Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 38 of 38
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abdulraheem, Salem
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Paulsson, Liselotte
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Petrén, Sofia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sonesson, Mikael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Do fixed orthodontic appliances cause halitosis? A systematic review2019In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 72Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine: (I) the current evidence of the impact of fixed orthodontic appliances on the development of halitosis in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, and (II) the influence of different orthodontic bracket systems on halitosis. Material and methods: Three electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Library) were searched prior to March 15, 2018. The review was systematically conducted and reported according to the Cochrane Handbook and the PRISMA statement. Only Randomised Clinical Trials (RCTs) were considered. Selected full-text papers were independently assessed by four investigators and any disagreements were resolved by consensus. The Cochrane Handbook was used to grade the risk of bias and the quality of evidence was rated according to GRADE. Results: Out of 363 identified studies, three RCTs on halitosis and fixed orthodontic appliances met the inclusion criteria. The risk of bias in the three studies was rated as high and the quality of evidence was rated as very low. Conclusions/clinical implications: There is a lack of scientific evidence that subjects with fixed orthodontic appliances develop halitosis during treatment. Additional well-conducted RCTs with extended periods of assessment are needed as well as consensus concerning cut-off values for the diagnosis of halitosis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 2.
    Aherne, Olivia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. CR Competence, Naturvetarvägen 14, 223 62, Lund, Sweden.
    Ortiz, Roberto
    CR Competence, Naturvetarvägen 14, 223 62, Lund, Sweden.
    Fazli, Magnus M
    Costerton Biofilm Center, Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; SoftOx Solutions AS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Davies, Julia R
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Effects of stabilized hypochlorous acid on oral biofilm bacteria2022In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Caries and periodontitis are amongst the most prevalent diseases worldwide, leading to pain and loss of oral function for those affected. Prevention relies heavily on mechanical removal of dental plaque biofilms but for populations where this is not achievable, alternative plaque control methods are required. With concerns over undesirable side-effects and potential bacterial resistance due to the use of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), new antimicrobial substances for oral use are greatly needed. Here we have investigated the antimicrobial effect of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), stabilized with acetic acid (HAc), on oral biofilms and compared it to that of CHX. Possible adverse effects of stabilized HOCl on hydroxyapatite surfaces were also examined.

    METHODS: Single- and mixed-species biofilms of six common oral bacteria (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Veillonella parvula, Parvimonas micra and Porphyromonas gingivalis) within a flow-cell model were exposed to HOCl stabilized with 0.14% or 2% HAc, pH 4.6, as well as HOCl or HAc alone. Biofilm viability was assessed in situ using confocal laser scanning microscopy following LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ staining. In-situ quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study erosion of hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces by stabilized HOCl.

    RESULTS: Low concentrations of HOCl (5 ppm), stabilized with 0.14% or 2% HAc, significantly reduced viability in multi-species biofilms representing supra- and sub-gingival oral communities, after 5 min, without causing erosion of HA surfaces. No equivalent antimicrobial effect was seen for CHX. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria showed no significant differential suceptibility to stabilized HOCl.

    CONCLUSIONS: At low concentrations and with exposure times which could be achieved through oral rinsing, HOCl stabilized with HAc had a robust antimicrobial activity on oral biofilms, without causing erosion of HA surfaces or affecting viability of oral keratinocytes. This substance thus appears to offer potential for prevention and/or treatment of oral biofilm-mediated diseases.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Augdal, Thomas A.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Sect Paediat Radiol, Postboks 100, N-9038 Tromso, Norway.;UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway..
    Angenete, Oskar W.
    St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Inst Circulat & Med Imaging, Trondheim, Norway..
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Sall, Mats
    St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Trondheim, Norway..
    Fischer, Johannes M.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Nordal, Ellen
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway.;Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Paediat, Tromso, Norway..
    Rosendahl, Karen
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Sect Paediat Radiol, Postboks 100, N-9038 Tromso, Norway.;UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway..
    Cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of TMJ deformity in children with JIA: repeatability of a novel scoring system2023In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, p. 1-15, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is frequently involved in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Diagnostic imaging is necessary to correctly diagnose and evaluate TMJ involvement, however, hitherto little has been published on the accuracy of the applied scoring systems and measurements. The present study aims to investigate the precision of 20 imaging features and five measurements based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods Imaging and clinical data from 84 participants in the Norwegian study on juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the NorJIA study, were collected. Altogether 20 imaging features and five measurements were evaluated indepen-dently by three experienced radiologists for intra-and interobserver agreement. Agreement of categorical variables was assessed by Fleiss', Cohen's simple or weighted Kappa as appropriate. Agreement of continuous variables was assessed with 95% limits of agreement as advised by Bland and Altman. Results "Overall impression of TMJ deformity" showed almost perfect intraobserver agreement with a kappa coefficient of 0.81 (95% CI 0.69-0.92), and substantial interobserver agreement (Fleiss' kappa 0.70 (0.61-0.78)). Moreover, both "flattening" and "irregularities" of the eminence/fossa and condyle performed well, with intra-and interobserver agreements of 0.66-0.82 and 0.55-0.76, respectively. "Reduced condylar volume" and "continuity" of the fossa/eminence had moderate intra-and interobserver Kappa values, whereas continuity of the condyle had Kappa values above 0.55. Measurements of distances and angles had limits of agreement of more than 15% of the sample mean. Conclusions We propose a CBCT-based scoring system of nine precise imaging features suggestive of TMJ deformity in JIA. Their clinical validity must be tested.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Bazsefidpay, Nikoo
    et al.
    Head-neck and plastic surgery clinic, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Fredrik
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Orofacial Diagnostics and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Khalil, Dalia
    Department of Dentistry, King Fahad General Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Larsson Wexell, Cecilia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hultin, Margareta
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Alfred Nobels allé 8, 141 04, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lund, Bodil
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Orofacial Diagnostics and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Medical Unit of Plastic Surgery and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Jaw Orthopedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Antibiotic prescription in bone augmentation and dental implant procedures: a multi-center study2023In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to antibiotic recommendations and safety aspects of restrictive use are important components when combating antibiotic resistance. The primary aim of this study was to assess the impact of national guidelines on antibiotic prescriptions for bone augmentation procedures among dentists working at three specialized clinics. The secondary aim was to assess the occurrence of postoperative infections.

    METHODS: Medical charts of 400 patients treated with bone augmentation were reviewed: 200 in the years 2010-2011 and 200 in 2014-2015. The Swedish national recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis were published in 2012.

    RESULTS: There was a wide variation in antibiotic regiments prescribed throughout the study. The number of patients treated with antibiotic prophylaxis in a single dose of 2 g amoxicillin, and treated as advocated in the national recommendations, was low and decreasing between the two time periods from 25% (n = 50/200) in 2010-2011 to 18.5% (n = 37/200) in 2014-2015. The number of patients not given any antibiotics either as a prophylactic single dose or during the postoperative phase increased (P < 0.001). The administration of a 3-7-days antibiotic prescription increased significantly from 25.5% in 2010-2011 to 35% in 2014-2015. The postoperative infection rates (4.5% and 6.5%) were without difference between the studied periods. Smoking and omitted antibiotic prophylaxis significantly increased the risk of postoperative infection. Logistic regression analyses showed that patient male gender and suffering from a disease were predictive factors for the clinician to adhere to the guidelines.

    CONCLUSIONS: After introduction of national recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis before bone augmentation procedures, the patient group receiving a single preoperative dose decreased while the group not given antibiotic prophylaxis increased. There was no difference in occurrence of postoperative infections between the two time periods. The results indicate a need for educational efforts and strategies for implementation of antibiotic prudence and awareness among surgeons performing bone augmentation procedures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Brogårdh-Roth, Susanne
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Månsson, Johanna
    Ridell, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Alward, Lubna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hellén-Halme, Kristina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Five years' follow-up of dental fear and anxiety, experience of dental care and oral health behaviour in Swedish preterm and full-term adolescents2017In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, article id 145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is rising concern about how preterm birth affects long-term health later in life. The various effects that preterm birth have on developmental outcomes, cognitive profiles and medical health may also affect levels of cooperation in the dental care situation in addition to general oral health and other oral health-related habits. Oral health is an integral part of one's general health and well-being; however, less is known about how prematurity affects oral health and other related areas such as dental care, and including dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in individuals during adolescence and adulthood. This is considered of special interest to study, as preterm children during the preschool and school period were reported to have behavioural problems during dental treatments and less than favourable oral hygiene. METHODS: A questionnaire was used of self-report design and structured into behavioural aspects relating to dental treatment, oral health-related factors, and medical health. This questionnaire at 17-19 years of age was a follow-up from 12 to 14 years of age and considered a predictor for planning future dental care for this group of patients. The 145 participating adolescents were all preterm, born between 23 and 32 weeks of gestation and 140 full-term controls, born ≥37 weeks of gestation. RESULTS: Dental fear and anxiety, oral health behaviour, and intake of sweets and sugary drinks of 17-19-year old adolescents born preterm was comparable to that of the full-term control group. Medical health problems as well as the intake of sweets and sugary drinks increased from the time of early adolescence to late adolescence in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Preterm as well as full-term adolescents between 17 and 19 years of age are satisfied with their dental care and display low prevalence of dental fear and anxiety (DFA). The findings in this study indicate that adolescents born very preterm and extremely preterm are well prepared for transition to dental care in adult life with expectations of being able to take responsibility for their oral health. KEYWORDS: Adolescent; Born preterm; Dental care; Oral health behaviour

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 6.
    Brogårdh-Roth, Susanne
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Paulsson, Liselotte
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Folktandvården Östergötland.
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Do preterm-born adolescents have a poorer oral health-related quality of life?2021In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) over a period of five years using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questionnaire in a population of Swedish adolescents born preterm and full term.

    METHODS: In a longitudinal study of adolescents aged 12-14 and 17-19, changes over time in OHRQoL were measured by using OHIP-14. The OHIP-14 score, self-reported chronic illness, temporomandibular disorder (TMD pain) and subjective orthodontic treatment need were compared between 98 extremely and very preterm born (< 32 gestational week) and 93 full-term controls (≥ 37 gestational week) at two ages. The chi-square test was used for comparisons within the extremely-, very-, and full-term control groups, and to contrast the differences of mean scores of OHIP-14, the ANOVA test was used for comparisons within the study groups of extremely preterm, very preterm and full term-born adolescents.

    RESULTS: All adolescents reported a good self-perceived OHRQoL. No significant differences in the comparisons of the total mean scores were revealed between the groups, between gender or in domain-specific scores over the 5-year period. Very preterm adolescents with reported chronic illness at 12-14 years of age showed significantly higher mean scores of OHIP-14 compared with those without chronic illness (p = 0.015). At age 17-19, significantly higher mean scores of OHIP-14 were reported by very preterm adolescents with TMD pain compared to those without TMD pain (p = 0.024). Significantly higher mean scores of OHIP-14 were found among the extremely preterm (p = 0.011) and very preterm born adolescents (p = 0.031) with a subjective need of orthodontic treatment compared with those without orthodontic treatment need.

    CONCLUSIONS: Poor OHRQoL measured with OHIP-14 in very preterm adolescents aged 12-14 was related to chronic illness and aged 17-19 to TMD pain. In addition, extremely and very preterm-born adolescents with subjective orthodontic treatment need at 17-19 years of age also reported poor OHRQoL. To improve the dentist-patient relationship and achieve more successful treatment results, it is important for dental clinicians to understand the impact that chronic illness, TMD pain and orthodontic treatment need has on OHRQoL in preterm-born adolescents.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Davies, Julia R
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kad, Trupti
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Neilands, Jessica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kinnby, B
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Prgomet, Zdenka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden..
    Khalaf, Hazem
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden..
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Polymicrobial synergy stimulates Porphyromonas gingivalis survival and gingipain expression in a multi-species subgingival community.2021In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dysbiosis in subgingival microbial communities, resulting from increased inflammatory transudate from the gingival tissues, is an important factor in initiation and development of periodontitis. Dysbiotic communities are characterized by increased numbers of bacteria that exploit the serum-like transudate for nutrients, giving rise to a proteolytic community phenotype. Here we investigate the contribution of interactions between members of a sub-gingival community to survival and development of virulence in a serum environment-modelling that in the subgingival pocket.

    METHODS: Growth and proteolytic activity of three Porphyromonas gingivalis strains in nutrient broth or a serum environment were assessed using A600 and a fluorescent protease substrate, respectively. Adherence of P. gingivalis strains to serum-coated surfaces was studied with confocal microscopy and 2D-gel electrophoresis of bacterial supernatants used to investigate extracellular proteins. A model multi-species sub-gingival community containing Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus constellatus, Parvimonas micra with wild type or isogenic mutants of P. gingivalis was then created and growth and proteolytic activity in serum assessed as above. Community composition over time was monitored using culture techniques and qPCR.

    RESULTS: The P. gingivalis strains showed different growth rates in nutrient broth related to the level of proteolytic activity (largely gingipains) in the cultures. Despite being able to adhere to serum-coated surfaces, none of the strains was able to grow alone in a serum environment. Together in the subgingival consortium however, all the included species were able to grow in the serum environment and the community adopted a proteolytic phenotype. Inclusion of P. gingivalis strains lacking gingipains in the consortium revealed that community growth was facilitated by Rgp gingipain from P. gingivalis.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the multi-species consortium, growth was facilitated by the wild-type and Rgp-expressing strains of P. gingivalis, suggesting that Rgp is involved in delivery of nutrients to the whole community through degradation of complex protein substrates in serum. Whereas they are constitutively expressed by P. gingivalis in nutrient broth, gingipain expression in the model periodontal pocket environment (serum) appeared to be orchestrated through signaling to P. gingivalis from other members of the community, a phenomenon which then promoted growth of the whole community.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Diogo Löfgren, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wickström, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sonesson, Mikael
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Tapia Lagunas, Pablo
    Malmö högskola, Library and IT Services (BIT).
    Christersson, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    A systematic review of methods to diagnose oral dryness and salivary gland function2012In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 12, no 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The most advocated clinical method for diagnosing salivary dysfunction is to quantitate unstimulated and stimulated whole saliva (sialometry). Since there is an expected and wide variation in salivary flow rates among individuals, the assessment of dysfunction can be difficult. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the quality of the evidence for the efficacy of diagnostic methods used to identify oral dryness. Methods A literature search, with specific indexing terms and a hand search, was conducted for publications that described a method to diagnose oral dryness. The electronic databases of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were used as data sources. Four reviewers selected publications on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted from the selected publications using a protocol. Original studies were interpreted with the aid of Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) tool. Results The database searches resulted in 224 titles and abstracts. Of these abstracts, 80 publications were judged to meet the inclusion criteria and read in full. A total of 18 original studies were judged relevant and interpreted for this review. In all studies, the results of the test method were compared to those of a reference method. Based on the interpretation (with the aid of the QUADAS tool) it can be reported that the patient selection criteria were not clearly described and the test or reference methods were not described in sufficient detail for it to be reproduced. None of the included studies reported information on uninterpretable/intermediate results nor data on observer or instrument variation. Seven of the studies presented their results as a percentage of correct diagnoses. Conclusions The evidence for the efficacy of clinical methods to assess oral dryness is sparse and it can be stated that improved standards for the reporting of diagnostic accuracy are needed in order to assure the methodological quality of studies. There is need for effective diagnostic criteria and functional tests in order to detect those individuals with oral dryness who may require oral treatment, such as alleviation of discomfort and/or prevention of diseases.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 9.
    Dorkhan, Marjan
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Davies, Julia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Salivary pellicles on titanium and their effect on metabolic activity in Streptococcus oralis2013In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 13, article id 32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Titanium implants in the oral cavity are covered with a saliva-derived pellicle to which early colonizing microorganisms such as Streptococcus oralis can bind. The protein profiles of salivary pellicles on titanium have not been well characterized and the proteins of importance for binding are thus unknown. Biofilm bacteria exhibit different phenotypes from their planktonic counterparts and contact with salivary proteins may be one factor contributing to the induction of changes in physiology. We have characterized salivary pellicles from titanium surfaces and investigated how contact with uncoated and saliva-coated titanium surfaces affects metabolic activity in adherent cells of S. oralis. METHODS: Salivary pellicles on smooth titanium surfaces were desorbed and these, as well as purified human saliva, were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy. A parallel plate flow-cell model was used to study binding of a fresh isolate of S. oralis to uncoated and saliva-coated titanium surfaces. Metabolic activity was assessed using the BacLight CTC Vitality Kit and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Experiments were carried out in triplicate and the results analyzed using Student's t-test or ANOVA. RESULTS: Secretory IgA, α-amylase and cystatins were identified as dominant proteins in the salivary pellicles. Selective adsorption of proteins was demonstrated by the enrichment of prolactin-inducible protein and absence of zinc-α₂-glycoprotein relative to saliva. Adherence of S. oralis to titanium led to an up-regulation of metabolic activity in the population after 2 hours. In the presence of a salivary pellicle, this effect was enhanced and sustained over the following 22 hour period. CONCLUSIONS: We have shown that adherence to smooth titanium surfaces under flow causes an up-regulation of metabolic activity in the early oral colonizer S. oralis, most likely as part of an adaptation to the biofilm mode of life. The effect was enhanced by a salivary pellicle containing sIgA, α-amylase, cystatins and prolactin-inducible protein which was, for the first time, identified as an abundant component of salivary pellicles on titanium. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the effect of surface contact on metabolic activity as well as to identify the salivary proteins responsible for enhancing the effect.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 10.
    Dorkhan, Marjan
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Yucel-Lindberg, Tulay
    Hall, Jan
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Davies, Julia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Adherence of human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to nano-structured titanium surfaces2014In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 14, no 75, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A key element for long-term success of dental implants is integration of the implant surface with the surrounding host tissues. Modification of titanium implant surfaces can enhance osteoblast activity but their effects on soft-tissue cells are unclear. Adherence of human keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to control commercially pure titanium (CpTi) and two surfaces prepared by anodic oxidation was therefore investigated. Since implant abutments are exposed to a bacteria-rich environment in vivo, the effect of oral bacteria on keratinocyte adhesion was also evaluated. METHODS: The surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of adhered cells and binding strength, as well as vitality of fibroblasts and keratinocytes were evaluated using confocal scanning laser microscopy after staining with Live/Dead Baclight. To evaluate the effect of bacteria on adherence and vitality, keratinocytes were co-cultured with a four-species streptococcal consortium. RESULTS: SEM analysis showed the two anodically oxidized surfaces to be nano-structured with differing degrees of pore-density. Over 24 hours, both fibroblasts and keratinocytes adhered well to the nano-structured surfaces, although to a somewhat lesser degree than to CpTi (range 42-89% of the levels on CpTi). The strength of keratinocyte adhesion was greater than that of the fibroblasts but no differences in adhesion strength could be observed between the two nano-structured surfaces and the CpTi. The consortium of commensal streptococci markedly reduced keratinocyte adherence on all the surfaces as well as compromising membrane integrity of the adhered cells. CONCLUSION: Both the vitality and level of adherence of soft-tissue cells to the nano-structured surfaces was similar to that on CpTi. Co-culture with streptococci reduced the number of keratinocytes on all the surfaces to approximately the same level and caused cell damage, suggesting that commensal bacteria could affect adherence of soft-tissue cells to abutment surfaces in vivo.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 11. Duane, Brett
    et al.
    Borglin, Linnea
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Pekarski, Stephanie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Saget, Sophie
    Duncan, Henry Fergus
    Environmental sustainability in endodontics. A life cycle assessment (LCA) of a root canal treatment procedure2020In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To analyse via life cycle analysis (LCA) the global resource use and environmental output of the endodontic procedure.

    METHODOLOGY: An LCA was conducted to measure the life cycle of a standard/routine two-visit RCT. The LCA was conducted according to the International Organization of Standardization guidelines; ISO 14040:2006. All clinical elements of an endodontic treatment (RCT) were input into OpenLCA software using process and flows from the ecoinvent database. Travel to and from the dental clinic was not included. Environmental outputs included abiotic depletion, acidification, freshwater ecotoxicity/eutrophication, human toxicity, cancer/non cancer effects, ionizing radiation, global warming, marine eutrophication, ozone depletion, photochemical ozone formation and terrestrial eutrophication.

    RESULTS: An RCT procedure contributes 4.9 kg of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 eq) emissions. This is the equivalent of a 30 km drive in a small car. The main 5 contributors were dental clothing followed by surface disinfection (isopropanol), disposable bib (paper and plastic), single-use stainless steel instruments and electricity use. Although this LCA has illustrated the effect endodontic treatment has on the environment, there are a number of limitations that may influence the validity of the results.

    CONCLUSIONS: The endodontic team need to consider how they can reduce the environmental burden of endodontic care. One immediate area of focus might be to consider alternatives to isopropyl alcohol, and look at paper, single use instrument and electricity use. Longer term, research into environmentally-friendly medicaments should continue to investigate the replacement of current cytotoxic gold standards with possible natural alternatives. Minimally invasive regenerative endodontics techniques designed to stimulate repair or regeneration of damaged pulp tissue may also be one way of improving the environmental impact of an RCT.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Feng, Xin
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Chen, Yicheng
    School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, People’s Republic of China.
    Hellén-Halme, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Cai, Weihua
    School of Energy and Power Engineering, Northeast Electric Power University, People’s Republic of China.
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
    The effect of rapid maxillary expansion on the upper airway's aerodynamic characteristics2021In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe effect of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on the upper airway (UA) has been studied earlier but without a consistent conclusion. This study aims to evaluate the outcome of RME on the UA function in terms of aerodynamic characteristics by applying a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation.MethodsThis retrospective cohort study consists of seventeen cases with two consecutive CBCT scans obtained before (T0) and after (T1) RME. Patients were divided into two groups with respect to patency of the nasopharyngeal airway as expressed in the adenoidal nasopharyngeal ratio (AN): group 1 was comprised of patients with an AN ratio<0.6 and group 2 encompassing those with an AN ratio<greater than or equal to>0.6. CFD simulation at inspiration and expiration were performed based on the three-dimensional (3D) models of the UA segmented from the CBCT images. The aerodynamic characteristics in terms of pressure drop (Delta P), maximum midsagittal velocity (V-ms), and maximum wall shear stress (P-ws) were compared by paired t-test and Wilcoxon test according to the normality test at T0 and T1.ResultsThe aerodynamic characteristics in UA revealed no statistically significant difference after RME. The maximum V-ms (m/s) decreased from 2.79 to 2.28 at expiration after RME (P=0.057).ConclusionThe aerodynamic characteristics were not significantly changed after RME. Further CFD studies with more cases are warranted.

  • 13.
    Fischer, J.
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Fac Med, Dept Clin Dent, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Augdal, T. A.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Radiol, Tromso, Norway..
    Angenete, O.
    St Olav Hosp HF, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Circulat & Med Imaging, Fac Med, Trondheim, Norway..
    Gil, E. G.
    Univ Bergen, Fac Med, Dept Clin Dent, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Skeie, M. S.
    Univ Bergen, Fac Med, Dept Clin Dent, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.;Mid Norway TkMidt, Ctr Oral Hlth Serv & Res, Trondheim, Norway..
    Åstrøm, A. N.
    Univ Bergen, Fac Med, Dept Clin Dent, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.;Competence Ctr Western Norway TkVest, Publ Dent Serv, Bergen, Norway..
    Tylleskär, K.
    Haukeland Hosp, Paediat Clin, Bergen, Norway..
    Rosendahl, K.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Radiol, Tromso, Norway.;UiT Arctic Univ North Norway, Tromso, Norway..
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Bergen, Fac Med, Dept Clin Dent, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Rosén, A.
    Univ Bergen, Fac Med, Dept Clin Dent, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Bergen, Norway..
    In children and adolescents with temporomandibular disorder assembled with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-no association were found between pain and TMJ deformities using CBCT2021In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may suffer from temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Due to this, imaging diagnosis is crucial in JIA with non-symptomatic TM joint (TMJ) involvement. The aim of the study was to examine the association between clinical TMD signs/symptoms and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings of TMJ structural deformities in children and adolescents with JIA. Methods This cross-sectional study is part of a longitudinal prospective multi-centre study performed from 2015-2020, including 228 children and adolescents aged 4-16 years diagnosed with JIA, according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR). For this sub-study, we included the Bergen cohort of 72 patients (32 female, median age 13.1 years, median duration of JIA 4.5 years). Clinical TMD signs/symptoms were registered as pain on palpation, pain on jaw movement, and combined pain of those two. The severity of TMJ deformity was classified as sound (no deformity), mild, or moderate/severe according to the radiographic findings of CBCT. Results Of 72 patients, 21 (29.2%) had pain on palpation at and around the lateral pole, while 41 (56.9%) had TMJ pain upon jaw movement and 26 (36.1%) had pain from both. Of 141 TMJs, 18.4% had mild and 14.2% had moderate/severe structural deformities visible on CBCT. CBCT findings were not significantly associated with either the pain on palpation or the pain on jaw movement. A significant difference was found between structural deformities in CBCT and the combined pain outcome (pain at both palpation and movement) for both TMJs for the persistent oligoarticular subtype (p = 0.031). Conclusions There was no association between painful TMD and CBCT imaging features of the TMJ in patients with JIA, but the oligoarticular subtype of JIA, there was a significant difference associated with TMJ pain and structural CBCT deformities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14. Fischer, J.
    et al.
    Skeie, M. S.
    Rosendahl, K.
    Tylleskar, K.
    Lie, S.
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gil, E. Grut
    Cetrelli, L.
    Halbig, J.
    von Wangenheim Marti, L.
    Rygg, M.
    Frid, P.
    Stoustrup, P.
    Rosen, A.
    Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a Norwegian cross-sectional multicentre study2020In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may suffer pain from temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Still, routines for the assessment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in health and dental care are lacking. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of TMD in children and adolescents with JIA compared to their healthy peers and to investigate potential associations between JIA and TMD. Methods This comparative cross-sectional study is part of a longitudinal multicentre study performed during 2015-2020, including 228 children and adolescents aged 4-16 years with a diagnosis of JIA according to the ILAR criteria. This particular substudy draws on a subset of data from the first study visit, including assessments of TMD as part of a broader oral health examination. Children and adolescents with JIA were matched with healthy controls according to gender, age, and centre site. Five calibrated examiners performed the clinical oral examinations according to a standardised protocol, including shortened versions of the diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and the TMJaw Recommendations for Clinical TMJ Assessment in Patients Diagnosed with JIA. Symptoms were recorded and followed by a clinical examination assessing the masticatory muscles and TMJs. Results In our cohort of 221 participants with JIA and 221 healthy controls, 88 (39.8%) participants with JIA and 25 (11.3%) healthy controls presented with TMD based on symptoms and clinical signs. Painful TMD during the last 30 days was reported in 59 (26.7%) participants with JIA vs. 10 (5.0%) of the healthy controls (p < 0.001). Vertical unassisted jaw movement was lower in participants with JIA than in controls, with means of 46.2 mm vs. 49.0 mm, respectively (p < 0.001). Among participants with JIA, a higher proportion of those using synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic-drugs and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic-drugs presented with painful masticatory muscles and TMJs at palpation. Conclusion Symptoms and clinical signs of TMD were seen in approximately half of the JIA patients compared to about one fourth of their healthy peers. Painful palpation to masticatory muscles and decreased vertical unassisted jaw movement were more frequent in participants with JIA than among healthy controls and should be part of both medical and dental routine examinations in patients with JIA.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Fisic, Amela
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Aras, Hulya Cevik
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oral Med & Pathol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Specialist Clin Oral Med, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Publ Dent Care, Publ Dent Serv, Vastra Gotaland, Sweden..
    Almhoejd, Ulrica
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Almståhl, Annica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oral Microbiol & Immunol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dental care professionals' awareness of oral dryness and its clinical management: a questionnaire-based study2024In: BMC Oral Health, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the high prevalence of oral dryness and awareness of its complications, there is limited research on the clinical management of patients with oral dryness in general dental care.

    Purpose: To (1) describe and compare awareness among dental care professionals regarding saliva functions, potential causes and complications of oral dryness, and patient management (2) Investigate if the length of professional experience influences these aspects.

    Methods: A digital self-administrated survey was sent to 2668 dental care professionals working in the general dental care, Public Dental Service, in Sweden. Twelve dental care professionals reviewed the questionnaire prior to its distribution. The questionnaire comprised 32 questions about patient management, awareness of saliva functions, causes and complications of oral dryness, and self-assessment queries.

    Results: The response rate was 18.6% (241 dentists and 257 dental hygienists). Older adults (65+) were asked more often about dry mouth (93.0%) compared to those aged 18-23 years (50.0%) and those under 18 years (24.9%). Dental hygienists encountered individuals with oral dryness more frequently (61.1%) than dentists (48.5%) (p < 0.01), and more often asked individuals in the age groups 18-23 years (p = 0.003), 24-40 years (p = 0.045), and 41-65 years (p = 0.031) about dry mouth. A higher proportion of dental hygienists (88.3%) than dentists (51.0%) had measured salivary secretion rate, (p < 0.001) and more often suggested preventive dental care 3-4 times a year, (42.5% vs. 30.5%) (p < 0.007). Dentists had a higher awareness of saliva functions, while dental hygienists had a higher awareness about causes and complications of oral dryness. Higher proportions of dentists and dental hygienists with over 10 years of professional experience had measured salivary secretion rate (69.1% vs. 95.7%) compared to their counterparts with less than 10 years of professional experience (35.9% vs. 79.5%) (p < 0.001 for both).

    Conclusion: Compared to dentists, dental hygienists were more attentive to patients with oral dryness as they encountered these individuals more often, asked more age-groups, suggested frequent preventive measures, and had higher awareness of the causes and complications of oral dryness. Length of professional experience could improve both the management of patients with oral dryness and awareness of its causes, particularly for dental hygienists.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16. Flink, Håkan
    et al.
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Patient-reported negative experiences related to caries and its treatment among Swedish adult patients2017In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has been suggested that dental caries should be regarded as a chronic disease as many individuals repeatedly develop new caries lesions. How this is perceived by caries active patients is unclear. The aim of this study was to measure patient-reported attitudes and negative experiences related to caries and dental treatment. Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to 134 caries active (CA) and 40 caries inactive (CI) adult patients treated at a Swedish public dental service clinic. The questionnaire included items regarding patient-reported oral health; attitudes towards caries and efforts to prevent them; and negative experiences related to caries and dental treatment. Questionnaire data were supplemented with data on caries and caries prophylaxis from patients' dental records. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on items related to patients' perceptions of problems to see whether scales could be created. Experiences, perceptions and dental records of CA and CI patients were compared. Results: The overall response rate was 69%. Dental records confirmed that CA patients had significantly more decayed teeth per year and a longer period of caries-active time than CI patients. Factor analysis resulted in 3 distinct scales measuring problems related to caries; 1) caries-related information; 2) negative experiences; and 3) negative treatment/staff attitudes. A fourth scale measuring perceived problems related to caries was also created. The CA group reported significantly more problems related to caries and dental treatment, received significantly more caries-related information, and reported significantly more negative treatment experiences compared to CI patients. Conclusions: Caries prophylaxis methods need to be improved in order to better meet the needs of caries active patients and to create a more positive experience with dental care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 17. Fröjd, Victoria
    et al.
    Linderbäck, Paula
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Chávez de Paz, Luis
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Davies, Julia R
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Effect of nanoporous TiO2 coating and anodized Ca2+ modification of titanium surfaces on early microbial biofilm formation2011In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The soft tissue around dental implants forms a barrier between the oral environment and the peri-implant bone and a crucial factor for long-term success of therapy is development of a good abutment/soft-tissue seal. Sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2 coatings have been shown to enhance soft-tissue attachment but their effect on adhesion and biofilm formation by oral bacteria is unknown. METHODS: We have investigated how the properties of surfaces that may be used on abutments: turned titanium, sol-gel nanoporous TiO2 coated surfaces and anodized Ca2+ modified surfaces, affect biofilm formation by two early colonizers of the oral cavity: Streptococcus sanguinis and Actinomyces naeslundii. The bacteria were detected using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization together with confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Interferometry and atomic force microscopy revealed all the surfaces to be smooth (Sa≤0.22 μm). Incubation with a consortium of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii showed no differences in adhesion between the surfaces over 2 hours. After 14 hours, the level of biofilm growth was low and again, no differences between the surfaces were seen. The presence of saliva increased the biofilm biovolume of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii ten-fold compared to when saliva was absent and this was due to increased adhesion rather than biofilm growth. CONCLUSIONS: Nano-topographical modification of smooth titanium surfaces had no effect on adhesion or early biofilm formation by S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii as compared to turned surfaces or those treated with anodic oxidation in the presence of Ca2+. The presence of saliva led to a significantly greater biofilm biovolume but no significant differences were seen between the test surfaces. These data thus suggest that modification with sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2, which has been shown to improve osseointegration and soft-tissue healing in vivo, does not cause greater biofilm formation by the two oral commensal species tested than the other surfaces.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 18.
    Gil, Elisabeth G.
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway..
    Skeie, Marit S.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway.;Ctr Oral Hlth Serv & Res, TkMidt, Trondheim, Norway..
    Halbig, Josefine
    Publ Dent Hlth Competence Ctr Northern Norway TkN, Tromso, Norway.;Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway..
    Jonsson, Birgitta
    Publ Dent Hlth Competence Ctr Northern Norway TkN, Tromso, Norway.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Dept Periodontol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lie, Stein Atle
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway..
    Rygg, Marite
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway.;St Olays Hosp, Dept Pediat, Trondheim, Norway..
    Fischer, Johannes
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway..
    Rosen, Annika
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Bergen, Norway..
    Bletsa, Athanasia
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway.;Oral Hlth Ctr Expertise Western Norway Vestland, Bergen, Norway..
    Luukko, Keijo
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway..
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway..
    Frid, Paula
    Publ Dent Hlth Competence Ctr Northern Norway TkN, Tromso, Norway.;Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway.;Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Div Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Tromso, Norway..
    Cetrelli, Lena
    Ctr Oral Hlth Serv & Res, TkMidt, Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway..
    Tylleskar, Karin
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Pediat, Bergen, Norway..
    Rosendahl, Karen
    Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway.;Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Radiol, Tromso, Norway..
    Astrom, Anne N.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Bergen, Norway..
    Oral health-related quality of life in 4-16-year-olds with and without juvenile idiopathic arthritis2022In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Few studies have investigated oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in young individuals with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Aims were to investigate whether OHRQoL differs between children and adolescents with JIA compared to controls without JIA, while adjusting for socio-demographic-, behavioral- and oral health-related covariates. Furthermore, to explore whether socio-behavioral and oral health-related covariates of OHRQoL vary according to group affiliation and finally, specifically for individuals with JIA, to investigate whether disease-specific features associate with OHRQoL. We hypothesized that participants with JIA have poorer OHRQoL compared to participants without JIA. Methods In this comparative cross-sectional study participants with JIA (n = 224) were matched to controls without JIA (n = 224). OHRQoL was assessed according to Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) (4-11-years-olds) and the child version of Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (Child-OIDP) (12-16-years-olds). JIA-specific characteristics were assessed by pediatric rheumatologists and socio-demographic, behavioral and self-reported oral health information collected by questionnaires. Index teeth were examined for caries by calibrated dentists. Multiple variable analyses were performed using logistic regression, reporting odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Two-way interactions were tested between group affiliation and the socio-behavioral- and oral health-related variables on the respective outcome variables. Results In total, 96 participants with JIA and 98 controls were evaluated according to ECOHIS, corresponding numbers for Child-OIDP was 125 and 124. Group affiliation was not associated with impaired ECOHIS or Child-OIDP in adjusted analyses (OR = 1.95, 95% CI 0.94-4.04 and OR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.46-2.17, respectively). Female adolescents with JIA were more likely than males to report oral impacts according to Child-OIDP. Continued activity or flare was found to adversely affect Child-OIDP, also self-reported outcome measures in JIA associated with Child-OIDP. Conclusions This study did not provide consistent evidence to confirm the hypothesis that children and adolescents with JIA are more likely to have impaired OHRQoL compared to their peers without JIA. However, female adolescents with JIA were more likely than males to report impacts on OHRQoL. Furthermore, within the JIA group, adolescents with continued disease activity, flare or reporting pain, physical disability, had higher risk than their counterparts of impaired OHRQoL.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Gil, Elisabeth G.
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Åstrøm, Anne N.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Lie, Stein Atle
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Rygg, Marite
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway.;St Olavs Hosp, Dept Pediat, Trondheim, Norway..
    Fischer, Johannes
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Rosén, Annika
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Bergen, Norway..
    Bletsa, Athanasia
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.;Oral Hlth Ctr Expertise Western Norway Vestland, Bergen, Norway..
    Luukko, Keijo
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.
    Halbig, Josefine
    Publ Dent Hlth Competence Ctr Northern Norway TkN, Tromso, Norway.;Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Dent, Tromso, Norway..
    Frid, Paula
    Publ Dent Hlth Competence Ctr Northern Norway TkN, Tromso, Norway.;Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Dent, Tromso, Norway.;Univ Hosp North Norway, Div Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Tromso, Norway..
    Cetrelli, Lena
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway.;Ctr Oral Hlth Serv & Res TKMidt, Trondheim, Norway..
    Tylleskär, Karin
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Pediat, Bergen, Norway..
    Rosendahl, Karen
    Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Dent, Tromso, Norway.;Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Radiol, Tromso, Norway..
    Skeie, Marit S.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Fac Med, Arstadveien 19, N-5009 Bergen, Norway..
    Dental caries in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and controls: a multilevel analysis2021In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Optimal utilization of dental caries data is crucial in epidemiological research of individuals with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aims were to: explore whether caries is more prevalent among children and adolescents with JIA compared to controls; examine presence of caries according to JIA group, socio-behavioral and intraoral characteristics, and the extent to which surface-specific caries varies between and within individuals; assess whether surface-specific caries varies according to JIA group and dentition; and investigate whether disease-specific clinical features of JIA are associated with presence of caries. Methods In this comparative cross-sectional study, calibrated dentists examined index teeth (primary 2. molars, 1. permanent molars) of 4-16-year-olds with JIA (n = 219) and matched controls (n = 224), using a detailed caries diagnosis system (including enamel caries). JIA-specific characteristics were assessed by pediatric rheumatologists and socio-behavioral information collected by questionnaires. Multilevel mixed-effect logistic regressions reporting odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied (caries at surface level as outcome variable). Potential confounders were adjusted for, and the effect of dependency of surface-specific caries data was estimated by calculating intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). Results At individual level, no significant difference in caries prevalence was found between individuals with JIA and controls, regardless of inclusion of enamel caries. Proportion of enamel lesions exceeded dentine lesions. JIA was not associated with presence of caries, but in both groups, low maternal educational level was associated with presence of caries (OR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.24-3.46). Occlusal and mesial surfaces, compared to buccal surfaces, had generally higher OR according to presence of caries than distal and lingual surfaces (ICC = 0.56). Surface-specific caries in the permanent dentition differed significantly according to group affiliation. Some JIA disease-specific variables were suggested to associate with presence of caries. Conclusions No overall difference in caries prevalence between individuals with JIA and controls was observed, but for both groups, low maternal educational level and tooth surface associated with presence of caries. Associations between JIA disease-specific variables and presence of caries cannot be excluded. Due to predominance of enamel lesions, the potential of preventative dental strategies is considerable.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Gudac, Jelena
    et al.
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Hellén-Halme, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Machiulskiene, Vita
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania.
    Prognostic validity of the Periapical and Endodontic Status Scale for the radiographically assessed 2-year treatment outcomes in teeth with apical periodontitis: a prospective clinical study2021In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Endodontic treatment planning and treatment success evaluation are largely based on radiographic assessment of anatomical and treatment-related parameters of teeth with apical periodontitis (AP). This prospective clinical study aimed to assess radiographically the 2-year endodontic treatment outcomes for teeth with AP, and to evaluate prognostic validity of Periapical and Endodontic Status Scale (PESS). Methods A total of 128 patients, representing 176 teeth with AP were examined by cone-beam computed tomography at baseline and at 24 months after endodontic treatment. Treatment outcome was evaluated using estimates of periapical radiolucency and the relationship between anatomical structures and location. The strength of the associations between these and treatment-related parameters was tested by logistic regression analysis. PESS sensitivity and specificity were calculated for every treatment risk group (low, moderate, high) of teeth. Results One hundred and fifty-seven teeth, representing 350 root canals had a positive treatment outcome, while 19 teeth, representing 53 root canals had a negative treatment outcome at 24 months. The probability of negative outcome was 25 times higher in the moderate/high-risk group than in the mild-risk group of teeth (OR = 25.1; 95%CI [12.2-51.5]). Pre-treatment complications and retreatment cases with radiolucency were associated with negative outcomes (OR = 35.9; 95%CI [12.6-102.4]; OR = 26.437; 95%CI [10.9-64.1], respectively). PESS sensitivity and specificity was over 80% in all risk groups except for high risk group, due to very low number of cases. Conclusions Endodontic treatment outcome depends on the severity of periapical changes. The presence of complications and retreatment cases with periapical lesions are associated with negative treatment outcome. The PESS is a valid instrument to predict outcome of teeth with low-moderate treatment risk of AP.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21. Hongxing, L
    et al.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nilsson, Ing-Marie
    Johansson, A
    Astrom, AN
    Validity and reliability of OIDP and OHIP-14: a survey of Chinese high school students2014In: BMC Oral Health, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 14, article id 158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To determine the impact of oral diseases on everyday life, measures of oral quality of life are needed. In complementing traditional disease-based measures, they assess the need for oral care to evaluate oral health care programs and management of treatment. To assess the reliability and validity of the Oral Impact of Daily Performance (OIDP) and the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) among high school students in Xi'an, the capital of Shanxi province, China. METHODS: Cross-sectional one-stage stratified random cluster sample using high schools as the primary sampling unit. Students completed self-administered questionnaires at school. The survey included the OHIP-14 and OIDP inventories, translated and culturally adapted for China, and global oral health and socio-behavioral measures. RESULTS: A total of 5,608 students participated in the study, with a 93% response rate (mean age 17.2, SD 0.8, 52% females, 45.3% urban residents).The proportion experiencing at least one impact (at any frequency) during the previous six months was 62.9% for the OHIP-14 and 45.8% for the OIDP. Cronbach's alpha measured internal consistency at 0.85 for OHIP-14 and 0.75 for OIDP while Cohen's kappa varied between 0.27 and 0.58 for OHIP-14 items and between 0.23 and 0.65 for OIDP items. Kappa scores for the OHIP-14 and OIDP additive scores were 0.52 and 0.66, respectively. Both measures varied systematically and in the expected direction, with global oral health measures showing criterion validity. The correlation between OIDP and OHIP-14 was rs +0.65. That both measures varied systematically with socio-behavioral factors indicates construct validity. CONCLUSION: Both the OIDP and OHIP-14 inventories had reasonable reliability and construct validity in relation to subjective global oral health indicators among adolescents attending high schools in China and thus appear to be useful oral health -related quality of life measures in this context. Overall, the OHIP-14 and OIDP performed equally well, although OHIP-14 had superior content validity due to its sensitivity towards less severe impacts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 22.
    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Isberg, Per Erik
    Twetman, Svante
    Caries risk assessment in schoolchildren using a reduced Cariogram model2010In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 10, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the caries predictive ability of a reduced Cariogram model without salivary tests in schoolchildren. METHODS: The study group consisted of 392 school children, 10-11 years of age, who volunteered after informed consent. A caries risk assessment was made at baseline with aid of the computer-based Cariogram model and expressed as "the chance of avoiding caries" and the children were divided into five risk groups. The caries increment (DeltaDMFS) was extracted from the dental records and bitewing radiographs after 2 years. The reduced Cariogram was processed by omitting the variables "salivary mutans streptococci", "secretion rate" and "buffer capacity" one by one and finally all three. Differences between the total and reduced models were expressed as area under the ROC-curve. RESULTS: The baseline caries prevalence in the study population was 40% (mean DMFS 0.87 +/- 1.35) and the mean 2-year caries increment was 0.51 +/- 1.06. Both Cariogram models displayed a statistically relationship with caries development (p < 0.05); more caries was found among those assessed with high risk compared to those with low risk. The combined sensitivity and specificity decreased after exclusion of the salivary tests and a statistically significant reduction of the area under the ROC-curve was displayed compared with the total Cariogram (p < 0.05). Among the salivary variables, omission of the mutans streptococci enumeration impaired the predictive ability the most. CONCLUSIONS: The accuracy of caries prediction in school children was significantly impaired when the Cariogram model was applied without enumeration of salivary tests.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 23.
    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Twetman, Svante
    Caries risk assessment in young adults: a 3 year validation of the Cariogram model2015In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 15, no 17, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To validate baseline caries risk classifications according to the Cariogram model with the actual caries development over a 3-year period in a group of young adults living in Sweden. Methods: The study group consisted of 1,295 19-year-old patients that completed a comprehensive clinical baseline examination, including radiographs and salivary tests. An individual caries risk profile was computed and the patient was placed in one of five risk categories. After 3 years, 982 patients (75.8%) were re-examined and caries increment for each patient was calculated. The outcome was expressed as sensitivity, specificity and predictive values and compared with a risk assessment scheme used in Public Dental Service. Results: The drop-outs displayed more risk factors and a significantly higher caries burden at baseline compared with those that remained in the project (p < 0.05). There was a strong association between the Cariogram risk categories and the 3-year caries increment on cavity level but the predictive values were modest. The high or very high caries risk categories yielded high specificities (>90%) but poor sensitivities. The low risk groups displayed higher sensitivities on expense of impaired specificities. No combinations proved clinically useful values according to Yuoden's index. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, the computer-based Cariogram did not perform better than a caries risk assessment scheme based on past caries experience and caries progression, over a 3-year period in young adults.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Twetman, Svante
    Relationship between risk assessment and payment models in Swedish Public Dental Service: a prospective study2017In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To a) compare risk categories in patients selecting a capitation payment (CP) model with those in fee-for-service (FFS), b) determine the 3-year caries increment in the two groups, and c) compare the amount of delivered preventive care in the two groups. Methods: A comprehensive risk assessment was carried out in 1295 young adults attending eight Public Dental Clinics in the Scania region and 75% could be re-examined after 3 years; 615 had selected the CP model and 310 the traditional FFS. Caries was scored according to WHO and data concerning preventive care was extracted from the dental records. Results: More patients in the low risk category preferred the CP model (74% vs. 26%) while > 80% with high risk selected FFS. The baseline caries level was significantly higher in the FFS group as well as the 3-year caries increment (1.6 vs. 0.8 DFS: p < 0.05). The amount of additional preventive care delivered to each patient was generally lower in the FFS model; it was most frequent among patients with "some" risk in the CP model (83.8%) while the lowest delivery rates were found among low risk patients in the FFS system (32.4%). Conclusions: Young adults in public dental care with low risk preferred the prepaid model while those in the higher risk categories selected fee-for-service. As more additional preventive care was delivered to patients in the subscribed care, oral health planners and decision makers should be aware of the fact that capitation payment models may enhance inequalities in dental health over time.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 25.
    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Åkerman, Sigvard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Isberg, Per-Erik
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Comparison of risk assessment based on clinical judgement and Cariogram in addition to patient perceived treatment need2016In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Predicting future risk for oral diseases, treatment need and prognosis are tasks performed daily in clinical practice. A large variety of methods have been reported, ranging from clinical judgement or "gut feeling" or even patient interviewing, to complex assessments of combinations of known risk factors. In clinical practice, there is an ongoing continuous search for less complicated and more valid tools for risk assessment. There is also a lack of knowledge how different common methods relates to one another. The aim of this study was to investigate if caries risk assessment (CRA) based on clinical judgement and the Cariogram model give similar results. In addition, to assess which factors from clinical status and history agree best with the CRA based on clinical judgement and how the patient's own perception of future oral treatment need correspond with the sum of examiners risk score. METHODS: Clinical examinations were performed on randomly selected individuals 20-89 years old living in Skåne, Sweden. In total, 451 individuals were examined, 51 % women. The clinical examination included caries detection, saliva samples and radiographic examination together with history and a questionnaire. The examiners made a risk classification and the authors made a second risk calculation according to the Cariogram. RESULTS: For those assessed as low risk using the Cariogram 69 % also were assessed as low risk based on clinical judgement. For the other risk groups the agreement was lower. Clinical variables that significantly related to CRA based on clinical judgement were DS (decayed surfaces) and combining DS and incipient lesions, DMFT (decayed, missed, filled teeth), plaque amount, history and soft drink intake. Patients' perception of future oral treatment need correlated to some extent with the sum of examiners risk score. CONCLUSIONS: The main finding was that CRA based on clinical judgement and the Cariogram model gave similar results for the groups that were predicted at low level of future disease, but not so well for the other groups. CRA based on clinical judgement agreed best with the number of DS plus incipient lesions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 26.
    Ilgunas, Aurelia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Visscher, Corine M
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Durham, Justin
    School of Dental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK; Newcastle Hospitals’ NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle, UK.
    Lövgren, Anna
    Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Patients' experiences of temporomandibular disorders and related treatment.2023In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common and therefore managed by dentists on a daily basis. However, patients with TMD consistently go undetected and therefore untreated in dentistry. The reasons for these shortcomings have not been fully explored, specifically with regard to patients' perspectives. Therefore, this study aimed to explore patients' experiences of TMD and related treatment, with special focus on the experiences of having TMD, factors related to seeking care, and perspectives on received treatment.

    METHODS: Purposive sampling was used to recruit adult patients at the Public Dental Health services (PDHS) in the Region of Västerbotten, Sweden, during 2019. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using Qualitative Content Analysis. Sixteen patients were interviewed (ten women and six men, 20-65 years). The interviews probed the patients' perspectives of having TMD, seeking care, and receiving treatment. All participants were also examined according to the Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and qualified for at least one DC/TMD diagnosis.

    RESULTS: The data analysis led to the main theme Seeking care when the situation becomes untenable, but dental care fails to meet all needs. The patients expressed worry and social discomfort because of the symptoms but still strived to have an as normal daily life as possible. However, severe symptoms and associated consequences compelled them to seek professional help. Experiences of distrust together with challenges to access the PDHS were identified and related to the patients' unfulfilled expectations.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients' reported experiences indicate that receiving timely and appropriate care is more of an unfulfilled expectation than the current state of management of patients with TMD in dentistry.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27. Johansson, Ann-Katrin
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders
    Nohlert, Eva
    Norring, Claes
    Åstrom, Anne Nordrehaug
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Eating disorders - knowledge, attitudes, management and clinical experience of Norwegian dentists2015In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 15, no 124, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate knowledge, attitudes and clinical experience with regard to patients with eating disorders (ED) among Norwegian dentists. METHODS: In 2010, a questionnaire was sent to all dentists in Norway (N = 4282) comprising 33 questions related to demographics of the participating dentists, their knowledge of ED (general and oral health aspects), clinical experience, attitudes and perceived management preferences. RESULTS: The participation rate was 40 % (47 % women and 53 % men). Their knowledge about ED was often retrieved from common media sources and the greater part of the participants reported they had seen very few patients with ED during their professional career. Female dentists reported superior knowledge about ED compared to males, but the former experienced greater difficulties to inform about the condition. Referrals of the patient to other health facilities were significantly more common among female compared to male dentists. The majority of dentists (76 %) reported a need of more education related to ED management. CONCLUSIONS: The Norwegian dentists in this study reported limited clinical experience and insufficient knowledge regarding ED. There is therefore a need to increase both undergraduate and continuing education in this field, which can improve preventive and management measures that a dentist can provide for ED patients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Kastenbom, Lisa
    et al.
    Department of Odontology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Falsen, Alexandra
    Department of Odontology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Centre of Oral Rehabilitation, Folktandvården Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sunnegårdh-Grönberg, Karin
    Department of Odontology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Centre for Medical Technology Assessment (CMT), Department of Medical and Health Sciences, (IMH), Linköping University, SE-581 83, Linköping, Sweden.
    Costs and health-related quality of life in relation to caries2019In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Dental caries remains a common and expensive disease for both society and affected individuals. Furthermore, caries often affect individuals' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Health economic evaluations are needed to understand how to efficiently distribute dental care resources. This study aims to evaluate treatment costs and QALY weights for caries active and inactive adult individuals, and to test whether the generic instrument EQ-5D-5 L can distinguish differences in this population. Methods A total of 1200 randomly selected individuals from dental clinics in Vasterbotten County, Sweden, were invited to participate. Of these, 79 caries active and 179 caries inactive patients agreed to participate (response rate of 21.7%). Inclusion criteria were participants between 20 and 65 years old and same caries risk group categorization in two consecutive check-ups between 2014 and 2017. Results Treatment costs showed to be twice as high in the caries active group compared to the caries inactive group and were three times higher in the caries active age group 20-29 compared to the caries inactive age group 20-29. Differences between the groups was found for number of intact teeth according to age groups. In the EQ-5D-5 L instrument, more problems relating to the dimension anxiety/depression was seen in the caries active group. QALY weights showed tendencies (non-significant) to be lower in the caries active group. Conclusions These findings highlight the need for efficient treatments and prevention strategies as well as adequate money allocation within dentistry. However, further research is needed to assess appropriate instruments for health economic evaluations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 29. Koole, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Van Den Brulle, Shani
    Christiaens, Veronique
    Jacquet, Wolfgang
    Cosyn, Jan
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Competence profiles in undergraduate dental education: a comparison between theory and reality2017In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Competence profiles are purposed to provide a blueprint in support to develop and/or benchmark the learning outcomes of undergraduate dental curricula. This study aims to investigate whether a competence profile as proposed by academic-and clinical experts is able to represent the real clinical reality. Methods: A questionnaire was developed including questions about gender and age, perception about required competences, and educational organisation and was distributed among Flemish dentists via email and on paper during a symposium. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square and non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-tests. Results: A total of 312 questionnaires were completed (= 6.5% of dentist population, with similar gender and age characteristics). All competences in the European competence profile were rated between 7.2 and 9.4 on a 10-point scale. In dentists under 50 years, females rated the importance of identifying/managing anxiety and abnormal patient behaviour; and promoting/improving oral health as significantly higher than males. In dentists of 50 years and above, females rated 8 competences significantly higher than males, including obtaining/recording a complete history; identifying/managing anxiety and abnormal patient behaviour; obtaining/interpreting radiography; identifying temporomandibular and associated disorders; identifying orthodontic needs; awareness of own limitations/when to refer; managing dental urgencies; and basic-life-support/defibrillation. Clinical practice management was most frequently reported as additional competence to address in dental education. Furthermore, the respondents suggested an undergraduate dental curriculum based on 34% theoretical education, 26% preclinical skills training, and 40% clinical education and 86% agreed with a duration of 5 years. Finally, the respondents also illustrated the dynamic nature of dentistry including a reduction of amalgam fillings, a shift from individual practice to group practices, an increased administrative load, and more assertive patients. Conclusion: Findings in the present study suggest the validation of the proposed competences for graduating European dentists within the clinical reality of dental professionals in daily practice. Nevertheless, the results have also demonstrated heterogeneity regarding gender and age within the dentist population and emphasised a continuously evolving dental profession and required competences. Hence, to maintain high quality of dental care, a strategy should be developed in which dental curricula are continuously benchmarked against an evolving clinical reality.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 30.
    Mensah, Tita
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Region Värmland.
    Tranæus, Sofia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services (SBU).
    Cederlund, Andreas
    Eastman Dental Institute, Stockholm.
    Naimi-Akbar, Aron
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Swedish quality registry for caries and periodontal diseases (SKaPa): validation of data on dental caries in 6- and 12-year-old children2021In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 21, article id 373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Swedish Quality Registry for caries and periodontal disease (SKaPa) automatically collects data on caries and periodontitis from patients’ electronic dental records. Provided the data entries are reliable and accurate, the registry has potential value as a data source for registry-based research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of the SKaPa registry information on dental caries in 6- and 12-year-old children.

    Method

    This diagnostic accuracy study compared dental caries data registered at an examination with dental health status registered in the patient’s electronic dental records, and with corresponding data retrieved from the SKaPa registry. Clinical examinations of 170 6- and 12-year-old children were undertaken by one of the researchers in conjunction with the children’s regular annual dental examinations where the number of teeth were registered, and dental caries was diagnosed using ICDAS II. Teeth with fillings were defined as filled and were added to the ICDAS II score and subsequently dft/DFT was calculated for each individual. Cohen’s Kappa, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and sensitivity and specificity were calculated to test the agreement of the ‘decayed and filled teeth’ in deciduous and permanent teeth (dft/DFT) from the three sources.

    Results

    Cohen’s Kappa of the dft/DFT-values was calculated to 0.79 between the researcher and the patient record, to 0.95 between patient dental record and SKaPa, and to 0.76 between the researcher and SKaPa. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to 0.96 between the researcher and the patient journal, to 0.99 between the patient dental record vs. SKaPa, and to 0.95 between the researcher and SKaPa.

    Conclusion

    The SKaPa registry information demonstrated satisfactory reliability and accuracy on dental caries in 6- and 12-year-old children and is a reliable source for registry-based research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31. Molarius, Anu
    et al.
    Engström, Sevek
    Flink, Håkan
    Simonsson, Bo
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Socioeconomic differences in self-rated oral health and dental care utilisation after the dental care reform in 2008 in Sweden2014In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 14, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aims of this study were to determine self-rated oral health and dental attendance habits among Swedish adults, with special reference to the role of social inequalities, after the Swedish dental care reform in 2008. Methods: The study is based on a survey questionnaire, sent to 12,235 residents of a Swedish county, in 2012. The age group was 16-84 years: 5,999 (49%) responded. Using chi-square statistics, differences in prevalence of self-rated oral health and regular dental attendance were analysed with respect to gender, age, educational level, family status, employment status and country of birth. Self-rated poor oral health was analysed by multivarite logistic regression adjusting for the different socio-demographic factors, financial security and having refrained from dental treatment for financial reasons. Results: Three out of four respondents (75%) reported fairly good or very good oral health. Almost 90% claimed to be regular dental attenders. Those who were financially secure reported better oral health. The differences in oral health between those with a cash margin and those without were large whereas the differences between age groups were rather small. About 8% reported that they had refrained from dental treatment for financial reasons during the last three months. Self-rated poor oral health was most common among the unemployed, those on disability pension or on long-term sick leave, those born outside the Nordic countries and those with no cash margin (odds ratios ranging from 2.4 to 4.4). The most important factor contributing to these differences was having refrained from dental treatment for financial reasons. Conclusion: The results are relevant to strategies intended to reduce social inequalities in oral health, affirming the importance of the provision of equitable access to dental care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Olofsson, Richard
    et al.
    Publ Dent Serv Reg Vastra Gotaland, Publ Dent Serv, Uddevalla, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oral Microbiol & Immunol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Korytowska, Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Publ Dent Hlth Serv, Specialist Clin Orofacial Med, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Almhöjd, Ulrica
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Almståhl, Annica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oral Microbiol & Immunol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Cevik-Aras, Huelya
    Publ Dent Serv Reg Vastra Gotaland, Publ Dent Serv, Uddevalla, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Odontol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oral Pathol & Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Oral health, dental treatment, and medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw in multiple myeloma - a longitudinal cohort study2024In: BMC Oral Health, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate oral health status, oral health related quality of life, and identify risk factors associated with invasive dental treatment and medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Material and methods: Patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma (n = 144) referred between January 2015 and September 2022 were retrospectively included. The patients underwent a thorough clinical and radiological oral examination and odontogenic infections were treated before the start of bisphosphonate treatment. The patients were followed annually, including clinical and radiological examinations. The oral health related quality of life was investigated by the OHIP-14 questionnaire.

    Results: Dental treatment (RR = 7.75), receiving combination antineoplastic therapy≥3 (RR =4.13), periodontitis (RR = 4.21), and reduced number of teeth (RR = 2.87) were associated with an increased risk of medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw. The response rate of the OHIP-14 questionnaire was 70.2%. Oral pain or discomfort in the mouth related to the medical treatment was reported by 30.5%.

    Conclusion: Dental screening and treatment planning in patients with Multiple Myeloma may result in fewer oral infections and fewer interruptions of the medical treatment of myeloma.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Olsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nordendahl, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Clinical Epidemiology Division, Dept of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Department of Periodontology, Eastman Institute, Folktandvården Stockholm AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Periodontology and Dental Prophylaxis Unit, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology Division, Dept of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Edlund, Christoffer
    Department of Oral Surgery, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå, Sweden.
    Fored, Michael
    Clinical Epidemiology Division, Dept of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Naimi-Akbar, Aron
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Does smoking cessation affect postoperative healing following oral surgery among smokers? - a systematic review.2024In: BMC Oral Health, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is well documented that smokers suffer increased risk of postoperative complications after medical surgery, for example delayed healing and increased risk of infection. It is also known that preoperative smoking cessation can reduce the risk of these complications. Because of this there are guidelines regarding preoperative smoking cessation in non-oral medical surgery. There are however no specific guidelines regarding oral surgical procedures, such as surgical extractions, dentoalveolar surgery, periodontal surgery, or dental implantation. Nevertheless, it is common that dentists and oral surgeons recommend smoking cessation pre to oral surgical procedures. The aim with this systematic review was to see if there are any evidence in the literature, supporting preoperative smoking cessation in oral surgical procedures.

    METHODS: A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane was conducted to identify studies addressing the effect of preoperative smoking cessation in oral surgical procedures. Included publications were subjected to preidentified inclusion criterion. Six examiners performed the eligibility and quality assessment of relevant studies. Risk of bias was assessed using ROBINS-I and RoB 2. Certainty assessment was carried out using GRADE.

    RESULTS: The initial search resulted in 2255 records, and after removal of 148 duplicates, 16 articles met an acceptable level of relevance. These were read in full text, whereof 12 articles were excluded, due to different intervention, outcome, or study design than stated in the review protocol. One study remained with moderate risk of bias and three were excluded due to high risk of bias.

    CONCLUSION: This systematic review could not determine the effect of smoking cessation pre to oral surgical procedures, in smokers. This indicates lack of knowledge in the effects of smoking cessation. We also conclude a lack of knowledge in how to design smoking cessation in the most effective way.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Shmarina, Elena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Kalmar County Council, Public Dental Service, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Götrick, Bengt
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Franzén, Cecilia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Dental professionals' perception of their role in the practice of oral health promotion: a qualitative interview study2023In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To explore dental professionals’ perceptions of their role in the practice of oral health promotion.

    Material and method

    In-depth interviews were conducted with three dentists, one specialist dentist and seven dental hygienists. All were employed in the public dental service in Kalmar County, Sweden and had at least two years’ work experience. The interview questions addressed the experience and views of dental professionals with reference to their role in the practice of health promotion. The interview data were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Analysis revealed two themes which capture the essence of the dental professionals’ perception of their role in the practice of oral health promotion. One theme, having person-focused approach, comprised four categories: ‘considering the patient’s life situation’, ‘establishing a trusting relationship with patients’, ’strengthening patients’ commitment to oral health’ and ‘health education’. The other theme, perceiving social responsibility for oral health, comprised three categories: ‘dissemination of oral health knowledge’, ‘interprofessional collaboration’ and ‘equality in oral health care’.

    Conclusion

    Dental professionals perceived promotion of oral health to be an important aspect of their professional role. They aspired to patient participation in the decisionmaking process and educational activities, as well as practising and evaluating skills development. Although the dental professionals perceived that they undertook health promotion activities, they did not clearly distinguish between oral health promotion and disease prevention. There was intra- and interprofessional agreement among the dentists and dental hygienists with respect to expected outcomes for health promotion activities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Sjöström, Mats
    et al.
    Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Odontology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lund, Bodil
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Medical Unit of Plastic Surgery and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Jaw Orthopedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sunzel, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Dep Oral and Maxillofacial surgery Public Dental health Växjö, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Martin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mikael
    Department of Specialist Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Colloseum and Smile AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rasmusson, Lars
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Sahlgrenska Academy and hospital, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Starting a Swedish national quality registry for orthognathic surgery: a tool for auditing fundamentals of care2022In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: National quality registries (NQRs) provide open data for user-directed acquisition. National Quality Registry (NQR) data are often used to analyze the rates of treatment success and adverse events for studies that aim to improve treatment quality and patient satisfaction. Thus, NQRs promote the goal of achieving evidence-based therapies. However, the scientific literature seldom focuses on the complex process of initiating, designing, and implementing an NQR. Starting an NQR may be particularly challenging in a setting where specialized care is decentralized, such as orthognathic surgery in Sweden. The present study describes the initiation and early phases of a new NQR for orthognathic surgery in Sweden.

    Methods: The initial inventory phase included gaining knowledge on regulations, creating economic plans, and identifying pitfalls in existing NQRs. Next, a crude framework for the registry was achieved. Outcome measures were selected with a nation-wide questionnaire, followed by a Delphi-like process for selecting parameters to include in the NQR. Our inclusive process comprised a stepwise introduction, feedback-based modifications, and preparatory educational efforts. Descriptive data were collected, based on the first 2 years (2018-2019) of registry operation.

    Results: Two years after implementation, 862 patients that underwent 1320 procedures were registered. This number corresponded to a 91% coverage rate. Bimaxillary treatments predominated, and the most common were a Le Fort I osteotomy combined with a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (n = 275). Reoperations were conducted in 32 patients (3.6%), and the rate of patient satisfaction was 95%.

    Conclusions: A National Quality Registry should preferentially be started and maintained by an appointed task force of active clinicians. A collaborative, transparent, inclusive process may be an important factor for achieving credibility and high coverage, particularly in a decentralized setting.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Sonesson, Mikael
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    De Geer, Emelie
    Subraian, Jaqueline
    Petrén, Sofia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in accelerating tooth movement, preventing relapse and managing acute pain during orthodontic treatment in humans: a systematic review2016In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, no 11, article id 11Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recently low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proposed to improve orthodontic treatment. The aims of this systematic review were to investigate the scientific evidence to support applications of LLLT: (a) to accelerate tooth movement, (b) to prevent orthodontic relapse and (c) to modulate acute pain, during treatment with fixed appliances in children and young adults. Methods: To ensure a systematic literature approach, this systematic review was conducted to Goodman's four step model. Three databases were searched (Medline, Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register and Scitation), using predetermined search terms. The quality of evidence was rated according to the GRADE system Results: The search identified 244 articles, 16 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria: three on acceleration of tooth movement by LLLT and 13 on LLLT modulation of acute pain. No study on LLLT for prevention of relapse was identified. The selected studies reported promising results for LLLT; elevated acceleration of tooth movement and lower pain scores, than controls. With respect to method, there were wide variations in type of laser techniques Conclusions: The quality of evidence supporting LLLT to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement is very low and low with respect to modulate acute pain. No studies met the inclusion criteria for evaluating LLLT to limit relapse. The results highlight the need for high quality research, with consistency in study design, to determine whether LLLT can enhance fixed appliance treatment in children and young adults.

  • 37.
    Vicente, António
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Alward, Lubna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wiedel, Anna-Paulina
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Becker, Magnus
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Clinical Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Hellén-Halme, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Brogårdh-Roth, Susanne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Do preterm-born children and adolescents have greater need for dental care as compared to full term-born controls?2022In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Preterm birth has been shown to cause various long-term health issues. Children who were born preterm have also been observed to have more dental behaviour management problems (DBMP) during dental examinations and treatment than children born full term. It is known that dental radiographic examinations can be uncomfortable and cause anxiety in paediatric patients. Thus, our aims were to retrospectively compare dental care related examinations and treatments carried out in three different age intervals (3-6 years, 7-12 years, and 13-19 years) among preterm- and full-term born children and adolescents.

    METHODS: The present study included 311 patient files: 122 very preterm-born and 33 extremely preterm-born children and adolescents (&lt; 32 gestational weeks). A matched control group of 156 full term-born children and adolescents (≥ 37 gestational weeks) was analysed for comparison. Various factors, including DBMP, missed appointments, dental caries, and radiographic examinations, were retrieved from the dental records for three age intervals: 3-6 years, 7-12 years, and 13-19 years.

    RESULTS: Extremely preterm-born children missed significantly more dental appointments and presented with more DBMP during dental examinations and treatment than full term-born children in the 3-6-year age group; the same was observed for the very preterm-born in the 7-12-year age group. No significant differences in DBMP during bitewing and periapical examinations or in number of bitewing, periapical and panoramic radiographs occurred between the groups in any age interval.

    CONCLUSION: Preterm-born children and adolescents may need more flexibility in booking and receive reminders for scheduled visits with the general dental team. Due to the non-significant differences in dental care related oral examinations and treatments, the same dental care service may be applied to the preterm- and full-term born children and adolescents.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Wickström, Claes
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Chávez de Paz, Luis
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Davies, Julia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Surface-associated MUC5B mucins promote protease activity in Lactobacillus fermentum biofilms2013In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 13, no 43, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mucosal surfaces are coated with layers of mucus gel that protect the underlying tissues and promote colonization by members of the commensal microflora. Lactobacillus fermentum is a common inhabitant of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts and is one of the most important lactic acid bacteria contributing to the formation of a healthy intestinal microflora. We have investigated the proteolytic activity in L. fermentum in response to interactions with the MUC5B mucin, which is a major component of mucus gels at sites colonized by this micro-organism. Methods: Biofilms of Lactobacillus fermentum were established in mini-flow cells in the presence or absence of human salivary MUC5B. The proteolytic activity of biofilm cells was examined in a confocal scanning laser microscope with a fluorescent protease substrate. Degradation of MUC5B by L. fermentum was analysed using SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting with antisera raised against the MUC5B peptide. Cell surface proteins differentialy expressed in a MUC5B-rich environment were identified with the aid of comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS. Results: Lactobacillus fermentum adhered well to surfaces coated with MUC5B mucin and in biofilms of L. fermentum formed in a MUC5B environment, the proportion of proteolytically-active cells (47 ± 0.6% of the population), as shown by cleavage of a fluorescent casein substrate, was significantly greater (p < 0.01) than that in biofilms formed in nutrient broth (0.4 ± 0.04% of the population). Thus, the presence of MUC5B mucins enhanced bacterial protease activity. This effect was mainly attributable to contact with surface-associated mucins rather than those present in the fluid phase. Biofilms of L. fermentum were capable of degrading MUC5B mucins suggesting that this complex glycoprotein can be exploited as a nutrient source by the bacteria. Comparison of the surface proteomes of biofilm cells of L. fermentum in a MUC5B environment with those in nutrient broth using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy, showed that the enhanced proteolytic activity was associated with increased expression of a glycoprotease; O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase, as well as chaperone proteins such as DnaK and trigger factor. Conclusions: Adhesion to mucin-coated surfaces leads to a shift towards a more protease-active phenotype within L. fermentum biofilms and proteases produced within the biofilms can degrade MUC5B mucins. The enhanced proteolytic activity was associated with an increase in O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase on the cell surface. We propose that the upregulation of chaperone proteins in the mucin environment may contribute to the protease-active phenotype through activation of the glycopeptidase. This would represent one way for commensal lactobacilli e.g. L. fermentum to exploit complex substrates in their local environment in order to survive on mucosal surfaces.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
1 - 38 of 38
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf