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Ingman, Sissi
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Mølbjerg Jørgensen, K., Trägårdh, T., Ingman, S., Witmer, H. & Säwe, F. (2023). Storymaking for Gaia?: Newcomers' stories of managing for sustainability. In: Organizing for the Good Life: Grand Challenges and the Rhetoric of Collective Action. Paper presented at European Group of Organization Studies, Cagliari, Italy, July 6-8 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storymaking for Gaia?: Newcomers' stories of managing for sustainability
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2023 (English)In: Organizing for the Good Life: Grand Challenges and the Rhetoric of Collective Action, 2023Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper constructs an ethics of managing by reading Latour’s notion of Gaia with Arendt’s notion of storytelling. Gaia implies reframing the ethical foundation for making stories as well as it has ontological consequences for how we perceive stories. We suggest reframing storytelling into storymaking. This concept attunes to how storymaking is part of making life that becomes through, relies on, and is answerable to multiple other lives: human as well as nonhuman. Second, storymaking allows depicting managers’ imagination of themselves and what they do in the complex webs of relations that managers are part of. We put storymaking to work in discussing the processes of translation that occur when new managers transition from management education for sustainability to work life. Our re-storying of their stories attunes to their ethical compass and how they enact it into being. We attune to the tensions involved in building a stable foundation for their storymaking and the compromises they make in coping with fleeting and, at times, chaotic organizational realities. Attuning to how organizations make life and affect the conditions of caring for life is important for judging organizational action. Second, storymaking allows understanding of managing as a process that involves making stories about life spiritually and materially, thereby stabilizing life amid chaos. 

Keywords
Ethical compass, sustainability managers, newcomers, storymaking, Gaia
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Organisational studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63079 (URN)
Conference
European Group of Organization Studies, Cagliari, Italy, July 6-8 2023
Available from: 2023-10-10 Created: 2023-10-10 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
Mølbjerg Jørgensen, K. & Ingman, S. (2022). Leaderless Leadership: Implications of the "Agora" and the "Public Library". In: Hertel, Fredrik; Örtenblad, Anders; Mølbjerg Jørgensen, Kenneth (Ed.), Debating Leaderless Management: Can Employees Do Without Leaders (pp. 125-141). Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaderless Leadership: Implications of the "Agora" and the "Public Library"
2022 (English)In: Debating Leaderless Management: Can Employees Do Without Leaders / [ed] Hertel, Fredrik; Örtenblad, Anders; Mølbjerg Jørgensen, Kenneth, Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 125-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Leadership education has become a billion-dollar business and is a popular field among researchers and students in universities. Multiple debates about what leadership is and how to perform it flourish. In a recent debate book, Anders Örtenblad (2018) has collected contributions that debate whether leadership should be a profession. Jørgensen and Svane (2018) argue that the answer is no to this question from the premises that leadership education would then be defined by the powerful and because it would entail an instrumentalization and standardization of leadership. Hertel and Fast (2018) suggest that leadership is connected to a certain way of being in a context. Therefore, they argue, that it is impossible to define universal principles of leadership. These arguments against turning leadership into a profession are grounded in the idea that leadership is a situated, relational and collective practice rather than a personal and a technical practice. Turning leadership into a profession implies the assumption that leadership emerges from the actions of superior individuals. These debates connect to our position regarding the central theme of the book, which is that we are for leaderless management. Using Hannah Arendt’s (1998) distinction between action and work, we develop a position within leaderless management, which we call leaderless leadership. This position is founded upon action and involves specifying the critical dimension of democratic participation in decisions that concern the whole organization. Arendt argues that action is where people become political among other people. It presumes the perception of a common space among them. Action is thus where people assume responsibility for a world they have in common with others (Arendt 1998, pp. 50–55). Action is etymologically associated with leading and is not only a natural part of the human condition, but also an obligation because it implies taking responsibility for the complex matters of the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022
Series
Palgrave Debates in Business and Management, ISSN 2524-5082, E-ISSN 2524-5090
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Organisational studies; Arbete och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-57319 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-04593-6_8 (DOI)978-3-031-04593-6 (ISBN)978-3-031-04592-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-01-09 Created: 2023-01-09 Last updated: 2023-01-12Bibliographically approved
Ingman, S. (2017). Dignity in Organizing from the Perspective of Hannah Arendt’s Worldliness (ed.). In: Monika Kostera, Michael Pirson (Ed.), Monika Kostera, Michael Pirson (Ed.), Dignity and the Organization: (pp. 11-36). : Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dignity in Organizing from the Perspective of Hannah Arendt’s Worldliness
2017 (English)In: Dignity and the Organization / [ed] Monika Kostera, Michael Pirson, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 11-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Hannah Arendt is not one of the more frequently cited names in today’s dignity discourse, despite having made an early contribution to the debate popularized (McCrudden 2008) by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In her book, On the Origins of Totalitarianism, written around the time of the declaration and when many were experiencing rightlessness, superfluousness, and statelessness, she devotes a chapter to “the perplexities of the rights of man,” in which she formulates her view of the “right to have rights.” In her foreword, she states that “human dignity needs a new guarantee which can be found only in a new political principle, in a new law on earth” (OT, p. ix).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
Series
Humanism in Business Series
Keywords
dignity, organizing, Hannah Arendt
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-9437 (URN)10.1057/978-1-137-55562-5_2 (DOI)23748 (Local ID)978-1-137-55561-8 (ISBN)978-1-137-55562-5 (ISBN)23748 (Archive number)23748 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-06-11Bibliographically approved
Projects
Rosengård – värden och utmaningar i skuggan av en stadsutvecklingsprocess; Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US)
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