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  • 1.
    Bijelic, Tessa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). School of Health Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ing-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Center for Oral Rehabilitation, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Expectations and Experiences of Internet-Based Therapy for Adolescents with TMD Pain2022In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 36, no 3, p. 237-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate expectations and experiences of internet-based therapy (IBT) in adolescents with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain. Methods: Seven adolescents were strategically selected for this study. All patients had received IBT for their TMD pain in a previous randomized controlled trial. Oneon- one interviews were conducted in a nonclinical setting. The interviews were semi-structured, following an interview guide with six domains. The recorded interviews were transcribed, and a qualitative inductive content analysis was then performed. Results: Content analysis indicated that the expectations of the adolescents and their experiences of IBT as a treatment for TMD pain can be understood in light of three main categories: (1) To become better; (2) An ambivalent experience; and (3) A personal challenge. The adolescents expressed expectations of less TMD pain after treatment, but also of improvement in general well-being and everyday life. Although their experiences of IBT varied, adolescents described having mixed feelings about treatment and feeling that it was personally challenging. Conclusion: Gained understanding of expectations and experiences is a necessary basis for revising the IBT program to meet the demands of adolescents and to improve treatment adherence. Furthermore, the content of the three categories clarifies the values of adolescents, and this understanding can in turn contribute to the development of new patient-centered treatment programs.

  • 2.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bechara, Christian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Pishdari, Brousk
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Visscher, Corine M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam, Dept Orofacial Pain & Dysfunct, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Impact of Catastrophizing in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders: A Systematic Review2020In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 34, no 4, p. 379-397BArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To assess the prevalence of catastrophizing in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and the possible associations between catastrophizing and treatment outcome. Methods: This review was registered in the Prospero database (CRD42018114233). Electronic searches were performed in PubMed, Scopus, and PsycINFO from the inception of each database up to October 26, 2018, and were combined with a hand search. Articles focusing on levels of catastrophizing and how catastrophizing affects pain levels and treatment outcomes for patients diagnosed with TMD were included, as well as studies reporting how treatment outcomes were affected by cognitive behavioral treatment as an addition to standard treatment for TMD. Reviews and case reports were excluded. Risk of bias was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Results: The literature search identified 266 articles. After screening of abstracts, the full texts of 59 articles were assessed. Of these, 37 articles, including 4,789 patients with TMD and 6,617 controls, met the inclusion criteria. Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were reported in patients with TMD, with a large effect size (Hedges' g = 0.86) compared to pain-free controls. Furthermore, associations of higher levels of catastrophizing with higher symptom severity and with poorer treatment outcome were reported together with indications of positive effects from cognitive behavioral therapy. Conclusion: The results suggest an association between catastrophizing and TMD that may affect not only symptom severity but also treatment outcome. Assessing levels of pain catastrophizing might therefore be valuable in the assessment and management of patients with TMD.

  • 3.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jawad, Nora
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Acuña, Xochitl
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Visscher, Corine
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Netherlands; University of Amsterdam & Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Schiffman, Eric
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Fear of Movement and Catastrophizing in Participants with Temporomandibular Disorders2022In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 36, no 1, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To assess differences in catastrophizing and kinesiophobia in relation to areas of pain and somatic symptoms among participants with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and controls. Methods: In total, 401 participants (333 women, 68 men, mean age: 45.8 years) in the TMJ Impact Project were examined in accordance with the Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, including clinical examination (Axis I) and psychosocial assessment (Axis II) augmented with imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Of these, 218 participants had a painful TMD pain diagnosis, 63 had a nonpainful TMD diagnosis, and 111 had no TMD. Nine participants had missing data. Participants completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Areas of Pain figure, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 for assessing somatic symptoms. Results: Compared to controls, participants with TMD pain showed higher levels of catastrophizing (P = .017), kinesiophobia (P < .001), areas of pain (P < .001), and somatic symptoms (P < .001). Participants with nonpainful TMD showed a higher level of kinesiophobia (P < .001) than controls. There was a positive correlation between catastrophizing and kinesiophobia for participants with TMD pain (r = 0.33, P < .001) and nonpainful TMD (r = 0.42, P < .001). Discussion: The results suggest more fear of movement, as well as an association between catastrophizing and fear of movement, in participants with TMD pain and in participants with nonpainful TMD compared to controls. Assessment and management of fear of movement as well as catastrophizing may be useful as part of individualized treatment strategies for patients with TMD.

  • 4.
    Jonsson Sjögren, Jakob
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, 701 16 Örebro, Sweden.
    Kvist, Thomas
    Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Eliasson, Alf
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, 701 16 Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, 701 82 Örebro, Sweden.
    EndoReCO,
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Foresight.
    Characteristics and impact of pain from root-filled teeth: A practice-based cross-sectional study comparing painful teeth with and without signs of inflammatory dental disease2024In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 38, no 1, p. 64-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare pain characteristics, impact of pain and characteristics of patients withpainful root-filled teeth with and without signs of inflammatory dental disease. Thiscross-sectional study was performed in the Public Dental Health services, RegionÖrebro County, Sweden. Adult patients with ≥1 root-filled tooth identified at theirregular check-up were included and assigned to one of two groups; those with ≥1sign of inflammatory dental disease (DD+) and those without any such sign (DD−).Patients/teeth were compared regarding pain characteristics (intensity, frequency,duration, quality and provoking factors), impact of pain (medication intake, impacton life) and patient characteristics as background factors (general health, other bodilyand orofacial pain). Statistics included descriptive data (frequency tables) and groupcomparisons (Chi-square, Fisher’s Exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests). The DD+ groupincluded 27 participants (30 teeth) and the DD− group 22 participants (23 teeth).On average, pain intensity was mild, the frequency most often recurrent, and theimpact was low. Average pain duration since onset exceeded 2 years in both groups.The only observed between-group differences were average pain intensity; 3.1 (0–10Numerical Rating Scale (NRS)) in DD− group compared to 1.6 for DD+ (p = 0.030),and tenderness to apical palpation; only reported in the DD+ group. The similaritiesin clinical presentation between the two groups underscore the difficulties in correctlydistinguishing between pain of odontogenic and non-odontogenic origin in root-filledteeth with a standard clinical investigation. Additional diagnostic methods need to beinvestigated for their ability to differentiate between tooth pain or discomfort of differentorigins

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  • 5.
    Sharma, Sonia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). University of Buffalo, USA.
    Lövgren, Anna
    Umeå University.
    Åkerman, Sigvard
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University.
    Axtelius, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Skåne University Hospital.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Umeå University.
    Prevalence of Facial Pain and Headache in Sweden2021In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 35, no 2, p. 139-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To compare the prevalence of facial pain and headache across various regions in Sweden. Methods: This study involved a comparison of cross-sectional questionnaire studies over a period of 10 years including 128,193 individuals and assessed facial pain, pain on function, and headache. Participants included (1) all Public Dental Service patients aged 16 to 90 years in Vasterbotten (n = 57,283) and Gavleborg (n = 60,900); and (2) random samples of residents in Kalmar (n = 3,560) and Skane (n = 6,450). Facial pain and pain on function were assessed for all participants, and headache was also assessed for participants in Kalmar and Skane. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate unadjusted prevalence estimates and demographic characteristics. Prevalence estimates were adjusted for age and sex using weighted distributions from the 2015 data in the Swedish population registry before comparisons across the regions. Results: Overall, the prevalence of facial pain and headache were significantly higher in female than in male participants (P<.01). The standardized prevalence of facial pain was 4.9% in Vasterbotten, 1.4% in Gavleborg, 4.6% in Kalmar, and 7.6% in Skane. For headache, the standardized prevalence was 18.9% in Kalmar and 21.3% in Skane. In Skane, individuals with facial pain had a 15-fold higher odds of headache than those without. Conclusion: In the present Swedish epidemiologic study, the prevalence of facial pain ranged from 1.4% in Gavleborg to 7.6% in Skane. Besides different sampling frames and other population characteristics, the presence of a high number of immigrants in Skane may account for some differences in pain prevalence across the Swedish regions.

  • 6.
    Slade, Gary D.
    et al.
    Division of Pediatric and Public Health, Adams School of Dentistry, Department of Dental Ecology, Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.
    Greenspan, Joel D.
    Department of Neural and Pain Sciences, Brotman Facial Pain Clinic, Center to Advance Chronic Pain Research, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, United States.
    Fillingim, Roger B.
    Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, Pain Research and Intervention Center of Excellence, College of Dentistry University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States.
    Maixner, William
    Department of Anesthesiology, Center for Translational Pain Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.
    Sharma, Sonia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo, School of Dental Medicine, Buffalo, NY, United States.
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo, School of Dental Medicine, Buffalo, NY, United States.
    Overlap of Five Chronic Pain Conditions: Temporomandibular Disorders, Headache, Back Pain, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Fibromyalgia2020In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 34, no Suppl, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To assess cohort retention in the OPPERA project and to compare the degree of overlap between pairs of chronic overlapping pain conditions (COPCs) using a cross-sectional analysis of data from 655 adults who completed followup in the OPPERA study. Methods: Subjects were classified for the absence or presence of each of the five COPCs. The extent of overlap beyond chance was quantified using odds ratios, which were calculated using binary logistic regression models. Results: While overlap was the norm, its magnitude varied according to COPC: 51% of people with headache had one or more overlapping COPCs, and this proportion increased to 90% for people with fibromyalgia. The degree of overlap between pairs of COPCs also varied considerably, with odds ratios being greatest for associations between musculoskeletal conditions (fibromyalgia,temporomandibular disorders, and low back pain) and less pronounced for overlap invoMng headache or IBS. Furthermore, univariate associations between some pairs of COPCs were nullified after adjusting for other COPCs. Conclusion: There was greater overlap between fibromyalgia and either temporomandibular disorders or low back pain than between other pairs of COPCs. While musculoskeletal conditions exhibited some features that could be explained by a single functional syndrome, headache and irritable bowel syndrome did not.

  • 7.
    Zhang, Yuanxiu
    et al.
    Nanjing Med Univ, Affiliated Hosp, Inst Stomatol, Orofacial Pain & TMD Res Unit,Dept Orthodont,Jian, Nanjing, Peoples R China; Aarhus Univ, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Exposto, Fernando G.
    Aarhus Univ, SCON, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Grigoriadis, Anastasios
    Karolinska Inst, SCON, Dept Dent Med, Div Oral Diagnost & Rehabil, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Aarhus, Denmark; Univ Amsterdam, ACTA, Dept Oral Kinesiol, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, MOVE Res Inst Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Koutris, Michail
    Univ Amsterdam, ACTA, Dept Oral Kinesiol, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; MOVE Res Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Zhang, Jinglu
    Nanjing Med Univ, Affiliated Hosp Stomatol, Inst Stomatol, Orofacial Pain & TMD Res Unit,Jiangsu Key Lab Ora, Nanjing, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Lin
    Nanjing Med Univ, Affiliated Hosp Stomatol, Inst Stomatol, Jiangsu Key Lab Oral Dis,Dept Orthodont,Orofacial, Nanjing, Peoples R China.
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Aarhus Univ, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Aarhus, Denmark; SCON, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Comparison of Pain-Generated Functional Outcomes in Experimental Models of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Nerve Growth Factor Injection of the Masticatory Muscles2020In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 34, no 4, p. 311-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To compare two pain models of myalgic TMD, delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and injections of nerve growth factor (NGF), in terms of pain-related and motor function outcomes, as well as activity-related temporal summation. Methods: Fifty age- and gender-matched healthy participants were recruited and randomized into one of three groups: to a repeated eccentric contraction task to cause DOMS (n = 20), to receive NGF injections into the masseter muscle (n = 20), or to a control group (n = 10). Mechanical sensitivity of masticatory muscles, chewing parameters, jaw function limitation, maximum bite force, and activity-related temporal summation were assessed at baseline and at days 1, 2, and 7 following the intervention. Results: Compared to baseline, both model groups showed increased mechanical sensitivity, jaw function limitation, pain on chewing, and decreased chewing efficiency, lasting longer in the NGF group than in the DOMS group (P < .05). Furthermore, also compared to baseline, the NGF group showed increased pain on maximum bite and decreased pain-free maximum opening (P < .05). No increases in activity-related temporal summation were shown for any of the model groups when compared to baseline or the control group (P > .05). Conclusion: Both models produced similar pain-related outcomes, with the NGF model having a longer effect. Furthermore, the NGF model showed a more substantial effect on motor function, which was not seen for the DOMS model. Finally, neither of the models were able to provoke activity-related temporal summation of pain.

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