Malmö University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Ehn, Pelle
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Hillgren, P.-A., Lindström, K., Strange, M., Witmer, H., Chronaki, A., Ehn, P., . . . Westerlaken, M. (2020). Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making
Show others...
2020 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

The research centers around two major themes:

  • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
  • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

Publisher
p. 34
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14308 (URN)
Available from: 2020-03-31 Created: 2020-03-31 Last updated: 2023-10-20Bibliographically approved
Binder, T., Brandt, E., Ehn, P. & Halse, J. (2015). Democratic design experiments: between parliament and laboratory (ed.). CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, 11(3-4), 152-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Democratic design experiments: between parliament and laboratory
2015 (English)In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 152-165Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

For more than four decades, participatory design has provided exemplars and concepts for understanding the democratic potential of design participation. Despite important impacts on design methodology, participatory design has, however, been stuck in a marginal position as it has wrestled with what has been performed and accomplished in participatory practices. In this article, we discuss how participatory design may be reinvigorated as a design research programme for democratic design experiments in the light of the decentring of human-centredness and the foregrounding of collaborative representational practices offered by the ANT tradition in the tension between a parliament of things and a laboratory of circulating references.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
participation, democracy, experiment, parliament, laboratory, thing
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-1424 (URN)10.1080/15710882.2015.1081248 (DOI)000363747600002 ()2-s2.0-84946484862 (Scopus ID)19902 (Local ID)19902 (Archive number)19902 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Ehn, P., Nilsson, E. M. & Topgaard, R. (2014). Introduction. In: Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard (Ed.), Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard (Ed.), Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy (pp. 1-13). MIT Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2014 (English)In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2014
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-9430 (URN)31218 (Local ID)9780262027939 (ISBN)31218 (Archive number)31218 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ehn, P., Nilsson, E. M. & Topgaard, R. (Eds.). (2014). Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy. MIT Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy
2014 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Innovation and design need not be about the search for a killer app. Innovation and design can start in people’s everyday activities. They can encompass local services, cultural production, arenas for public discourse, or technological platforms. The approach is participatory, collaborative, and engaging, with users and consumers acting as producers and creators. It is concerned less with making new things than with making a socially sustainable future. This book describes experiments in innovation, design, and democracy, undertaken largely by grassroots organizations, non-governmental organizations, and multi-ethnic working-class neighborhoods. These stories challenge the dominant perception of what constitutes successful innovations. They recount efforts at social innovation, opening the production process, challenging the creative class, and expanding the public sphere. The wide range of cases considered include a collective of immigrant women who perform collaborative services, the development of an open-hardware movement, grassroots journalism, and hip-hop performances on city buses. They point to the possibility of democratized innovation that goes beyond solo entrepreneurship and crowdsourcing in the service of corporations to include multiple futures imagined and made locally by often-marginalized publics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2014. p. 352
Keywords
participatory design, design for social innovation, infrastructuring, commons, interaction design, media and communication studies, new publics, new media, collaborative media
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-8384 (URN)17985 (Local ID)9780262027939 (ISBN)17985 (Archive number)17985 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Watts, L., Ehn, P. & Suchman, L. (2014). Prologue. In: Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard (Ed.), Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard (Ed.), Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy. MIT Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prologue
2014 (English)In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2014
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-9446 (URN)31215 (Local ID)9780262027939 (ISBN)31215 (Archive number)31215 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ehn, P. (2013). Partizipation an Dingen des Designs. In: Claudia Mareis, Matthias Held, Gesche Joost (Ed.), Claudia Mareis, Matthias Held, Gesche Joost (Ed.), Wer gestaltet die Gestaltung: Praxis, Theorie und Geschichte des partizipatorischen Designs (pp. 79-104). Transcript Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Partizipation an Dingen des Designs
2013 (German)In: Wer gestaltet die Gestaltung: Praxis, Theorie und Geschichte des partizipatorischen Designs / [ed] Claudia Mareis, Matthias Held, Gesche Joost, Transcript Verlag, 2013, p. 79-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Transcript Verlag, 2013
Keywords
design gestaltung partizipation
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-9359 (URN)10.14361/transcript.9783839420386.79 (DOI)16592 (Local ID)9783839420386 (ISBN)16592 (Archive number)16592 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ehn, P. (2013). The End of the User: The Computer as a Thing (ed.). In: (Ed.), End-User Development: 4th International Symposium, IS-EUD 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 10-13, 2013. Proceedings. Paper presented at International Symposium on End-User Development (IS-EUD), Copenhagen, Denmark (2013). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The End of the User: The Computer as a Thing
2013 (English)In: End-User Development: 4th International Symposium, IS-EUD 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 10-13, 2013. Proceedings, Springer, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We may all agree on the importance of end users, as in end user programming, human centred design or user driven innovation. But are there theoretical limits with political implications to this anthropocentric understanding of our engagement with users, technology and the artifacts we call computers? Has the end user been patronised by contemporary progressive design and taken hostage by neo-liberal capitalism? In sociology it is becoming clear that society is not just social, but also material. The neglected objects strike back. Just think of global environmental crises. With design research it might be just the same. We know design cannot be reduced to the shaping of dead objects, as in object oriented programming, but humans are neither users living external to objects. Where sociology have had to acknowledge that society is a collective of humans and non-humans, design might have to do away with both users and objects to remain socially and politically relevant. This talk explores the consequences of replacing the object and the user with the thing. Etymologically the thing was originally not an objective matter, but a political assembly dealing with matters of concern. Which humans and non-humans should be invited to participate in contemporary design things? Who invites? Who is marginalised or excluded? What issues should be dealt with? Which designarly and parliamentary technologies should be invoked in prototyping futures? If the computer is to become a controversial thing, is that a well-grounded end of the user?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 7897
Keywords
user, design, objects, things, participation, democracy
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-11088 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-38706-7_2 (DOI)2-s2.0-84884397730 (Scopus ID)16595 (Local ID)16595 (Archive number)16595 (OAI)
Conference
International Symposium on End-User Development (IS-EUD), Copenhagen, Denmark (2013)
Available from: 2020-02-29 Created: 2020-02-29 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Björgvinsson, E., Ehn, P. & Hillgren, P.-A. (2012). Agonistic participatory design: working with marginalised social movements (ed.). CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, 8(2-3), 127-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agonistic participatory design: working with marginalised social movements
2012 (English)In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 8, no 2-3, p. 127-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Participatory design (PD) has become increasingly engaged in public spheres and everyday life and is no longer solely concerned with the workplace. This is not only a shift from work-oriented productive activities to leisure and pleasurable engagements, but also a new milieu for production and ‘innovation’. What ‘democratic innovation’ entails is often currently defined by management and innovation research, which claims that innovation has been democratised through easy access to production tools and lead-users as the new experts driving innovation. We sketch an alternative ‘innovation’ practice more in line with the original visions of PD based on our experience of running Malmö Living Labs – an open innovation milieu where new constellations, issues and ideas evolve from bottom–up long-term collaborations among diverse stakeholders. Three cases and controversial matters of concern are discussed. The fruitfulness of the concepts ‘agonistic public spaces’ (as opposed to consensual decision-making), ‘thinging’ and ‘infrastructuring’ (as opposed to projects) are explored in relation to democracy, innovation and other future-making practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2012
Keywords
design, democracy, agonsim, participatory design, infrastructuring, thinging
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-1405 (URN)10.1080/15710882.2012.672577 (DOI)000304277900004 ()2-s2.0-84861637606 (Scopus ID)14331 (Local ID)14331 (Archive number)14331 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Bannon, L. & Ehn, P. (2012). Design matters in participatory design. In: Jesper Simonsen, Toni Robertson (Ed.), Jesper Simonsen, Toni Robertson (Ed.), Routledge international handbook of participatory design: (pp. 37-61). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design matters in participatory design
2012 (English)In: Routledge international handbook of participatory design / [ed] Jesper Simonsen, Toni Robertson, Routledge, 2012, p. 37-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter examines the ways in which the field of Participatory Design engages with the field of design–as both a topic, a research field and a practice. We highlight what we consider are core themes in design, especially as they relate to Participatory Design concerns. The chapter is not intended as a review of the whole design field, nor is it a comprehensive overview of work being done by the Participatory Design community. Rather, our purpose is to mine both traditions for insights into the relation between design topics ...

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2012
Keywords
design, participation, thing, object, prototype, history
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-9560 (URN)14804 (Local ID)978-0-415-69440-7 (ISBN)14804 (Archive number)14804 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Björgvinsson, E., Ehn, P. & Hillgren, P.-A. (2012). Design things and design thinking: contemporary participatory design challenges (ed.). Design Issues, 28(3), 101-116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design things and design thinking: contemporary participatory design challenges
2012 (English)In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 101-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Design thinking has become a central issue in contemporary design discourse and rhetoric, and for good reason. With the design thinking practice of world leading design and innovation firm IDEO, and with the application of these principles to successful design education at prestigious d. school, the Institute of Design at Stanford University, and not least with the publication of Change by Design, in which IDEO chief executive Tim Brown elaborates on the firm's ideas about design thinking, ...

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2012
Keywords
design, design thinking, participatory design, things, objects, prototyping
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-2118 (URN)10.1162/DESI_a_00165 (DOI)14805 (Local ID)14805 (Archive number)14805 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2024-01-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications