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Dawson, Andreas
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Dawson, A., Bendixen, K., Tran, A., van Bui, T., Svensson, P. & List, T. (2020). Effects of Acute Experimental Stress on Pain Sensitivity and Cortisol Levels in Healthy Participants: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study. Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, 34(3), 281-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Acute Experimental Stress on Pain Sensitivity and Cortisol Levels in Healthy Participants: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study
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2020 (English)In: Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, ISSN 2333-0384, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 281-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To investigate pain sensitivity in the masseter muscle and index finger in response to acute psychologic stress in healthy participants. Methods: Fifteen healthy women (23.7 +/- 2.3 years) participated in two randomized sessions: in the experimental stress session, the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) was used to induce acute stress, and in the control session, a control task was performed. Salivary cortisol, perceived stress levels, electrical and pressure pain thresholds (PTs), and pain tolerance levels (PTLs) were measured at baseline and after each task. Mixed-model analysis was used to test for significant interaction effects between time and session. Results: An interaction effect between time and session occurred for perceived stress levels (P < .001); perceived stress was significantly higher after the experimental task than after the control task (P < .01). No interaction effects occurred for salivary cortisol levels, electrical PTs, or pressure PTLs. Although significant interactions did occur for electrical PTL (P < .05) and pressure PT (P < .001), the simple effects test could not identify significant differences between sessions at any time point. Conclusion: The PASAT evoked significant levels of perceived stress; however, pain sensitivity to mechanical or electrical stimuli was not significantly altered in response to the stress task, and the salivary cortisol levels were not altered in response to the PASAT. These results must be interpreted with caution, and more studies with larger study samples are needed to increase the clinical relevant understanding of the pain mechanisms and psychologic stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence publishing co inc, 2020
Keywords
analgesia, facial pain, hyperalgesia, pain, stress
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-18241 (URN)10.11607/ofph.2488 (DOI)000562821600011 ()32870957 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85090180105 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-18 Created: 2020-09-18 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Dawson, A., Dawson, J. & Ernberg, M. (2020). The effect of botulinum toxin A on patients with persistent idiopathic dentoalveolar pain: A systematic review. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 47(9), 1184-1191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of botulinum toxin A on patients with persistent idiopathic dentoalveolar pain: A systematic review
2020 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 1184-1191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that botulinum toxin A (BONT-A) is a safe and effective treatment in relieving pain in patients with persistent idiopathic dentoalveolar pain (PIDP).

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically evaluate all the available studies investigating the pain-relieving effects of BONT-A in patients with PIDP.

METHODS: A systematic search with specific search terms was made in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus. Two authors screened titles and abstracts and selected eligible studies for inclusion in the systematic review. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the 12 items Quality Assessment Tool for Observational studies (Pre-Post) Studies with No Control Group, and the level of evidence was assessed according to GRADE.

RESULTS: Three observational studies of 3695 identified were included (445 overlapping studies; 3247 excluded studies). All studies were uncontrolled observational studies investigating the pain-relieving effect of BONT-A in patients with PIDP. The included studies had a fair quality (moderate risk of bias) and insufficient level of evidence. The pain reducing effect by BONT-A injections was in average 50% or more in two studies, in one study 3 out of 4 patients became almost pain free.

CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review shows that presently the level of scientific evidence is insufficient to evaluate the pain-relieving effect of BONT-A injections in patients with PIDP. There are indications that BONT-A injections could be a possible management option for patients with PIDP that seems to be safe and with few adverse events. There is a need for well-designed placebo-controlled, double-blind RCTs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
botulinum toxin A, neuropathic pain, orofacial pain
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-18020 (URN)10.1111/joor.13053 (DOI)000563940400014 ()32640063 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85088310845 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-18 Created: 2020-08-18 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Bajramaj, E., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Dawson, A., Gerdle, B. & Ghafouri, B. (2019). The Effect of Microdialysis Catheter Insertion on Glutamate and Serotonin Levels in Masseter Muscle in Patients with Myofascial Temporomandibular Disorders and Healthy Controls (ed.). Diagnostics, 9(1), Article ID 14.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Microdialysis Catheter Insertion on Glutamate and Serotonin Levels in Masseter Muscle in Patients with Myofascial Temporomandibular Disorders and Healthy Controls
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2019 (English)In: Diagnostics, ISSN 2075-4418, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most common cause of chronic pain in the orofacial region. Microdialysis has been used to study metabolic changes in the human masseter muscle. The insertion of the microdialysis probe causes acute tissue trauma that could affect the metabolic milieu and thereby influence the results when comparing healthy subjects to those with TMD. This study aimed to investigate the levels of serotonin and glutamate during the acute tissue trauma period in healthy subjects and in patients with TMD. Microdialysis was carried out in 15 patients with TMD and 15 controls, and samples were collected every 20 min during a period of 140 min. No significant alterations of serotonin or glutamate were observed over the 2 h period for the healthy subjects. For the TMD group, a significant decrease in serotonin was observed over time (p < 0.001), followed by a significant increase between 120 and 140 min (p < 0.001). For glutamate, a significant reduction was observed at 40 min compared to baseline. The results showed that there was a spontaneous increase of serotonin 2 h after the insertion of the catheter in patients with TMD. In conclusion, the results showed that there are differences in the masseter muscle levels of serotonin and glutamate during acute nociception in patients with myofascial TMD compared to healthy subjects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
microdialysis, myofascial temporomandibular disorders, serotonin, glutamate, chronic pain
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-6918 (URN)10.3390/diagnostics9010014 (DOI)000464204000001 ()30678220 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066418195 (Scopus ID)30147 (Local ID)30147 (Archive number)30147 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Ikoma, T., Bendixen, K. H., Arima, T., Dawson, A., Yamaguchi, T., List, T. & Svensson, P. (2018). Effects of Low-Intensity Contractions of Different Craniofacial Muscles in Healthy Participants: An Experimental Cross-Over Study (ed.). Headache, 58(4), 559-569
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Low-Intensity Contractions of Different Craniofacial Muscles in Healthy Participants: An Experimental Cross-Over Study
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2018 (English)In: Headache, ISSN 0017-8748, E-ISSN 1526-4610, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 559-569Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective.-Repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterized by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible, ie, bruxism, is traditionally linked to pain and unpleasantness in the active muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of standardized craniofacial muscle contractions on self-reported symptoms. Methods.-Sixteen healthy volunteers performed six 5-minute bouts of 20% maximal voluntary contraction task of the jaw-closing (Jaw), the orbicularis-oris (O-oris), and the orbicularis-oculi (O-oculi) muscles. Participants rated their perceived pain, unpleasantness, fatigue, and mental stress levels before, during, and after the contraction tasks on 0-10 Numeric Rating Scales (NRS). Each muscle contraction task (= 1 session) was separated by at least 1 week and the order of the sessions was randomized in each subject. Results.-All muscle contraction tasks evoked significant increases in NRS scores of pain (mean +/- SD: Jaw; 3.8 +/- 2.7, O-oris; 1.9 +/- 2.2, O-oculi; 1.4 +/- 1.3, P < .014), unpleasantness (Jaw; 4.1 +/- 2.5, O-oris; 2.1 +/- 1.9, O-oculi; 2.9 +/- 1.8, P<.001), fatigue (Jaw; 5.8 +/- 2.0, O-oris; 3.2 +/- 2.3, O-oculi; 3.6 +/- 1.9, P<.001), and mental stress (Jaw; 4.1 +/- 2.1, O-oris; 2.2 +/- 2.7, O-oculi; 2.9 +/- 2.2, P<.001). The Jaw contractions were associated with higher NRS scores compared with the O-oris and the O-oculi contractions (P<.005) without differences between the O-oris and the O-oculi (P>.063). All symptoms disappeared within 1 day (P>.469). Conclusions.-The results showed that submaximal static contractions of different craniofacial muscle groups could evoke transient, mild to moderate levels of muscle pain and fatigue and increased stress scores. The fatigue resistance may differ between different muscle groups. Further studies are warranted to better understand the contribution of specific craniofacial muscle groups for the characteristic presentation of musculoskeletal pain conditions in the head.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
experimental muscle pain, tooth clenching, orbicularis oculi, orbicularis oris, orofacial pain
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15396 (URN)10.1111/head.13280 (DOI)000428995700007 ()29476530 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042369319 (Scopus ID)26612 (Local ID)26612 (Archive number)26612 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Nordin, S., Dawson, A. & Ekberg, E. (2016). Achieved Competencies and Satisfaction in Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain Education (ed.). Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, 30(2), 156-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Achieved Competencies and Satisfaction in Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain Education
2016 (English)In: Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0376, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 156-164Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To assess dental students' achieved competencies and perceived satisfaction with their temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orofacial pain education and to compare these with the results of their final examination in TMD and orofacial pain. METHODS: Dental students from two consecutive classes (2011/2012 and 2012/2013) at the Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function at the dental school in Malmö, Sweden completed two self-evaluations, one at the beginning of semester seven and one at the end of semester eight. The questionnaire that they were given concerned achieved competencies and satisfaction with education in TMD and orofacial pain. Items focused on anatomy, physiology, and clinical training. Students estimated their competence and satisfaction on a numeric rating scale and described their idea of treating TMD and orofacial pain patients on a verbal rating scale. Outcome variables were tested with paired samples t test for differences over time and independent samples t test for between-class comparisons; both were adjusted for multiple testing with Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: Significant improvement in all items was observed for achieved competencies and satisfaction in both classes between semester seven and semester eight (P < .05). No differences in competencies or satisfaction occurred between classes at the end of the clinical course in semester eight (P > .05). CONCLUSION: This study has shown that expansion in undergraduate TMD and orofacial pain education at the dental school in Malmö has allowed all students to develop the same level of competence, independent of prior experience. The study also pointed out that continuous evaluation and enhancement of TMD and orofacial pain education in undergraduate dental education is beneficial

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence, 2016
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-6748 (URN)10.11607/ofph.1471 (DOI)000376213700010 ()27128480 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84977464928 (Scopus ID)21974 (Local ID)21974 (Archive number)21974 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Dawson, A., Stensson, N., Ghafouri, B., Gerdle, B., List, T., Svensson, P. & Ernberg, M. (2016). Dopamine in plasma: a biomarker for myofascial TMD pain? (ed.). Journal of Headache and Pain, 17(1), Article ID 65.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dopamine in plasma: a biomarker for myofascial TMD pain?
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Headache and Pain, ISSN 1129-2369, E-ISSN 1129-2377, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Dopaminergic pathways could be involved in the pathophysiology of myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated plasma levels of dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) in patients with M-TMD and in healthy subjects. METHODS: Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects participated. The patients had received an M-TMD diagnosis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD. Perceived mental stress, pain intensity (0-100-mm visual analogue scale), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT, kPa) over the masseter muscles were assessed; a venous blood sample was taken. RESULTS: Dopamine in plasma differed significantly between patients with M-TMD (4.98 ± 2.55 nM) and healthy controls (2.73 ± 1.24 nM; P < 0.01). No significant difference in plasma 5-HT was observed between the groups (P = 0.75). Patients reported significantly higher pain intensities (P < 0.001) and had lower PPTs (P < 0.01) compared with the healthy controls. Importantly, dopamine in plasma correlated significantly with present pain intensity (r = 0.53, n = 14, P < 0.05) and perceived mental stress (r = 0.34, n = 28, P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that peripheral dopamine might be involved in modulating peripheral pain. This finding, in addition to reports in other studies, suggests that dopaminergic pathways could be implicated in the pathophysiology of M-TMD but also in other chronic pain conditions. More research is warranted to elucidate the role of peripheral dopamine in the pathophysiology of chronic pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
5-HT, Bruxism, Dopamine, Masseter muscle, Temporomandibular joint disorders
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15341 (URN)10.1186/s10194-016-0656-3 (DOI)000386608400001 ()27386870 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978036298 (Scopus ID)21972 (Local ID)21972 (Archive number)21972 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Dawson, A., Ljunggren, L., Ernberg, M., Svensson, P. & List, T. (2014). Effect of experimental tooth clenching on the release of beta-endorphin (ed.). Paper presented at 4th European Headache and Migraine Trust International Congress: EHMTIC 2014, Copenhagen, Denmark (18-21 September 2014). Journal of Headache and Pain, 15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of experimental tooth clenching on the release of beta-endorphin
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Headache and Pain, ISSN 1129-2369, E-ISSN 1129-2377, Vol. 15Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Clinical Neurology, Neurosciences
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-5287 (URN)10.1186/1129-2377-15-S1-C13 (DOI)000209576900052 ()27572 (Local ID)27572 (Archive number)27572 (OAI)
Conference
4th European Headache and Migraine Trust International Congress: EHMTIC 2014, Copenhagen, Denmark (18-21 September 2014)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Dawson, A., Ljunggren, L., Ernberg, M., Svensson, P. & List, T. (2014). Effect of experimental tooth clenching on the release of β-endorphin (ed.). Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, 28(2), 159-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of experimental tooth clenching on the release of β-endorphin
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2014 (English)In: Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, ISSN 2333-0384, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 159-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To investigate the association between experimental tooth clenching and the release of β-endorphin in patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD) and healthy subjects. METHODS: Fifteen M-TMD patients and 15 healthy subjects were included and assigned an experimental tooth-clenching task. Venous blood was collected and pain intensity was noted on a visual analog scale. The masseter pressure pain threshold (PPT) was assessed 2 hours before the clenching task and immediately after. A mixed-model analysis of variance was used for statistical analyses. RESULTS: Significant main effects for time and group were observed for pain intensity and PPT, with significantly lower mean values of pain intensity (P < .001) and PPT (P < .01) after the clenching task compared with baseline. M-TMD patients had significantly higher pain intensity (P < .001) and significantly lower PPT (P < .05) than healthy subjects. No significant time or group effects were observed for the level of β-endorphin. Neither pain intensity nor PPT correlated significantly with β-endorphin levels. CONCLUSION: This experimental tooth-clenching task was not associated with significant alterations in β-endorphin levels over time, but with mechanical hyperalgesia and low to moderate levels of pain in healthy subjects and M-TMD patients, respectively. More research is required to understand the role of the β-endorphinergic system in the etiology of M-TMD

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence, 2014
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-5794 (URN)10.11607/ofph.1210 (DOI)000335635800008 ()24822239 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84901832364 (Scopus ID)17999 (Local ID)17999 (Archive number)17999 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Dawson, A., Ghafouri, B., Gerdle, B., List, T., Svensson, P. & Ernberg, M. (2014). Effects of experimental tooth clenching on pain and intramuscular release of 5-HT and glutamate in patients with myofascial TMD (ed.). The Clinical Journal of Pain, 31(8), 740-749
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of experimental tooth clenching on pain and intramuscular release of 5-HT and glutamate in patients with myofascial TMD
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2014 (English)In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 740-749Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:: It has been suggested that tooth clenching may be associated with local metabolic changes, and is a risk factor for myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated the effects of experimental tooth clenching on the levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate, as well as on blood flow and pain intensity, in the masseter muscles of M-TMD patients. METHODS:: Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to assess blood flow. Two hours after the insertion of a microdialysis catheter, participants performed a 20-min repetitive tooth clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction). Pain intensity was measured throughout. RESULTS:: A significant effect of group (P<0.01), but not of time, was observed on 5-HT levels, and blood flow. No significant effects of time or group occurred on glutamate, pyruvate, or lactate levels. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity (P<0.05, and P<0.001). No significant correlations were identified between: (i) 5-HT, glutamate, and pain intensity or between (ii) pyruvate, lactate, and blood flow. DISCUSSION:: This experimental tooth clenching model increased jaw muscle pain levels in M-TMD patients and evoked low levels of jaw muscle pain in healthy controls. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT than healthy controls and significantly lower blood flow. These two factors may facilitate the release of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Raven Press, 2014
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15604 (URN)10.1097/AJP.0000000000000154 (DOI)000358207900009 ()25232860 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84937811246 (Scopus ID)17981 (Local ID)17981 (Archive number)17981 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Dawson, A., Raphael, K. G., Glaros, A., Axelsson, S., Arima, T., Ernberg, M., . . . List, T. (2013). Development of a quality-assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies: reliability and validity (ed.). Journal of Orofacial Pain, 27(2), 111-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a quality-assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies: reliability and validity
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To combine empirical evidence and expert opinion in a formal consensus method in order to develop a quality-assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies in systematic reviews. METHODS: Tool development comprised five steps: (1) preliminary decisions, (2) item generation, (3) face-validity assessment, (4) reliability and discriminitive validity assessment, and (5) instrument refinement. The kappa value and phi-coefficient were calculated to assess inter-observer reliability and discriminative ability, respectively. RESULTS: Following preliminary decisions and a literature review, a list of 52 items to be considered for inclusion in the tool was compiled. Eleven experts were invited to join a Delphi panel and 10 accepted. Four Delphi rounds reduced the preliminary tool-Quality-Assessment Tool for Experimental Bruxism Studies (Qu-ATEBS)- to 8 items: study aim, study sample, control condition or group, study design, experimental bruxism task, statistics, interpretation of results, and conflict of interest statement. Consensus among the Delphi panelists yielded good face validity. Inter-observer reliability was acceptable (k = 0.77). Discriminative validity was excellent (phi coefficient 1.0; P < .01). During refinement, 1 item (no. 8) was removed. CONCLUSION: Qu-ATEBS, the seven-item evidence-based quality assessment tool developed here for use in systematic reviews of experimental bruxism studies, exhibits face validity, excellent discriminative validity, and acceptable inter-observer reliability. Development of quality assessment tools for many other topics in the orofacial pain literature is needed and may follow the described procedure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence, 2013
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-5853 (URN)10.11607/jop.1065 (DOI)000322042000003 ()23630683 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84880582701 (Scopus ID)15902 (Local ID)15902 (Archive number)15902 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
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