Malmö University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The salivary mucin MUC5B and lactoperoxidase can be used for layer-by-layer film formation
Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0392-3540
Show others and affiliations
2007 (English)In: Journal of Colloid Interface Science, Vol. 310, no 1, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Abstract In situ ellipsometry was used to study layer-by-layer film formation on hydrophilic and hydrophobized silica surfaces by alternating sequential adsorption of human mucin MUC5B and cationic proteins lysozyme, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase or histatin 5, respectively. The stability of the multilayers was investigated by addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate solution (SDS). Atomic force microscopy was employed to investigate morphological structures on the surfaces during the layer-by-layer film build-up. It was clearly shown that, on both hydrophilic and hydrophobized silica, only MUC5B and lactoperoxidase showed the ability for multilayer formation, resulting in an approximately linear increase in adsorbed amount and film thickness with each deposition cycle. The net increase in amounts per cycle was larger on the hydrophilic silica. Further, MUC5B needs to be adsorbed first on the hydrophilic substrates to obtain this fast build-up behavior. Generally, addition of SDS solution showed that a large fraction of the adsorbed film could be desorbed. However, films on the hydrophobized silica were more resistant to surfactant elution. In conclusion, MUC5B–cationic protein multilayers can be formed on hydrophilic and hydrophobized silica, depending on the choice of the cationic protein as well as in which order the build-up is started on hydrophilic silica. Additionally, SDS disrupts the layer-by-layer film formed by MUC5B and lactoperoxidase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 310, no 1, p. 74-82
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-4649DOI: 10.1016/j.jcis.2007.01.086ISI: 000245967500008PubMedID: 17346726Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-34147114414Local ID: 4474OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mau-4649DiVA, id: diva2:1401483
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. In vitro and in vivo studies of salivary films at solid/liquid interfaces
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro and in vivo studies of salivary films at solid/liquid interfaces
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A conditioning film, the pellicle, of which many salivary proteins areimportant constituents, covers the surfaces present in the mouth. The pellicleforms in a selective adsorption process, and it has protective and lubricatingfunctions as well as an influence on the adherence of oral microbes thatultimately leads to the development of dental plaque. Understanding theinteractions responsible for the selective pellicle formation would make itpossible to strive at creating a pellicle that serves its protective and lubricatingfunctions and also promotes a healthy biofilm for the benefit of the individual.The aim of this research was to characterize the adsorption of salivaryproteins to different types of substrates, to evaluate the influence of differentprotein-surface interactions on the adsorption process, and also to assesssubstrate dependent differences in film composition. Furthermore, as it is wellknown that complexes form between different salivary proteins and mucins(large glycoproteins) in bulk saliva, the aim was also to study interactionsbetween mucins and other pellicle constituents at the solid/liquid interface.Additionally, the effects of a surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), onthe protein films were investigated, to evaluate the stability of the films andalso the possibilities to completely remove the in vivo formed pellicle.The adsorption experiments were performed in vitro using nullellipsometry, by which parameters such as adsorbed amount per unit area andaverage layer thickness can be obtained. Hydrophilic and hydrophobized silicawere used as model substrates. The adsorption behaviour of the cationic,antimicrobial proteins lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, lysozyme, and histatin 5indicated that the adsorption on hydrophilic substrates was mainly driven byelectrostatics, while on hydrophobized substrates hydrophobic interactionsalso influenced the adsorption process. Furthermore, it was shown that12sequential alternating adsorption of the anionic salivary mucin MUC5B andlactoperoxidase resulted in the build-up of multilayered structures on thesurface. The rate of build-up was influenced by the surface characteristics.Sequential adsorption studies showed that neither MUC5B nor human wholesaliva (HWS) was able to exchange substantial amounts of the pre-adsorbedanionic pellicle proteins acidic proline-rich protein 1 (PRP-1) or statherin,respectively. The resistance of the adsorbed mixed protein films to SDS elutiondepended on surface properties as well as on the number of layers adsorbedand adsorbed components. Pre-adsorbed PRP-1 was to some extent protectedfrom SDS elution by the sequential adsorption of MUC5B to the PRP-1 film.Pellicles formed on natural tooth enamel were collected in vivo andinvestigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). MechanicallyassistedSDS elution was used to collect the in vivo formed pellicle. Theeffectiveness of the collection procedure was validated in vitro by means ofmechanical removal in combination with HCl treatment. The results indicatedthat rubbing the tooth surfaces with fibre pellets soaked in 0.5 % (w/v) SDSwas sufficient to completely remove the pellicle from human enamel. Inaddition, 2-DE analysis of pellicles formed in vitro on human enamel and thedental materials titanium and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) showeddifferences in composition when compared to each other, revealing that thepellicle is influenced by the substrate properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö University, 2009
Series
Malmö University Health and Society Dissertations, ISSN 1653-5383 ; 2
Keywords
saliva, proteins, adsorption, ellipsometry, gel electrophoresis
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-7329 (URN)9389 (Local ID)978-91-7104-227-9 (ISBN)9389 (Archive number)9389 (OAI)
Note

Note: The papers are not included in the fulltext online

Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-03-01Bibliographically approved
2. Interactions of Mucins with Biopolymers and Drug Delivery Particles
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions of Mucins with Biopolymers and Drug Delivery Particles
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The main components in the mucous gels apart from water are mucins, which are proteins with high molecular weights and an abundance of negatively charged oligosaccharide side chains. The aim of the investigations was to characterize interactions between mucins and other proteins that are present in the mucous gel, and also between mucins and components used in pharmaceutical formulations. More specifically, the main objectives were (I) to investigate the possibility to assemble multilayer films with mucins and oppositely charged polymers or proteins on solid substrates; (II) to evaluate mucoadhesive proper-ties of drug delivery particles by examination of their interactions with mucins. The construction of multilayer films was performed on silica and hydrophobized silica surfaces by alternate adsorption, and the adsorbed amount and thickness of the films were measured in situ by time resolved ellipsometry. It was demonstrated that films could be assembled using mucins in combination with both chitosan and lactoperoxidase. The build-up was characterized by adsorption and redissolution processes, and the extent of redissolution could be explained by taking the charge densities and concentrations of the components into account. It was also demonstrated that the nature of the substrate can be crucial for the possibilities to assemble multilayer films, and from the results it may be concluded that a high amount of mucin in the first step is important for successful layer-by-layer assembly. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that lactoperoxidase is catalytically active when adsorbed to mucin layers, and it may thereby exert its antimicrobial action. The evaluation of mucoadhesive properties of drug delivery particles was performed with lipid nanoparticles stabilized by a poly(ethylene oxide) based polymer and with particles modified by chitosan. Both types of model particles (unmodified and chitosan modified) were investigated by measuring their adsorption to mucin-coated silica surfaces by ellipsometry. It was shown that the binding of unmodified particles to mucin-coated silica surfaces was weak and pH-dependent. Based on the pH and electrolyte dependence of the adsorption, it was proposed that the interaction is mediated by hydrogen bonding between protonated carboxyl groups in the mucin molecule and oxygen atoms in poly(ethylene oxide). Chitosan modified particles, on the other hand, showed a substantial and strong binding to mucin-coated surfaces, which can probably be attributed to interactions between amino groups in chitosan and negatively charged groups in the mucin layer. The findings from the present investigations are in agreement with previous reports on the interaction of mucins with poly(ethylene oxide) and chitosan. It can therefore be concluded that the methodology applied is useful for evaluating mucoadhesive properties of nanoparticles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö University, 2008
Series
Malmö University Health and Society Dissertations, ISSN 1653-5383
Keywords
mucin, chitosan, lactoperoxidase, multilayer, mucoadhesion, nanoparticles, ellipsometry
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-7339 (URN)5930 (Local ID)978-91-7104-212-5 (ISBN)5930 (Archive number)5930 (OAI)
Note

Note: The papers are not included in the fulltext online.

Paper III and V in dissertation as manuscript, paper IV as accepted manuscript.

Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-03-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Lindh, LiselottSvendsen, IdaCárdenas, MaritéArnebrant, Thomas

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindh, LiselottSvendsen, IdaCárdenas, MaritéArnebrant, Thomas
By organisation
Faculty of Odontology (OD)Faculty of Health and Society (HS)
Physical Chemistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 24 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf