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The role of political fit and self-censorship at work for job satisfaction, social belonging, burnout, and turnover intentions
Institutionen för psykologi, Linnéuniversitetet.
Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Linköping University, Linköping; Sweden Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2077-0243
2024 (English)In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

We examined whether employees (N = 710) who experience low levels of political fit and who self-censor their political opinions at work, are more likely to display lower job satisfaction and perceived social community, and higher turnover intentions, burnout, and fear of social isolation. The results largely confirmed these associations and showed that the associations between perceived political fit and job satisfaction, social community, turnover intentions, and burnout were statistically mediated by willingness to self-censor. This suggests that employees who experience lower levels of person-organization fit with regards to their political ideology have a higher tendency to censure themselves, which is negatively related to their well-being, perceived social belonging, and job satisfaction. Furthermore, we found that the willingness to self-censor political opinions at work was slightly higher on average among those who were politically to the left, female, younger, and less educated. The findings point to the complexity of navigating political ideologies in the workplace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024.
National Category
Psychology Work Sciences
Research subject
Arbete och organisation; Organisational studies
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URN: urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66627DOI: 10.1007/s12144-024-05910-zISI: 001197367700006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85189348643OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mau-66627DiVA, id: diva2:1849285
Available from: 2024-04-05 Created: 2024-04-05 Last updated: 2024-04-23Bibliographically approved

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Holm, Kristoffer

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