Malmö University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alward, Lubna
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Vicente, A., Alward, L., Wiedel, A.-P., Becker, M., Shi, X.-Q., Hellén-Halme, K. & Brogårdh-Roth, S. (2022). Do preterm-born children and adolescents have greater need for dental care as compared to full term-born controls?. BMC Oral Health, 22(1), Article ID 479.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do preterm-born children and adolescents have greater need for dental care as compared to full term-born controls?
Show others...
2022 (English)In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Preterm birth has been shown to cause various long-term health issues. Children who were born preterm have also been observed to have more dental behaviour management problems (DBMP) during dental examinations and treatment than children born full term. It is known that dental radiographic examinations can be uncomfortable and cause anxiety in paediatric patients. Thus, our aims were to retrospectively compare dental care related examinations and treatments carried out in three different age intervals (3-6 years, 7-12 years, and 13-19 years) among preterm- and full-term born children and adolescents.

METHODS: The present study included 311 patient files: 122 very preterm-born and 33 extremely preterm-born children and adolescents (< 32 gestational weeks). A matched control group of 156 full term-born children and adolescents (≥ 37 gestational weeks) was analysed for comparison. Various factors, including DBMP, missed appointments, dental caries, and radiographic examinations, were retrieved from the dental records for three age intervals: 3-6 years, 7-12 years, and 13-19 years.

RESULTS: Extremely preterm-born children missed significantly more dental appointments and presented with more DBMP during dental examinations and treatment than full term-born children in the 3-6-year age group; the same was observed for the very preterm-born in the 7-12-year age group. No significant differences in DBMP during bitewing and periapical examinations or in number of bitewing, periapical and panoramic radiographs occurred between the groups in any age interval.

CONCLUSION: Preterm-born children and adolescents may need more flexibility in booking and receive reminders for scheduled visits with the general dental team. Due to the non-significant differences in dental care related oral examinations and treatments, the same dental care service may be applied to the preterm- and full-term born children and adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Children, Dental radiography, Intraoral imaging, Preterm birth
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56098 (URN)10.1186/s12903-022-02504-8 (DOI)000885083600003 ()36352446 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141447605 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-17 Created: 2022-11-17 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Brogårdh-Roth, S., Månsson, J., Ridell, K., Alward, L., Hellén-Halme, K. & Ekberg, E. (2017). Five years' follow-up of dental fear and anxiety, experience of dental care and oral health behaviour in Swedish preterm and full-term adolescents (ed.). BMC Oral Health, 17, Article ID 145.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five years' follow-up of dental fear and anxiety, experience of dental care and oral health behaviour in Swedish preterm and full-term adolescents
Show others...
2017 (English)In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, article id 145Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is rising concern about how preterm birth affects long-term health later in life. The various effects that preterm birth have on developmental outcomes, cognitive profiles and medical health may also affect levels of cooperation in the dental care situation in addition to general oral health and other oral health-related habits. Oral health is an integral part of one's general health and well-being; however, less is known about how prematurity affects oral health and other related areas such as dental care, and including dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in individuals during adolescence and adulthood. This is considered of special interest to study, as preterm children during the preschool and school period were reported to have behavioural problems during dental treatments and less than favourable oral hygiene. METHODS: A questionnaire was used of self-report design and structured into behavioural aspects relating to dental treatment, oral health-related factors, and medical health. This questionnaire at 17-19 years of age was a follow-up from 12 to 14 years of age and considered a predictor for planning future dental care for this group of patients. The 145 participating adolescents were all preterm, born between 23 and 32 weeks of gestation and 140 full-term controls, born ≥37 weeks of gestation. RESULTS: Dental fear and anxiety, oral health behaviour, and intake of sweets and sugary drinks of 17-19-year old adolescents born preterm was comparable to that of the full-term control group. Medical health problems as well as the intake of sweets and sugary drinks increased from the time of early adolescence to late adolescence in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Preterm as well as full-term adolescents between 17 and 19 years of age are satisfied with their dental care and display low prevalence of dental fear and anxiety (DFA). The findings in this study indicate that adolescents born very preterm and extremely preterm are well prepared for transition to dental care in adult life with expectations of being able to take responsibility for their oral health. KEYWORDS: Adolescent; Born preterm; Dental care; Oral health behaviour

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Adolescent, Born preterm, Dental care, Oral health behaviour
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15719 (URN)10.1186/s12903-017-0431-0 (DOI)000416976100001 ()29202809 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037638346 (Scopus ID)23966 (Local ID)23966 (Archive number)23966 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Projects
Oral health related quality of life, temporomandibular disorders, malocclusions and oral treatment needs in preterm born Swedish children and adolescents; Malmö University
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications