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  • 1. Cao, Cheng
    et al.
    Chen, Fan
    Garvey, Christopher J.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Stenzel, Martina H
    Drug-Directed Morphology Changes in Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly (PISA) Influence the Biological Behavior of Nanoparticles2020Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, nr 27, s. 30221-30233Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the hydrophobic block length on the morphologies of polymerization-induced self-assembled (PISA) nanoparticles is well understood. However, the influence of drug loading on the phase morphology of the nanoparticles during the PISA process, and the resulting biological function of PISA nanoparticles, has barely been investigated. In this work, we show that the addition of a drug, curcumin, during the PISA process shifts the phase diagram toward different morphologies. The PISA system was based on hydrophilic poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethylphosphorylcholine) (PMPC), which was chain extended with hydrophobic methyl methacrylate (MMA) in various concentrations of curcumin. According to transmission electron microscopy, the presence of curcumin led to the transition of, for example, worms to polymersome and micelles to worms analysis. To understand the interaction between polymer particles and drug, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out. These measurements show that curcumin is predominantly located in the core in the case of micelles and worms while it is found in the shell of polymersomes. The change in morphology influences the cellular uptake by MCF-7 cells and the movement of the particles in multicellular cancer spheroids (3D model). With the increasing amount of drug, the cellular uptake of micelles and worms was enhanced with the increasing grafting density of MPC chains, which contrasts the decreasing cellular uptake in the higher drug-loaded polymersomes due to the lower shell hydration.

  • 2. Chang, Debby P.
    et al.
    Jankunec, Marija
    Barauskas, Justas
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV).
    Tiberg, Fredrik
    Nylander, Tommy
    Adsorption of lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles on cationic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces2012Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 4, nr 5, s. 2643-2651Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigation of nonlamellar nanoparticles formed by dispersion of self-assembled lipid liquid crystalline phases is stimulated by their many potential applications in science and technology; resulting from their unique solubilizing, encapsulating, and space-dividing nature. Understanding the interfacial behavior of lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) at surfaces can facilitate the exploitation of such systems for a number of potentially interesting uses, including preparation of functional surface coatings and uses as carriers of biologically active substances. We have studied the adsorption of LCNP, based on phosphatidylcholine/glycerol dioleate and Polysorbate 80 as stabilizers, at different model surfaces by use of in situ ellipsometry. The technique allows time-resolved monitoring of the layer thickness and the amount adsorbed, thereby providing insights into the restructuring of the lipid nanoparticle upon adsorption. The effects of solvent condition, electrolyte concentration, particle size, and surface chemistry on adsorbed layer properties were investigated. Furthermore, the internal structures of the particles were investigated by cryo-transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction on the corresponding liquid crystalline phases in excess water. LCNPs are shown to form well-defined layers at the solid–liquid interface with a structure and coverage that are determined by the interplay between the self-assembly properties of the lipids and lipid surface interactions, respectively. At the hydrophobic surface, hydrophobic interaction results in a structural transition from the original LCNP morphology to a monolayer structure at the interface. In contrast, at cationic and hydrophilic surfaces, relaxation is a relatively slow process, resulting in much thicker adsorbed layers, with thickness and adsorption behavior that to a greater extent reflect the original bulk LCNP properties.

  • 3.
    Delvar, Alice
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Lindh, Liselott
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Interaction of polyelectrolytes with salivary pellicles on hydroxyapatite surfaces under erosive acidic conditions2015Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 38, nr 7, s. 21610-21618Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The modification of acidic beverage formulations with food-approved, nonhazardous substances with antierosive properties has been identified as a key strategy for counteracting the prevalence of dental erosion, i.e., the acid-induced dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HA, the main mineral component of tooth surfaces). While many of such substances have been reported, very little is known on how they interact with teeth and inhibit their acid-induced dissolution. With the aim of filling this gap in knowledge, we have studied under acidic conditions the interaction between two polyelectrolytes of differing ionic character, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and chitosan, and saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, i.e., a model for the outer surface of teeth. These studies were performed by means of ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and atomic force microscopy. We also studied, by means of pH variations, how dissolution of saliva-coated HA is affected by including these polyelectrolytes in the erosive solutions. Our results confirm that salivary films protect HA from acid-induced dissolution, but only for a limited time. If the acid is modified with CMC, this polyelectrolyte incorporates into the salivary films prolonging in time their protective function. Eventually, the CMC-modified salivary films are removed from the HA surfaces. From this moment, HA is continuously coated with CMC, but this offers only a weak protection against erosion. When the acid is modified with the cationic chitosan, the polyelectrolyte adsorbs on top of the salivary films. Chitosan-modified salivary films are also eventually replaced by bare chitosan films. In this case both coatings offer a similar protection against HA dissolution, which is nevertheless notably higher than that offered by CMC.

  • 4.
    Gericke, Sabrina M.
    et al.
    Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Kauppinen, Minttu M.
    Department of Physics and Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wagner, Margareta
    Institute of Applied Physics, Technische Universität Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria.
    Riva, Michele
    Institute of Applied Physics, Technische Universität Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria.
    Franceschi, Giada
    Institute of Applied Physics, Technische Universität Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria.
    Posada-Borbón, Alvaro
    Department of Physics and Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rämisch, Lisa
    Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Pfaff, Sebastian
    Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Rheinfrank, Erik
    Institute of Applied Physics, Technische Universität Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria.
    Imre, Alexander M.
    Institute of Applied Physics, Technische Universität Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria.
    Preobrajenski, Alexei B.
    MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Appelfeller, Stephan
    MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Sara
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Merte, Lindsay R.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för materialvetenskap och tillämpad matematik (MTM).
    Zetterberg, Johan
    Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Diebold, Ulrike
    Institute of Applied Physics, Technische Universität Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria.
    Grönbeck, Henrik
    Department of Physics and Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Edvin
    Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Effect of Different In2O3(111) Surface Terminations on CO2 Adsorption2023Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 15, nr 38, s. 45367-45377Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In2O3-based catalysts have shown high activity and selectivity for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol; however, the origin of the high performance of In2O3 is still unclear. To elucidate the initial steps of CO2 hydrogenation over In2O3, we have combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations to study the adsorption of CO2 on the In2O3(111) crystalline surface with different terminations, namely, the stoichiometric, reduced, and hydroxylated surface. The combined approach confirms that the reduction of the surface results in the formation of In adatoms and that water dissociates on the surface at room temperature. A comparison of the experimental spectra and the computed core-level shifts (using methanol and formic acid as benchmark molecules) suggests that CO2 adsorbs as a carbonate on all three surface terminations. We find that the adsorption of CO2 is hindered by hydroxyl groups on the hydroxylated surface.

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  • 5. Okhrimenko, Denis V.
    et al.
    Budi, Akin
    Ceccato, Marcel
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Johansson, Dorte B.
    Lybye, Dorthe
    Bechgaard, Klaus
    Andersson, Martin P.
    Stipp, Susan L. S.
    Hydrolytic Stability of 3-Aminopropylsilane Coupling Agent on Silica and Silicate Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures2017Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, nr 9, s. 8344-8353Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    3-Aminopropylsilane (APS) coupling agent is widely used in industrial, biomaterial, and medical applications to improve adhesion of polymers to inorganic materials. However, during exposure to elevated humidity and temperature, the deposited APS layers can decompose, leading to reduction in coupling efficiency, thus decreasing the product quality and the mechanical strength of the polymer–inorganic material interface. Therefore, a better understanding of the chemical state and stability of APS on inorganic surfaces is needed. In this work, we investigated APS adhesion on silica wafers and compared its properties with those on complex silicate surfaces such as those used by industry (mineral fibers and fiber melt wafers). The APS was deposited from aqueous and organic (toluene) solutions and studied with surface sensitive techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), streaming potential, contact angle, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. APS configuration on a model silica surface at a range of coverages was simulated using density functional theory (DFT). We also studied the stability of adsorbed APS during aging at high humidity and elevated temperature. Our results demonstrated that APS layer formation depends on the choice of solvent and substrate used for deposition. On silica surfaces in toluene, APS formed unstable multilayers, while from aqueous solutions, thinner and more stable APS layers were produced. The chemical composition and substrate roughness influence the amount of deposited APS. More APS was deposited and its layers were more stable on fiber melt than on silica wafers. The changes in the amount of adsorbed APS can be successfully monitored by streaming potential. These results will aid in improving industrial- and laboratory-scale APS deposition methods and increasing adhesion and stability, thus increasing the quality and effectiveness of materials where APS is used as a coupling agent.

  • 6.
    Paracini, Nicolò
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gutfreund, Philipp
    Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France.
    Welbourn, Rebecca
    ISIS Neutron & Muon Source, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxfordshir, U.K.
    Gonzalez-Martinez, Juan F
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Zhu, Kexin
    School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Miao, Yansong
    School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Yepuri, Nageshwar
    National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, Australia.
    Darwish, Tamim A
    National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, Australia.
    Garvey, Christopher
    Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany.
    Waldie, Sarah
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Larsson, Johan
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wolff, Max
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Structural Characterization of Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayer Arrays by Grazing Incidence X-ray and Neutron Scattering2023Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 3772-3780Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrays of nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (nanoSLB) are lipid-coated nanopatterned interfaces that provide a platform to study curved model biological membranes using surface-sensitive techniques. We combined scattering techniques with direct imaging, to gain access to sub-nanometer scale structural information on stable nanoparticle monolayers assembled on silicon crystals in a noncovalent manner using a Langmuir-Schaefer deposition. The structure of supported lipid bilayers formed on the nanoparticle arrays via vesicle fusion was investigated using a combination of grazing incidence X-ray and neutron scattering techniques complemented by fluorescence microscopy imaging. Ordered nanoparticle assemblies were shown to be suitable and stable substrates for the formation of curved and fluid lipid bilayers that retained lateral mobility, as shown by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and quartz crystal microbalance measurements. Neutron reflectometry revealed the formation of high-coverage lipid bilayers around the spherical particles together with a flat lipid bilayer on the substrate below the nanoparticles. The presence of coexisting flat and curved supported lipid bilayers on the same substrate, combined with the sub-nanometer accuracy and isotopic sensitivity of grazing incidence neutron scattering, provides a promising novel approach to investigate curvature-dependent membrane phenomena on supported lipid bilayers.

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  • 7.
    Sergeeva, Yulia
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Yeung, Sing Yee
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Heteromultivalent Ligand Display on Reversible Self-Assembled Monolayers (rSAMs): A Fluidic Platform for Tunable Influenza Virus Recognition2024Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 16, nr 3, s. 3139-3146Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the design of heteromultivalent influenza A virus (IAV) receptors based on reversible self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) featuring two distinct mobile ligands. The principal layer building blocks consist of α-(4-amidinophenoxy)alkanes decorated at the ω-position with sialic acid (SA) and the neuraminidase inhibitor Zanamivir (Zan), acting as two mobile ligands binding to the complementary receptors hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) on the virus surface. From ternary amphiphile mixtures comprising these ligands, the amidines spontaneously self-assemble on top of carboxylic acid-terminated SAMs to form reversible mixed monolayers (rSAMs) that are easily tunable with respect to the ligand ratio. We show that this results in the ability to construct surfaces featuring a very strong affinity for the surface proteins and specific virus subtypes. Hence, an rSAM prepared from solutions containing 15% SA and 10% Zan showed an exceptionally high affinity and selectivity for the avian IAV H7N9 (Kd = 11 fM) that strongly exceeded the affinity for other subtypes (H3N2, H5N1, H1N1). Changing the SA/Zan ratio resulted in changes in the relative preference between the four tested subtypes, suggesting this to be a key parameter for rapid adjustments of both virus affinity and selectivity.

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  • 8.
    Shen, Xiantao
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Huang, Chuixiu
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Jagadeesan, Kishore
    Ekström, Simon
    Fritz, Emelie
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Catalytic Formation of Disulfide Bonds in Peptides by Molecularly Imprinted Microgels at Oil/Water Interfaces2016Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, nr 44, s. 30484-30491Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the preparation and investigation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) microgels (MGs) stabilized Pickering emulsions (PE) for their ability to catalyze the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides at the O/W interface. The MIP MGs were synthesized via precipitation polymerization and a programmed initiator change strategy. The MIP MGs were characterized using DLS analysis, SEM measurement and optical microscopy analysis. The dry and wet MIP MGs showed a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm and 280 nm, respectively. Template rebinding experiment showed that the MIP MGs bound over two times more template (24 mg g-1) compared to the uptake displayed by a non-imprinted reference polymer (NIP) MG (10 mg g-1) at saturation. Using the MIP MGs as stabilizers, catalytic oxidation systems were prepared by emulsifying the oil phase and water phase in presence of different oxidizing agents. During the cyclization, the isolation of the thiol precursors and the oxidizing reagents non-selectively decreased the formation of the byproducts, while the imprinted cavities on the MIP MGs selectively promoted the intramolecular cyclization of peptides. When I2 was used as the oxidizing agent, the MIP-PE-I2 system showed a product yield of 50 %, corresponding to a nearly two-fold increase compared to the non-imprinted polymer NIP-PE-I2 system (26 %). We believe the interfacial catalysis system presented in this work may offer significant benefits in synthetic peptide chemistry by raising productivity while suppressing the formation of by-products.

  • 9. Wadsater, Maria
    et al.
    Barauskas, Justas
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV).
    Nylander, Tommy
    Tiberg, Fredrik
    Formation of Highly Structured Cubic Micellar Lipid Nanoparticles of Soy Phosphatidylcholine and Glycerol Dioleate and Their Degradation by Triacylglycerol Lipase2014Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, nr 10, s. 7063-7069Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipid nanoparticles of reversed internal phase structures, such as cubic micellar (I-2) structure show good drug loading ability of peptides and proteins as well as some small molecules. Due to their controllable small size and inner morphology, such nanoparticles are suitable for drug delivery using several different administration routes, including intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous injection. A very interesting system in this regard, is the two component soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC)/glycerol dioleate (GDO) system, which depending on the ratio of the lipid components form a range of reversed liquid crystalline phases. For a 50/50 (w/w) ratio in excess water, these lipids have been shown to form a reversed cubic micellar (I-2) phase of the Fd3m structure. Here, we demonstrate that this SPC/GDO phase, in the presence of small quantities (5-10 wt %) of Polysorbate 80 (P80), can be dispersed into nanoparticles, still with well-defined Fd3m structure. The resulting nanoparticle dispersion has a narrow size distribution and exhibit good long-term stability. In pharmaceutical applications, biodegradation pathways of the drug delivery vehicles and their components are important considerations. In the second part of the study we show how the structure of the particles evolves during exposure to a triacylglycerol lipase (TGL) under physiological-like temperature and pH. TGL catalyzes the lipolytic degradation of acylglycerides, such as GDO, to monoglycerides, glycerol, and free fatty acids. During the degradation, the interior phase of the particles is shown to undergo continuous phase transitions from the reversed 12 structure to structures of less negative curvature (2D hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and sponge), ultimately resulting in the formation of multilamellar vesicles.

  • 10.
    Yeung, Sing Yee
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sergeeva, Yulia
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Pan, Guoqing
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Institute for Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212 013, China.
    Mittler, Silvia
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Division of Biophysics and Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
    Dam, Tommy
    Division of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Peter
    Division of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tillo, Adam
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Hsiung Mattisson, Sabrina
    ImaGene-iT AB, Medicon Village, Scheelevägen 2, 223 81 Lund, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Bo
    ImaGene-iT AB, Medicon Village, Scheelevägen 2, 223 81 Lund, Sweden.
    Stollenwerk, Maria M
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Reversible Self-Assembled Monolayers with Tunable Surface Dynamics for Controlling Cell Adhesion Behavior.2022Ingår i: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 14, nr 37, s. 41790-41799Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cells adhering onto surfaces sense and respond to chemical and physical surface features. The control over cell adhesion behavior influences cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation, which are important considerations in biomaterial design for cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. Here, we report on a supramolecular-based approach to prepare reversible self-assembled monolayers (rSAMs) with tunable lateral mobility and dynamic control over surface composition to regulate cell adhesion behavior. These layers were prepared by incubating oxoacid-terminated thiol SAMs on gold in a pH 8 HEPES buffer solution containing different mole fractions of ω-(ethylene glycol)2-4- and ω-(GRGDS)-, α-benzamidino bolaamphiphiles. Cell shape and morphology were influenced by the strength of the interactions between the amidine-functionalized amphiphiles and the oxoacid of the underlying SAMs. Dynamic control over surface composition, achieved by the addition of inert filler amphiphiles to the RGD-functionalized rSAMs, reversed the cell adhesion process. In summary, rSAMs featuring mobile bioactive ligands offer unique capabilities to influence and control cell adhesion behavior, suggesting a broad use in biomaterial design, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

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