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  • 1.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Gender equal BDSM practice: a Swedish paradox?2017In: Psychology & Sexuality, ISSN 1941-9899, E-ISSN 1941-9902, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 268-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine power and BDSM, that is, Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, and Sadism and Masochism, within Swedish society. The main research question is: How do practi- tioners relate to power, gender and consent in Swedish society, which has been characterised by a long tradition of gender equality? The study is based on 29 in-depth interviews with self-defined BDSM practitioners and ethnographic fieldwork in Swedish BDSM communities. The article shows that there is a strong preoccupation of gender and equality among Swedish practitioners. They express gender awareness and pro- blematise the practice in relation to societal power structures. For BDSM to fit into a society with a strong egalitarian discourse like Sweden, the practitioners need to reconcile BDSM and gender equality. To defend an interest in BDSM, the practitioners emphasise the voluntariness, the central role of consent, and the defined staging in the practices. By highlighting the consent, the informants thus position themselves against the discourse of BDSM as violent, oppressive and patriarchal.

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  • 2.
    Holmström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Elmerstig, Eva
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Complexities of sexual consent: young people's reasoning in a Swedish context2020In: Psychology & Sexuality, ISSN 1941-9899, E-ISSN 1941-9902, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 342-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research and public debate argue that partnered sexual activity is construed in terms of being consensual or not, we know little about young people’s own reasoning on sexual consent. This study aimed to investigate how sexual consent and sexual negotiations are interpreted by young people in Sweden. Forty-four female and male participants, ranging from 18–21 years old, took part in 12 focus groups, organised according to a set of vignettes. All focus groups were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The findings illustrate the complexity of the interpretation of sexual consent. There was a clear perception among the participants that sex between two individuals is a mutual process, and that sex should be consensual, expressed either through words, body language, or both. They all stated clearly that a ‘No’ has to be respected, independently of context. However, at the same time participants expressed contradictory norms and expectations in relation to the described situations, that showed an ambivalence concerning sexual scripts and consequences of challenging these in specific situations. Reasoning concerning discrepancy between ideals and actual possibilities to act in sexual encounters indicates differences in relation to gender, age and educational background and pathways.

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