power. This is discussed in relation to situational ethics and the importance of building relationships and trust to service users in general and to ‘unaccompanied children’ in particular.

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  • 8.
    Hulusjö, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    A critical perspective on difference: 'the prostitute' and women with prostitution experience2013In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the continuities and discontinuities between ‘the prostitute’ as representation(s) and prostitution as lived experience(s). Women (men, and transgendered) involved in prostitution are subjected to othering processes, processes that stigmatize, disempower and potentially silence them as Others. Representations of ‘prostitutes’ in academic discourse, popular discourse and in the media constructs ‘the prostitute’ as disparately as: ‘victim of patriarchy’, ‘economic entrepreneur’, ‘undeserving victim’, ‘unfit mother’, ‘commodity’, ‘dirty and sexually indiscriminatory’, etc. Reductionist and stigmatizing representations of ‘prostitutes’ have both symbolical and material consequences for women with prostitution experience. I argue that one of the main challenges for social work research on prostitution is to counter rather than to participate in othering processes. Through othering processes women with prostitution experience are constructed as different from other women. With an and/both approach to difference, differences are considered to be fluid, shifting and discursive as well as enduring and embodied. Women with prostitution experience are not only constructed as ‘different’ but also consequently have ‘different’ experiences. Doing research that counters rather than participates in othering processes implies both deconstructing difference and making visible the effects of constructed difference.

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  • 9.
    Jolly, Andy
    et al.
    Institute for Community Research and Development, University of Wolverhampton, UK.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Firewalls as a resource for resistance: separating border policing from social service provision in Sweden and the UK2021In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 183-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firewalls separate rights provision for undocumented migrants from the border policing of migration authorities. In this article, we compare how firewalls have been negotiated during recent years in Sweden and the UK. Firewalls have been partly strengthened in the UK as a result of the ‘Windrush scandal’. Simultaneously, firewalls have been increasingly contested in Sweden after the 2015 ‘long summer of migration’ as a result of continuously more repressive migration policies. On the basis of this detailed comparison, we argue that firewalls are a useful conceptual lens to understand migrant struggles and the development of migration policies. Moreover, we suggest that firewalls can be a useful resource for social service providers using their discretion to resist repressive migration governing at different levels and scales and for organizing political work by and for people at risk of deportation. 

  • 10.
    Markstöm, Annica
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Björkhagen Turesson, Annelie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    A collaborative process: child participation in interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services2024In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The right of children to express their views on matters concerning them is a core principle of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, as defined in Article 12. However, research shows that interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services are planned and based on parents' perspectives even though research suggests that child participation results in welfare service provision that is better matched to the children's needs. The aim of this study is to explore how child participation is constructed in interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services and to study which elements are of importance to this process. The article is based on a qualitative interview study with 14 family social workers and 11 children aged 7-16 with experience of family interventions provided by the child and family welfare services. The results suggest that child participation is a collaborative process in which both the child and the FSW have an active role to play. Participation is constructed through a series of seemingly small, everyday actions in the meeting between the child and the FSW. By actively asking questions and allowing the child to practice participation and influence the process, the FSW can, together with the child, work towards increased child participation in interventions.

  • 11.
    Meeuwisse, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Scaramuzzino, Roberto
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Swärd, Hans
    Everyday realities and visionary ideals among social workers in the Nordic countries: A matter of specialization and work tasks?2011In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 5-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although social workers can be regarded as the practical interpreters and implementing actors of social policies, little is known about their attitudes to their working conditions and to ongoing social-political trends, especially in a comparative Nordic perspective. In this article the present conditions for social work is studied on the basis of a questionnaire distributed to a representative sample of social workers in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The questionnaire was answered by a total of 5554 respondents, which represents a response frequency of 60%. In addition to some general discussions based on the answers of the entire population of respondents, the article particularly focuses on social workers in municipal social services (N = 3018). Our most important result is that social workers' attitudes seem to vary to a certain extent if different fields of specialization within municipal social services are compared, and that these tendencies appear in all the Nordic countries. Those who work with financial support are more dissatisfied with their work situation and are somewhat more positive to sanctions and restrictions aimed at the clients than their colleagues in the other fields. They are also more inclined to explain poverty with reference to individual deficiencies.

  • 12.
    Mulinari, Paula
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Policing time – creating labour: the temporal control of the unemployed2021In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 117-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking as a point of departure the experience of unemployed women in the municipality of Malmö, Sweden, this article identifies the continuity between the policing of time in the migration complex and the unemployment complex. It explores three forms of temporal border policing: placing people on hold (waiting time), placing people in line (labour time), and placing people out of line (disposable time). By focusing on these three forms of policing unemployed people’s time, the article illuminates and analyses the contours of a gendered and racial temporality that creates a flexible, patient and disposable female and racialized workforce. It shows how processes of gendered racialization are those of time disposition and robbery, of time control and time waste, where racialized women’s time is in different ways less valued and less visible. The article illustrates the unequal gendered and racial time regime that is shaped through temporal border practices in the Swedish unemployment complex.

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  • 13.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Ulmestig, Rickard
    Denvall, Verner
    Coping with tensions between standardization and individualization in social assistance2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 435-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s ambition to adapt and individualize welfare delivery poses a challenge to human service organizations at the same time seeking to standardize clients, with consequences for street-level bureaucrats. In this article, the implementation of an instrument for standardized assessment of income support (IA) in Swedish social services is used to investigate what strategies street-level bureaucrats use to cope with tensions between standardization and individualization. Results from six focus groups in two organizations show how job coaches cope by individualizing their practice towards the client, while caseworkers equally often cope through standardization, which could work towards or against the client, in order to keep their discretion and handle organizational demands. Results point to a loose coupling between IA as an organizational tool for legitimacy, and as a pragmatically used questionnaire. Conflicts and contradictions are left to street-level bureaucrats to deal with.

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  • 14.
    Nordesjö, Kettil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Ulmestig, Rickard
    Department of Social Work, Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Scaramuzzino, Gabriella
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Saving time for activation or relationships? The legitimation and performance of automated decision-making for time efficiency in two street-level bureaucracies serving poor and unemployed clients2023In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, digitalized automated decision-making (ADM) has been implemented in many Swedish municipal social services to achieve values such as legal security, client empowerment and time efficiency. The paper aims to understand how ADM policy is legitimized and performed through time efficiency, by a comparison of ADM policy in two Swedish municipalities’ social assistance agencies. It builds on 17 interviews with managers and professionals in two Swedish municipalities’ social assistance units. Findings show ADM is legitimized through arguments of activation and relationships, and performed by handling more applications or increasing time spent with clients, rather than being perceived as increasing the quality of social assistance services. This highlights the significance of organizational goals regarding how street-level bureaucrats perform tasks within their discretionary powers.

  • 15.
    Nordling, Vanna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Persdotter, Maria
    Linköping University.
    Bordering through destitution: the case of social assistance to irregularised migrants in Malmö, Sweden2021In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 155-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we bring attention to the local-level administration of social services as a site of bordering. Specifically, we focus on the provision of social assistance (i.e. a means-tested cash support program, ekonomiskt bistånd) for irregularised migrants. Based on a close comparative reading of the City of Malmö’s 2013 and 2017 guidelines on social assistance, we analyse how entitlements to social assistance have been redefined and restricted following the 2015 so-called refugee crisis and the subsequent overhaul of Swedish asylum policy. Prior to this ‘crisis’, in 2013, the City of Malmö became the first Swedish municipality to extend access to social assistance to irregularised migrants. In 2017, the guidelines were revised with the expressed aim to discourage irregularised migrants from remaining in the country. We see this as a shift from a needs-based approach to one that, instead, sees social policy as subordinate to the goals of immigration enforcement. Further, we conceptualize this as a shift towards a type of indirect internalized bordering measure that so far has received relatively little scholarly attention in the Nordic context, namely self deportation measures that aim to deter immigration and encourage ‘voluntary return’ by restricting access to public services and welfare benefits for (irregularised) migrants. Finally, we argue that the overall specialization, juridification and standardization of social service provision supports the shift in question, providing a convenient justification for restricting entitlements to irregularised migrants. 

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  • 16.
    Persdotter, Maria
    et al.
    Post doc fellow in Welfare Law, Department of Culture and Society, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Introduction to special issue: Bordering practices in the social service sector: experiences from Norway and Sweden2021In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the 2015-peak of asylum-seeking migrants in Europe, asylumpolicies have become increasingly restrictive. As bordering has become a prioritized issue among many European national governments, including in the Nordic countries, practices of bordering have also become more decentralised, diffuse and dispersed. This special issue set focus on such bordering practices as these are manifest in the social service sector. It draws on research conducted in Norway and Sweden and consists, besides this introduction, of seven original articles.Of particular focus is how social work, in its regulations and practices, are involved in the bordering of both the nation and the welfare state. Connecting insights from border studies – and related critical research – with social work research, the articles present empirical analyses of the dynamics of bordering practices among varying practitioners and in varying organizations, including legislators, courts, municipalities, street-level social workers and civil society organizations. The special issue as a whole also raises questions about the ethical and political challenges that emerge at the nexus of bordering and social service provision. In this introductory article, we provide an overview of the field of border studies and discuss how it relates to social work research. This serves as a conceptual foundation which we hope will enable critical reflections on the relationships between social service

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  • 17.
    Porter, Susann
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Swedish politicians’ perspective on civil servants’ collaboration, financial resources, and contextual knowledge in eldercare: A qualitative study2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish municipalities are the main employer for the staff in eldercare, a sector where sick leave rates are high and work environment deficiencies are reported. This qualitative grounded theory study aimed to explore how the politicians accountable for eldercare in Sweden perceived their collaboration with civil servants, their understanding of the financing of eldercare, and views regarding their own existing knowledge of their assignment within eldercare. The study comprised interviews with 41 politicians from municipalities across Sweden. Three categories emerged: (1) holding a position of power, (2) lacking finance of eldercare, and (3) wanting to increase their knowledge base. The strongest finding showed that the civil servants can be viewed as holding a position of power in relation to the politicians. Politicians relied on the civil servants to gather and present information regarding eldercare so they could make accurate decisions; at the same time, they were aware that information might be incomplete. Most of the accountable politicians believe that the financial resources allocated for eldercare were insufficient. The politicians also believed they needed to increase their own knowledge base and expressed a desire to learn more about eldercare and the employees’ work environment. Further studies should explore the role of the first line managers of staff in the eldercare organization and their work environment, and how they perceived their collaboration with civil servants and the accountable politicians.

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  • 18.
    Richert, Torkel
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Nordgren, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Social work with people who use drugs during the Covid-19 pandemic: A mixed methods study2022In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures to control the spread of Covid-19 are challenging social work practice in terms of difficulties to deliver services to vulnerable groups. The aim of this study was to investigate how the Covid-19 pandemic affected social work with people who use drugs regarding ways of working, quality of work, accessibility, and staff motivation. A mixed methods approach was used which included an online survey (n = 81), and three qualitative focus group sessions with social workers in the field of addiction. We analysed the quantitative data through frequency calculations, cross tabulations and Pearson’s χ2 test, and the qualitative data with qualitative textual analysis. The demand for physical distancing challenged important principles of social work such as social closeness, trust and accessibility, and led to a difficult work environment and fewer opportunities to conduct high quality social work, as well as a reduced likelihood of vulnerable clients receiving adequate assistance. Altered practices concerning client meetings negatively affected assessments, working alliances as well as motivation and energy in social work practice. Social workers on the frontline became the ‘last outpost’ when other services shut down, and ‘digital bridges’ between clients and other social workers. Social workers faced a difficult trade-off between protecting themselves and clients from the risk of infection and providing support to a vulnerable group. There were also examples of new practices and lessons learned, for example, the introduction of ‘walks and talks’ with clients and an increased knowledge of how and when to use digital tools for communication.

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  • 19.
    Wallengren-Lynch, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    From compassion to action: school social workers at the forefront of emergency response2024In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate the role of school social workers in emergencies within educational settings. Using a semi-systematic methodology, it identifies relevant research to provide a comprehensive overview of literature covering school social work and emergency interventions. Through an analysis of 22 articles representing diverse global perspectives, this study sheds light on the intricate interplay within these domains. Its significance lies in revealing current knowledge while pointing to unexplored avenues for practitioners and researchers. By examining the experiences and strategies of school social workers, this study uncovers the dynamic approaches employed during emergencies, providing essential insights for effective emergency management. Social capital is widely employed when seeking to understand resilience and vulnerability in times of natural hazards and man-made disasters and crises. In this paper, a social capital perspective, broken down into bonding, bridging, and linking levels, is applied to the results. This enables an analysis that argues for the importance of adopting a systemic approach. The results show that social workers in schools play a vital role in all phases of disaster and crisis management. While the majority of research focuses on the response after an event has occurred, the findings from the reviewed articles also indicate the importance of involvement in the preparation and planning phases. These findings underscore the importance of social workers having an understanding of education, psychology, and community well-being. More research and education about the readiness and preparedness of school social workers in the Nordics is required.

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