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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Bodin, M., Plantin, L., Schmidt, L., Ziebe, S. & Elmerstig, E. (2023). The pros and cons of fertility awareness and information: a generational, Swedish perspective. Human Fertility, 26(2), 216-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The pros and cons of fertility awareness and information: a generational, Swedish perspective
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2023 (English)In: Human Fertility, ISSN 1464-7273, E-ISSN 1742-8149, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 216-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Being aware of factors that affect fertility can help people make informed decisions about their reproductive futures. To some, however, fertility information leads to worry and self-blame. In this paper, we explore how people from different generations discuss fertility and reproductive decision-making, along with their perceptions of fertility information. The study was conducted in southern Sweden with 26 focus-group discussions that included a total of 110 participants aged 17-90 years. The material was analysed thematically. Our results show that fertility knowledge and openness to talking about fertility problems have increased over generations. Participants who were assigned female at birth were more often concerned about their fertility than those who were not, and fertility concerns were transferred from mothers to daughters. While age-related fertility concerns had been uncommon in older generations, participants aged 25-40 often expressed these concerns. Young adults appreciated being knowledgeable about fertility but simultaneously expressed how fertility information could lead to distress. Our conclusion is that fertility information was best received by high-school students, and efforts to improve fertility education in schools are therefore recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Fertility awareness, reproductive decision-making, generations, focus group discussions
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-45816 (URN)10.1080/14647273.2021.1968045 (DOI)000687543600001 ()34423731 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85113809500 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-15 Created: 2021-09-15 Last updated: 2023-12-07Bibliographically approved
Bodin, M. & Björklund, J. (2022). "Can I take responsibility for bringing a person to this world who will be part of the apocalypse!?": Ideological dilemmas and concerns for future well-being when bringing the climate crisis into reproductive decision-making.. Social Science and Medicine, 302, Article ID 114985.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Can I take responsibility for bringing a person to this world who will be part of the apocalypse!?": Ideological dilemmas and concerns for future well-being when bringing the climate crisis into reproductive decision-making.
2022 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 302, article id 114985Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the wake of the ongoing climate crisis and its negative effects on public health, it has been questioned by climate activists whether it is right to bring more children into the world. Moreover, according to previous scholarship, having one fewer child is the most high-impact lifestyle change individuals in developed countries can make in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But do climate awareness and recommendations to have fewer children have any impact on how lay people reason around reproductive decision-making? In this paper, which is based on focus group discussions with people from different generations, we show how various and sometimes conflicting discourses on reproductive norms and responsibility are negotiated. Even though participants were highly aware of the ongoing discussions around the climate crisis, in the end it had little bearing on their decision to have children or not, and they justified reproduction through addressing other ways to contribute to a better world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Climate change, Reproductive decision-making, Well-being, World conditions
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-51283 (URN)10.1016/j.socscimed.2022.114985 (DOI)000866322500007 ()35468522 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129103654 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-04 Created: 2022-05-04 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Bodin, M., Holmström, C., Plantin, L., Schmidt, L., Ziebe, S. & Elmerstig, E. (2021). Preconditions to parenthood: changes over time and generations. Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online, 13, 14-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preconditions to parenthood: changes over time and generations
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2021 (English)In: Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online, ISSN 2405-6618, Vol. 13, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reproductive decision-making and fertility patterns change with time and place, and are influenced by contemporary societal factors. In this paper, we have studied biosocial aspects of reproductive decision-making over time and generations in a Nordic setting. The aim was to explore intergenerational changes and influences on decision-making, especially regarding preconditions to first birth. Twenty-six focus group interviews were conducted in southern Sweden, including a total of 110 participants aged 17–90 years. The analysis of the interviews resulted in six themes: (i) ‘Providing security – an intergenerational precondition’; (ii) ‘A growing smorgasbord of choices and requirements’; (iii) ‘Parenthood becoming a project’; (iv) ‘Stretched out life stages’; (v) ‘(Im)possibilities to procreate’; and (vi) ‘Intergenerational pronatalism’. Our findings reflect increasing expectations on what it means to be prepared for parenthood. Despite increasing awareness of the precariousness of romantic relationships, people still wish to build new families but try to be as prepared as possible for adverse events. The findings also show how increasing life expectancy and medical advancements have come to influence people’s views on their reproductive timeline.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
fertility, focus group discussions, generations, reproductive decision-making
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and society; Health and society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-42466 (URN)10.1016/j.rbms.2021.03.003 (DOI)34136667 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85107089262 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-31 Created: 2021-05-31 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Bodin, M., Plantin, L. & Elmerstig, E. (2019). A wonderful experience or a frightening commitment? An exploration of men’s reasons to (not) have children (ed.). Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online, 9, 19-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A wonderful experience or a frightening commitment? An exploration of men’s reasons to (not) have children
2019 (English)In: Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online, ISSN 2405-6618, Vol. 9, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on reproductive decision-making mainly focuses on women's experiences and desire for children. Men included in this type of research usually represent one-half of a heterosexual couple and/or men who are involuntarily childless. Perspectives from a broader group of men are lacking. This study is based on the results of a baseline questionnaire answered by 191 men aged 20–50 years who attended two sexual health clinics in two major Swedish cities. The questionnaire included questions about sociodemographic background, reproductive history and fertility, but also two open-ended questions focusing on reasons for having or not having children. The results of these two questions were analysed by manifest content analysis and resulted in five categories: ‘(non-)ideal images’, ‘to pass something on’, ‘personal development and self-image’, ‘the relationship with the (potential) co-parent’ and ‘practical circumstances and prerequisites’. Reasons for having children were mainly based on ideal images of children, family and parenthood. Meanwhile, reasons for not having children usually concerned practical issues. The type of answer given was related to men's procreative intentions but not to background characteristics. In conclusion, men raised many different aspects for and against having children. Therefore, reproductive decision-making should not be considered a non-choice among men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
reproductive decision-making, men, parenthood
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-4751 (URN)10.1016/j.rbms.2019.11.002 (DOI)31938736 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077501305 (Scopus ID)30516 (Local ID)30516 (Archive number)30516 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4647-5709

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