Malmö University Publications
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  • 1. Careja, Romana
    et al.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Using population registers for migration and integration research: examples from Denmark and Sweden2018In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 19, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper starts from the observation that research on immigrants’ integration trajectories needs detailed information, both objective and attitudinal, and ideally longitudinal. This study uses the cases of Denmark and Sweden – whose registers produce detailed records about all natives’ and immigrants’ lives in their host countries – in order to, first, review existing research on immigrants and their integration and, second, discuss the way in which register data are used, their caveats and their potential. The study finds that, in Denmark and Sweden, registers provide systematic objective data which are fully available to researchers and have the potential to help in the collection of high-quality subjective data. However, the population registers have some traits which may impact on the representativeness of the samples. The authors argue that, if researchers are aware of the caveats, registers can be used to obtain representative samples of immigrants, and register data can be complemented with survey-based attitudinal data, thus opening up new research opportunities for testing propositions on integration theories.

  • 2.
    Ekstedt, Johan
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bureaucratic configuration and discretion in asylum case processing: the case of the EUAA in Greece2023In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes an in-depth look at caseworkers at the European Union Asylum Agency in Greece. The agency’s increased role in asylum case processing and the emergence of the called “integrated European administration” is an unusual but nevertheless critical case to study for scholars of European asylum bureaucracies. Previous research into member state’s national migration authorities has shown that discretionary decision-making is widely deployed by asylum caseworkers. Generally, street-level bureaucrats tend to ‘reinterpret’ policy and creatively make use of the legal framework of the Common European Asylum System in order to make their day-to-day operations run more smoothly and resolve ethical dilemmas. However, this article finds that in the case of the European Union Asylum Agency, the compartmentalized institutional arrangement and short-term contracts removes both the incentive and ability for caseworkers to creatively reinterpret policy and deploy discretionary practices. It is therefore argued that scholars of asylum bureaucracy in Europe must pay increased attention to how the bureaucratic configuration of migration authorities.

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  • 3.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    A national turn of local integration policy: multi-level governance dynamics in Denmark and Sweden2015In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 3, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in the research community in the local governance of migration and integration. Studies indicate a local turn in integration policies, with local governments becoming important integration policy actors. Unlike most research, this study of recent developments in the policies for migrant newcomers in Denmark and Sweden observes a national turn in local integration policy. Despite their different integration policies, the central governments of both countries have increased their control and influence at the local level and thereby made it more difficult for local governments to formulate their own integration policies. This study highlights the need to complement earlier research based on frame analysis with an analytical framework that takes central government steering and the uneven power relationship between the levels of government into account.

  • 4.
    Fernandez, Christian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum
    The civic integrationist turn in Danish and Swedish school politics.2017In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 5, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The civic integrationist turn usually refers to the stricter requirements for residence and citizenship that many states have implemented since the late 1990's. But what of other policy spheres that are essential for the formation of citizens? Is there a civic turn in school policy? And does it follow the pattern of residence and citizenship? This article addresses these questions through a comparative study of the EU's allegedly strictest and most liberal immigration regimes, Denmark and Sweden, respectively. The analysis shows a growing concern with citizenship education in both countries, yet with different styles and content. Citizenship education in Denmark concentrates on reproducing a historically derived core of cultural values and knowledge to which minorities are expected to assimilate, while the Swedish model subscribes to a pluralist view that stresses mutual adaptation and intercultural tolerance. Despite claims to the contrary, the analysis shows that Sweden too has experienced a civic turn.

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  • 5.
    Kraly, Ellen Percy
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Colgate Univ, Hamilton, NY 13346 USA..
    Hovy, Bela
    UN Dept Econ & Social Affairs, Populat Div, New York, NY USA..
    Data and research to inform global policy: the global compact for safe, orderly and regular migration2020In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In December 2018, the UN General Assembly formerly endorsed the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for International Migration, said, "the formal endorsement of the Compact represents a resounding commitment to an international migration framework based on fact, not myth, and to an understanding that national migration policies are best implemented through cooperation not in isolation." While there are formidable challenges to the implementation of the Compact, the mandates for the role of evidence in policy and program formulation have been expressed from stakeholders, Member States, civil society organizations, and migrants, throughout the preparatory processes. This paper seeks to share those voices vis a vis the call for research concerning data, research and analysis concerning international migrants and displaced persons, and will consider the implications for scientific initiatives for migration research and analysis and for global policy and goals concerning migration and sustainable development.

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  • 6.
    Meer, N.
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Dimaio, C.
    University of Calabria, Rende, Italy.
    Hill, E.
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Angeli, M.
    Mediterranean Institute for Gender Studies (MIGS), Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Öberg, Klara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Governing displaced migration in Europe: housing and the role of the “local”2021In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article will explore the extent to which a focus on the ‘local’ can tell us something meaningful about recent developments in the governance of displaced migrants and refugees. Taking a multi-sited approach spanning cases in the south and north of Europe, we consider how the challenge of housing and accommodation in particular, a core sector of migrant reception and integration, can shed light on the ways local and city level approaches may negotiate, and sometimes diverge from, national level policy and rhetoric. While it can be said that despite variation, local authorities are by definition ultimately ‘always subordinate’ (Emilsson, Comparative Migration Studies, 3: 1-17, 2015: 4), they can also show evidence of ‘decoupling’ across geographies of policy delivery (Pope and Meyer, European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology, 3: 280–305, 2016: 290). This article traces how possible local variations in different European cases are patterned by ground-level politics, local strategic networks, and pre-existing economic resources in a manner that is empirically detailed through the study of housing.

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  • 7.
    Mozetič, Katarina
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    A help or hindrance?: Highly educated refugees’ perceptions of the role of civic integration programmes in accessing the labour market in Oslo, Malmö and Munich2022In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research often focuses on individual-level factors shaping refugee labour market participation. Less research has been conducted on the implications of the roles of employers, integration programmes, migrant support organisations and similar. This article contributes to the literature by seeking to understand highly educated refugees’ perceptions of how civic integration programmes shape opportunity structures for their labour market participation. It is particularly concerned with how the programmes’ characteristics of malleability and comprehensiveness inform integration processes. Accordingly, the article analyses identification contestations that transpire within civic integration programmes, as perceived by the participants, and compares how these unfold in three different contexts. A total of 41 semi-structured interviews with highly educated refugees in Oslo, Malmö, and Munich were analysed. The findings suggest that the civic integration programmes were thought to either foster or hinder the participants’ employment pathways depending on whether the participants were perceived as highly educated individuals or reduced to the general category of ‘refugee’. The differences were traced back to each civic integration programme’s capacity to provide malleable integration support, calling attention to the importance of the programmes’ acknowledgment of refugees’ heterogeneous needs and the pitfalls associated with undifferentiated refugee categorisation.

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  • 8.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Playing the safe card or playing the race card?: Comparison of attitudes towards interracial marriages with non-white migrants and transnational adoptees in Sweden2018In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 6, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares the attitudes of white Swedes towards interracial marriages with someone of non-white migrant origin and a non-white transnational adoptee. The analysis is based on a postal survey and follow-up interviews conducted in Malmö, Sweden. Survey results show that transnational adoptees are not preferred as marriage partners by white Swedes to the same extent as white Swedes. Moreover, the differences in attitudes towards marriages with migrants and non-white adoptees are not statistically significant. Interviewees utilized the notion of cultural differences to explain the attitudes towards intermarriages with migrants. However, this was highly contested when talking about the attitudes towards non-white transnational adoptees. These results show how race and visible differences play a role in attitudes toward interracial marriages in Sweden.

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  • 9.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Suyemoto, Karen L.
    Univ Massachusetts, Psychol & Asian Amer Studies, Boston, MA 02125 USA..
    What does it mean to "go beyond race"?2022In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this commentary piece, we argue that we must interrogate the meaning of race and examine why and how race does matter in different societies across contexts before we can even consider moving "beyond race." We understand race as fundamentally related to power, privilege, and oppression; we discuss how we cannot go "beyond race" in the face of persistent racisms, hierarchies and maintenance of power and privilege. We address that demographic changes in itself does not bring us "beyond race" and the importance of active policies and political mobilization through addressing race as an analytical category is necessary to go "beyond racism."

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  • 10.
    Pendakur, Ravi
    et al.
    Univ Ottawa, Grad Sch Publ & Int Affairs, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Polish immigrants and their children in Canada and Sweden, employment status and income patterns2021In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a combination of logit, and OLS regressions we ask if the labour force outcomes for Polish immigrants differ across two immigration policy regimes (Canada and Sweden). Specifically, we compare the employment and earnings prospects of Polish immigrants and their children in Canada and Sweden using data that is similar in quality and timing. We find that in general, Polish immigrants, while facing substantial penalties compared to native-born workers fare better in Canada than in Sweden in terms of employment and income. As expected, second generation Poles fare much better than their immigrant counterparts in terms of employment and earnings differentials and have similar outcomes to the native-born majority in both countries. Membership in the EU fundamentally changed migration flows from Poland. In light of this we also look at how post-2004 Polish migrants have fared in both Canada and Sweden.

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  • 11.
    Tucker, Jason
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Why here?: Factors influencing Palestinian refugees from Syria in choosing Germany or Sweden as asylum destinations2018In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 29, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the findings of 33 interviews, carried out in 2017, examining the factors influencing Palestinian refugees from Syria (PRS) in choosing Germany or Sweden as asylum destinations. The findings showed that there was a very high degree of destination specificity towards Sweden for nearly all of the participants. This was based on their desire to reach Sweden due to its accessible citizenship as compared to other European or Arab states. This paper details how most of the refugees had conducted research, drawing on information from social networks and other sources, in order to establish in which European country they could most easily and quickly acquire citizenship. As a consequence of the prioritisation of resolving their and their families’ statelessness as quickly as possible, the interviewees often devalued social and human capital. Considerations related to economic or educational opportunities played only a marginal role in the decision making. This research finds that in order to better understand the migration of stateless refugees, their desire to resolve their statelessness should be considered as a potentially significant aspect of their choice of asylum destination.

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1 - 11 of 11
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