Publikationer från Malmö universitet
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 17 of 17
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Hjalmers, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Pejtersen, Jan Hyld
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Good Work for dentists - a qualitative analysis2010Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 38, nr 2, s. 159-170Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explores dentists' perceptions of Good Work in the meaning of positive and rewarding aspects in their work in contrast to a traditional problem-centred focus on work life. Methods: Nine informants were selected among Danish and Swedish general dental practitioners to obtain variation as to country of origin, gender, age and clinical work experience. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim in the original language. Statements concerning positive aspects of work were used for systematic text condensation according to the principles of Giorgi's phenomenological analysis, as modified by Malterud, generalizing descriptions reflecting aspects of Good Work. Selection of participants continued until saturation of the emerging categories was achieved. Results: The core of Good Work emanates from the clinical encounter: from the relation with the patient and from the opportunity to carry out high quality odontological handicraft. Social relations at the workplace, as well as organizational values and conditions were perceived as influencing the opportunities to achieve the rewarding aspects from the clinical encounter. Conclusions: The results implicate a need for developing a work-environmental model with intrinsic as well as extrinsic rewards when dealing with human service organizations. At policy level it is necessary to address the professional culture.

  • 2.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Hyld Pejtersen, Jan
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Measurement of social support, community and trust in dentistry2011Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 39, nr 4, s. 289-299Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Relationships among people at work have previously been found to contribute to the perception of having a good work. The aim of the present paper was to develop scales measuring aspects of social support, trust, and community among dentists, and to evaluate psychometric properties of the scales. Material and methods: In 2008, a questionnaire was sent to 1835 general dental practitioners randomly selected from the dental associations in Sweden and Denmark. The response rate was 68% after two reminders. Principal Component Analysis was applied to 14 items and scales were established based on the resulting factors. Internal consistency was evaluated by Cronbach’s alpha. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) with respect to gender, nationality and employment sector was analysed using ordinal logistic regression methods. Construct validity was assessed in relation to selfrated health and a range of work satisfaction outcomes. Results: The percentage of missing values on the items was low (range 0.7%–3.8%). Two scales (range 0–100) were established to measure ‘Community with Trust’ (nine items, mean = 79.2 [SD = 13.4], Cronbach’s alpha = 0.89) and ‘Collegial Support’ (five items, mean = 70.4 [SD = 20.8], Cronbach’s alpha = 0.89). DIF of only minor importance was found which supported cultural equivalence. The two scales were weakly positively correlated with each other. ‘Community with Trust’ was in general more strongly correlated with work satisfaction variables than ‘Collegial Support’ was. Conclusions: Stability and internal consistency of the scales were considered as satisfactory. Content validity and construct validity were considered as good. Further validation in other populations is recommended.

  • 3.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö universitet, Centrum för tillämpad arbetslivsforskning och utvärdering (CTA). Malmö University.
    Owen, Mikaela
    Centre for Workplace Excellence, University of South Australia.
    Wretlind, Katharina
    Public Dental Service Västra Götaland.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Does staff-assessed care quality predict early failure of dental fillings?: a prospective study2020Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 48, nr 5, s. 387-394Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate staff-assessed care quality as an indicator of register-based measures of care quality at dental clinics, more specifically register-based measures of survival of dental fillings and initiation of preventive treatments for caries patients.

    METHODS: This prospective study includes data from cross-sectional workplace psychosocial risk assessment surveys at dental clinics and register data on survival of dental fillings, and initiation of preventive treatment for caries patients obtained from the Swedish Quality Registry for Caries and Periodontal Disease (SKaPa) Demographic background data on the age, gender, income level and place of birth of patients was obtained from Statistics Sweden (SCB). The data were analysed using discrete-time multilevel survival analysis and multiple linear regression analysis.

    RESULTS: The results showed that staff-assessed care quality rated by the total staff or by dental nurses at the clinic predicted the risk of replacement of dental fillings made due to a caries diagnosis during the 3-year follow-up period, controlling for potential confounding due to patient demographic characteristics (age, sex, income and country of birth). In contrast, the better the staff-assessed care quality at the clinic, the smaller the proportion of the patients received preventive care in addition to operative caries therapy when controlling for potential confounding due to patient demographics. Care quality assessed by dentists at the clinic did not predict either of these outcome measures.

    CONCLUSIONS: Premature failure of dental fillings is costly for both patients and society, which leads to a need for relevant measures for following dental care quality. Our findings indicate that staff-assessed care quality - a cheap and easy measure to collect and follow continuously in dental practice - can be used to monitor aspects of quality in real time in order to facilitate continuous improvement and quickly amend quality problems. Also, it can be used for integrating quality improvement in systematic work environment risk management.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Malmö högskola, Centrum för tillämpad arbetslivsforskning och utvärdering (CTA).
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Hakanen, Jari J
    Kristensen, Tage S
    It is not just about occupation, but also about where you work2017Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 45, nr 4, s. 372-379Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Dentistry is characterized by a meaningful but also stressful psychosocial working environment. Job satisfaction varies among staff working under different organizational forms. The aim of this study was to identify (i) to what extent crucial psychosocial work environment characteristics differ among occupations in general public dental clinics in Sweden, and (ii) how much of the variation within each occupation is attributable to the organizational level. Methods: All staff (N=1782) employed in four public dental organizations received an email with personal log-in to an electronic questionnaire based on the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. After two reminders, a response rate of 75% was obtained. Responses from 880 nonmanagerial dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses working in general practices were included in our analyses. Results: First, we compared the three dental occupations. We found that job demands, task resources (eg influence, possibilities for development and role clarity), strain symptoms and attitudes to work differed among occupations, dentists having the least favourable situation. Next, we compared the four organizations for each occupational group, separately. For dentists, a significant and relevant amount of variance (P<.05 and ICC >.05) was explained by the organizational level for 15 of 26 subscales, least pronounced for task resources. By contrast, for dental nurses and hygienists, the corresponding number was 2 subscales of 26. The psychosocial working environment of people working at the organization with the highest levels of strain indicators and the least positive work-related attitudes differed systematically from the organization with the most favourable profile, in particular regarding job demands and leadership aspects. Conclusion: In conclusion, the psychosocial working environment depended to a large degree on occupation and, for dentists in particular, also on their organizational affiliation. The findings suggest a potential for designing interventions at organizational level for improvements of the psychosocial working environment for dentists.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 5.
    Borglin, Linnea
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Pekarski, Stephanie
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Saget, Sophie
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
    Duane, Brett
    Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; Dublin Dental University Hospital, Ireland.
    The life cycle analysis of a dental examination: Quantifying the environmental burden of an examination in a hypothetical dental practice2021Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 49, nr 6, s. 581-593Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Global sustainability is considered the number one health concern facing our planet. Dental care is currently not provided in a sustainable way. This study aims to quantify the potential environmental burden of an examination in a hypothetical dental practice and identify major contributors to environmental harm.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A life cycle analysis was performed for the life cycle of an examination of one patient in a hypothetical dental practice. The equipment and products analysed were those available at the Faculty of Dentistry, Malmö University. The Ecoinvent version 3.5 database and the life cycle assessment software tool OpenLCA version 1.10 were chosen for this study.

    RESULTS: Normalized results indicate that the impact categories to which the modelled examination most significantly contributes are water scarcity, freshwater eutrophication and human toxicity (cancer effects). The major contributors or hotspots relating to the environmental harm of an examination procedure are soaps and detergents, disposable bibs, surface disinfection, stainless-steel instruments, clothing, water use and wastewater.

    CONCLUSION: Normalized results indicate that the potential environmental impact of an examination compared to one individual's impact per year is minimal. Considering the potential number of dental examinations and other dental procedures performed every year puts the findings in another perspective. This paper touches on some of the ways that the environmental burden of an examination could be reduced. Small changes to everyday practice, such as always making sure the dishwasher and washing machines are full when turned on, using less environmentally damaging soaps, more sustainable clothing alternatives and using necessary instruments could significantly reduce dentistry's environmental impact. Changes in materials and practice may result in potential trade-offs. Research would need to be carried out comparing the environmental burden of any alternatives. We hope in the near future that there will be more evidence relating to products used within dental care settings, potential trade-offs and dentistry's environmental burden.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6. Bratthall, Douglas
    et al.
    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Cariogram - a multifactorial risk assessment model for a multifactorial disease2005Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 33, nr 4, s. 256-264Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews some common methods for the assessment of caries risk. It also describes a new way of illustrating the caries risk profile of an individual, the Cariogram. Past caries experience and socioeconomic factors are often used for prediction of caries. As prediction models, the methods are simple, inexpensive and fast. However, they are not risk models, as they do not specify which particular risk factors are operating. Various biological factors can be used for risk assessment. Common ones are bacteria, diet and host factors. Taken separately, these biological factors often have limited predictive values. Socioeconomic factors often have a heavy impact on the biological factors as they can explain why an individual, for example, has a cariogenic diet or neglects oral hygiene. The biological factors are the immediate cause of the cavities. Caries experience is an illustration of how the host copes up with the biological activity. To facilitate the interpretation of biological data, the Cariogram was developed. It is a computer program showing a graphical picture that illustrates a possible overall caries risk scenario. The program contains an algorithm that presents a 'weighted' analysis of the input data, mainly biological factors. It expresses as to what extent different etiological factors of caries affect caries risk. The Cariogram identifies the caries risk factors for the individual and provides examples of preventive and treatment strategies to the clinician.

  • 7.
    Christell, Helena
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Birch, Stephen
    Horner, Keith
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    SEDENTEXCT consortium,
    A framework for costing diagnostic methods in oral health care: an application comparing a new imaging technology with the conventional approach for maxillary canines with eruption disturbances2012Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 40, nr 4, s. 351-361Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims were (i) to propose a framework for costing diagnostic methods in oral health care and (ii) to illustrate the application of the framework to the radiographic examination of maxillary canines with eruption disturbances. Methods: The framework for costing, following Drummond et al.(2005), includes three elements: (i) identification of different resources used in producing and delivering the service, (ii) measurement of the amount of each resource required and (iii) valuation of the resources in monetary terms. Four data collection instruments were designed – a protocol for apportioning the cost of capital equipment to each diagnostic procedure, separate forms for recording consumable items, for the time of different health care providers used for a diagnostic examination and a patient survey for calculation of the total cost to the patient associated with the examination. The framework was applied to the radiographic examination of maxillary canines with eruption disturbances comparing two imaging methods: (i) a new method with cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography and (ii) a conventional method using intraoral and panoramic radiography. The primary analysis was performed from the perspective of the health care system. A separate analysis included patient costs with health care system costs to provide a societal perspective. Comparison of the two perspectives allows consideration of whether any costs savings to the health care system are generated at the expense of greater costs for patients and their families. Data for the cost-analysis were retrieved from 47 patients (mean age 14 years) referred to a department of radiology for examination of maxillary canines. Results:Application of the framework for costing allowed us to compare the resources used to perform examinations of the two methods. The mean total cost per examination for the new method was 128.38€ and 81.80€ for the conventional method, resulting in an incremental cost per examination of the new method of 46.58€. Conclusions: The application of the framework demonstrates the feasibility of measuring and comparing the total costs as well as the distribution of total costs between providers and patients for different approaches to this common examination.

  • 8.
    Edman, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Jönköping University.
    Holmlund, Anders
    Uppsala University.
    'Periodontal health and disease in an older population: A 10-year longitudinal study'2022Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 50, nr 4, s. 225-232Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate alveolar bone loss (ABL), which is an indicator of periodontitis, and to identify risk factors for ABL in an older population between 2008 and 2018. Methods This longitudinal study used data from a questionnaire survey and a clinical examination administered on two occasions ten years apart to 273 individuals who were 65 years and 75 years in 2008. Results The mean number of teeth decreased significantly over the ten-year study period, while the proportion of individuals with calculus and moderate ABL visible on radiographs increased. For both ages, the number of teeth decreased by a mean of 2 teeth. The proportions of participants reporting poor general health, daily medication, xerostomia, living singly, visiting dental care irregularly and being in need of extra support in their homes all increased over the observation period. Conclusions Despite an increased progression of moderate alveolar bone loss, a fairly good dentition and chewing capacity was retained in this older population. However, the individual's age and fragility are important indicators that need to be considered when planning oral health care and the availability of dental care.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Franzén, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Boundary work of dentists in everyday work2012Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 40, nr 4, s. 377-384Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The Swedish policy objectives in dental care provision – to meet public demands for dental care and to increase the cost-effectiveness of the service – require dentists to work in teams with dental hygienists and dental nurses. This study focused on the role of dentists in the distribution of work tasks within teams in one Swedish Public Dental Service organisation. Dental clinics were viewed as micro-political arenas in which dentists attempt to demarcate professional boundaries in response to teamwork. Methods Semi-structured interviews, observations and documents were used. The interviewed individuals were seven dentists employed at two clinics, the managers of each clinic and the general manager. The dentists were interviewed to investigate how they defend or blur professional boundaries. They were also observed at work. The clinic managers and the general manager were interviewed to identify their expectations of dentists concerning work division. The documents comprised organisational plans and annual reports. Results Dentists demarcated professional boundaries by utilising various power resources: treatment responsibility, specialist knowledge, discretion, and avoidance of work considered to be low status work. The dentists also contributed to blurred boundaries between themselves and the other dental professionals by discussing patient treatment, giving and receiving advice, and assisting the others in skill development. Conclusion Although dentists' boundary work could obstruct implementation of policy objectives, dentists' behaviour contributed to effective collaboration within the teams.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 10. Geraets, Wil G
    et al.
    Verheij, Johannes G
    van der Stelt, Paul F
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Horner, Keith
    Nicopoulou-Karayianni, Kety
    Jacobs, Reinhilde
    Devlin, Hugh
    Osteoporosis and the general dental practitioner: reliability of some digital dental radiological measures2007Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 35, nr 6, s. 465-471Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Dental radiographs are relatively inexpensive and are regularly made of a large fraction of the adult population; therefore, they represent an enormous potential as a screening tool for osteoporosis. Monitoring the population by means of dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is currently the most accepted method for diagnosing osteoporosis, involves enormous costs and facilities. In previous studies, it was shown that the radiographic trabecular pattern shows correlations with the bone mineral density (BMD) as measured by DXA. The objective of this study was to assess the reproducibility of the quantitative analysis of the trabecular pattern on dental radiographs. METHODS: Six regions of interest were selected manually on three digital radiographic images of 20 women. This process was performed 10 times resulting in 1200 image samples. For each image sample 26 parameters were measured. The reliability of the parameters was evaluated by means of Cronbach's alpha. RESULTS: Of the values of Cronbach's alpha 83% is at least 0.9 and 99% is at least 0.8. CONCLUSIONS: The measurements of the parameters used in this study are very reproducible. Therefore, the manual selection of the regions of interest does not introduce large amounts of noise. The imaging parameters potentially offer an accurate tool for the prediction of BMD values. PMID: 18039288 [PubMed - in process]

  • 11.
    Johansson, Veronica
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Axtelius, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Sampogna, Francesca
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Paulander, Jörgen
    Sondell, Katarina
    Multivariate analyses of patient financial systems and oral health-related quality of life2010Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 38, nr 5, s. 436-444Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Since 1999, the public dental health service (PDHS) in the county of Värmland, Sweden, has two co-existing patient financial systems, i.e. ways for the patient to pay for dental care services. Alongside the traditional system of fee-for-service payment, i.e. paying afterwards for provided services, a new system of contract care is offered. In this system, dental care is covered by a contractual agreement, for which the patient pays an annual fee and receives care covered by the contract without additional costs. The aim of this article was to study whether patient financial system was associated with oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Methods: A questionnaire was answered by 1324 randomly selected patients, 52% from contract care and 48% from fee-for-service. The questionnaire contained questions about how much one was prepared to pay for dental care, how much one paid for dental care the previous year, OHIP-14 (measured OHRQoL), dental anxiety, humanism of caregiver, SF-36 (measured general health), multidimensional health locus of control, sense of coherence (SOC), self-esteem and demographics. Data on patient financial system, gender and age were obtained from the sampling frame. The material was analysed with a hierarchical block method of multiple regression analysis. Results: When controlling for all other variables, patient financial system was one of the strongest associations with OHRQoL: patients in fee-for-service had worse OHRQoL than those in contract care. OHRQoL was also associated with general health, SOC and to some extent also with psychological and economic factors. Of the social variables, only being foreign born was significant: it was associated with worse OHRQoL. Conclusions: Patient financial system was associated with OHRQoL when controlling for confounding factors: patients in contract care had better OHRQoL than those in fee-for-service care.

  • 12.
    Mac Giolla Phadraig, Caoimhin
    et al.
    School of Dental Science Trinity College Dublin; Dublin Dental University Hospital Dublin Ireland.
    Healy, Olive
    Trinity College Dublin Lincoln Place Dublin 2 Ireland.
    Fisal, Aisyah Ahmad
    Faculty of Dentistry Universiti Malaya Kuala Lumpur Malaysia.
    Yarascavitch, Carilynne
    Faculty of Dentistry University of Toronto Toronto Ontario Canada.
    van Harten, Maria
    School of Dental Science Trinity College Dublin; Dublin Dental University Hospital Dublin Ireland.
    Nunn, June
    School of Dental Science Trinity College Dublin; Dublin Dental University Hospital Dublin Ireland.
    Newton, Tim
    King's College London London UK.
    Sturmey, Peter
    The Graduate Center and Queens College City University of New York New York USA.
    Asimakopoulou, Koula
    Oxford Brookes University Oxford UK.
    Daly, Blánaid
    School of Dental Science Trinity College Dublin; Dublin Dental University Hospital Dublin Ireland.
    Hosey, Marie Therese
    King's College London London UK.
    Kammer, Pedro Vitali
    Federal University of Santa Catarina Florianopolis Brazil.
    Dougall, Alison
    School of Dental Science Trinity College Dublin; Dublin Dental University Hospital Dublin Ireland.
    Geddis‐Regan, Andrew
    Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust Manchester UK.
    Pradhan, Archana
    School of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health The University of Sydney Surry Hills Australia.
    Setiawan, Arlette Suzy
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran Bandung Indonesia.
    Kerr, Bryan
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust London UK.
    Friedman, Clive S.
    Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry London Ontario Canada.
    Cornelius, Bryant W.
    The Cleveland Children's Surgery Center Cleveland Ohio USA.
    Stirling, Christopher
    Crisis Prevention Institute Milwaukee Wisconsin USA.
    Hamzah, Siti Zaleha
    Ministry of Health Kajang Hospital Kajang Malaysia.
    Decloux, Derek
    Mount Sinai Hospital Toronto Ontario Canada.
    Molina, Gustavo
    Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud Universidad Católica de Córdoba Cordoba Argentina.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Ayup, Hani
    Ministry of Health Bandar Seri Begawan Brunei Darussalam.
    Buchanan, Heather
    Medical School University of Nottingham Nottingham UK.
    Anjou, Helena
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education Jönköping Sweden.
    Maura, Isabel
    Hospital HM NENS Barcelona Spain.
    Bernal Fernandez, Ilidia Reyes
    Aspanaes ‐ Servicio de Atención Diurna Terapéutica Santiago de Compostela Spain.
    Limeres Posse, Jacobo
    Santiago de Compostela University Santiago de Compostela Spain.
    Hare, Jennifer
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust London UK.
    Francis, Jessica
    Faculty of Dentistry Universiti Malaya Kuala Lumpur Malaysia.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping and CHILD research group, School of Health and Welfare Jönköping University Jönköping Sweden.
    Rohani, Maryani Mohamed
    Faculty of Dentistry Universiti Malaya Kuala Lumpur Malaysia.
    Prabhu, Neeta
    The University of Sydney, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health AND Westmead Centre for Oral Health | Western Sydney Local Health District Surry Hills Australia.
    Ashley, Paul F.
    UCL Eastman London UK.
    Marques, Paula Faria
    Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Unidade Odontopediatria Universidade de Lisboa Lisboa Portugal.
    Chopra, Shalini
    Berkshire Community Dental Service Skimped Hill Health Centre Berkshire UK.
    Pani, Sharat Chandra
    Faculty of Dentistry University of British Columbia B.C. Children's Hospital Vancouver British Columbia Canada.
    Krämer, Susanne
    Facultad de Odontología Universidad de Chile Santiago Chile.
    Behaviour support in dentistry: A Delphi study to agree terminology in behaviour management2024Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Dental behaviour support (DBS) describes all specific techniques practiced to support patients in their experience of professional oral healthcare. DBS is roughly synonymous with behaviour management, which is an outdated concept. There is no agreed terminology to specify the techniques used to support patients who receive dental care. This lack of specificity may lead to imprecision in describing, understanding, teaching, evaluating and implementing behaviour support techniques in dentistry. Therefore, this e-Delphi study aimed to develop a list of agreed labels and descriptions of DBS techniques used in dentistry and sort them according to underlying principles of behaviour.

    Methods: Following a registered protocol, a modified e-Delphi study was applied over two rounds with a final consensus meeting. The threshold of consensus was set a priori at 75%. Agreed techniques were then categorized by four coders, according to behavioural learning theory, to sort techniques according to their mechanism of action.

    Results: The panel (n = 35) agreed on 42 DBS techniques from a total of 63 candidate labels and descriptions. Complete agreement was achieved regarding all labels and descriptions, while agreement was not achieved regarding distinctiveness for 17 techniques. In exploring underlying principles of learning, it became clear that multiple and differing principles may apply depending on the specific context and procedure in which the technique may be applied.

    Discussion: Experts agreed on what each DBS technique is, what label to use, and their description, but were less likely to agree on what distinguishes one technique from another. All techniques were describable but not comprehensively categorizable according to principles of learning. While objective consistency was not attained, greater clarity and consistency now exists. The resulting list of agreed terminology marks a significant foundation for future efforts towards understanding DBS techniques in research, education and clinical care.

  • 13. Norberg, Carina
    et al.
    Hallström-Stalin, Ulla
    Matsson, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Body mass index (BMI) and dental caries in 5-year-old children from southern Sweden2012Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 40, nr 4, s. 315-322Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present survey was to study the association between dental caries and body mass index (BMI) in Swedish preschool children (born in 1999). METHODS: A population-based and cross-sectional study design was used comprising all 920 5-year-old children in a defined area in and around the city of Lund. Anthropometric measures for the calculation of BMI were retrieved for each child from recordings at Child Health Care Centers (CHC). The occurrence of caries and fillings in the primary dentition, defined as deft (decayed, extracted, or filled primary teeth) and dt (decayed primary teeth), was collected from the children's dental records. RESULTS: The mean BMI was 16.1 (no differences between boys and girls). About 19.2% were overweight, of which 5.1% were obese. Overweight or obese children did not have higher deft or dt than others. However, children with low BMI (below -1 SD of national mean values for Swedish 5-year-olds) had statistically significantly higher deft and dt than children with normal BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Children with low BMI may be at risk of caries development. Low BMI may be associated with eating habits endangering dental health.

  • 14. Stenlund, Hans
    et al.
    Mejàre, Ingegerd
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Kallestål, Carina
    Caries incidence rates in Swedish adolescents and young adults with particular reference to adjacent approximal tooth surfaces: a methodological study2003Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 31, nr 5, s. 361-367Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to assess the dependence of the caries status of the adjacent approximal surface on the incidence of approximal caries. METHODS: At baseline, the material consisted of a cohort of 536 Swedish children. The individuals were followed through annual bitewing radiographs from the age of 11-13 to 21-22 years. A radiographic scoring system was used to assess the caries status of the surfaces: scores 0 and 1 = sound surface to score 4 = caries in the outer half of the dentine. A model was used to calculate the dependence of the caries status of adjacent approximal tooth surfaces. The unit of analysis was a pair of adjacent approximal surfaces and in all, 12 pairs of posterior approximal surfaces were analysed. RESULTS: The individual caries rates of the 24 posterior approximal surfaces ranged from 1.3 to 8.3 new caries lesions per 100 tooth surface-years. The caries rate of an approximal tooth surface depended on the caries status of the adjacent surface: a sound surface next to a sound surface had a relatively small risk of developing caries, while the risk increased 1.6-32.3 times if the adjacent surface was in a caries state as judged radiographically. The distal surface of the first molar developed caries more often than the mesial surface of the second molar. CONCLUSIONS: The caries rate of an approximal tooth surface was 1.6-32.3 times higher if the adjacent surface was in a caries state compared to when the latter was sound.

  • 15.
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Unell, Lennart
    Halling, Arne
    Axtelius, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Changes over 5 years in utilization of dental care by a Swedish age cohort2005Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 33, nr 1, s. 64-73Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal development of the utilization of dental care, in relation to socio-economic factors and also considering perceived oral health, attitudes to dental care, dental anxiety, care organisation and changes in the way that dental care is paid for. A conflict model was used as a theoretical framework. METHODS: In 1992, a mail questionnaire was sent to all 50-year-old persons in two counties in Sweden, Orebro and Ostergotland, as part of a cross-sectional study. This study group numbered 8888 persons. In 1997, the same population was sent a new questionnaire. There were 5363 persons who completed the questionnaire in both 1992 and 1997. Changes in utilization of dental care were analysed. RESULTS: An increase in personal expenditure for care was obvious, 42% paid more in 1997 compared with 1992. In the study, 7% had prolonged their time since most recent visit and 12% had less frequent visits. In regression models, education, occupation, place of residence, country of birth, marital status, gender, dental anxiety, having poor perceived oral health and poor general health were associated with utilization. Care organisation factors showed there was a greater probability of having higher utilization and higher cost of care when private practitioners provided the care. CONCLUSION: Small changes in the utilization of dental care occurred during this study time. Inequality in utilization existed and socio-economic factors affected utilization as well as health perception and dental anxiety. Changes in the cost of care did not affect utilization appreciably, probably because of a selected population with high price elasticity. Having a private care provider compared with one in the public system affected the probability of having higher utilization and higher cost for care.

  • 16.
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Unell, Lennart
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Halling, Arne
    Axtelius, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Perceived oral health: changes over 5 years in one Swedish age-cohort2003Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 31, nr 4, s. 292-299Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate if a change in the social gradients in perceived oral health occurred over a 5-year period, 1992-97, using a cohort population from two Swedish counties. Methods: In 1992, a cross-sectional mail questionnaire was sent to all 50-year-old persons in two counties in Sweden, Örebro and Östergotland, and altogether there were 8888 persons. In 1997, the same population was sent a new questionnaire. The cohort, comprising the same respondents from 1992 and 1997, was of 5363 persons. An index of perceived oral health was constructed out of three questionnaire variables: satisfaction with teeth, chewing ability and the number of remaining teeth. This index value was set as a dependent variable in a regression model. Reports of toothache were investigated in a separate logistic regression model. Results: There were obvious social gradients in the perceived oral health index both in 1992 and in 1997. Marital status, foreign birth, education and occupation were all substantially related to the perceived oral health. The change in perceived oral health was analyzed. Almost half of the cohort (47.4%) showed no change at all. Those with increased and those with decreased health were rather evenly distributed on both sides, with 22.0% with better health in 1997 and 30.6% with worse health. Gender and education were related to toothache experience. Conclusion: Changes have been moderate in the perceived oral health in this cohort, despite the rather drastic changes in the remuneration of dental care during this study time. On the other hand, this also means that the social differences remain, despite the official goals of increased equity.

  • 17. Åström, Anne N
    et al.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Nasir, Elwalid
    Ordell, Sven
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Unell, Lennart
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Use of dental services throughout middle and early old ages: a prospective cohort study2013Inngår i: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 41, nr 1, s. 30-39Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Focusing on a Swedish 1942 birth cohort, this study describes the trend of dental health care utilization between age 50 and 65 and identifies major determinants of dental visiting habits using Andersen's model as adapted for dentistry as a theoretical framework. METHOD: In 1992, a census of 50 year olds in two counties of Sweden was invited to participate in a longitudinal questionnaire survey. Of the total population of 8888 subjects, 6346 responded (71%). Of the 6346 subjects who completed the 1992 survey, 4143 (65%) completed postal follow ups in 1997, 2002 and 2007. RESULTS: 83.3% and 3.2% of the cohort remained stable with respect to use and nonuse of regular dental care. Cochran's Q test revealed that the proportions reporting regular use decreased from 93% at age 50-87% at age 65 (P < 0.001). Generalized estimated equations revealed the following covariates; gender (females), country of birth (native born), marital status (married), perceived quality of dental care (good perceptions), dental care utilization as a child, remaining teeth and perceived oral problems. The influence of the variable time, functioning as a measure of period/ageing, maintained a statistically significant relationship with regular utilization after adjusting for all covariates in the model. CONCLUSION: Regular use of dental health care services decreased slightly but statistically significantly from age 50 to 65 and was most prevalent in socio-economically advantaged groups, among those with remaining own teeth, subjects who perceived oral problems and reported high quality dental care. The results have implications for planning of elderly dental health care and required dental workforce in Sweden and countries with similar welfare systems.

1 - 17 of 17
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf