Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Annersten Gershater, Magdalena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Skånes universitetssjukhus .
    Alm-Roijer, Carin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Re-ulceration is common in persons with diabetes and healed foot ulcer after participant-driven education in group: A randomized controlled trial.2022In: Advances in wound care, ISSN 2162-1918, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 117-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the number of ulcer-free days during 24 months in persons with diabetes and a healed foot ulcer below the ankle provided with adjusted therapeutic shoes who were given standard information and participated in participant-driven group education compared with standard information alone.

    METHOD: A randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the number of ulcer-free days after participant-driven group education in addition to standard information compared to standard information alone. The number needed to treat (N=174) was not met, as only n=138 persons with diabetes and previously healed foot ulcer were recruited (age median 63 years [34-79], 101 male/37 female).

    RESULT: 138 persons were recruited, of whom 107 (77.5%) completed the study, 7 (5%) dropped out, and 12 (9%) became deceased. No statistically significant difference was found between the intervention group compared to the control group after 6, 18, or 24 months. After 12 months, more patients in the intervention group had developed ulcers. Seventy-seven participants (56%) developed new foot ulcers, irrespective of side and site. Development of one ulcer appeared in 36 participants, two ulcers in 19, and 22 participants developed three ulcers. Forty-eight participants remained ulcer-free (35%) during the 24-month follow-up. Median ulcer-free days until first ulceration were 368 (4-720); until second ulceration, 404 (206-631); and until third ulceration, 660 (505-701). The participants wore prescribed therapeutic shoes during 88% of the follow-up visits.

    CONCLUSION: One third of the participants remained ulcer free for 24 months. Patient-driven education in groups did not give better results than standard information in this underpowered study. The present study illustrates the challenges to perform comparative preventive studies in this group of patients with extensive comorbidity. Further studies are needed to evaluate interventions on ulceration in persons with a healed foot ulcer.

  • 2.
    Boonsatean, Wimonrut
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Östman, M
    Dychawy Rosner, I
    Carlsson, A
    Illness perception and self-management among Thai women and men living with type 2 diabetes2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3. De Silva, Kushan
    et al.
    Jönsson, Daniel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Demmer, Ryan T
    A combined strategy of feature selection and machine learning to identify predictors of prediabetes2020In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 396-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of prediabetes using feature selection and machine learning on a nationally representative sample of the US population.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed n = 6346 men and women enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2014. Prediabetes was defined using American Diabetes Association guidelines. The sample was randomly partitioned to training (n = 3174) and internal validation (n = 3172) sets. Feature selection algorithms were run on training data containing 156 preselected exposure variables. Four machine learning algorithms were applied on 46 exposure variables in original and resampled training datasets built using 4 resampling methods. Predictive models were tested on internal validation data (n = 3172) and external validation data (n = 3000) prepared from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2012. Model performance was evaluated using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Predictors were assessed by odds ratios in logistic models and variable importance in others. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) prediabetes screening tool was the benchmark to compare model performance.

    RESULTS: Prediabetes prevalence was 23.43%. The CDC prediabetes screening tool produced 64.40% AUROC. Seven optimal (≥ 70% AUROC) models identified 25 predictors including 4 potentially novel associations; 20 by both logistic and other nonlinear/ensemble models and 5 solely by the latter. All optimal models outperformed the CDC prediabetes screening tool (P < 0.05).

    DISCUSSION: Combined use of feature selection and machine learning increased predictive performance outperforming the recommended screening tool. A range of predictors of prediabetes was identified.

    CONCLUSION: This work demonstrated the value of combining feature selection with machine learning to identify a wide range of predictors that could enhance prediabetes prediction and clinical decision-making.

  • 4.
    De Silva, Kushan
    et al.
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Lim, Siew
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Mousa, Aya
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Teede, Helena
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Forbes, Andrew
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Demmer, Ryan T
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America; Columbia University, New York, New York, United States of America.
    Jönsson, Daniel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Enticott, Joanne
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Nutritional markers of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in adults: Findings of a machine learning analysis with external validation and benchmarking.2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 5, article id e0250832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Using a nationally-representative, cross-sectional cohort, we examined nutritional markers of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in adults via machine learning.

    METHODS: A total of 16429 men and non-pregnant women ≥ 20 years of age were analysed from five consecutive cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Cohorts from years 2013-2016 (n = 6673) was used for external validation. Undiagnosed type 2 diabetes was determined by a negative response to the question "Have you ever been told by a doctor that you have diabetes?" and a positive glycaemic response to one or more of the three diagnostic tests (HbA1c > 6.4% or FPG >125 mg/dl or 2-hr post-OGTT glucose > 200mg/dl). Following comprehensive literature search, 114 potential nutritional markers were modelled with 13 behavioural and 12 socio-economic variables. We tested three machine learning algorithms on original and resampled training datasets built using three resampling methods. From this, the derived 12 predictive models were validated on internal- and external validation cohorts. Magnitudes of associations were gauged through odds ratios in logistic models and variable importance in others. Models were benchmarked against the ADA diabetes risk test.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes was 5.26%. Four best-performing models (AUROC range: 74.9%-75.7%) classified 39 markers of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes; 28 via one or more of the three best-performing non-linear/ensemble models and 11 uniquely by the logistic model. They comprised 14 nutrient-based, 12 anthropometry-based, 9 socio-behavioural, and 4 diet-associated markers. AUROC of all models were on a par with ADA diabetes risk test on both internal and external validation cohorts (p>0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Models performed comparably to the chosen benchmark. Novel behavioural markers such as the number of meals not prepared from home were revealed. This approach may be useful in nutritional epidemiology to unravel new associations with type 2 diabetes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Egerstad, Alina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nordin, Katarzyna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Patienters upplevelser av att leva med nyupptäckt diabetes typ 2: En litteraturstudie2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Diabetes är en av de stora folksjukdomarna i världen. Över 500 000 personer har diabetes i Sverige idag. Cirka 90 procent har typ 2-diabetes, dvs cirka 4-5 % av befolkningen i Sverige har diabetes typ 2. 

    Syfte: Litteraturstudiens syfte var att belysa patienters upplevelser av att leva med nyupptäckt diabetes typ 2. 

    Metod: En litteraturstudie baserad på 10 vetenskapliga artiklar med kvalitativ studiedesign. Artiklarna hämtades från PubMed och Cinahl, båda med inriktning på omvårdnad. Artiklarna analyserades och sammanställdes enligt mall om dataanalys. 

    Resultat: Ur analysen framkom tre huvudkategorier och 10 underkategorier identifierades. Huvudkategorierna var: Upplevelse vid en ny diagnos; Innebörden av egenvård; Motivation som drivkraft för förändring.

    Konklusion: Upplevelserna av att leva med nydiagnostiserad diabetes typ 2 var individuell, men gemensamt för alla patienter var att livet påverkades. För att sjuksköterskan ska kunna möta patienternas behov samt ge bästa möjliga personcentrerad vård krävs en förståelse för patienternas upplevelser av att leva med nydiagnostiserad diabetes typ 2. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Elgzyri, Targ
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lindholm, Eero
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Örneholm, Hedvig
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Malmo, Sweden..
    Annersten Gershater, Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Healing below the ankle is possible in patients with diabetes mellitus and a forefoot gangrene2021In: SAGE Open Medicine, E-ISSN 2050-3121, Vol. 9, article id 20503121211029180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Forefoot gangrene in patients with diabetes is a severe form of foot ulcers with risk of progress and major amputation. No large cohort studies have examined clinical characteristics and outcome of forefoot gangrene in patients with diabetes. The aim was to examine clinical characteristics and outcome of forefoot gangrene in patients with diabetes admitted to a diabetic foot centre. Methods: Patients with diabetes and foot ulcer consecutively presenting were included if they had forefoot gangrene (Wagner grade 4) at initial visit or developed forefoot gangrene during follow-up at diabetic foot centre. Patients were prospectively followed up until final outcome, either healing or death. The median follow-up period until healing was 41 (3-234) weeks. Results: Four hundred and seventy-six patients were included. The median age was 73 (35-95) years and 63% were males. Of the patients, 82% had cardiovascular disease and 16% had diabetic nephropathy. Vascular intervention was performed in 64%. Fifty-one patients (17% of surviving patients) healed after auto-amputation, 150 after minor amputation (48% of surviving patients), 103 had major amputation (33% of surviving patients) and 162 patients deceased unhealed. Ten patients were lost at follow-up. The median time to healing for all surviving patients was 41 (3-234) weeks; for auto-amputated, 48 (10-228) weeks; for minor amputated, 48 (6-234) weeks; and for major amputation, 32 (3-116) weeks. Conclusion: Healing without major amputation is possible in a large proportion of patients with diabetes and forefoot gangrene, despite these patients being elderly and with extensive co-morbidity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The effect of magnesium on early osseointegration in osteoporotic bone: a histological and gene expression investigation: response to comments by Marcus2018In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 1005-1006Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hellstrand Tang, Ulla
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg; Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy,University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Centre of Empirical Research in Information Systems, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Sundberg, Leif
    Gothenburg Diabetes Association, Gothenburg.
    Annersten Gershater, Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Zügner, Roland
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy,University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Patients’ Expectations of Evidence-Based Service at the Pharmacy Regarding Information on Self-Care of the Feet for Persons with Diabetes at Risk of Developing Foot Ulcers – A Cross-Sectional Observational Study in Sweden2023In: Patient Preference and Adherence, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 17, p. 3557-3576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Self-care of the feet is one of the cornerstones in the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Often, individuals with diabetes seek help at the pharmacy, but it is still unclear whether the service meets their expectations and needs. The aims were to explore patients' expectations of support from the pharmacy regarding self-care of their feet and explore how patients with diabetes felt that they managed the self-care of their feet.

    Patients and methods: The included participants (n = 17), aged 70 ± 9 years, answered surveys regarding their expectations of support from the pharmacy related to self-care of the feet and how they felt that they managed the self-care of their feet. By using software, MyFoot Diabetes, they assessed their risk of developing DFU (ranging from 1 = no risk to 4 = DFU). In addition, a healthcare professional assessed the risk grade.

    Results: Sixteen patients had not received any information from the pharmacy regarding how to take care of their feet. Several suggestions for ways the pharmacy could help patients with diabetes to take care of their feet were registered. They included having the necessary skills and competence, giving advice regarding self-care, giving information regarding the products they market and have for sale and giving advice on ointments/creams. The participants gave several examples of how they self-managed their feet: by wearing shoes indoors and outdoors, wearing socks and compression stockings as often as possible, being physically active, inspecting their feet, being aware of the fact that their feet have no problems, washing, moisturising their feet, cutting their nails and finally seeking help to prevent DFU.

    Conclusion: The participants thought that they should receive competent information from the personnel at the pharmacy to improve the self-care of their feet, eg, being given information about which ointments/creams to use.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Jujić, Amra
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Atabaki-Pasdar, Naeimeh
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Dieden, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Tuomi, Tiinamaija
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Folkhälsan Research Centre, Biomedicum, and Research Program Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Endocrinology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Franks, Paul W
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
    Holst, Jens Juul
    Department of Biomedical Sciences and Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Torekov, Signe Sørensen
    Department of Biomedical Sciences and Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ravassa, Susana
    Program of Cardiovascular Diseases, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; CIBERCV, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
    Díez, Javier
    Program of Cardiovascular Diseases, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; CIBERCV, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. 15Department of Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery and Department of Nephrology, University of Navarra Clinic, Pamplona, Spain.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ahlqvist, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Melander, Olle
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Gomez, Maria F
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Groop, Leif
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Folkhälsan Research Centre, Biomedicum, and Research Program Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Wallenberg Center for Molecular Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Hypertension in Africa Research Team, North-West University Potchefstroom, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
    Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Peptide in the High-Normal Range Is Associated With Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness2021In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 224-230, article id dc201318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE While existing evidence supports beneficial cardiovascular effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), emerging studies suggest that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and/or signaling via the GIP receptor may have untoward cardiovascular effects. Indeed, recent studies show that fasting physiological GIP levels are associated with total mortality and cardiovascular mortality, and it was suggested that GIP plays a role in pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. We investigated the associations between fasting and postchallenge GIP and GLP-1 concentrations and subclinical atherosclerosis as measured by mean intima-media thickness in the common carotid artery (IMTmeanCCA) and maximal intima-media thickness in the carotid bifurcation (IMTmaxBulb).

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants at reexamination within the Malmö Diet and Cancer–Cardiovascular Cohort study (n = 3,734, mean age 72.5 years, 59.3% women, 10.8% subjects with diabetes, fasting GIP available for 3,342 subjects, fasting GLP-1 available for 3,299 subjects) underwent oral glucose tolerance testing and carotid ultrasound.

    RESULTS In linear regression analyses, each 1-SD increment of fasting GIP was associated with increased (per mm) IMTmeanCCA (β = 0.010, P = 0.010) and IMTmaxBulb (β = 0.014; P = 0.040) in models adjusted for known risk factors and glucose metabolism. In contrast, each 1-SD increment of fasting GLP-1 was associated with decreased IMTmaxBulb (per mm, β = −0.016, P = 0.014). These associations remained significant when subjects with diabetes were excluded from analyses.

    CONCLUSIONS In a Swedish elderly population, physiologically elevated levels of fasting GIP are associated with increased IMTmeanCCA, while GLP-1 is associated with decreased IMTmaxBulb, further emphasizing diverging cardiovascular effects of these two incretin hormones.

  • 10.
    Kristensen, Karl
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lund, Sweden..
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Katsarou, Anastasia
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden..
    Shaat, Nael
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden..
    Simmons, David
    Univ Western Sydney, Macarthur Clin Sch, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia.;Orebro Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden..
    Fadl, Helena
    Orebro Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden..
    Berntorp, Kerstin
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden..
    Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Point-of-Care Methods for Glucose versus Hospital Laboratory Method Using Isotope Dilution Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry as Reference2020In: Journal of Diabetes Research, ISSN 2314-6745, E-ISSN 2314-6753, Vol. 2020, article id 7937403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In Sweden, both glucose analyzers in accredited laboratories and point-of-care glucose devices are used for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of the HemoCue Glucose 201+ (HC201+) and RT (HC201RT) systems with that of the hospital central laboratory hexokinase method (CL) based on lyophilized citrate tubes, using the isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ID GC-MS) as reference. Methods. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was performed on 135 women screened positive for GDM. Diagnosis was based on the World Health Organization 2013 diagnostic thresholds for fasting (n=135), 1 h (n=52), and 2 h (n=135) glucose measurements. Bland-Altman analysis and surveillance error grids were used to evaluate analytical and clinical accuracy. Results. Significantly more women were diagnosed with GDM by HC201+ (80%) and CL (80%) than with the reference (65%, P<0.001) based on fasting and/or 2 h thresholds, whereas the percentage diagnosed by HC201RT (60%) did not differ significantly from the reference. In Bland-Altman analysis, a positive bias was observed for HC201+ (4.2%) and CL (6.1%) and a negative bias for HC201RT (-1.8%). In the surveillance error grid, 95.9% of the HC201+ values were in the no-risk zone as compared to 98.1% for HC201RT and 97.5% for CL. Conclusions. A substantial positive bias was found for CL measurements resulting in overdiagnosis of GDM. Our findings suggest better performance of HC201RT than HC201+ in GDM diagnosis. The results may have possible implications for GDM diagnosis in Sweden and require further elucidation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Kumlien, Christine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmo, Sweden..
    Acosta, Stefan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Björklund, Sebastian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Lavant, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Lazer, Victoria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Engblom, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Gershater, Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Research priorities to prevent and treat diabetic foot ulcers-A digital James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership2022In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 39, no 11, article id e14947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To establish outcomes of a priority setting partnership between participants with diabetes mellitus and clinicians to identify the top 10 research priorities for preventing and treating diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Methods Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership process was adapted into a digital format which involved a pilot survey to identify understandable uncertainties with high relevance for participants tested by calculating the content validity index; a main survey answered by 53 participants living with diabetes and 49 clinicians; and a final digital workshop to process and prioritise the final top 10 research priorities. Results The content validity index was satisfactory for 20 out of 25 uncertainties followed by minor changes and one additional uncertainty. After we processed the 26 uncertainties from the main survey and seven current guidelines, a list of 28 research uncertainties remained for review and discussion in the digital workshop. The final top 10 research priorities included the organisation of diabetes care; screening of diabetes, impaired blood circulation, neuropathy, and skin properties; vascular surgical treatment; importance of self-care; help from significant others; pressure relief; and prevention of infection. Conclusion The top 10 research priorities for preventing and treating DFUs represent consensus areas from persons living with diabetes and clinicians to guide future research. These research priorities can justify and inform strategic allocation of research funding. The digitalisation of James Lind Alliance methodology was feasible.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12. Magnusson, Martin
    et al.
    Jujic, Amra
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Hedblad, Bo
    Engstrom, Gunnar
    Persson, Margaretha
    Struck, Joachim
    Morgenthaler, Nils G.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Newton-Cheh, Christopher
    Wang, Thomas J.
    Melander, Olle
    Low Plasma Level of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Predicts Development of Diabetes: The Prospective Malmo Diet and Cancer Study2012In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 638-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The cardiac natriuretic peptides are involved in blood pressure regulation, and large cross-sectional studies have shown lower plasma levels of N-terminal pro-natriuretic peptide levels [N-terminal atrial natriuretic peptide (N-ANP) and N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (N-BNP)] in patients with insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes. Objective: In this study, we prospectively tested whether plasma levels of mid-regional ANP (MRANP) and N-BNP predict new-onset diabetes and long-term glucose progression. Design, Setting, and Patients: MR-ANP and N-BNP were measured in 1828 nondiabetic individuals of the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort (mean age 60 yr; 61% women) who subsequently underwent a follow-up exam including an oral glucose tolerance test after a median follow-up time of 16 yr. Logistic regression was used to adjust for covariates. Results: During follow-up, 301 subjects developed new-onset diabetes. After full multivariate adjustment, MR-ANP was significantly inversely associated with incident diabetes (OR = 0.85; 95% CI = 0.73-0.99; P = 0.034) but not N-BNP (OR = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.80-1.06; P = 0.262). In fully adjusted linear regression models, the progression of fasting glucose during follow-up was significantly inversely related to baseline levels of MR-ANP (P = 0.004) but not N-BNP (P = 0.129). Quartile analyses revealed that the overall association was mainly accounted for by excess risk of incident diabetes in subjects belonging to the lowest quartile of MR-ANP. After full adjustment, the odds ratio for incident diabetes in the bottom compared with the top quartile of MR-ANP was 1.65 (OR = 1.08-2.51, P = 0.019) and 1.43 (OR = 1.04-1.96, P = 0.027) compared with all other subjects. Conclusion: Low plasma levels of MR-ANP predict development of future diabetes and glucose progression over time, suggesting a causal role of ANP deficiency in diabetes development. (J Clin Endocrinol Metab 97: 638-645, 2012)

  • 13.
    Messanga, Ashley
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mahmodkuba, Dalia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjuksköterskors upplevelser av att vårda patientermed diabetes mellitus typ II: En litteraturstudie2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetes mellitus type II is one of the fastest growing disease worldwide. It is a chronic endocrine disease that requires a lot of life changes and determination. It is characterized primarily by the pancreas producing insufficient insulin. The main cause of diabetes type II includes risk factors such as heredity and unhealthy lifestyle regarding poor diet, physical inactivity, obesity and age. Early symptoms of diabetes type II are increased thirst, frequent urinary, fatigue and dry mouth. Aim: The purpose was to explore nurses´ perception in caring of patients with diabetes mellitus type II. Method: A literature review of which 10 qualitative articles were critically analyzed and summarized. Searches derived from relevant keywords were made in PUBMED and CINAHL databases. This contributed to the finding of relevant articles that were conducted worldwide and were quality-reviewed. 

    Result: The articles acknowledged  that the majority of the nurses perceived a lack of strategy and inability to inform patients about lifestyle changes. The result also showed that person-centered care was crucial in order to provide effective care and improve patient participation. Conclusion: Nurses need more knowledge, competence and organizational conditions in order to provide effective person-centered care with treatment that supports a person living with type II diabetes. Nurses  also required more knowledge within cultural and social economic factors in order to provide optimal care and strengthen the patient’s abilities. Lack of effective collaboration between healthcare professionals in diabetes care was also identified as an obstacle to provide good care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Nisser Christofferson, Nils
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Policarpio Cruz, Rhyan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    "Hur kan jag hjälpa till?" Sjuksköterskans erfarenheter att stödja patienter med diabetes i deras egenvård: En litteraturstudie2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetes is a chronic disease that increases in prevalence across the world. For people with diabetes, self–care is an extensive part of daily life that requires engagement and knowledge to be able to live their best life. Nurses have a responsibility to provide patients with diabetes the support they need, so the patient has the internal resources and motivation to manage their diabetes in a sustainable way. Aim: The aim of this literature review was to highlight nurses’ experiences of supporting patients with diabetes with their self-care. Method: The literature review method was based on qualitative studies because the aim was to explore the phenomenon of subjective experience. The analysis was done using a qualitative content analysis. Results: The results were based on 13 scientific studies, of which the authors designed four main categories with a total of nine subcategories. The four main categories were “The care-relationship between patient and nurse”, “Nurses’ strategies”, “Nurses’ challenges, and “Nurses’ competence”. Conclusion: Nurses' experiences regarding the support towards patients with diabetes were similar across the studies included in the result. Nurses were aware of the importance of having a good care-relationship with the patient to be able to provide adequate support, and provided several support-strategies, with the person-centered care being the most discussed. Nurses also demonstrated the challenges they faced with disengaged patients, lack of time and work overload, and that the support provided was limited in its efficacy. A lack of competence and a need for more education around diabetes and self-care was expressed repeatedly. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15. Norhammar, Anna
    et al.
    Kjellström, Barbro
    Habib, Natalie
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nygren, Åke
    Näsman, Per
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rydén, Lars
    Response to Comment on Norhammar et al. Undetected Dysglycemia Is an Important Risk Factor for Two Common Diseases, Myocardial Infarction and Periodontitis: A Report From the PAROKRANK Study. Diabetes Care 2019;42:1504-15112020In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 43, no 1, p. E9-E9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Norhammar, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Medicine K2, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Capio St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellström, Barbro
    Department of Medicine K2, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Habib, Natalie
    Department of Medicine K2, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nygren, Åke
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyds Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Näsman, Per
    Center for Safety Research, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Department of Medicine K2, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rydén, Lars
    Department of Medicine K2, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Undetected Dysglycemia Is an Important Risk Factor for Two Common Diseases, Myocardial Infarction and Periodontitis: A Report From the PAROKRANK Study2019In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1504-1511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Information on the relationship among dysglycemia (prediabetes or diabetes), myocardial infarction (MI), and periodontitis (PD) is limited. This study tests the hypothesis that undetected dysglycemia is associated with both conditions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The PAROKRANK (Periodontitis and Its Relation to Coronary Artery Disease) study included 805 patients with a first MI and 805 matched control subjects. All participants without diabetes (91%) were examined with an oral glucose tolerance test. Abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) (impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes) was categorized according to the World Health Organization. Periodontal status was categorized from dental X-rays as healthy (>= 80% remaining alveolar bone height), moderate (79-66%), or severe (<66%) PD. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were calculated by logistic regression and were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, education, marital status, and explored associated risks of dysglycemia to PD and MI, respectively. RESULTS: AGT was more common in patients than in control subjects (32% vs. 19%; P < 0.001) and was associated with MI (OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.58-2.60). Undetected diabetes was associated with severe PD (2.50; 1.36-4.63) and more strongly in patients (2.35; 1.15-4.80) than in control subjects (1.80; 0.48-6.78), but not when categorized as AGT (total cohort: 1.07; 0.67-1.72). Severe PD was most frequent in subjects with undetected diabetes, and reversely undetected diabetes was most frequent in patients with severe PD. CONCLUSIONS: In this large case-control study previously undetected dysglycemia was independently associated to both MI and severe PD. In principal, it doubled the risk of a first MI and of severe PD. This supports the hypothesis that dysglycemia drives two common diseases, MI and PD.

