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Lindh, Liselott
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Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Nilsson, G., Ellner, S., Arnebrant, L., Brudin, L. & Larsson, C. (2023). Loss of pulp vitality correlated with the duration of the interim restoration and the experience of the dentist: A retrospective study. The Journal of prosthetic dentistry (Print), 130(6), 833-839, Article ID S0022-3913(21)00698-3.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loss of pulp vitality correlated with the duration of the interim restoration and the experience of the dentist: A retrospective study
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2023 (English)In: The Journal of prosthetic dentistry (Print), ISSN 0022-3913, E-ISSN 1097-6841, Vol. 130, no 6, p. 833-839, article id S0022-3913(21)00698-3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: The second most common biological complication in fixed prosthodontics is loss of pulp vitality, which may lead to restoration loss. While reasons for loss of pulp vitality are unclear, 2 potential contributing factors, duration of the interim restoration and operator experience, have not been fully investigated.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate whether the duration of the interim restoration or the experience of the dentist was correlated with loss of pulp vitality.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fixed prosthetic restorations placed between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Abutment teeth supporting single-unti or multiunit restorations were evaluated regarding loss of pulp vitality. The Mann-Whitney U test and simple logistic regression were used, with α=.05 for the subsequent multiple logistic regression. The experience of dental professionals was defined by the number of treatments performed and coupled with failure rate by using an analysis of variance.

RESULTS: One hundred seventy-four dentists made 15 879 restorations, of which 1136 failed during the observation period, a failure rate of 7.2%. Two hundred fifty restorations were randomly selected from the failed restorations, and a corresponding 250 restorations were randomly selected from nonfailed restorations for the control group. Increased duration with interim replacement was linked to a higher risk of loss of pulp vitality (P<.001). Failure rate in the dentist group varied from 0% to 100%. No significant differences in failure rate were found among dentists who did few restorations and those who performed larger numbers of restorations.

CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest that operator experience does not affect failure rate. However, extended time with an interim restoration was a contributing factor to the loss of pulp vitality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-50057 (URN)10.1016/j.prosdent.2021.11.029 (DOI)001125659800001 ()35105459 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85123699161 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-09 Created: 2022-02-09 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Chrcanovic, B. R., Ghiasi, P., Kisch, J., Lindh, L. & Larsson, C. (2020). Retrospective study comparing the clinical outcomes of bar-clip and ball attachment implant-supported overdentures. Journal of Oral Science, 62(4), 397-401, Article ID 19-0412.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retrospective study comparing the clinical outcomes of bar-clip and ball attachment implant-supported overdentures
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Oral Science, ISSN 1343-4934, E-ISSN 1880-4926, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 397-401, article id 19-0412Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of implant-supported overdentures (ODs) with either bar-clip or ball attachments. The implant, prosthesis failure, and technical complications were the outcomes analyzed in this retrospective clinical study conducted in a specialty clinic. Seventy-five patients with 242 implants supported by 76 ODs (36 maxillary, 40 mandibular) were included in the study and followed up for 88.8 ± 82.9 months (mean ± standard deviation). Bar-clip and ball attachments were used in 78.9% and 21.1% of the cases, respectively. Forty-three implant failures (17.8%) in 17 prostheses (17/76; 22.4%) were observed in this study. The average period of implant failure was 43.3 ± 41.0 months, and most of them were maxillary turned implants. The bar-clip system demonstrated more complications in the attachment parts compared to the ball attachment system. Poor retention of the prosthesis was similar between the two systems. Loss of implants resulted in the failure of 10 ODs in this study. ODs opposed by natural dentition or fixed prostheses presented with more complications. The Cox proportional hazards model did not show a significant effect on prosthesis failure for any of the factors. These findings indicated that patients with ODs need constant maintenance follow-ups to address the technical complications and perform prosthodontic maintenance regardless of the attachment system used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tokyo Nihon University School of Dentistry, 2020
Keywords
Overdenture, dental implant, attachment, prosthodontic maintenance, failure
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-18133 (URN)10.2334/josnusd.19-0412 (DOI)000573430900010 ()32848099 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091647505 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-27 Created: 2020-08-27 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Dahlström, M., Sjögren, M., Jonsson, P. R., Göransson, U., Lindh, L., Arnebrant, T., . . . Berglin, M. (2015). Affinity states of biocides determine bioavailability and release rates in marine paints (ed.). Biofouling (Print), 31(2), 201-210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affinity states of biocides determine bioavailability and release rates in marine paints
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2015 (English)In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 201-210Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A challenge for the next generation marine antifouling (AF) paints is to deliver minimum amounts of biocides to the environment. The candidate AF compound medetomidine is here shown to be released at very low concentrations, ie ng ml(-1) day(-1). Moreover, the release rate of medetomidine differs substantially depending on the formulation of the paint, while inhibition of barnacle settlement is independent of release to the ambient water, ie the paint with the lowest release rate was the most effective in impeding barnacle colonisation. This highlights the critical role of chemical interactions between biocide, paint carrier and the solid/aqueous interface for release rate and AF performance. The results are discussed in the light of differential affinity states of the biocide, predicting AF activity in terms of a high surface affinity and preserved bioavailability. This may offer a general framework for the design of low-release paint systems using biocides for protection against biofouling on marine surfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
antifouling biocides, release, suface adsorption, barnacle, ellipsometry, RP-HPLC
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15382 (URN)10.1080/08927014.2015.1012639 (DOI)000353565900007 ()25775096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84926162171 (Scopus ID)19163 (Local ID)19163 (Archive number)19163 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Cukkemane, N., Bikker, F., Nazmi, K., Brand, H., Sotres, J., Lindh, L., . . . Veerman, E. (2015). Anti-adherence and bactericidal activity of sphingolipids against Streptococcus mutans (ed.). European Journal of Oral Sciences, 123(4), 221-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-adherence and bactericidal activity of sphingolipids against Streptococcus mutans
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2015 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 123, no 4, p. 221-227Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study evaluated the anti-biofilm activity of sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), and sphinganine for: (i) anti-adherence activity on hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces; and (ii) bactericidal activity on different Streptococcus mutans phenotypes (i.e. planktonic cells and cells from a disrupted biofilm). For this, HA discs treated with sphingolipids were incubated with S. mutans and the number of adherent cells was evaluated by both culture and confocal microscopy. Sphinganine strongly inhibited bacterial adherence by 1000-fold compared with an untreated surface. Phytosphingosine and sphingosine inhibited bacterial adherence by eight- and five-fold, respectively, compared with an untreated surface. On saliva-coated HA, sphinganine and PHS inhibited bacterial adherence by 10-fold. Bactericidal activity of sphingolipids was evaluated by culture. For biofilms, the strongest bactericidal activity was exhibited by sphingosine compared with PHS and sphinganine. At a concentration of 12.5 μg ml−1, PHS and sphingosine were profoundly effective against planktonic and disrupted biofilms; and sphinganine reduced the number of cells in planktonic form by 100-fold and those derived from a disrupted biofilm by 1000-fold. Atomic force microscopy studies suggested that mechanical stability does not appear to be a factor relevant for anti-fouling activity. The results suggest that sphingolipids may be used to control oral biofilms, especially those loaded with S. mutans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14673 (URN)10.1111/eos.12200 (DOI)000357696500001 ()26094809 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84935698036 (Scopus ID)19506 (Local ID)19506 (Archive number)19506 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Delvar, A., Lindh, L., Arnebrant, T. & Sotres, J. (2015). Interaction of polyelectrolytes with salivary pellicles on hydroxyapatite surfaces under erosive acidic conditions (ed.). ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 38(7), 21610-21618
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction of polyelectrolytes with salivary pellicles on hydroxyapatite surfaces under erosive acidic conditions
2015 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 21610-21618Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The modification of acidic beverage formulations with food-approved, nonhazardous substances with antierosive properties has been identified as a key strategy for counteracting the prevalence of dental erosion, i.e., the acid-induced dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HA, the main mineral component of tooth surfaces). While many of such substances have been reported, very little is known on how they interact with teeth and inhibit their acid-induced dissolution. With the aim of filling this gap in knowledge, we have studied under acidic conditions the interaction between two polyelectrolytes of differing ionic character, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and chitosan, and saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, i.e., a model for the outer surface of teeth. These studies were performed by means of ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and atomic force microscopy. We also studied, by means of pH variations, how dissolution of saliva-coated HA is affected by including these polyelectrolytes in the erosive solutions. Our results confirm that salivary films protect HA from acid-induced dissolution, but only for a limited time. If the acid is modified with CMC, this polyelectrolyte incorporates into the salivary films prolonging in time their protective function. Eventually, the CMC-modified salivary films are removed from the HA surfaces. From this moment, HA is continuously coated with CMC, but this offers only a weak protection against erosion. When the acid is modified with the cationic chitosan, the polyelectrolyte adsorbs on top of the salivary films. Chitosan-modified salivary films are also eventually replaced by bare chitosan films. In this case both coatings offer a similar protection against HA dissolution, which is nevertheless notably higher than that offered by CMC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2015
Keywords
dental erosion, saliva, pellicle, hydroxyapatite, polyelectrolytes
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-4753 (URN)10.1021/acsami.5b07118 (DOI)000362243500070 ()26368580 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84942896360 (Scopus ID)19757 (Local ID)19757 (Archive number)19757 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Valentijn-Benz, M., van 't Hof, W., Bikker, F. J., Nazmi, K., Brand, H. S., Sotres, J., . . . Veerman, E. C. (2015). Sphingoid Bases Inhibit Acid-Induced Demineralization of Hydroxyapatite (ed.). Caries Research, 49(1), 9-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sphingoid Bases Inhibit Acid-Induced Demineralization of Hydroxyapatite
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2015 (English)In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H+ ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2015
Keywords
Erosion, Hydroxyapatite, Lipids, Phytosphingosine, Protection
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15163 (URN)10.1159/000362096 (DOI)000346584800002 ()25300299 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84923516963 (Scopus ID)18610 (Local ID)18610 (Archive number)18610 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Barrantes, A., Arnebrant, T. & Lindh, L. (2014). Characteristics of saliva films adsorbed onto different dental materials studied by QCM-D (ed.). Paper presented at European Colloid and Interface Society (ECIS), Malmö, Sweden (2014). Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 442(Special issue: Selected papers from the 26th European Colloid and Interface Society conference (26th ECIS 2012)), 56-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of saliva films adsorbed onto different dental materials studied by QCM-D
2014 (English)In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 442, no Special issue: Selected papers from the 26th European Colloid and Interface Society conference (26th ECIS 2012), p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The formation of salivary films onto different surfaces relevant in dental research like titania, hydroxyapatite, gold, zirconia, silica, and hydrophobized silica has been studied by means of QCM-D. Human whole saliva (HWS), and sterile filtered HWS (sHWS) both diluted in water to a final concentration of 25% (v/v) were used. Main differences between the salivary films formed from the two saliva types were observed with the help of ΔD vs Δf plots where sHWS samples showed an almost linear adsorption regime for most of the surfaces whereas most of the HWS samples had a marked multi-regime nature indicating that the former ones are homogenous and the later are heterogeneous supporting previous data on a multi-phase adsorption process. The films with highest shear elastic modulus, μ > 105 N m−2, shear viscosity, η ∼ 3 × 10−3 N s m−2, and lowest thickness (∼10 nm) were formed for both types of saliva onto hydroxyapatite and for sHWS on titania. Furthermore, the ratio between the loss, G″, and the storage modulus, G′, indicates that these films have a solid-like behavior (G″/G′ ≤ 0.5). In contrast, for the remaining surfaces the adsorbed films show higher d values and are also characterized by low μ ∼ 104 N m−2, η ∼ 10−3 N s m−2, and by high ratios, G″/G′ > 2, that indicate a fluid like behavior. These observations might be expected to have influence on the lubricating properties of the salivary films. The SDS induced elutability also indicates a different interaction strength and composition of the adsorbed films and is likely associated with the ease by which these surfaces can be cleaned. Our results suggest that, among the relevant materials, zirconia and titania would yield the more lubricious films whereas hydroxyapatite will be the most easily cleaned.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Saliva adsorption, QCM-D, Voigt model, Viscoelastic properties, dental materials
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14786 (URN)10.1016/j.colsurfa.2013.05.054 (DOI)000331687000009 ()2-s2.0-84895057189 (Scopus ID)18276 (Local ID)18276 (Archive number)18276 (OAI)
Conference
European Colloid and Interface Society (ECIS), Malmö, Sweden (2014)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Aroonsang, W., Sotres, J., El-Schich, Z., Arnebrant, T. & Lindh, L. (2014). Influence of substratum hydrophobicity on salivary pellicles: organization or composition? (ed.). Biofouling (Print), 30(9), 1123-1132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of substratum hydrophobicity on salivary pellicles: organization or composition?
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2014 (English)In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 1123-1132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Different physico-chemical properties (eg adsorption kinetics, thickness, viscoelasticity, and mechanical stability) of adsorbed salivary pellicles depend on different factors, including the properties (eg charge, roughness, wettability, and surface chemistry) of the substratum. Whether these differences in the physico-chemical properties are a result of differences in the composition or in the organization of the pellicles is not known. In this work, the influence of substratum wettability on the composition of the pellicle was studied. For this purpose, pellicles eluted from substrata of different but well-characterized wettabilities were examined by means of sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The results showed that substratum hydrophobicity did not have a major impact on pellicle composition. In all substrata, the major pellicle components were found to be cystatins, amylases and large glycoproteins, presumably mucins. In turn, interpretation of previously reported data based on the present results suggests that variations in substratum wettability mostly affect the organization of the pellicle components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014
Keywords
salivary pellicle, SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, cystatin, amylase, mucin
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14820 (URN)10.1080/08927014.2014.974155 (DOI)000344320100009 ()25377485 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84911980267 (Scopus ID)18153 (Local ID)18153 (Archive number)18153 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Falk, M., Pankratov, D., Lindh, L., Arnebrant, T. & Shleev, S. (2014). Miniature direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cell operating in human sweat and saliva (ed.). Fuel Cells, 14(6), 1050-1056
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Miniature direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cell operating in human sweat and saliva
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2014 (English)In: Fuel Cells, ISSN 1615-6846, E-ISSN 1615-6854, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 1050-1056Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present data on operation of a miniature membrane-less, direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cell in human sweat and saliva. The enzymatic fuel cell was fabricated following our previous reports on miniature biofuel cells, utilizing gold nanoparticle modified gold microwires with immobilized cellobiose dehydrogenase and bilirubin oxidase. The following average characteristics of miniature glucose/oxygen biodevices operating in human sweat and saliva, respectively, were registered: 580 and 560 mV open-circuit voltage, 0.26 and 0.1 μW cm–2 power density at a cell voltage of 0.5 V, with up to ten times higher power output at 0.2 V. When saliva collected after meal ingestion was used, roughly a two-fold increase in power output was obtained, with a further two-fold increase by addition of 500 μM glucose. Likewise, the power generated in sweat at 0.5 V increased two-fold by addition of 500 μM glucose.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2014
Keywords
Enzymatic Fuel Cell, Microscale, Non-Invasive, Saliva, Sweat
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-4923 (URN)10.1002/fuce.201400037 (DOI)000346019800033 ()2-s2.0-84918588577 (Scopus ID)18129 (Local ID)18129 (Archive number)18129 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Lindh, L., Aroonsang, W., Sotres, J. & Arnebrant, T. (2014). Salivary pellicles. In: AJM Ligtenberg, ECI Veerman (Ed.), AJM Ligtenberg, ECI Veerman (Ed.), Saliva: secretion and Functions (pp. 30-39). S. Karger
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salivary pellicles
2014 (English)In: Saliva: secretion and Functions / [ed] AJM Ligtenberg, ECI Veerman, S. Karger, 2014, p. 30-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The salivary pellicle is a thin acellular organic film that forms on any type of surface upon exposure to saliva. The role of the pellicle is manifold, and it plays an important role in the maintenance of oral health. Its functions include not only substratum protection and lubrication, but also remineralization and hydration. It also functions as a diffusion barrier and possesses buffering ability. Not only the function, but also the formation, composition and stability of the pellicle are known to be highly influenced by the physicochemical properties of both substrata and ambient media. In this chapter, we discuss these aspects of salivary pellicles, an area where research has boomed in the past years partly because of the application of experimental techniques often reserved for more traditional surface science studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2014
Series
Monographs in Oral Science, ISSN 1662-3843
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-8565 (URN)10.1159/000358782 (DOI)24862592 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904685204 (Scopus ID)17302 (Local ID)978-3-318-02595-8 (ISBN)978-3-318-02596-5 (ISBN)17302 (Archive number)17302 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
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