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Health and quality of life among women after participation in a CBPR-informed physical activity intervention: with a pandemic perspective.
Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4603-9974
Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1235-620X
Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0077-9061
Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6421-2158
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2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 17972Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lack of culturally and contextually oriented interventions promoting physical activity (PA) has led to increased physical inactivity among women living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Sweden. In this study one such intervention informed by community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been evaluated among 34 women from a disadvantaged neighbourhood before and during COVID-19. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), behavioural and biomedical outcomes were assessed directly prior and post-intervention, followed by evaluations at 6-months and 18-months follow-up during COVID-19. The results revealed that HRQOL, particularly psychological, social, and environmental health significantly increased post-intervention compared to prior to intervention but reversed back at 6-months follow-up. Perceived health satisfaction and environmental health increased at 18-months follow-up during COVID-19. Participation in PA improved post-intervention and at 6-months follow-up. Everyday activities and fruit and vegetable intake continued to increase through all timepoints. Systolic blood pressure significantly decreased post-intervention and 6-months follow-up; blood flow rate increased significantly at all timepoints. Overall, the findings underscores the potential effectiveness of CBPR approaches in promoting and sustaining healthy lifestyles, even during acute situations such as the COVID-19. It may even serve as a future model for promoting health and addressing health disparities in similar groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023. Vol. 13, no 1, article id 17972
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63606DOI: 10.1038/s41598-023-45239-4ISI: 001087596300084PubMedID: 37863947Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85174618667OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mau-63606DiVA, id: diva2:1811143
Available from: 2023-11-10 Created: 2023-11-10 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Non-invasive biomedical analysis: recent advances, challenges, and future perspectives
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-invasive biomedical analysis: recent advances, challenges, and future perspectives
2024 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Non-invasive healthcare technologies are increasingly pivotal in research anddevelopment due to their affordability and the convenience they offer to bothhealthcare recipients and providers. Alongside traditional non-invasive methodssuch as ultrasound imaging, a variety of innovative non-invasive devices havebeen developed. These include cardiovascular diagnostic systems, bioimpedancebasedscales, and various types of analyzers. These analyzers, which can be fluidlessor fluid-based, are capable of measuring not just physical parameters of thebody but also key biomarkers like glucose and lactate. This comprehensive andtransdisciplinary thesis encompasses three distinct yet interconnected segments:1) Advanced ultrasound imaging (Papers I and II): The first explored vortexformation time in female athletes and the second detailed investigations of thesuperficial venous systems of apparently healthy volunteers.2) Validation and application of commercially available fluid-less bloodanalyzers (Papers IV-VI). These papers focus on non-invasive blood glucosemonitoring (Paper IV) and the general use of non-invasive healthcaretechnologies among female participants from socioeconomicallydisadvantaged areas (Papers V and VI).3) Design and testing of novel, fluid-based sensors, and biosensors (Papers II andIII): Paper II delves into biosensing of viruses, and paper III deals withcontinuous ex vivo glucose sensing in human blood using an enzymatic sensorin a vein replica.Each of these segments contribute to the broader understanding and advancementof non-invasive healthcare technologies, highlighting the significant role suchtechnologies play in modern healthcare research. The thesis's transdisciplinaryapproach, spanning from advanced imaging techniques to the development ofnovel biosensors, exemplifies the dynamic and evolving nature of medicaltechnology research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Malmö University Press, 2024. p. 64
Series
Malmö University Health and Society Dissertations, ISSN 1653-5383
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Natural Sciences Social Sciences
Research subject
Health and society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66097 (URN)10.24834/isbn.9789178774562 (DOI)978-91-7877-455-5 (ISBN)978-91-7877-456-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2024-03-01, Aula, Health, and Society, Jan Waldenströms gata 25, 205 06, Malmö, 13:00 (English)
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Note

Paper IV in dissertation as manuscript

Available from: 2024-02-27 Created: 2024-02-26 Last updated: 2024-02-29Bibliographically approved

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Ramji, RathiRämgård, MargaretaCarlson, ElisabethShleev, SergeyAwad, EmanCirovic, StefanKottorp, Anders

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