  • 17.
    Psotta, Carolin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Aptusens AB, S-29394 Kyrkhult, Sweden..
    Cirovic, Stefan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Falk, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Mandal, Tanushree
    Univ Galway, Sch Chem & Ryan Inst, Univ Rd, Galway, Ireland..
    Reichhart, Thomas
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci, Dept Food Sci & Technol, BOKU, A-1190 Vienna, Austria.;DirectSens Biosensors GmbH, A-3400 Klosterneuburg, Austria..
    Leech, Donal
    Univ Galway, Sch Chem & Ryan Inst, Univ Rd, Galway, Ireland..
    Ludwig, Roland
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci, Dept Food Sci & Technol, BOKU, A-1190 Vienna, Austria.;DirectSens Biosensors GmbH, A-3400 Klosterneuburg, Austria..
    Kittel, Roman
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci, Dept Food Sci & Technol, BOKU, A-1190 Vienna, Austria..
    Schuhmann, Wolfgang
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fac Chem & Biochem, Analyt Chem Ctr Electrochem Sci, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Aptusens AB, S-29394 Kyrkhult, Sweden..
    Continuous ex vivo glucose sensing in human physiological fluids using an enzymatic sensor in a vein replica2023In: Bioelectrochemistry, ISSN 1567-5394, E-ISSN 1878-562X, Vol. 152, article id 108441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing blood glucose can affect important clinical outcomes during the intraoperative phase of surgery. However, currently available instruments for glucose monitoring during surgery are few and not optimized for the specific application. Here we report an attempt to exploit an enzymatic sensor in a vein replica that could continuously monitor glucose level in an authentic human bloodstream. First, detailed investigations of the superficial venous systems of volunteers were carried out using ocular and palpating examinations, as well as advanced ultrasound measurements. Second, a tubular glucose-sensitive biosensor mimicking a venous system was designed and tested. Almost ideal linear dependence of current output on glucose concentration in phosphate buffer saline was obtained in the range 2.2-22.0 mM, whereas the dependence in human plasma was less linear. Finally, the developed biosensor was investigated in whole blood under homeostatic conditions. A specific correlation was found between the current output and glucose concentration at the initial stage of the biodevice operation. However, with time, blood coagulation during measurements negatively affected the performance of the biodevice. When the experimental results were remodeled to predict the response without the influence of blood coagulation, the sensor output closely followed the blood glucose level.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Rouyard, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Leal, José
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Salvi, Dario
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). University of Oxford, UK.
    Baskerville, Richard
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Velardo, Carmelo
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Gray, Alastair
    University of Oxford, UK.
    An Intuitive Risk Communication Tool to Enhance Patient-Provider Partnership in Diabetes Consultation.2022In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, E-ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 988-994, article id 1932296821995800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: This technology report introduces an innovative risk communication tool developed to support providers in communicating diabetes-related risks more intuitively to people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    METHODS: The development process involved three main steps: (1) selecting the content and format of the risk message; (2) developing a digital interface; and (3) assessing the usability and usefulness of the tool with clinicians through validated questionnaires.

    RESULTS: The tool calculates personalized risk information based on a validated simulation model (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes Model 2) and delivers it using more intuitive risk formats, such as "effective heart age" to convey cardiovascular risks. Clinicians reported high scores for the usability and usefulness of the tool, making its adoption in routine care promising.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite increased use of risk calculators in clinical care, this is the first time that such a tool has been developed in the diabetes area. Further studies are needed to confirm the benefits of using this tool on behavioral and health outcomes in T2DM populations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Stenzelius, K.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Urol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Urinary tract symptoms and bother among middle-aged women with long lasting type 1 diabetes2023In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 58, p. 11-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Stigberg, Robin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wictorsson, Julia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjuksköterskans insatser för att öka fysisk aktivitet hos patienter med diabetes typ 2.: En kvantitativ litteraturstudie2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Diabetes är en folksjukdom som drabbar allt fler i världen.Från år 1980 har antalet personer med diabetes ökat från ca 108 miljoner till 422miljoner år 2014. Diabetes typ 1 och diabetes typ 2 är de vanligast förekommandetyperna av diabetes. Diabetes typ 2 är i hög grad ärftlig men det finns fleralivsstilsförändringar människan kan göra för att förebygga eller minska risken förkomplikationer, bland annat ökad fysisk aktivitet. Vid diabetes typ 2rekommenderar Socialstyrelsen 30 minuter medelintensiv fysisk aktivitet per dageller 150 minuter medelintensiv fysisk aktivitet per vecka.Syfte: Syftet med litteraturstudien var att undersöka det vetenskapliga stödet förolika egenvårdsinsatser som sjuksköterskan kan rekommendera för att öka fysiskaktivitet hos patienter med diabetes typ 2.Metod: En litteraturstudie baserad på studier med kvantitativ ansats hargenomförts. Deltagarna i studierna var vuxna patienter med diabetes typ 2.Interventionernas syfte var att öka den fysiska aktiviteten hos deltagarna.Resultatet i litteraturstudien bygger på data från tio olika vetenskapliga artiklarfrån databaserna Cinahl och PubMed.Resultat: Olika former av insatser från sjuksköterskan exempelvis rådgivande,individuell- eller grupputbildning samt med hjälp av olika tekniska hjälpmedelsom komplement visade resultat i form av ökad fysisk aktivitet hos deltagarna.Konklusion: Det finns ett flertal insatser som kan hjälpa patienter med diabetestyp 2 att öka sin fysiska aktivitet och minska risken för diabetesrelateradekomplikationer. I genomförandet av dessa insatser har sjuksköterskan en viktigpedagogisk, motiverande och stödjande roll gentemot patienterna. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Viberg, Ellen
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Is it possible to extract and use DNA from blood samples stored for up to 21 years in the DiPiS study?2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Blood samples stored long-term in research studies could prove to be very valuable if it is possible to isolate good quality deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from them. The aim was to isolate and evaluate quality of DNA from 500 capillary blood samples, stored for 7 to 21 years in the DiPiS study. The samples were obtained from 5 different time-periods in the DiPiS study. DNA was isolated using QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen) and quantified using NanoQuant (Tecan). TapeStation (Agilent) was used to evaluate quality and fragmentation of n=100 DNA samples. It was found that it is possible to isolate good quality DNA from blood samples stored long-term, in the range of 7 to 21 years at -20 °C. There was significant difference in [260/280 nm] absorbance ratio between groups of samples stored for 7, 8, 12, 16 or 21 years and the quality control using n=100 samples revealed a significant difference in DNA integrity number (DIN) relative to storage time but not in fragment size. However, no correlation between sample quality and storage time could be found. The results suggest that good quality DNA can be isolated from the 7 to 21 years old blood samples in the DiPiS study and used in future analyses. The results from this study suggest that other studies that have blood samples stored long-term could isolate good quality DNA from these.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf