Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 118
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aiyar, Akila
    et al.
    Section for Orthodontics, Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Shimada, Akiko
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University; Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Osaka Dental University, Japan.
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Section for Orofacial Pain and Jaw function, Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Assessment of masticatory efficiency based on glucose concentration in orthodontic patients - a methodological study2022In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 954-960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment for malocclusion can cause discomfort and pain in the teeth and periodontium, which may impair masticatory efficiency. The glucose concentration method is widely used to assess masticatory efficiency for its convenience in the clinical situation, although its validity has not been shown.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims were to determine the validity of the glucose concentration method and investigate if this method can be applicable to orthodontic patients with braces.

    DESIGN: Sixteen healthy individuals (7 men, 9 women, and 26±5 years old) and 16 patients with malocclusions needing orthodontic treatment (5 men, 11 women, and 26±4 years old) participated. Glucose concentration was measured after 5-, 10-, and 15-s mastication of gummy jelly and compared to Hue values obtained from the color-changing gum method (reference method). In addition, all participants were asked to fill out the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP) to assess differences in perception related to the mouth before and after the placement of braces.

    RESULTS: = 0.711, P < 0.001) Masticatory efficiency assessed by both methods was significantly lower in orthodontic patients compared to controls (P<0.05), even though it was not affected by bonding (P>0.09). In addition, OHIP scores in physical pain dimension and psychological disability were higher in orthodontic patients than in the control group (P<0.005).

    CONCLUSION: Measurement of glucose concentration was confirmed as a reliable and convenient method for assessing masticatory efficiency. Furthermore, it appears that this method is applicable to patients with braces whose perception in the oral cavity could change.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Al-Harthy, Mohammad
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Michelotti, Ambra
    Cross-cultural differences in types and beliefs about treatment in women with temporomandibular disorder pain2018In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 659-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesWomen with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain from three cultures were assessed for type of treatment received and core illness beliefs. MethodsIn a clinical setting, 122 women patients with chronic TMD pain (39 Saudis, 41 Swedes and 42 Italians) were evaluated for patient characteristics, type of practitioner, type of treatment received and beliefs about TMD prior to consultation in TMD specialist centres. Measures included a survey of treatments received and a belief scale regarding contributing, aggravating and treatment-relevant factors related to the pain. All questionnaires were translated from English and culturally adapted. Comparisons among cultural groups were performed using a linear regression model for continuous variables and logistic regression model for dichotomous variables. A P-value

  • 3.
    Al-Harthy, Mohammad
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Michelotti, A.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ohrbach, R.
    Influence of culture on pain comorbidity in women with and without temporomandibular disorder-pain2017In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 415-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence on cultural differences in prevalence and impact of common chronic pain conditions, comparing individuals with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) versus individuals without TMD, is limited. The aim was to assess cross-cultural comorbid pain conditions in women with chronic TMD pain. Consecutive women patients (n = 122) with the index condition of chronic TMD pain diagnosed per the research diagnostic criteria for TMD and TMD-free controls (n = 121) matched for age were recruited in Saudi Arabia, Italy and Sweden. Self-report questionnaires assessed back, chest, stomach and head pain for prevalence, pain intensity and interference with daily activities. Logistic regression was used for binary variables, and ancova was used for parametric data analysis, adjusting for age and education. Back pain was the only comorbid condition with a different prevalence across cultures; Swedes reported a lower prevalence compared to Saudis (P < 001). Saudis reported higher prevalence of work reduced >50% due to back pain compared to Italians or Swedes (P < 001). Headache was the most common comorbid condition in all three cultures. The total number of comorbid conditions did not differ cross-culturally but were reported more by TMD-pain cases than TMD-free controls (P < 001). For both back and head pain, higher average pain intensities (P < 001) and interference with daily activities (P < 001) were reported by TMD-pain cases, compared to TMD-free controls. Among TMD-pain cases, Italians reported the highest pain-related disability (P < 001). Culture influences the associated comorbidity of common pain conditions. The cultural influence on pain expression is reflected in different patterns of physical representation.

  • 4.
    Al-Harthy, Mohammad
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Michelotti, A
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The effect of culture on pain sensitivity2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-cultural differences in pain sensitivity have been identified in pain-free subjects as well as in chronic pain patients. The aim was to assess the impact of culture on psychophysical measures using mechanical and electrical stimuli in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and pain-free matched controls in three cultures. This case-control study compared 122 female cases of chronic TMD pain (39 Saudis, 41 Swedes and 42 Italians) with equal numbers of age- and gender-matched TMD-free controls. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) and tolerance (PPTo) were measured over one hand and two masticatory muscles. Electrical perception threshold and electrical pain threshold (EPT) and tolerance (EPTo) were recorded between the thumb and index fingers. Italian females reported significantly lower PPT in the masseter muscle than other cultures (P < 0001) and in the temporalis muscle than Saudis (P = 0003). Swedes reported significantly higher PPT in the thenar muscle than other cultures (P = 0017). Italians reported significantly lower PPTo in all muscles than Swedes (P 0006) and in the masseter muscle than Saudis (P < 0001). Italians reported significantly lower EPTo than other cultures (P = 001). Temporomandibular disorder cases, compared to TMD-free controls, reported lower PPT and PPTo in all the three muscles (P < 0001). This study found cultural differences between groups in the PPT, PPTo and EPTo. Overall, Italian females reported the highest sensitivity to both mechanical and electrical stimulation, while Swedes reported the lowest sensitivity. Mechanical pain thresholds differed more across cultures than did electrical pain thresholds. Cultural factors may influence response to type of pain test.

  • 5. Al-Khotani, Amal A
    et al.
    Naimi-Akbar, Aron
    Björnsson, Olof
    Christidis, Nikolaos
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Professional knowledge among Swedish and Saudi healthcare practitioners regarding oro-facial pain in children and adolescents2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oro-facial pain (OFP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents are a growing problem. To meet patients' healthcare needs, professionals must perform their work intuitively and with quality. Therefore, a high degree of professional knowledge is necessary. To investigate the professional knowledge regarding OFP/TMD in children and adolescents among Swedish and Saudi Arabian dental and medical specialists compared with Swedish OFP specialists. One questionnaire including the four domains Chronic pain and behaviour; Aetiology; Diagnosis and classification; Treatment and prognosis was distributed to 383 potential participants, that is physicians and dentists in Sweden and Saudi Arabia. The Swedish OFP/TMD specialists were used as a reference group. The response rates from Sweden and Saudi Arabia were 49% and 86%, respectively. The degree of agreement was highest in the domain Chronic pain and behaviour, especially for the Swedish groups. Regarding the other three domains, the agreement was modest to poor. In general, Swedish groups showed a higher agreement with Swedish OFP/TMD specialists than Saudi Arabian groups. This study shows that professional knowledge regarding OFP/TMD in children and adolescents is limited among Swedish and Saudi Arabian dental and medical professionals compared to Swedish OFP/TMD specialists. In Swedish groups, the professional knowledge is more accurate than in the corresponding Saudi Arabian. With these results in mind, and the frequent prevalence of OFP/TMD in children and adolescents, one can draw the conclusion that there is a need for modern medical education regarding OFP/TMD among both physicians and dentists, especially in Saudi Arabia.

  • 6.
    Alstergren, Per
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kopp, S.
    Clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular joint arthritis2018In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 269-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence-based clinical diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis are not available. To establish (i) criteria for clinical diagnosis of TMJ arthritis and (ii) clinical variables useful to determine inflammatory activity in TMJ arthritis using synovial fluid levels of inflammatory mediators as the reference standard. A calibrated examiner assessed TMJ pain, function, noise and occlusal changes in 219 TMJs (141 patients, 15 healthy individuals). TMJ synovial fluid samples were obtained with a push-pull technique using the hydroxycobalamin method and analysed for TNF, TNFsRII, IL-1, IL-1ra, IL-1sRII, IL-6 and serotonin. If any inflammatory mediator concentration exceeded normal, the TMJ was considered as arthritic. In the patient group, 71% of the joints were arthritic. Of those, 93% were painful. About 66% of the non-arthritic TMJs were painful to some degree. Intensity of TMJ resting pain and TMJ maximum opening pain, number of jaw movements causing TMJ pain and laterotrusive movement to the contralateral side significantly explained presence of arthritis (AUC 0.72, P<.001). Based on these findings, criteria for possible, probable and definite TMJ arthritis were determined. Arthritic TMJs with high inflammatory activity showed higher pain intensity on maximum mouth opening (P<.001) and higher number of painful mandibular movements (P=.004) than TMJs with low inflammatory activity. The combination TMJ pain on maximum mouth opening and Contralateral laterotrusion <8mm appears to have diagnostic value for TMJ arthritis. Among arthritic TMJs, higher TMJ pain intensity on maximum mouth opening and number of mandibular movements causing TMJ pain indicates higher inflammatory activity.

  • 7. Altamash, M.
    et al.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Engstrom, P. -E
    Periodontal treatment and HbA1c levels in subjects with diabetes mellitus2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has earlier been reported that individuals with poorly controlled diabetes have severe periodontal disease (PD) compared to well-controlled diabetes. This longitudinal interventional study compared periodontal treatment outcomes with HbA1c level changes in four groups of diabetic and non-diabetic patients with or without PD, respectively. HbA1c, bleeding on probing (BOP), plaque index and periodontal pocket depth (PPD) 4 < 6 mm and >= 6 mm were recorded at baseline to 3 months after non-surgical treatment and 3-6 months for surgical treatment in subjects with or without T2D, and with or without PD. A total of 129 patients were followed from baseline to 6 months. Diabetics with PD and without PD showed reductions in HbA1c levels with a mean value of 0.3% after 3 months and mean values of 1% and 0.8%, respectively, after 6 months. Diabetics with PD showed higher levels of BOP versus non-diabetics without PD (P < 0.01) and versus diabetics without PD (P < 0.05) at baseline. After 6 months, diabetics with PD showed higher number of PPD 4 < 6 mm versus diabetics without PD (P < 0.01) and non-diabetics with PD (P < 0.01). Diabetics without PD showed higher levels of PPD 4 < 6 mm versus non-diabetics without PD (P < 0.01). Surgical and non-surgical periodontal treatment in all groups improved periodontal inflammatory conditions with a decrease in HbA1c levels in a period of three and 6 months. No change was seen in the number of pockets PPD 4 < 6 mm in diabetic subjects with PD after non-surgical and surgical treatment.

  • 8. Andrén, Ann
    et al.
    Sjöquist, M
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Effects on blood pressure after treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea with a mandibular advancement appliance - a three-year follow-up2009In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 36, p. 719-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a highly prevalent sleep disorder; it affects 4% of males and 2% of females. Hypertension has been shown to occur in 28-57% of OSA patients. There is a steady increase in evidence linking OSA to long-term cardiovascular morbidity including hypertension. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether mandibular advancement oral appliance (OA) treatment of OSA affects the patient's blood pressure (BP) in a 3-month and a 3-year perspective. Twenty-nine consecutive patients, with verified OSA defined as apnoea index (AI) >5 per hour and/or apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) > or =10 per hour, received an OA as treatment. BP was measured on three occasions; before treatment, after 3 months of treatment, and after 3 years of treatment. BP was measured with an electronic blood pressure monitor. The treatment effect of OA was measured after 3 months by repeated somnographic registration while the patient was wearing the OA. A treatment response was defined as AHI < 10; this was achieved in 25 of 29 patients (86%) at the 3-month evaluation. Significant reductions in blood pressure were attained between baseline and the 3-month evaluation (P < 0.001) and these changes remained at the 3-year follow-up in both systolic BP of -15.4 +/- 18.7 mm Hg and diastolic BP of -10.3 +/- 10.0 mm Hg. OA therapy reduced blood pressure in both a 3-month and a 3-year perspective in patients with OSA.

  • 9. Baad-Hansen, Lene
    et al.
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Yang, G
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensson, Peter
    Drangsholt, M
    Reliability of intra-oral quantitative sensory testing (QST) in patients with atypical odontalgia and healthy controls: a multicentre study2015In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reliability of comprehensive intra-oral quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol has not been examined systematically in patients with chronic oro-facial pain. The aim of the present multicentre study was to examine test-retest and interexaminer reliability of intra-oral QST measures in terms of absolute values and z-scores as well as within-session coefficients of variation (CV) values in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) and healthy pain-free controls. Forty-five patients with AO and 68 healthy controls were subjected to bilateral intra-oral gingival QST and unilateral extratrigeminal QST (thenar) on three occasions (twice on 1 day by two different examiners and once approximately 1 week later by one of the examiners). Intra-class correlation coefficients and kappa values for interexaminer and test-retest reliability were computed. Most of the standardised intra-oral QST measures showed fair to excellent interexaminer (9-12 of 13 measures) and test-retest (7-11 of 13 measures) reliability. Furthermore, no robust differences in reliability measures or within-session variability (CV) were detected between patients with AO and the healthy reference group. These reliability results in chronic orofacial pain patients support earlier suggestions based on data from healthy subjects that intra-oral QST is sufficiently reliable for use as a part of a comprehensive evaluation of patients with somatosensory disturbances or neuropathic pain in the trigeminal region.

  • 10. Baker, Z.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sahlstrom, L. Englesson
    Ekberg, Ewa Carin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Questionable effect of lavage for treatment of painful jaw movements at disc displacement without reduction: a 3-year randomised controlled follow-up2015In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 42, no 10, p. 742-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present randomised controlled study compared the 3-year outcome of local anaesthetics with anaesthetics and lavage in patients suffering from painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ) locking. The study included 45 patients referred for treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) to the Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Faculty of Odontology, Malmo University, Malmo, Sweden. All patients received a history questionnaire and clinical examination according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, panoramic radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging at baseline. Twenty-five patients were randomised to anaesthetics alone and 20 patients to anaesthetics and lavage. Three years after treatment, we sent the 37 patients who were available for follow-up a questionnaire that evaluated pain intensity, physical and emotional functioning, and global improvement. Thirty-four patients responded. The primary outcome was defined as >= 30% pain relief. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 28 of 45 patients (62%) reported >= 30% pain relief at the follow-up. At 3 years, improvement in pain relief, physical functioning, emotional functioning and global improvement differed non-significantly between local anaesthetics and anaesthetics and lavage. Compared with baseline, significant improvements (P < 0.05) in pain intensity, physical functioning, emotional functioning and global changes had occurred in both groups after 3 years. Because outcome measurements in the local anaesthetics and lavage and the local anaesthetics groups differed non-significantly 3 years after treatment of painful TMJ disc displacement without reduction, use of lavage (50 mL saline) has an equivalent effect as local anaesthetics.

  • 11. Boeskov Øzhayat, Esben
    et al.
    Korduner, Eva-Karin
    Collin Bagewitz, Ingrid
    Öwall, Bengt
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Impairments due to tooth loss and prosthetic expectations in patients from an urban area and a rural area in Sweden. A qualitative study2020In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 212-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To explore impairments due to tooth loss and expectations of prosthetic replacements in an urban group and a rural group of patients in Sweden. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were performed on 35 partially edentulous patients from prosthodontic specialist clinics located in an urban area and a rural area in Sweden. The interviews focused on impairments due to tooth loss and expectations of prosthetic restorations. Analysis was made using the grounded theory approach, allowing in-depth investigation of the phenomenon. RESULTS: Functional, aesthetic and social impairments were mentioned, and coping strategies (eg chewing differently and laughing less) and modifications (eg age, time and social setting) of the impairments were described. The rural patient group accepted impairments somewhat better than the urban one. Otherwise, there was only minor difference between the groups. Removable prosthodontic restorations were more acceptable among rural patients. Urban patients insisted more often on implant-based restorations and had higher expectations of longevity. Patients with minor impairments still wanted treatment, based on concerns about the future of their dentition. The interviews themselves generated new thoughts in the patients and were thus considered valuable by the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Impairments due to tooth loss and expectations of prosthetic replacements were expressed in the same way in the rural and urban patient groups. However, in the rural population, there was a higher acceptance of impairments and also of removable prosthetic restorations, whereas the urban population expressed a higher demand for implant-based restorations.

  • 12.
    Boscato, Noeli
    et al.
    Univ Fed Pelotas, Sch Dent, Dept Restorat Dent, Pelotas, RS, Brazil.;Aarhus Univ, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Hayakawa, Hidetoshi
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Nihon Univ, Div Oral Funct & Rehabil, Dept Oral Hlth Sci, Sch Dent Matsudo, Matsudo, Chiba, Japan..
    Iida, Takashi
    Nihon Univ, Div Oral Funct & Rehabil, Dept Oral Hlth Sci, Sch Dent Matsudo, Matsudo, Chiba, Japan..
    Costa, Yuri M.
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Univ Estadual Campinas, Piracicaba Dent Sch, Dept Biosci, Piracicaba, Brazil..
    Kothari, Simple Futarmal
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Hammel Neurorehabil Ctr, Dept Clin Med, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Univ Res Clin, Dept Clin Med, Aarhus, Denmark.;Scandinavian Ctr Orofacial Neurosci SCON, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Kothari, Mohit
    Aarhus Univ, Hammel Neurorehabil Ctr, Dept Clin Med, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Univ Res Clin, Dept Clin Med, Aarhus, Denmark.;Scandinavian Ctr Orofacial Neurosci SCON, Aarhus, Denmark.;JSS Acad Higher Educ & Res, JSS Dent Coll & Hosp, Mysore, Karnataka, India..
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Aarhus Univ, Sect Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Dept Dent & Oral Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Scandinavian Ctr Orofacial Neurosci SCON, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Impact of oral motor task training on corticomotor pathways and diadochokinetic rates in young healthy participants2022In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 924-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Studies addressing the training-induced neuroplasticity and interrelationships of the lip, masseter, and tongue motor representations in the human motor cortex using single syllable repetition are lacking. Objective This study investigated the impact of a repeated training in a novel PaTaKa diadochokinetic (DDK) orofacial motor task (OMT) on corticomotor control of the lips, masseter, and tongue muscles in young healthy participants. Methods A total of 22 young healthy volunteers performed 3 consecutive days of training in an OMT. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the lip, masseter, tongue, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI, internal control) muscles. MEPs were assessed by stimulus-response curves and corticomotor mapping at baseline and after OMT. The DDK rate from PaTaKa single syllable repetition and numeric rating scale (NRS) scores were also obtained at baseline and immediately after each OMT. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to detect differences at a significance level of 5%. Results There was a significant effect of OMT and stimulus intensity on the lips, masseter, and tongue MEPs compared to baseline (p < .001), but not FDI MEPs (p > .05). OMT increased corticomotor topographic maps area (p < .001), and DDK rates (p < .01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that 3 consecutive days of a repeated PaTaKa training in an OMT can induce neuroplastic changes in the corticomotor pathways of orofacial muscles, and it may be related to mechanisms underlying the improvement of orofacial fine motor skills due to short-term training. The clinical utility should now be investigated.

  • 13.
    Bracci, Alessandro
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, School of Dentistry, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Colonna, Anna
    Department of Biomedical Technologies, School of Dentistry, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
    Bender, Steven
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Texas A&M School of Dentistry, Dallas, Texas, USA.
    Conti, Paulo C R
    Bauru School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Emodi-Perlman, Alona
    Department of Oral Rehabilitation, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Telaviv, Israel.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Klasser, Gary D
    Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Louisiana State University School of Dentistry, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
    Michelotti, Ambra
    Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Oral Sciences, Section of Orthodontics and Temporomandibular Disorders, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy.
    Lavigne, Gilles J
    Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Research Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, and Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Svensson, Peter
    Section for Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ahlberg, Jari
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial, Diseases, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Manfredini, Daniele
    Department of Biomedical Technologies, School of Dentistry, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
    Research routes on awake bruxism metrics: implications of the updated bruxism definition and evaluation strategies.2024In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 150-161Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In line with a similar recent proposal for sleep bruxism (SB), defining clinically oriented research routes to implement knowledge on awake bruxism (AB) metrics is important for an enhanced comprehension of the full bruxism spectrum, i.e. better assessment and more efficient management.

    METHODS: We summarised current strategies for AB assessment and proposed a research route for improving its metrics.

    RESULTS: Most of the literature focuses on bruxism in general or SB in particular, whilst knowledge on AB is generally fragmental. Assessment can be based on non-instrumental or instrumental approaches. The former include self-report (questionnaires, oral history) and clinical examination, whilst the latter include electromyography (EMG) of jaw muscles during wakefulness as well as the technology-enhanced ecological momentary assesment (EMA). Phenotyping of different AB activities should be the target of a research task force. In the absence of available data on the frequency and intensity of wake-time bruxism-type masticatory muscle activity, any speculation about the identification of thresholds and criteria to identify bruxers is premature. Research routes in the field must focus on the improvement of data reliability and validity.

    CONCLUSIONS: Probing deeper into the study of AB metrics is a fundamental step to assist clinicians in preventing and managing the putative consequences at the individual level. The present manuscript proposes some possible research routes to advance current knowledge. At different levels, instrumentally-based and subject-based information must be gathered in a universally accepted standardized approach.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Böthun, Alicia
    et al.
    Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Wiesinger, Birgitta
    Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Research and Development, Umeå University, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Wänman, Anders
    Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Hellström, Fredrik
    Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden..
    Österlund, Catharina
    Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Jaw-neck motor strategy during jaw-opening with resistance load2022In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 514-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The jaw and neck motor systems have a close functional integration but the effect of resistance load to the mandible during jaw opening on the jaw-neck integration is not known.

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of resistance load compared to no load on integrated jaw and neck motor function in individuals free from pain and dysfunction in the jaw and neck regions.

    METHODS: Jaw and head movements during continuous jaw opening were recorded with an optoelectronic system (MacReflex®) in 26 pain-free individuals (14 women, 12 men, mean age 22 years). Jaw opening was performed with and without resistance load (1600 g) to the mandible. The relationship between jaw movement amplitude, head movement amplitude, head/jaw ratio (quotient of head and jaw movement amplitude) and resistance load were modelled using linear mixed-model analysis. A p-value <.05 was considered statistically significant.

    RESULTS: The expected head/jaw ratio mean was increased by 0.05 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.08, P<0.001) with resistance load as compared to no load. This corresponds to an increase in expected mean by 55.6%. With resistance load, expected mean head movement amplitude increased by 1.4 mm (95% CI: 0.2, 2.5, P=0.018), and expected mean jaw movement amplitude decreased by 3.7 mm (95% CI: -7.0, -0.5, P=0.025).

    CONCLUSION: There is a compensation and adaptation of integrated jaw-neck motor function with an altered jaw-neck motor strategy during jaw opening with resistance load compared to no load. The head/jaw ratio demonstrates increased proportional involvement of the neck during increased load on the jaw system.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15. Cairns, Brian
    et al.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Michelotti, Ambra
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    JOR-CORE recommendations on rehabilitation of temporomandibular disorders2010In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 481-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the long history of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the term ”rehabilitation“ has been often associated with ”occlusal rehabilitation“ indicating a specific philosophy in which occlusion is the crucial factor for TMD and that intervention on the occlusion could ”cure“ the problem. In this paper, the term rehabilitation is used to denote any medical, physical, or psychological treatment which brings or restores an individual to a normal or optimal state of health, and this revised concept therefore significantly broadens the scope of rehabilitation of TMD. The purpose of the JOR-CORE in Siena, 2009 was to critically examine the current state-of-the-science in the field of TMDs. This lead to four extensive reviews and the present summaries and recommendations for future research into rehabilitation of TMDs.

  • 16.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Dental implants inserted in male versus female patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis2015In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 709-722Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL) and post-operative infection for implants inserted in male or female patients, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in December 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. Ninety-one publications were included, with a total of 27,203 implants inserted in men (1185 failures), and 25,154 implants inserted in women (1039 failures). The results suggest that the insertion of dental implants in male patients statistically affected the implant failure rates (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.07-1.37, P = 0.002). Due to the limited number of studies reporting results on MBL, it is difficult to estimate the real effect of the insertion of implants in different sexes on the marginal bone level. Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  • 17.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Prophylactic antibiotic regimen and dental implant failure: a meta-analysis2014In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 941-956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate whether there are any positive effects of prophylactic antibiotic regimen on implant failure rates and post-operative infection when performing dental implant treatment in healthy individuals. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. The search strategy resulted in 14 publications. The I(2) statistic was used to express the percentage of the total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used with a fixed- or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity. The estimates of relative effect were expressed in risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval. Six studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, whereas one study was considered at moderate risk, and six studies were considered at low risk of bias. The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures (use versus non-use of antibiotics) significantly affected the implant failure rates (P = 0·0002), with a RR of 0·55 (95% CI 0·41-0·75). The number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one patient having an implant failure was 50 (95% CI 33-100). There were no apparent significant effects of prophylactic antibiotics on the occurrence of post-operative infections in healthy patients receiving implants (P = 0·520). A sensitivity analysis did not reveal difference when studies judged as having high risk of bias were not considered. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  • 18.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Reasons for failures of oral implants2014In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 443-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reviews the literature regarding the factors contributing to failures of dental implants. An electronic search was undertaken including papers from 2004 onwards. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. All reference lists of the selected studies were then hand-searched, this time without time restrictions. A narrative review discussed some findings from the first two parts where separate data from non-comparative studies may have indicated conclusions different from those possible to draw in the systematic analysis. It may be suggested that the following situations are correlated to increase the implant failure rate: a low insertion torque of implants that are planned to be immediately or early loaded, inexperienced surgeons inserting the implants, implant insertion in the maxilla, implant insertion in the posterior region of the jaws, implants in heavy smokers, implant insertion in bone qualities type III and IV, implant insertion in places with small bone volumes, use of shorter length implants, greater number of implants placed per patient, lack of initial implant stability, use of cylindrical (non-threaded) implants and prosthetic rehabilitation with implant-supported overdentures. Moreover, it may be suggested that the following situations may be correlated with an increase in the implant failure rate: use of the non-submerged technique, immediate loading, implant insertion in fresh extraction sockets, smaller diameter implants. Some recently published studies suggest that modern, moderately rough implants may present with similar results irrespective if placed in maxillas, in smoking patients or using only short implants.

  • 19.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Turned versus anodised dental implants: a meta-analysis2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 716-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL)and post-operative infection for patients being rehabilitated by turned versus anodised-surface implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in November 2015. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. Thirty-eight publications were included. The results suggest a risk ratio of 2·82 (95% CI 1·95–4·06, P < 0·00001) for failure of turned implants, when compared to anodised-surface implants. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results when only the studies inserting implants in maxillae or mandibles were pooled. There were no statistically significant effects of turned implants on the MBL (mean difference-MD 0·02, 95%CI −0·16–0·20; P = 0·82) in comparison to anodised implants. The results of a meta-regression considering the follow-up period as a covariate suggested an increase of the MD with the increase in the follow-up time (MD increase 0·012 mm year−1), however, without a statistical significance (P = 0·813). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome ‘post-operative infection’ was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kisch, Jenö
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bruxism and dental implant failures: a multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis approach2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 813-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have suggested that the insertion of dental implants in patients being diagnosed with bruxism negatively affected the implant failure rates. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the bruxism and the risk of dental implant failure. This retrospective study is based on 2670 patients who received 10 096 implants at one specialist clinic. Implant- and patient-related data were collected. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants. Multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis was used to test the association between bruxism and risk of implant failure adjusting for several potential confounders. Criteria from a recent international consensus (Lobbezoo et al., J Oral Rehabil, 40, 2013, 2) and from the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (International classification of sleep disorders, revised: diagnostic and coding manual, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Chicago, 2014) were used to define and diagnose the condition. The number of implants with information available for all variables totalled 3549, placed in 994 patients, with 179 implants reported as failures. The implant failure rates were 13·0% (24/185) for bruxers and 4·6% (155/3364) for non-bruxers (P < 0·001). The statistical model showed that bruxism was a statistically significantly risk factor to implant failure (HR 3·396; 95% CI 1·314, 8·777; P = 0·012), as well as implant length, implant diameter, implant surface, bone quantity D in relation to quantity A, bone quality 4 in relation to quality 1 (Lekholm and Zarb classification), smoking and the intake of proton pump inhibitors. It is suggested that the bruxism may be associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure.

  • 21. Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues
    et al.
    Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi
    Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana
    Costa, Yuri Martins
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Pain complications of oral implants: is that an issue?2021In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of oral implants as a form of replacing missing teeth in partial or total edentulous patients is considered the gold standard in oral rehabilitation. Although considered a history of success in contemporary dentistry, surgical complications may occur, as excessive bleeding, damage to the adjacent teeth and mandibular fractures. Persistent pain and abnormal somatosensory responses after the surgery ordinary healing time are also potential problems and may lead to the development of a condition named posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathic pain (PTNP). Though relatively rare, PTNP has a profound impact on patient’s quality of life. Appropriated previous image techniques, effective anaesthetic procedures and caution during the surgical procedure and implant installation are recommended for the prevention of this condition. In case of the PTNP, different management modalities, including antidepressant and membrane stabilizer medications, as well as peripheral strategies, as the use of topical medication and the botulin toxin are presented and discussed.

  • 22.
    Costa, Yuri M
    et al.
    University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Brazil; Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences (SCON), Aarhus, Denmark; Bauru Orofacial Pain Group, Bauru, Brazil.
    Bonjardim, Leonardo R
    Bauru Orofacial Pain Group, Bauru, Brazil; University of Sao Paulo, Bauru, Brazil.
    Conti, Paulo César R
    Bauru Orofacial Pain Group, Bauru, Brazil; University of Sao Paulo, Bauru, Brazil.
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences (SCON), Aarhus, Denmark.
    Psychophysical evaluation of somatosensory function in orofacial pain: achievements and challenges2021In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1066-1076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This critical review describes key methodological aspects for a successful orofacial psychophysical evaluation of the somatosensory system and highlights the diagnostic value of somatosensory assessment and management perspectives based on somatosensory profiling.

    METHODS: This topical review was based on a non-systematic search for studies about somatosensory evaluation in orofacial pain in PubMed and Embase.

    RESULTS: The recent progress regarding psychophysical evaluation of somatosensory function was largely possible due to the development and application of valid, reliable, and standardized psychophysical methods. Qualitative sensory testing may be useful as a screening tool to rule out relevant somatosensory abnormalities. Nevertheless, the patient should preferably be referred to a more comprehensive assessment with the quantitative sensory testing battery if confirmation of somatosensory abnormalities is necessary. Moreover, the identification of relevant somatosensory alterations in chronic pain disorders that do not fulfill the current criteria to be regarded as neuropathic has also increased the usefulness of somatosensory evaluation as a feasible method to better characterize the patients and perhaps elucidate some underpinnings of the so-called "nociplastic" pain disorders. Finally, an additional benefit of orofacial pain treatment based on somatosensory profiling still needs to be demonstrated and convincing evidence of somatosensory findings as predictors of treatment efficacy in chronic orofacial pain awaits further studies.

    CONCLUSION: Psychophysical evaluation of somatosensory function in orofacial pain is still in its infancy but with a clear potential to continue to improve the assessment, diagnosis and management of orofacial pain patients.

  • 23.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Dawson, Jenny
    Ernberg, Malin
    The effect of botulinum toxin A on patients with persistent idiopathic dentoalveolar pain: A systematic review2020In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 1184-1191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that botulinum toxin A (BONT-A) is a safe and effective treatment in relieving pain in patients with persistent idiopathic dentoalveolar pain (PIDP).

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically evaluate all the available studies investigating the pain-relieving effects of BONT-A in patients with PIDP.

    METHODS: A systematic search with specific search terms was made in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus. Two authors screened titles and abstracts and selected eligible studies for inclusion in the systematic review. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the 12 items Quality Assessment Tool for Observational studies (Pre-Post) Studies with No Control Group, and the level of evidence was assessed according to GRADE.

    RESULTS: Three observational studies of 3695 identified were included (445 overlapping studies; 3247 excluded studies). All studies were uncontrolled observational studies investigating the pain-relieving effect of BONT-A in patients with PIDP. The included studies had a fair quality (moderate risk of bias) and insufficient level of evidence. The pain reducing effect by BONT-A injections was in average 50% or more in two studies, in one study 3 out of 4 patients became almost pain free.

    CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review shows that presently the level of scientific evidence is insufficient to evaluate the pain-relieving effect of BONT-A injections in patients with PIDP. There are indications that BONT-A injections could be a possible management option for patients with PIDP that seems to be safe and with few adverse events. There is a need for well-designed placebo-controlled, double-blind RCTs.

  • 24.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Comparison of pain thresholds and pain tolerance levels between Middle Easterners and Swedes and between genders2009In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the presence of culture and gender differences in pain thresholds and pain tolerance levels between Middle Easterners and Swedes. METHODS: Sixty-four healthy individuals, 32 Middle Easterners (16 men and 16 women, mean age: 24.6 +/- 3.4 years) and 32 Swedes (16 men and 16 women, mean age: 24 +/- 3.5 years) participated in the study. Three experimental pain tests were conducted in each participant. Pain thresholds and pain tolerance levels were measured using an algometer (mechanical stimulus), the PainMatcher((R)) (electric stimulus) and cold pressor test (thermal stimulus). RESULTS: While no significant differences in pain thresholds were observed between Middle Easterners and Swedes in algometer and cold pressor tests, differences in pain tolerance levels were significant (P < 0.01 for both tests). All between-culture differences in pain perception, pain threshold and pain tolerance level were non-significant when measured with the PainMatcher. Significant between-gender differences were observed only in pain threshold with the PainMatcher (P < 0.05) and in pain tolerance level with the algometer (P < 0.01) and the PainMatcher (P <0.001). CONCLUSION: This study found significant differences in two out of three pain tolerance level tests - but not pain threshold tests - between the Middle Eastern and Swedish cultures and between genders. These differences were more pronounced between Middle Eastern and Swedish men than between Middle Eastern and Swedish women. Gender differences were more pronounced within the Swedish than the Middle Eastern culture. These findings indicate that culture and gender influence pain experience.

  • 25. Doepel, M.
    et al.
    Nilner, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Le Bell, Y.
    Long-term effectiveness of a prefabricated oral appliance for myofascial pain2012In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 252-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary  The long-term effectiveness of a prefabricated oral appliance (R) was compared with a stabilisation appliance (S) in patients with myofascial pain. Sixty-five patients diagnosed with myofascial pain at two centres for Stomatognathic Physiology in Sweden and Finland were included in a randomised controlled trial using Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, with history questionnaires and clinical examinations performed by blinded examiners at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were randomly assigned either to the R or the S group. Treatment outcome was measured according to IMMPACT for four chronic pain outcome domains: pain intensity, overall improvement, physical functioning and emotional functioning. Physical functioning was classified for Graded Chronic Pain severities and assessed by the Jaw Functional Limitation scale. Emotional functioning composed of scores of non-specific physical symptoms and depression. There were no differences between groups at baseline. At both follow-ups, all outcome domains showed significant within-group improvement, without significant differences between groups. At 12 months, 72% of all patients reported a 30% reduction in worst pain and 63% of the patients a 50% reduction in worst pain. Overall improvement ‘better’ to ‘symptom-free’ was observed in 81% in the R and 64% in the S group at the 12-month follow-up. Graded Chronic Pain, Functional Limitation of the Jaw, non-specific physical symptoms and depression showed statistically significant reduction at 12-month follow-up. Results support the hypothesis that the effectiveness of the prefabricated appliance is similar to that of the stabilisation appliance in the long-term when treating patients with myofascial pain.

  • 26. Durham, Justin
    et al.
    Al-Baghdadi, M
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    Breckons, M
    Goulet, Jean-Paul
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Michelotti, A
    Nixdorf, Donald R
    Peck, CC
    Raphael, K
    Schiffman, Eric
    Steele, JG
    Story, W
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Self-management programmes in temporomandibular disorders: results from an international Delphi process2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 929-936Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-management (SM) programmes are commonly used for initial treatment of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The programmes described in the literature, however, vary widely with no consistency in terminology used, components of care or their definitions. The aims of this study were therefore to construct an operationalised definition of self-management appropriate for the treatment of patients with TMD, identify the components of that self-management currently being used and create sufficiently clear and non-overlapping standardised definitions for each of those components. A four-round Delphi process with eleven international experts in the field of TMD was conducted to achieve these aims. In the first round, the participants agreed upon six principal concepts of self-management. In the remaining three rounds, consensus was achieved upon the definition and the six components of self-management. The main components identified and agreed upon by the participants to constitute the core of a SM programme for TMD were as follows: education; jaw exercises; massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. This Delphi process has established the principal concepts of self-management, and a standardised definition has been agreed with the following components for use in clinical practice: education; self-exercise; self-massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. The consensus-derived concepts, definitions and components of SM offer a starting point for further research to advance the evidence base for, and clinical utility of, TMD SM.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 27.
    Durham, Justin
    et al.
    School of Dental Sciences Newcastle University Newcastle UK;Newcastle Hospitals' NHS Foundation Trust Newcastle UK.
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Oral Diagnostic Sciences University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine Buffalo New York USA.
    Baad‐Hansen, Lene
    Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Section for Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function Aarhus University Aarhus Denmark.
    Davies, Stephen
    Division of Dentistry University of Manchester UK Manchester UK.
    De Laat, Antoon
    Department Oral health Sciences KU Leuven and Department Dentistry UZ Leuven Belgium.
    Goncalves, Daniela Godoi
    School of Dentistry, Araraquara São Paulo State University (Unesp) Araraquara Brazil.
    Gordan, Valeria V.
    Restorative Dental Sciences Department University of Florida College of Dentistry Gainesville Florida USA.
    Goulet, Jean‐Paul
    Faculty of Dental Medicine Laval University Quebec Quebec Canada.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Horton, Michael
    College of General Dentistry UK (CGDent) London UK.
    Koutris, Michail
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.
    Law, Alan
    Endodontist, The Dental Specialists Woodbury Minnesota USA;Research Professor, Division of Endodontics University of Minnesota Minneapolis Minnesota USA.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Skåne University Hospital, Specialized Pain Rehabilitation Lund Sweden.
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.
    Michelotti, Ambra
    Department of Neurosciences, School of Orthodontics, Reproductive Sciences and Oral Sciences University of Naples Federico II Naples Italy.
    Nixdorf, Donald R.
    Division of TMD &amp; Orofacial Pain, School of Dentistry and Department of Radiology, Medical School University of Minnesota Minneapolis Minnesota USA.
    Oyarzo, Juan Fernando
    TMD and Orofacial Pain Program, Faculty of Odontology Universidad Andres Bello Santiago Chile.
    Peck, Chris
    Faculty of Dentistry National University of Singapore Singapore Singapore.
    Penlington, Chris
    School of Dental Sciences Newcastle University Newcastle UK;Newcastle Hospitals' NHS Foundation Trust Newcastle UK.
    Raphael, Karen G.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology &amp; Medicine New York University College of Dentistry New York New York USA.
    Santiago, Vivian
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology &amp; Medicine New York University College of Dentistry New York New York USA.
    Sharma, Sonia
    Oral Diagnostic Sciences University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine Buffalo New York USA.
    Svensson, Peter
    Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Section for Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function Aarhus University Aarhus Denmark.
    Visscher, Corine M.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.
    Yoshiki, Imamura
    Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences Nihon University School of Dentistry Tokyo Japan.
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Skåne University Hospital, Specialized Pain Rehabilitation Lund Sweden.
    Constructing the brief diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (bDC/TMD) for field testing2023In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite advances in temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) diagnosis, the diagnostic process continues to be problematic in non-specialist settings.

    Objective: To complete a Delphi process to shorten the Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) to a brief DC/TMD (bDC/TMD) for expedient clinical diagnosis and initial management.

    Methods: An international Delphi panel was created with 23 clinicians representing major specialities, general dentistry and related fields. The process comprised a full day workshop, seven virtual meetings, six rounds of electronic discussion and finally an open consultation at a virtual international symposium.

    Results: Within the physical axis (Axis 1), the self-report Symptom Questionnaire of the DC/TMD did not require shortening from 14 items for the bDC/TMD. The compulsory use of the TMD pain screener was removed reducing the total number of Axis 1 items by 18%. The DC/TMD Axis 1 10-section examination protocol (25 movements, up to 12 sets of bilateral palpations) was reduced to four sections in the bDC/TMD protocol involving three movements and three sets of palpations. Axis I then resulted in two groups of diagnoses: painful TMD (inclusive of secondary headache), and common joint-related TMD with functional implications. The psychosocial axis (Axis 2) was shortened to an ultra-brief 11 item assessment.

    Conclusion: The bDC/TMD represents a substantially reduced and likely expedited method to establish (grouping) diagnoses in TMDs. This may provide greater utility for settings requiring less granular diagnoses for the implementation of initial treatment, for example non-specialist general dental practice.

  • 28.
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nilner, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Treatment outcome of short- and long-term appliance therapy in patients with TMD of myogenous origin and tension-type headache2006In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 713-721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare the short- and long-term effect of a stabilization appliance with a control appliance in myofascial pain patients suffering from episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Sixty patients (mean age 29 +/- 12 years) with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) of myogenous origin and headache were studied in this prospective controlled study. Seventy-seven per cent of the patients reported episodic and 23% chronic tension-type headache at the start of the study. The 60 patients were randomly assigned to a treatment group (stabilization appliance) or to a control group (control appliance). The patients were interviewed regarding symptoms of headache and myofascial pain and clinically examined for masticatory muscle tenderness. At the 10-week and the 6- and 12-month evaluations of appliance therapy, the treatment outcome of tension-type headache was studied. At the 10-week evaluation, 17 patients dropped-out from the control group by requesting another appliance and receiving a stabilization appliance. Another patient in the control group dropped out later during the trial. In an intent-to-treat analysis, significant differences in improvement of headache between treatment and control groups were found at the follow-ups. A 30% reduction of muscles tender to palpation correlated significantly to improvement of headache at all follow-ups. The stabilization appliance seems to have a positive effect on tension-type headache, both in a short- and in a long-term perspective in patients with TMD with pain of myogenous origin.

  • 29.
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nilsson, Ing-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Center for Oral Rehabilitation, FTV Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Michelotti, Ambrosina
    chool of Orthodontics, Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Oral Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy.
    Al-Khotani, Amal
    Dental Department, East Jeddah Hospital, Ministry of Health, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö, Sweden.
    Alstergren, Per
    Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö, Sweden; Dental Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Conti, Paulo Cesar Rodrigues
    Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil; Bauru Orofacial Pain Group, University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil.
    Durham, Justin
    Newcastle School of Dental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Goulet, Jean-Paul
    aculty of Dental Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
    Hirsch, Christian
    Clinic of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Kalaykova, Stanimira
    Department of Oral Function and Prosthetic Dentistry, College of Dental Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kapos, Flavia P
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.
    King, Christopher D
    Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Pediatric Pain Research Center (PPRC), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
    Komiyama, Osamu
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Japan.
    Koutris, Michail
    Department of Orofacial pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Department of Orofacial pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands;.
    Ohrbach, Richard
    Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
    Palermo, Tonya M
    Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.
    Peck, Christopher C
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Penlington, Chris
    Newcastle School of Dental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Restrepo, Claudia
    CES-LPH Research Group, Universidad CES, Medellin, Colombia.
    Rodrigues, Maria Joao
    Institute for Occlusion and Orofacial Pain, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Sharma, Sonia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
    Svensson, Peter
    Section for Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Visscher, Corine M
    Department of Orofacial pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Wahlund, Kerstin
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Rongo, Roberto
    International Network for Orofacial Pain and Related Disorders Methodology (INfORM), a Network within the International Association for Dental Research (IADR).
    Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders - INfORM recommendations: Comprehensive and short-form adaptations for adolescents.2023In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 1167-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for use in adults is in use worldwide. Until now, no version of this instrument for use in adolescents has been proposed.

    OBJECTIVE: To present comprehensive and short-form adaptations of the adult version of DC/TMD that are appropriate for use with adolescents in clinical and research settings.

    METHODS: International experts in TMDs and experts in pain psychology participated in a Delphi process to identify ways of adapting the DC/TMD protocol for physical and psychosocial assessment of adolescents.

    RESULTS: The proposed adaptation defines adolescence as ages 10-19 years. Changes in the physical diagnosis (Axis I) include (i) adapting the language of the Demographics and the Symptom Questionnaires to be developmentally appropriate for adolescents, (ii) adding two general health questionnaires, one for the adolescent patient and one for their caregivers, and (iii) replacing the TMD Pain Screener with the 3Q/TMD questionnaire. Changes in the psychosocial assessment (Axis II) include (i) adapting the language of the Graded Chronic Pain Scale to be developmentally appropriate for adolescents, (ii) adding anxiety and depression assessment that have been validated for adolescents, and (iii) adding three constructs (stress, catastrophizing and sleep disorders) to assess psychosocial functioning in adolescents.

    CONCLUSION: The recommended DC/TMD, including Axis I and Axis II for adolescents, is appropriate to use in clinical and research settings. This adapted first version for adolescents includes changes in Axis I and Axis II requiring reliability and validity testing in international settings. Official translations of the comprehensive and short-form to different languages according to INfORM requirements will enable a worldwide dissemination and implementation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30. Eklund, Anton
    et al.
    Wiesinger, Birgitta
    Lampa, Ewa
    Österlund, Catharina
    Wänman, Anders
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jaw-neck motor function in the acute stage after whiplash trauma.2020In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 834-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Jaw-neck motor function is affected in the chronic stage following whiplash trauma. It is not known whether motor function is affected also in the early stage after whiplash trauma.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine how jaw and head movement amplitudes and movement cycle times correlate with jaw and neck pain, and neck disability in the acute stage after whiplash trauma.

    METHODS: Jaw and head movements during jaw opening-closing were recorded with an optoelectronic system in 23 cases (4 men, 19 women, 18-66 yrs) within one month after whiplash trauma and compared with 27 controls without neck trauma (15 men, 12 women, 20-66 yrs). Jaw and head movement amplitudes, head/jaw ratio (quotient of head and jaw movement amplitude), and movement cycle times were evaluated in relation to jaw and neck pain (Numeric Rating Scale) and neck disability (Neck Disability Index). Analyses were performed with Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman´s correlation.

    RESULTS: Compared with controls, cases showed smaller jaw movement amplitudes (p=0.006) but no difference in head movement amplitudes, head/jaw ratios, or movement cycle times. There were no significant correlations between movement amplitudes or cycle times and jaw and neck pain, and neck disability. Cases with high neck pain intensity had smaller jaw movement amplitudes compared to cases with low neck pain intensity (p=0.024).

    CONCLUSION: The results suggest that jaw-neck motor function may be affected in the acute stage after whiplash trauma, and more so in cases with higher neck pain intensity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31. Forssell, H.
    et al.
    Jaaskelainen, S.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensson, P.
    Baad-Hansen, L.
    An update on pathophysiological mechanisms related to idiopathic oro-facial pain conditions with implications for management2015In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 300-322Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic oro-facial pain conditions such as persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP), atypical odontalgia (AO) and burning mouth syndrome (BMS), usually grouped together under the concept of idiopathic oro-facial pain, remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Lack of understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of these pain conditions is one of the important reasons behind the problems in diagnostic and management. During the last two decades, neurophysiological, psychophysical, brain imaging and neuropathological methods have been systematically applied to study the trigeminal system in idiopathic oro-facial pain. The findings in these studies have provided evidence for neuropathic involvement in the pathophysiology of PIFP, AO and BMS. The present qualitative review is a joint effort of a group of oro-facial pain specialists and researchers to appraise the literature on idiopathic oro-facial pain with special focus on the currently available studies on their pathophysiological mechanisms. The implications of the findings of these studies for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic oro-facial pain conditions are discussed.

  • 32.
    Ghariani, L
    et al.
    Department of Oral Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Beirut Arab University, Beirut, Lebanon.
    Segaan, Lucette
    Department of Oral Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Beirut Arab University, Beirut, Lebanon.
    Rayyan, Mohammad
    Department of Oral Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Beirut Arab University, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of dentistry, Misr University for Science and Technology, Giza Governorate, Giza, Egypt.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    Public Health Service (Folktandvården), Gefle, Sweden.
    Does crown/implant ratio influence the survival and marginal bone level of short single implants in the mandibular molar?: A preliminary investigation consisting of 12 patients2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crown/implant (C/I) ratio has been proven to not affect the survival of the implants; however, it is also a fact that no evidence exists with regard to the use of single short implants in the mandibular molar. The aim of this study was to determine whether the crown/implant ratios of single implant-supported fixed restorations on implants of 6-8 mm in the mandibular molar have an impact on the implant survival and marginal bone maintenance. Twelve short dental implants (6-8 mm) were installed and restored with single crowns, loaded after 3 months of healing. The restorations were divided according to crown-to-implant ratio into two groups: Group 1: C/I < 2.0 and Group 2: C/I >== 2.0. Alveolar bone loss was measured using CBCT scan, taken at the implant placement and after 12 months follow-up from loading. Reduced implant/crown ratio shown no statistic significant differences on implant survival and the alveolar bone level compared with recommended implant/crown ratio. Within the limitation of this study, it can be concluded that reduced C/I ratio could be used as a substitute for recommended C/I ratio in severely mandibular atrophic residual alveolar ridges.

  • 33.
    Gillborg, Susanna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Åkerman, Sigvard
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Tooth wear in Swedish adults: A cross-sectional study2020In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 235-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tooth wear has been recognised as a growing oral health problem in children and adolescents, with erosion often cited as the main cause of the tooth wear. Most studies on tooth wear have been conducted on children and adolescents, and only few studies focus on adults. Our aim was to study the prevalence of different types of tooth wear in an adult population and investigate related factors to tooth wear.

    METHODS: A total of 831 adults in Sweden participated in the study by completing a questionnaire about oral health, a clinical examination, saliva sample and intraoral photographs. Tooth wear was estimated according to the Basic Erosive Wear Examination index, and the aetiology was determined based on the clinical appearance.

    RESULTS: Almost 80% of the individuals had signs of erosion, and over 90% had signs of attrition. A high level of tooth wear was found in 4.6% of the individuals, few of who reported having received information about both attrition and erosion. Significantly, more men had tooth wear. Daily consumption of fruit had a stronger correlation to tooth wear than acidic drinks.

    DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION: A high level of tooth wear was found in 4.6% of the individuals, and it was more common in men than women. Aside from attrition, tooth wear due to erosion was a frequent finding in adults. Only a few of the individuals with a high level of tooth wear reported to have received information about tooth wear from their dentist or dental hygienist.

  • 34. Gotfredsen, Klaus
    et al.
    Carlsson, Gunnar E
    Jokstad, Asbjørn
    Arvidson Fyrberg, Kristina
    Berge, Morten
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    Bergendal, Tom
    Ellingsen, Jan Eirik
    Gunne, Johan
    Hofgren, M
    Holm, Betty
    Isidor, Flemming
    Karlsson, Stig
    Klemetti, Esa
    Lang, Niklaus P
    Lindh, Tomas
    Midtbø, Marit
    Molin, Margareta
    Närhi, Tommi
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Öwall, Bengt
    Pjetursson, Bjarni
    Saxegaard, Erik
    Schou, Sören
    Stokholm, Rie
    Thilander, Birgit
    Tomasi, Cristiano
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Implants and/or teeth: consensus statements and recommendations2008In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 35, no Suppl 1, p. 2-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In August 23-25, 2007, the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry in collaboration with the Danish Society of Oral Implantology arranged a consensus conference on the topic 'Implants and/or teeth'. It was preceded by a workshop in which eight focused questions were raised and answered in eight review articles using a systematic approach. Twenty-eight academicians and clinicians discussed the eight review papers with the purpose to reach consensus on questions relevant for the topic. At the conference the consensus statements were presented as well as lectures based on the review articles. In this article the methods used at the consensus workshop are briefly described followed by the statements with comments.

  • 35. Gyllensvärd, K.
    et al.
    Qvarnström, M.
    Wolf, Eva
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The dentist's care-taking perspective of dental fear patients: a continuous and changing challenge2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 598-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to analyse the care taking of dental fear patients from the perspective of the dentist, using a qualitative methodology. In total, 11 dentists from both the private and public dental service were selected through a purposive sampling according to their experience of treating dental fear patients, their gender, age, service affiliation and location of undergraduate education. Data were obtained using one semi-structured interview with each informant. The interviews were taped and verbatim transcribed. The text was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The theme, 'The transforming autodidactic process of care taking', covering the interpretative level of data content was identified. The first main category covering the descriptive level of data was 'The continuous and changing challenge', with the subcategories 'The emotional demand' and 'The financial stress'. The second main category identified was 'The repeated collection of experience', with the subcategories 'The development of resources' and 'The emotional change'. The dentists' experience of treating dental fear patients was considered a challenging self-taught process under continuous transformation. The competence and routine platform expanded over time, parallel to a change of connected emotions from frustration towards safety, although challenges remained.

  • 36. Hatherell, S
    et al.
    Lynch, Christopher D
    Burke, Francis M
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gilmour, Alan SM
    Attitudes of final-year dental students to bleaching of vital and non-vital teeth in Cardiff, Cork, and Malmö2011In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine attitudes of final-year dental students in Cardiff, Cork and Malmö towards tooth whitening. Following receipt of ethical approval, pre-piloted questionnaires were distributed to final-year dental students in Cork, Cardiff, and Malmö as close as possible to graduation. The questionnaire sought information relating to various opinions and attitudes towards the use of bleaching techniques including safety of bleaching, confidence in the provision of bleaching, recommendations to patients, teaching received, awareness of restrictions on the use of bleaching products and management of simulated clinical scenarios. Eighty three per cent (n = 116) of questionnaires were returned. Cork dental students had the most didactic teaching (2- h vital, 1- h non-vital bleaching) compared to Cardiff or Malmö students (0 h each). More Cork students regarded bleaching as safe (76%, n = 28) than Cardiff (70%, n = 32) or Malmö (36%, n = 12) students. More than 50% of Cork students feel they know enough about bleaching to provide it in practice, significantly more than Cardiff (<25%) or Malmö (<25%) students. The majority of students would provide vital bleaching after qualification (100% (n = 37) Cork; 82% (n = 27) Malmö; 76% (n = 35) Cardiff). In simulated clinical scenarios, more Cork students would propose bleaching treatments (89%n = 33) than Malmö (64%n = 21) or Cardiff (48%n = 22) students. Variations exist in the attitudes and approaches of three European dental schools towards bleaching. Dental students need to be best prepared to meet the needs of their future patients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 37. Hjalmarsson, L
    et al.
    Smedberg, JI
    Wennerberg, A
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Material degradation in implant-retained cobalt-chrome and titanium framworks2011In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to estimate in vitro material degradation in implants and cobalt-chrome or titanium frameworks, before and after exposure to artificial saliva. Four full-arch implant frameworks were fabricated according to the Cresco™ method (Astra Tech AB, Mölndal, Sweden), two in a cobalt-chrome alloy and two in commercially pure (CP) titanium. They were cut vertically, and the three central sections of each framework were used. Element leakage into an artificial saliva solution was observed with mass spectrometry. Before artificial saliva exposure, three Brånemark System(®) implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) were screw-retained to cobalt-chrome sections, and three to titanium sections. The contact surfaces with the implants of the framework sections and the corresponding surfaces of six implants were examined with optical interferometry before and after exposure to artificial saliva to evaluate material degradation. Conventional descriptive statistics were used to present the mass spectrometry and interferometry data. One-way anova and Dunnett's T3 post hoc test were used to identify and study differences between the groups. To highlight changes within the groups, the Student's t-test was used. The significance level was set at 5%. There was significantly more leakage of cobalt elements than of titanium and chrome (P < 0·05). After saliva exposure and framework connection, the implants roughened (P < 0·05). The titanium frameworks were generally rougher than the cobalt-chrome frameworks, both before and after saliva exposure (P < 0·05). The findings in this study suggest active material degradation processes for both implants and framework materials.

  • 38. Hongxing, L
    et al.
    Astrøm, AN
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nilsson, IM
    Johansson, A
    Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in Chinese adolescents compared to an age-matched Swedish population.2016In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to (i) assess the prevalence and perceived need for treatment of TMD pain, and its association with socio-economic factors and gender, in adolescents in Xi᾽an, Shaanxi Province, China, and (ii) compare the prevalence and association with gender of TMD pain in Xi᾽an to an age-matched Swedish population. We surveyed Chinese adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in Xi'an, China (n = 5524), using a questionnaire with two-stage stratified sampling and the school as the sampling unit. The study included second-year students at selected high schools. It also included an age-matched Swedish population (n = 17,015) surveyed using the same diagnostic criteria for TMD pain as that used in the Chinese sample. The survey found TMD pain in 14·8% (n = 817) of the Chinese sample and 5·1% (n = 871) of the Swedish sample (P < 0·0001). Girls had significantly more TMD pain than boys in both the Chinese (P < 0·05) and Swedish (P < 0·001) samples. TMD pain increased with age in the Chinese population. Of the Chinese adolescents with TMD pain, 47% reported that they felt a need for treatment. Rural schools, low paternal education levels, poverty, living outside the home, poor general and oral health, and dissatisfaction with teeth all showed significant positive correlations with TMD pain. Prevalence of TMD pain in Chinese adolescents was significantly higher than in the Swedish sample.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 39.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ali, David
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Aljamal, Mustafa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Bruxism and dental implants: A systematic review and meta-analysis2024In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 202-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Overload from bruxism may affect survival of dental implants.

    Objectives: To evaluate implant failure and marginal bone loss (MBL) in patients presenting with probable bruxism compared to non-bruxers. The study was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42021238397).

    Methods: An electronic search September 2022 in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science and Science Direct was combined with a hand search. Two independent reviewers carried out abstract screening, full-text assessment, quality assessment (National Institutes of Health tool) and data extraction. Only studies that provided information on self-report and clinical examination needed for the diagnosis of at least 'probable' bruxism were included. A pairwise random-effect meta-analysis was carried out.

    Results: In total 1338 studies were identified, and after screening and full-text assessment 27 studies that presented data on 2105 implants in probable bruxers and 10 264 implants in non-bruxers were included, with 138 and 352 implant failures in respective groups. the meta-analysis showed that implants placed in probable bruxers had a higher risk of failure than in non-bruxers (OR 2.189; 95% CI 1.337, 3.583, p = .002). A meta-regression showed that follow-up time did not affect this OR. Eighteen studies provided general data on MBL but did not report results separated between bruxers and non-bruxers. Therefore, an analysis of MBL was not possible.

    Conclusion: The results of the present systematic review show that implants placed in probable bruxers present a significantly higher risk of failure than implants placed in non-bruxers. This should be considered in treatment planning and management of implant patients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Davidson, T
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Högestätt, ED
    Östlund, Pernilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Tranaeus, Sofia
    Vitols, S
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Pharmacological treatment of oro-facial pain: health technology assessment including a systematic review with network meta-analysis.2017In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 800-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This health technology assessment evaluated the efficacy of pharmacological treatment in patients with oro-facial pain. Randomised controlled trials were included if they reported pharmacological treatment in patients ≥18 years with chronic (≥3 months) oro-facial pain. Patients were divided into subgroups: TMD-muscle [temporomandibular disorders (TMD) mainly associated with myalgia]; TMD-joint (TMD mainly associated with temporomandibular joint pain); and burning mouth syndrome (BMS). The primary outcome was pain intensity reduction after pharmacological treatment. The scientific quality of the evidence was rated according to GRADE. An electronic search in PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE from database inception to 1 March 2017 combined with a handsearch identified 1552 articles. After screening of abstracts, 178 articles were reviewed in full text and 57 studies met the inclusion criteria. After risk of bias assessment, 41 articles remained: 15 studies on 790 patients classified as TMD-joint, nine on 375 patients classified as TMD-muscle and 17 on 868 patients with BMS. Of these, eight studies on TMD-muscle, and five on BMS were included in separate network meta-analysis. The narrative synthesis suggests that NSAIDs as well as corticosteroid and hyaluronate injections are effective treatments for TMD-joint pain. The network meta-analysis showed that clonazepam and capsaicin reduced pain intensity in BMS, and the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine, for the TMD-muscle group. In conclusion, based on a limited number of studies, evidence provided with network meta-analysis showed that clonazepam and capsaicin are effective in treatment of BMS and that the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine has a positive treatment effect for TMD-muscle pain.

  • 41.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Rezvani, M
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Prevalence of whiplash trauma in TMD patients: a systematic review2014In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 59-68Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the prevalence of whiplash trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and to describe clinical signs and symptoms in comorbid TMD/whiplash compared with TMD localised to the facial region. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Bandolier databases was carried out for articles published from 1 January 1966 to 31 December 2012. The systematic search identified 129 articles. After the initial screening of abstracts, 32 articles were reviewed in full text applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six studies on the prevalence of neck trauma in patients with TMD met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Two of the authors evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. The reported prevalence of whiplash trauma ranged from 8·4% to 70% (median 35%) in TMD populations, compared with 1·7-13% in the non-TMD control groups. Compared with patients with TMD localised to the facial region, TMD patients with a history of whiplash trauma reported more TMD symptoms, such as limited jaw opening and more TMD pain, and also more headaches and stress symptoms. In conclusion, the prevalence of whiplash trauma is higher in patients with TMD compared with non-TMD controls. Furthermore, patients with comorbid TMD/whiplash present with more jaw pain and more severe jaw dysfunction compared with TMD patients without a history of head-neck trauma. These results suggest that whiplash trauma might be an initiating and/or aggravating factor as well as a comorbid condition for TMD

  • 42.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Umeå University.
    Visscher, C M
    Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Wänman, A
    Umeå University.
    Ljótsson, B
    Karolinska Institute.
    Peck, C C
    The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Lövgren, A
    Umeå University.
    Even mild catastrophic thinking is related to pain intensity in individuals with painful Temporomandibular Disorders2021In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 1193-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are often associated with psychological comorbidities. One such comorbidity is pain catastrophizing, i.e., exaggeration of negative consequences of a painful event. The aim was to investigate catastrophizing in individuals with painful TMD compared to controls and the association between catastrophizing and pain intensity, number of pain sites and functional limitations.

    METHODS: A community-based sample of 110 individuals (83 women; 20-69 yrs) with painful TMDs (myalgia/arthralgia as per Diagnostic Criteria for TMD), and 190 age- and gender-matched controls (119 women; 20-69 yrs) from the Public Dental services in Västerbotten, Sweden participated. Associations between catastrophizing and functional jaw limitations, respectively, and painful TMD were evaluated with ordinal regression. adjusted for the effect of gender and age. Associations (Spearman's correlation) of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) with Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS-20), pain site number (whole body pain map), and characteristic pain intensity (CPI) and intergroup comparisons (Mann-Whitney U test) of these variables were also calculated.

    RESULTS: Levels of catastrophizing, were associated with TMD pain (OR 1.6, 95%CI 1.1-2.6). Among individuals with painful TMD, catastrophizing was correlated to pain intensity (r=0.458, p<0.01) and functional limitations (r=0.294-0.321, p≤0.002), but not to number of pain sites.

    CONCLUSION: Compared to controls, community-based individuals with painful TMD demonstrated higher levels of pain catastrophizing, and this catastrophizing was associated with increased pain intensity and jaw dysfunction. The relatively low scores of pain catastrophizing suggest that even mild catastrophic thinking is associated with pain perception and jaw function, and should be considered in patient management.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Isacsson, Göran
    et al.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Schumann, Mohamad
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Nohlert, Eva
    Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Mejersjö, Christina
    Clinic of Orofacial Pain, Sahlgrenska Academy and Public Dental Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pain relief following a single-dose intra-articular injection of methylprednisolone in the temporomandibular joint arthralgia - A multicentre randomised controlled trial.2019In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 5-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia is a painful condition assumed to be associated with local inflammation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to determine the efficacy for reducing pain of a single-dose intra-articular (IA) injection of methylprednisolone to the TMJ. The hypothesis was that methylprednisolone would effectively reduce TMJ pain. METHODS: This randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, multicentre, controlled study included visits for enrolment, treatment and 4-week follow-up. The study included patients 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with unilateral TMJ arthralgia. All participants were randomly assigned to receive 1 mL IA injections of methylprednisolone or saline. The primary outcome was change in recorded pain intensity on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at maximum jaw opening, analysed in the per protocol population. RESULTS: In total, 54 patients were randomly assigned to single-dose IA injections with methylprednisolone (n = 27) or saline (n = 27). Between baseline and the 4-week follow-up, VAS-rated pain intensity at maximum jaw opening decreased from a mean of 61.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 50.1; 70.7) to 33.9 (95% CI: 21.6; 46.2) in the methylprednisolone group and from 59.6 (95% CI: 50.7; 65.9) to 33.9 (95% CI: 23.8; 43.9) in the saline group. The between-group difference was not significant (P = 0.812). Treatment-related adverse events were doubled in the methylprednisolone group. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone provided no additional benefit for reducing pain, but caused more harm compared with saline following a single-dose IA injection in patients with TMJ arthralgia.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 44.
    Iskanderani, Durer
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ekberg, Ewa Carin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hellén-Halme, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Web-based educational programme for temporomandibular joint assessment with cone-beam computed tomography.2020In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1330-1336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate an educational web-based program for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) assessment using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

    METHODS: A web-based educational program was designed for TMJ assessment using CBCT images. Fifteen CBCT cases of the TMJ (three-dimensional reconstructed volumes) and an assessment module based on image analysis criteria in the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) were added to the program. Thirty-six undergraduate dental students were invited to test the program by assessing all cases twice: before and after 2 months of training. Participants submitted written subjective evaluations of the program.

    RESULTS: The web-based program can be accessed on Malmö University webpage (www.cbct-tmj.mau.se). Despite limited CBCT learning in their undergraduate training and not using the program in the 2-month interval, the students were able to correctly diagnose 80% of the cases at the second assessment. Their diagnoses, however, did not differ significantly from the first assessment. Overall, the students were satisfied with the program and considered it user friendly.

    CONCLUSION: The web-based educational program that was developed in the present study and tested by dental students could be a useful educational tool for TMJ assessment using CBCT.

  • 45.
    Iskanderani, Durer
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hellén-Halme, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Assessment of a training programme on detection of temporomandibular joint osseous changes applying pre-defined 2D multiplane cone beam computed tomography reconstructions2018In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Osseous changes in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are common indications for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The number of such cases is increasing while a number of qualified oral radiologists is limited. This study investigated the usefulness of a training programme for general dental practitioners (GDPs) regarding temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osseous changes detection in CBCT images. Methods We selected CBCT images of 35 TMD cases and chose 5 of them to use in training 7 GDPs on detecting osseous changes in the TMJ. In evaluation directly following training, GDPs assessed the 30 remaining cases. Three qualified radiologists served as reference standard. A 2-month follow-up of training comprising evaluation of the same cases. The cases are assessed according to Ahmad etal (Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod, 107, 2009, 844) protocol of TMJ osseous changes in CBCT images. ResultsSensitivity and specificity of the CBCT protocol were high, except for some criteria that did not appear in the cases. Average observer sensitivity was 65% while specificity was 87%. Average correct individual response rate was 84%. Mean agreement among the GDPs was 73%. Observer performance had improved at the 2-month follow-up. Conclusion The present educational programme could be a helpful material on recognising possible osseous changes of TMJ and it can be used as a part of a training programme for GDP and for specialist candidates.

  • 46.
    Iwata, Yoshihiro
    et al.
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Nishimori, Hideta
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Iida, Takashi
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Masuda, Manabu
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Yoshida, Kazuhiro
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Ishii, Yuki
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Yamakawa, Yuichirou
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Hayakawa, Hidetoshi
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Section for Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Department of Dentistry and Oral Health Aarhus University Aarhus Denmark;Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences (SCON) Aarhus Denmark.
    Komiyama, Osamu
    Department of Oral Function and Fixed Prosthodontics Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo Chiba Japan.
    Effect of clinical experience and training with visual feedback on standardized palpation outcomes: Potential implications for assessment of jaw muscle sensitivity2024In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 601-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The evaluation of muscle pain and sensitivity by manual palpation is an important part of the clinical examination in patients with myalgia. However, the effects of clinical experience and visual feedback on palpation of the masticatory muscles with or without a palpometer are not known.

    Objective: To estimate the effects of clinical experience and visual feedback on the accuracy of palpation in standardized settings.

    Methods: Thirty-two dentists (age 35 ± 11 years) classified as either specialists (n = 16) or generalists (n = 16) participated in this experiment. All dentists were instructed to target force levels of 500- or 1000-gf, as determined on an electronic scale using either standardized palpometers or manual palpation (MP). All dentists participated in four different tests: MP, MP with visual feedback (MPVF), palpometer (PAL) and PAL with visual feedback (PALVF). Actual force values for each type of palpation from 0 to 2, 2 to 5 and 0 to 5 s were analysed by calculating target force level.

    Results: The relative differences during 2-5 and 0-5 s with 1000 gf were significantly lower for generalists than for specialists (p < .05). In generalists and specialists, the coefficients of variation and the relative differences during 2-5 s were significantly lower for PAL and PALVF than for MP (p < .05).

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that the use of a palpometer, but not clinical experience with palpation of masticatory muscles, increases the accuracy of palpation, and ≥2 s of palpation with a palpometer is optimal for masticatory muscles.

  • 47. Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Unell, Lennart
    Carlsson, Gunnar E
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Halling, Arne
    Risk factors associated with symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in a population of 50- and 60-year-old subjects2006In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 473-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were first to investigate, by means of a mail questionnaire, variables from three domains: (i) socio-economic attributes; (ii) general and oral health; and (iii) dental attitudes and behaviours in a large sample of 50- and 60-year-old subjects, and second to compare subjects with or without reported temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain with respect to these variables. In 2002, a questionnaire was mailed to all 50- and 60- year-old subjects in two Swedish counties, Örebro and Östergötland (n =17 138; n 50 = 8878; n 60 = 8260). Individuals not responding within 2 weeks were given a reminder. If still not answering, a new questionnaire was sent. The final response rate was 72.8% (n = 12 468). The reported responses to questions regarding ‘pain in the TMJ region’ and ‘difficulty to open the mouth wide’ were dichotomized into two groups: (i) no temporomandibular disorders (TMD) symptoms; and (ii) some, rather great or severe TMD symptoms. Striking differences in demographic, occupational, general and oral health conditions were found between the groups with and without TMD symptoms. The strongest risk indicator for both pain and dysfunction was reported bruxism. Women, younger subjects (50 years old) and bluecollar workers were significantly more prevalent in the TMD symptom groups. Variables related to impaired general and oral health were more common in the groups with reported TMD problems, whereas satisfaction with received dental care and wlth teeth was lower. Individuals with reported TMD symptoms differed significantly from those without TMD symptoms in socio-economic attributes, general and oral health symptoms, dental conditions and satisfaction with their teeth.

  • 48.
    John, Mike T.
    et al.
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences School of Dentistry University of Minnesota Minneapolis MN USA;Division of Epidemiology &amp; Community Health School of Public Health University of Minnesota Minneapolis MN USA.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences Denmark.
    Sekulic, Stella
    Dental Division Department for Prosthetic Dentistry Faculty of Medicine University of Ljubljana Ljubljana Slovenia.
    Stamm, Tanja
    Section for Outcomes Research Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems Medical University of Vienna Vienna Austria.
    Oghli, Ibrahim
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences Denmark;Department of Oral Basic Sciences Taibah University Medina Saudi Arabia.
    Schierz, Oliver
    Department of Prosthodontics and Materials Science University of Leipzig Leipzig Germany.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences Denmark;Department of Rehabilitation Medicine Skåne University Hospital Malmö Sweden.
    Baba, Kazuyoshi
    Department of Prosthodontics Showa University Tokyo Japan.
    Bekes, Katrin
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry University Clinic of Dentistry Medical University of Vienna Vienna Austria.
    van Wijk, Arjen
    Department of Social Dentistry Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) University of Amsterdam &amp; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.
    Su, Naichuan
    Department of Social Dentistry Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) University of Amsterdam &amp; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.
    Reissmann, Daniel R.
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry University Medical Center Hamburg‐Eppendorf Hamburg Germany.
    Fueki, Kenji
    Removable Partial Prosthodontics Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences Tokyo Medical and Dental University Bunkyo‐ku Japan.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Centre for Oral Rehabilitation Folktandvården Östergötland Linköping Sweden.
    Theis‐Mahon, Nicole
    Health Sciences Libraries University of Minnesota Minneapolis MN USA.
    Omara, Maisa
    Section for Outcomes Research Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems Medical University of Vienna Vienna Austria;Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster Arthritis and Rehabilitation Vienna Austria.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Visscher, Corine M.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Disfunction Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.
    Mapping Oral Disease Impact with a Common Metric (MOM)—Project summary and recommendations2021In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 305-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact—the dimensions of oral health-related quality of life—capture dental patients’ oral health problems worldwide and regardless of whether the patient currently suffers from oral diseases or intends to prevent them in the future. Using scores for these dimensions, the project Mapping Oral Disease Impact with a Common Metric (MOM) aims to provide four-dimensional oral health impact information across oral diseases and settings. In this article, project authors summarize MOM’s findings and provide recommendations about how to improve standardized oral health impact assessment. Project MOM’s systematic reviews identified four-dimensional impact information for 189 adult and 22 pediatric patient populations that were contained in 170 publications. A typical functional, pain-related, aesthetical, and psychosocial impact (on a 0-8 impact metric based on two items with a response format 0 = never, 1 = hardly ever, 2 = occasionally, 3 = fairly often, 4 = very often) was about 2 to 3 units. Project MOM provides five recommendations to improve standardized oral health impact assessment for all oral diseases in all settings. 

  • 49. Kokubo, Yuji
    et al.
    Nagayama, Yuki
    Tsumita, Mitsuyoshi
    Ohkubo, Chikahiro
    Fukushima, Shunji
    Vult von Steyern, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Clinical Marginal and Internal Gaps of In-Ceram Crowns Fabricated Using the GN-I System2005In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 753-758Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The marginal and internal gaps of ceramic crowns with alumina copings fabricated using a computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing system, were evaluated in vivo using silicone materials. Black and white silicone materials were used to record the marginal and internal gaps of 82 In-Ceram crowns before final cementation. The silicone materials were sectioned bucco-lingually and mesio-distally and viewed under a microscope to measure the thickness of the white silicone layer. Sixteen reference points were measured on each specimen. The mean marginal gaps were compared among the anterior, premolar and molar teeth, and the mean gaps at the reference points within the groups were compared by analysis of variance and the Dunnett T3 test. The mean marginal gap was 66.8 mum. There were no differences in marginal gaps among the three groups. In all the groups, the marginal gaps were the smallest, whereas the occlusal gaps were the largest. The mean marginal gaps of the In-Ceram crowns with the alumina copings fabricated using the GN-I system were within the range of clinically acceptable values.

  • 50. Kokubo, Yuji
    et al.
    Ohkubo, Chikahiro
    Tsumita, Mitsuyoshi
    Miyashita, Akira
    Vult von Steyern, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Fukushima, Shunji
    Clinical Marginal and Internal Gaps of Procera AllCeram Crowns2005In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 526-530Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the marginal and internal gaps of Procera AllCeram crowns in vivo using silicone materials. Ninety Procera AllCeram crowns were evaluated before final cementation. White and black silicone materials were used to record the marginal and internal fit; then the crowns were sectioned bucco-lingually and mesio-distally to measure the thickness of the silicone layer using a microscope. Sixteen reference points were measured on each specimen. Mean marginal gaps among anterior, premolar and molar teeth, and mean gaps at the reference points within the groups were compared by analysis of variance and Dunnett T3 test. The mean values at the margins were the smallest in all tooth groups, whereas those at the rounded slope of the chamfer were the largest. There were significant differences (P < 0.001) in the mean gaps at the four reference points (margin, rounded slope of the chamfer, axial wall and occlusal surface) in each group, except for the molar teeth. The mean marginal gaps of the Procera AllCeram crowns were within the range of clinical acceptance.

123 1 - 50 of 118
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf