Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alsuhaibani, Fatimah
    et al.
    Department of Restorative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Qassim University, Buraydah, Saudi Arabia.
    Alsuhaibani, Abdulaziz
    Department of General Surgery, King Saud Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Larsson, Kerstin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Risk Factors for Dental Erosion After Bariatric Surgery: A Patient Survey2021In: International Dental Journal, ISSN 0020-6539, E-ISSN 1875-595X, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 491-498, article id S0020-6539(21)00251-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment of obesity by bariatric surgery has increased in recent years. Reported side effects that may predispose to dental erosion include reflux, vomiting, and an increased frequency of intake of food and drink.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to investigate long-term dietary behaviour and experiences related to symptoms of dental erosion at least 5 years after bariatric surgery.

    METHODS: An online questionnaire study was conducted amongst 250 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery at King Saud Medical City in Saudi Arabia 5 years ago or more. It comprised 36 questions on demographic data, dietary habits, general health, dental health, and oral symptoms. The data were analysed using Chi-square and sign tests (significance level P < .05).

    RESULTS: A significant increase in acidic reflux and vomiting was found after bariatric surgery and appeared to increase with time after surgery. Also, a significant association between presence of acidic reflux and symptoms of dental erosion was found. However, 68.5% reported improved overall well-being after surgery. The response rate was 21.6% (most were female, aged 30-59 years). Respondents were generally not advised to visit a dentist in connection with bariatric surgery.

    CONCLUSIONS: This long-term cross-sectional study suggests a time-dependent, increasing occurrence of vomiting and acidic reflux after bariatric surgery. Vomiting and reflux became even more common after 5 to 10 years. A significant relationship emerged between a high frequency of acidic reflux and a high frequency of oral symptoms related to dental erosion. Daily occurrence of general symptoms related to dumping syndrome were reported by the majority. However, in a 5- to 10-year perspective, general symptoms related to dumping syndrome and symptoms from dental erosion did not seem to detract from the respondents' overall satisfaction with daily living. Oral health problems might be reduced if patients who had bariatric surgery were referred to a dentist for prevention and monitoring.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Custodio, Antonio Luis Neto
    et al.
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Biol Sci Inst, Dept Morphol, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Cameron, Andrew
    Griffith Univ, Sch Dent & Oral Hlth, Dent Technol, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, Qld, Australia..
    Bakr, Mahmoud
    Griffith Univ, Sch Dent & Oral Hlth, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, Qld, Australia..
    Reher, Peter
    Griffith Univ, Sch Dent & Oral Hlth, Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, Qld, Australia..
    Accuracy evaluation of 3D-printed guide-assisted flapless micro-osteoperforations in the anterior mandible2022In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTERIZED DENTISTRY, ISSN 1463-4201, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 387-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of tridimensional (3D)-printed guide-assisted flapless cortical bone micro-osteoperforations (MOPs) in the anterior mandible on a cadaver model. Materials and methods: Five human cadaver heads with complete dentition in the anterior mandible were used in the present study. Preplanning CBCT and intraoral surface scans were obtained. After alignment, drilling sites in the interradic-ular areas were planned from canine to canine, and a surgical guide was printed. The drilling was performed and a post -procedure CBCT scan was obtained to assess the accuracy of the procedure in relation to the virtual planning. Results: The mean +/- standard deviation (SD) mesiodistal interradicular space was 2.67 +/- 0.84 mm. The mean +/- SD error of the actual drilled hole compared with the planned position of the mesial drill site was 0.66 +/- 0.33 mm, and to the distal drill site it was 0.56 +/- 0.33 mm. There was a statistically signifi-cant difference between the number of times the teeth were hit mesially (10 out of 64 holes) and distally (none). Conclusions: The proposed technique, limited to an ex vivo scenario, provides a valid and reliable method for mandibu-lar MOPs using a 3D-generated surgical guide. However, the risk of damaging adjacent radicular surfaces, particularly in areas with limited mesiodistal interradicular bone, needs to be considered. Further studies should focus on using thinner drills and adding other methods to stabilize the guide. Addi-tionally, by selecting individuals and perforation sites with more mesiodistal interradicular bone, less damage is likely.

  • 3.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    State of Recovery 6 Months After Rectal Cancer Surgery: Postoperative Symptoms and Differences With Regard to Surgical Procedure2021In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rectal cancer surgery has developed to be highly technological and precise. Nevertheless, postoperative symptoms can affect patients for a long time after surgery and might also be persistent. The purpose of this study was to describe the level of postoperative symptoms 6 months after rectal cancer surgery as well as differences in symptoms with regard to surgical procedure. Data from 117 patients recovering from rectal cancer surgery were collected 6 months after surgery using the Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP) questionnaire measuring self-reported postoperative symptoms. Results showed that the majority of patients had no or mild problems with the 19 symptoms recorded in the questionnaire. There was a significant difference between surgical procedures: patients after anterior resection experienced mild problems in gastrointestinal function (physical domain) and interest in their surroundings (social domain), whereas most patients after abdominoperineal resection and abdominoperineal resection with myocutaneous flap showed no problems. In all groups, a considerably high proportion of patients reported severe problems in sexual activity (physical domain). Findings in this study emphasize that healthcare professionals should pay attention to patients recovering from anterior resection especially regarding problems in the gastrointestinal function. Moreover, there is a need to acknowledge eventual sexual dysfunctions in all rectal cancer patients.

  • 4.
    Mirdamadian, Pegah
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Salahshour Nargi, Raha
    Grafting materials for alveolar cleft reconstruction -a systematic review2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this literature study was to systematically review the scientific evidence on the most effective donor sites and/or bone substitute material for secondary alveolar cleft grafting in alveolar cleft patients.

    Material and method: In order to acquire a systematic and transparent reporting this literature review was conducted according to the PRISMA statement. The literature search was performed in the following four databases; PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science and Scopus.The quality of the included studies was assessed using the revised Cochrane Risk of Bias 2 tool (RoB 2 tool).

    Result: The search identified 4754 studies. Five RCT studies was included in this systematic review and assessed different donor site or bone substitute materials. Two studies showed low risk of bias and three moderate risk of bias. Only one study showed a statistically significant difference when comparing iliac bone to substitute material however all studies presented substitute materials with satisfactory results.

    Conclusion: According to the data from this systematic review no clear conclusion can be drawn regarding what the most effective bone donor site and/or tissue engineered bone substitute material to use in secondary bone grafts. Based on the available evidence iliac bone could still be regarded as a benchmark, but more research and RCT’s of high quality are required, especially for artificial bone substitute materials.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Olsson, P.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden.;Helsingborg Cent Hosp, Dept Med, Sect Rheumatol, Helsingborg, Sweden..
    Ekblad, F.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Hassler, A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Bengtsson, M.
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Lund, Sweden..
    Warfvinge, Gunnar
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Mandl, T.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Kvarnström, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Hlth Serv Reg, Ctr Rheumatol, Acad Specialist Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Complications after minor salivary gland biopsy: a retrospective study of 630 patients from two Swedish centres2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 208-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aims of the study were to investigate the prevalence of impaired sensation after minor salivary gland biopsy (MSGB) in two Swedish centres [Karolinska University Hospital (KUH) and Skane University Hospital (SUH)] and to assess its impact on quality of life (QoL) and associated risk factors. Method A questionnaire including questions regarding the presence of impaired sensation, impact on QoL, and impact on everyday life was sent to patients who had undergone MSGB between 2007 and 2016, and their medical notes were scrutinized. Results The study included 630 patients (505 from KUH and 125 from SUH). In KUH the biopsies were performed by rheumatologists and in SUH by dentists or oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs). Long-standing, probably permanent, impaired sensation after MSGB was reported by 21% of patients, and was associated with lower age and absence of anti-SSA antibodies. Patients with long-standing impaired sensation reported the inconvenience (1-10) of impaired sensation as 4.0 (2.0-7.0) [median (interquartile range)], and 32% reported an influence on their QoL, the reported influence (1-10) on everyday life being 3.0 (1.0-5.0). When comparing the outcomes from KUH and SUH, patients from SUH reported a significantly lower frequency of long-standing impaired sensation (14% vs 23%; p = 0.02). Conclusion A high frequency of long-standing impaired sensation after MSGB was found among patients who had undergone MSGB, although it had a low impact on everyday life. The complication frequency was less pronounced when a dentist or an OMS had performed the biopsy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Vicente, António
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wiedel, Anna-Paulina
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, Malmö, Sweden..
    Becker, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Plast & Reconstruct Surg, Malmö, Sweden..
    Brogårdh-Roth, Susanne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Shi, Xie-Qi
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Sect Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, Bergen, Norway..
    Hellén-Halme, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Dent, Sect Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, Bergen, Norway..
    Quantitative assessment of cleft volume and evaluation of cleft's impact on adjacent anatomical structures using CBCT imaging2024In: Oral Radiology/Springer, ISSN 0911-6028, E-ISSN 1613-9674, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 295-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine pre-operative cleft volume and evaluate cleft´s impact on surrounding anatomical structures in children and adolescents with orofacial clefts using cone bean computed tomography (CBCT) imaging.

    Methods: The present retrospective study retrieved CBCT examinations of 68 patients from a previous study. The examinations had been exposed either before (n = 53) or after (n = 15) alveolar bone grafting. Pre-operative volume of cleft was determined, and type and location were evaluated. Morphological changes on the adjacent anatomical structures, including the incisive foramen, the nasal septum and floor, and the inferior turbinate, were assessed.

    Results: Mean bilateral cleft volume was 0.76 cm3, while mean unilateral cleft volume was 1.08 cm3; the difference was significant (p < 0.001). Variation in cleft volume, however, was large. The incisive foramen was not visible in the majority of cases with bilateral clefts (71%); the difference was significant (p = 0.001). In cases with unilateral clefts, the nasal septum in 87% was curved towards the cleft or graft side. Also, the mean size of the widest part of the inferior turbinate was 8.8 mm on the cleft or graft side and 10.4 mm on the non-cleft side. The difference was significant (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: When required, CBCT is a feasible method for quantitatively illustrating alveolar clefts and their impact on the morphological development of surrounding structures. Variation in cleft volume was large.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf