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  • 1.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Pendakur, Ravi
    The labour market integration of refugee and family reunion immigrants: a comparison of outcomes in Canada and Sweden2014In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 689-709Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses the employment and earnings trajectories of refugee and family reunion category immigrants in Canada and Sweden using two national level sources of data. The Canadian Immigration Database (IMDB) is a file that links the intake record of post-1979 immigrants with annual taxation records. The 2007 Swedish Register Data includes information on all legal permanent residents. Using standard regression methods, we compare labour force outcomes of age–sex–schooling–place of birth cohorts looking specifically at non-economic (family reunion and refugee intake) immigrants from Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan and the former Yugoslavia. We find that the employment and earning trajectories of the selected non-economic migrant groups are quite similar in the two host countries, although earnings are higher in Canada than in Sweden.

  • 2.
    DeBono, Daniela
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Human Rights and Migration: Trafficking for Forced Labour edited by Christien van den Anker and Ilse van Liempt2014In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 2052-2053Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    DeBono, Daniela
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Migration and Human Rights: The United Nations Convention on Migrant Workers' Rights2012In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 367-368Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Mozetič, Katarina
    Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Intra-EU youth mobility, human capital and career outcomes: the case of young high-skilled Latvians and Romanians in Sweden2021In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 1811-1828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the relationship between human capital and career outcomes using the case of highly skilled young Latvians and Romanians in Sweden. As a non-English-speaking country with regulated labour markets, the Swedish case provides a contrast to previous studies on EU10 to EU15 mobility that usually focus on English-speaking receiving countries with less regulated labour markets. Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews are analysed from a life-course perspective to map the education and career trajectories before and after their mobility. Three career trajectories are found: match, re-skilling, and de-skilling. Most young migrants tend to prioritize general, rather than country specific, human capital investments, which negatively affects their career outcomes. The results highlight the importance of individual human capital investment choices as well as structural opportunities in receiving countries for understanding the relationship between human capital and career outcomes for young EU-migrants.

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  • 5.
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Elwert, Annika
    Department of Economic History and Centre for Economic Demography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Like parents, like children?: The impact of parental endogamy and exogamy on their children’s partner choices in Sweden2021In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 895-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the marriage patterns of multi-ethnic people – who have one native-born and one foreign-born parent – born in Sweden (multi-ethnic Swedes). Based on Swedish register data from the period 1997–2016 and multinomial regression analysis, this paper looks into the generational transmission of inter- and intra-marriage for multi-ethnic Swedes versus mono-ethnic individuals who have two native-born parents (mono-ethnic Swedes). It also analyses specific partner choices for multi-ethnic and mono-ethnic Swedes as well as the contribution of other factors to their marriage patterns. We find that the odds of multi-ethnic Swedes marrying individuals with a foreign background are higher than those of mono-ethnic Swedes. Living in one of the three major cities was found to be the strongest predictor among other factors affecting marital patterns. Our results also show that highly educated multi-ethnic and mono-ethnic Swedes are slightly less likely to marry individuals with a foreign background than they are to marry mono-ethnic Swedes.

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  • 6.
    Lulle, Aija
    et al.
    Geography and Environment, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Janta, Hania
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Introduction to the Special Issue: European youth migration: human capital outcomes, skills and competences2021In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 1725-1739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human capital has been long an exceedingly important concept in migration research. Over time there have been attempts to provide more nuanced, and less economistic interpretations of human capital. Based on outputs from the EU Horizon 2020 project YMOBILITY (2015–2018) and two additional papers, this Special Issue seeks to advance this agenda further by addressing the complexities of the mobility of human capital. Migration problematises human capital assumptions due to challenges in transferring human capital across national borders. In this introductory paper we propose rethinking the human capital of migrants in a three-fold way. Firstly, we question the interpretation of skills and competences beyond the conventional divide of ‘higher-skilled’ and ‘lower-skilled’ through the concept of a ‘knowledgeable migrant’. Secondly, we probe deeper into an understanding of the transferability of skills in relation to ‘location’, exploring the possibilities and constraints to the transfer of human capital in different spatial contexts. Thirdly, we theorise human capital in terms of new temporalities of migration and the role these play in skill acquisition. We illustrate our novel theoretical thinking with selected empirical data, both quantitative and qualitative, on youth mobility in Europe.

  • 7.
    Martins, Bruno Oliveira
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Peace Research Institute Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Jumbert, Maria Gabrielsen
    Peace Research Institute Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    EU Border technologies and the co-production of security 'problems' and 'solutions'2022In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1430-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to an understanding of how expert technological knowledge impacts the security-migration management nexus at the EU borders. It argues that recent migration flows augmented pre-existing dynamics of growing reliance upon technology in EU border management. These dynamics are assessed through a study of the way emerging technologies, in particular Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV, commonly known as drones), and specific information and surveillance technologies installed on them, have become increasingly understood as crucial for the management of migration into the EU. The article synthesises securitisation theory with Science and Technology Studies to show, first, how the values reflected in border technologies often encapsulate a securitised understanding of the migrant, and second, how the migrants arriving in Europe have been characterised as both potential security threats and as individuals in need of rescue and protection. These frames trigger securitisation dynamics that portray the migration issue as amenable to state-of-the-art technology. In this logic, security 'problems' and security 'solutions' are co-produced within a complex multi-layered network of public and private actors.

  • 8.
    Midtbøen, Arnfinn H.
    et al.
    Institute for Social Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Brochmann, Grete
    Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Erdal, Marta Bivand
    Peace Research Institute Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Kruse, Mathias
    Department of Political Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum
    Department of Politics and Society, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Mouritsen, Per
    Department of Political Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Bech, Emily Cochran
    Ramböll, Kobenhavn, Denmark.
    Assessments of citizenship criteria: are immigrants more liberal?2020In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 46, no 13, p. 2625-2646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on citizenship policies is flourishing, yet we know little of which naturalisation requirements majorities and minorities find reasonable, and how they view existing citizenship regimes. Drawing on original survey data with young adults in Norway (N = 3535), comprising immigrants and descendants with origins from Iraq, Pakistan, Poland, Somalia and Turkey, as well as a non-immigrant majority group, this article examines whether perceptions of ideal citizenship criteria and assessments of Norway's current rules differ between groups. In terms of ideal citizenship criteria, we find a striking similarity across groups when looking at six different dimensions of citizenship policy. When merged into an index and estimated in a multivariate regression model, we find that both immigrants and descendants are significantly more liberal than natives are, yet the differences are small. When assessing the semi-strict citizenship regime in Norway, we find that immigrants are significantly more positive towards the current rules than natives. The results lend little support to recent work on 'strategic' and 'instrumental' citizenship and point instead to a close to universal conception of the terms of membership acquisition in Norway. This suggests that states may operate with moderate integration requirements while maintaining the legitimacy of the citizenship institution.

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  • 9.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Rodríguez-García, Dan
    Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Understanding Mixed Experiences: Towards a Conceptual Framework of Mixedness2021In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 763-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue brings together nine articles on the experiences of multiracial and multiethnic individuals from nine different countries across the globe – the United Kingdom, Sweden, Ireland, Spain, Canada, the United States, Japan, Singapore and Israel. The articles in this volume address the diverse experiences of the identification, socialising and mainstreaming of multiethnic and multiracial individuals in different national contexts. The collection consists of both qualitative and quantitative research from various disciplines in the social sciences and thus contributes to an interdisciplinary understanding and a multi-method approach to this reality. Through a cross-country analysis of the results provided by each paper, this Introduction proposes a conceptual framework for better understanding the realities of mixedness globally.

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  • 10.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Sato, Yuna
    Graduate School of Human Relations, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Beyond being either-or: Identification of multiracial and multiethnic Japanese youth2021In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 802-820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the number of multiracial and multiethnic Japanese who are socially recognised and identified as haafu (mixed) has increased due to a rise in intermarriages, the identities and experiences of mixed persons in Japan are seldom critically analysed. Based on interviews with 29 multiracial and multiethnic individuals residing in Japan, this article explores not only how multiracial and multiethnic Japanese identify themselves but also how they feel they are identified by others in society. The analysis shows that multiracial and multiethnic persons self-identify in a way that goes beyond either-or categories and the binary notions of Japanese/foreigner. It also reveals how both multiracial and multiethnic persons face a gap between self-identity and ascribed identity and that they negotiate this gap in various ways. However, the gap and the negotiation process that multiracial persons face differ to those of multiethnic persons. Multiracial persons whose mixedness is phenotypically visible experience more constraints in their ethnic options and have more difficulty in passing as Japanese, whereas multiethnic persons whose mixedness is invisible can pass as Japanese more easily but face constraints in their ethnic option to be identified as mixed and in claiming their multiethnic background.

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  • 11.
    Slotwinski, Michaela
    et al.
    Univ Zurich, Fac Econ, Zurich, Switzerland.;ZEW Ctr European Econ Res, Mannheim, Germany.;Univ Basel, Fac Business & Econ, Basel, Switzerland..
    Stutzer, Alois
    Univ Basel, Fac Business & Econ, Basel, Switzerland..
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    From participants to citizens?: Democratic voting rights and naturalisation behaviour2023In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 49, no 13, p. 3184-3204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the causal effect of the possibility to vote on foreigners' propensity to naturalise - a key indicator of successful integration. Based on Swedish administrative data and an institutional setting producing a quasi-random assignment of the eligibility to vote, we find that the overall effect depends on the composition of the migrant population. For immigrants from places with poor living conditions, we observe that the experience of non-citizen voting rights substantially increases their propensity to naturalise. However, for those coming from places with a high standard of living, the same experience reduces it. Both reactions clearly reveal that individuals assign a positive value to formal democratic participation rights. While the behaviour of the former group is likely dominated by the motivational force inherent in the possibility to participate, the behaviour of the latter group reflects the devaluation of formal citizenship if it is decoupled from democratic rights.

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  • 12.
    Stallwitz, Anke
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Department of Social Work, Protestant University of Applied Sciences Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany;Department of Social Work, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Richert, Torkel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    ‘Not having a real life’: psychosocial functions of using and selling drugs among young Afghan men who came to Sweden as unaccompanied minors2023In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unaccompanied minors (UM) entering Europe face significant psychosocial challenges. Uncertain residence situations, marginalization during the asylum process, and low levels of support increase their risk of developing mental health and drug use issues. However, little is known about drug involvement (using and dealing) in this group. This is the first study to investigate drug involvement among young adults who entered Europe as UM from their subjective perspectives. We conducted qualitative interviews with 11 Afghan men who came to Sweden as UM in 2015/2016 and had experience of using and/or selling drugs, and analyzed the transcripts based on grounded theory. Drug initiation usually occurred after arrival in Sweden and was related to peer influence. Using and selling fulfilled specific psychosocial functions including self-medication and money-making. ‘Not having a real life’ (being excluded from school, employment, and many social activities) emerged as a central motive for drug involvement. By using or selling drugs, feelings of social belonging and control over one's own life could be experienced. Long, uncertain asylum processes and social exclusion exacerbate the risk of UM and former UM using or selling drugs. Policy and intervention measures must focus on providing this group with support, social inclusion, and meaningful activities.

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